The Oxford Listings: HT2019 / Week 4

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 4

Hilary Term 2019

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MONDAY 4th February

12.00   Bioarchaeology Seminar

School of Archaeology, 1 South Parks Road, Lecture Theatre

Patxi Ramallo, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, University of the Basque Country

Pilgrimage to Santiago: Osteological and Biomolecular Analysis on Medieval Individuals

[+]

14.15   Seminar in Palaeography and Manuscript Studies

Weston Library, Horton Room

Karl Kinsella

Plan and elevation: the architectural drawings of Richard of St. Victor

[+]

16.15   Gender in Classical Archaeology Seminar Series

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Professor Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones, Cardiff University

Women, Dress and the Body in Pre-Islamic Iran

[+]

15.00   Medieval Archaeology Seminar

Institute of Archaeology, Lecture Theatre

Barbora Ziackova

Burials ar-Rus: imports and identity construction in funerary rituals of the eastern Viking World

[+]

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, Warton Room

Sara Lipton (State University of New York at Stony Brook/Corpus Christi)

Preaching Passion: Art and Emotion in Thirteenth-Century Sermons

[+]

17.00   Centre for the Reception History of the Bible

Trinity College, Danson Room

Professor Sue Gillingham (University of Oxford)

Artistic depictions of exile in illuminated Psalters

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TUESDAY 5th Februay

14:00   Later Medieval Seminar – Commemoration

St John’s College, 21 St Giles seminar room

Karl Kugle (Oxford)

Ancient music in late-medieval Europe: From 13th-century Paris to 17th-century Silesia

[+]

14:00   Byzantine Epigraphy

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Dr Ida Toth

[+]

17:00   Medieval Church and Culture

Harris Manchester College, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Bernard Gowers (Keble/Middlebury)

Burchard of Worms, Jews and Food

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WEDNESDAY 6th February

12.00-13.00     Money in the Medieval West and Byzantium

Ashmolean Museum, Floor 2, Coin Study Centre, off Gallery 36 Japan after 1860

Dr Julian Baker

Carolingians, Vikings, Anglo-Saxons, and the birth of the medieval West, ca. 750-1150

[+]

13.00   Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Jacopo De Grossi Mazzorin (Università di Salento), Mamoru Ikeguchi (Kurume University) and Claudia Minniti (Università di Salento)

Animal use and consumption in Roman Italy: new zooarchaeological evidence from the so-called ‘Porta Capua’, Pompeii 

[+]

13.00   Early Medieval Britain Network

Balliol College

Caitlin Ellis (History), Nik Gunn (English), Alex Johnson (Archaeology)

Three x 3: Vikings

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

George Malagaris (Oxford)

Manzikert, Dandanqan, and Somnath: Nomadic and sedentary warfare in medieval Eurasia

[+]

17.00   The Slade Lectures 2019: Islam and Image: Beyond Aniconism and Iconoclasm

Maths Institute, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter 

Economies of Imaging: Bowls, Baths and Bazaars

[+]

17.00   Oxford Archaeological Fieldwork Seminar

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Achilles Iasonos

Deep Sea Archaeology in Cyprus: Extracting Archaeological Data from the Oil and Gas Industry

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THURSDAY 7th February

11.00-12.30     Byzantine Art and Archaeology Seminar

Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, First Floor Seminar Room

Aleksandra Pawlikowska

Monastic communities in the Western Thebes. Reusing pagan space

[+]

16.30   Aquinas Seminar Series: “The Good of Human Interdependence”

Blackfriars Hall, Aula

Prof Patricio Dominguez

The Theory of Passions as Constituent of a Theory of Providence

[+]

17.00   Late Roman Seminar

Corpus Christi College

Marine Tesson (Paris-Est Créteil and Maison française d’Oxford)

Constantina, daughter of Constantine

[+]

17.00   Khalili Research Centre Seminars

Wolfson College

No Seminar

[+]

17.00   Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance music

All Souls, Wharton Room

Étienne Anheim, Directeur d’études, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris

The musical chapel of the popes in Avignon during the fourteenth century 

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FRIDAY 8th February

9.30-11.00       Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Center, 66 St Giles

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

11.00-12.45     KRC Manuscript Viewing Sessions

Weston Library, Horton Seminar Room

TF and Cailah Jackson, Bodleian Bahari Fellow 2019

Manuscript production under Mongol rule c.1258–1410: Ilkhanid, Injuid, Jalayirid and Muzaffarid

Registration is required. Please contact teresa.fitzherbert@orinst.ox.ac.uk

[+]

12.00-13.00     Byzantine Literature

Ioannou Center, 66 St Giles

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

14.15   Seminar in the history of the book

Weston Library, Broad Street, Oxford Level 2 Visiting Scholars’ Centre (VSC)

15cBOOKTRADE tools for the History of Art

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Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings: HT 2019 / Week 3

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 3

Hilary Term 2019

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MONDAY 28th January

16.15   Gender in Classical Archaeology Seminar Series

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Dr Emma-Jayne Graham (Open University)
A mother’s touch? Making sense of the swaddled infant votives of early Roman Italy

[+]

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, Warton Room

Dr Pablo Gonzalez Martin (Queen’s)

Guilds, neighbourhoods, and city councils: Political participation in late medieval towns. Tournai and Burgos, 1380-1520

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TUESDAY 29th January

12.00   Climate and Chronology Group

School of Archaeology, 1 South Parks Road, Lecture Theatre

A Panel Discussion: Using Social Media in Science
Prof. David Pyle, Nyree Manoukian, Richard Thomas, and Lucy Kissick

[+]

14:00   Later Medieval Seminar – Commemoration

St John’s College, 21 St Giles seminar room

Elizabeth van Houts (Cambridge)

Medieval memory, gendered emotion and the recent past.

[+]

14:00   Byzantine Epigraphy

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Dr Ida Toth

[+]

17.00   Medieval French Research Seminar

Maison Française

Catherine Croizy-Naquet (Paris 3 – Sorbonne Nouvelle)

Lectures médiévales de la légende de Troie en langue romane

[+]

17:00   Medieval Church and Culture

Harris Manchester College, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Yael Fisch (Oriel)

Allegory and the Formation of Genealogy:  between Pauline and Rabbinic literature

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WEDNESDAY 30th January

12.00-13.00     Money in the Medieval West and Byzantium

Ashmolean Museum, Floor 2, Coin Study Centre, off Gallery 36 Japan after 1860

Dr Julian Baker

Francia, Iberia, England, ca. 500-750 (Wednesday 30 January, 12-1pm)

[+]

13.00   Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Jack Hanson (University of Reading)
Scale, social networks, and the Pompeian-Nucerian riot

[+]

16.30   Aquinas Seminar Series: “The Good of Human Interdependence”

Blackfriars Hall, Aula

Prof Jennifer Frey

Temperance and the Common Good

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Sergio Basso (Rome)

Some proposals on the textual transmission of Barlaam and Ioasaph

[+]

17.00   The Slade Lectures 2019: Islam and Image: Beyond Aniconism and Iconoclasm

Maths Institute, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter

Regulating the Gaze in the Medieval Mosque

[+]

17.00   Oxford Archaeological Fieldwork Seminar

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Penny Coombe
Cycling the Limits of the Roman Empire

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THURSDAY 31st January

11.00-12.30     Byzantine Art and Archaeology Seminar

Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, First Floor Seminar Room

Dr Panayiotis Panayides (Oxford)

The life, death, and afterlife of statues at the public baths of Salamis, Cyprus (100-700 AD) 

[+]

12.00   RLAHA Martin Aitken Seminar

School of Archaeology, 1 South Parks Road, Lecture Theatre

Dr. Amanda Henry (Leiden University)
The evolution of the human diet

[+]

17.00   Late Roman Seminar

Corpus Christi College

No Seminar

[+]

17.00   Khalili Research Centre Seminars

Wolfson College

Peyvand Firouzeh (Bodleian Library/Kunsthistorisches Institut Florenz)

Spatial Poetry and the Sufi Body: the chelleh-khaneh at the shrine of Shah Ni’matullah Wali in Mahan

[+]

17.00   Inaugural Julia Smith

South School, Examination Schools

It is with great pleasure that the Faculty of History invites all medievalists to join them on Thursday 31 January for the Inaugural lecture of Professor Julia Smith, Chicele Professor of Medieval History. All are welcome to attend. The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception in the Rooms 14 and 15, Examination Schools.

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FRIDAY 1st January

9.30-11.00       Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Center, 66 St Giles

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

11.00-12.45     KRC Manuscript Viewing Sessions

Weston Library, Horton Seminar Room

Manuscript Illustration in the Near East, c.12th–13thc. (AG)

Registration is required. Please contact teresa.fitzherbert@orinst.ox.ac.uk

[+]

12.00-13.00     Byzantine Literature

Ioannou Center, 66 St Giles

Professor Lauxtermann

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 27/01/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 27th January 2019
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

Past & Present Global Middle Ages Supplement Launch Event, Friday 8 February, 5.30pm,  Joan Thirsk Common Room, History Faculty, University of Oxford.

Catherine Holmes, Naomi Standen, Ian Forrest and Amanda Power invite you to an informal drinks reception to mark the publication of the Past & Present Global Middle Ages supplement (13), a volume which includes a contribution on sources for medieval global history by the late Mark Whittow. Please RSVP to Claire Phillips.

“Philosophy and Byzantine Medicine from East to West”, 28 February 2019, Scuola Grande di San Marco, Venice.

Molto di ciò che conosciamo della medicina classica è giunto a noi attraverso la mediazione bizantina a cui Venezia e, più precisamente l’antica biblioteca domenicana del convento dei Ss.Giovanni e Paolo (la cui splendida Sala è da duecento anni parte del nostro ambito storico-monumentale), diede un’indimenticabile “custodia” a manoscritti greci e latini. Grazie a quei manoscritti si stamparono poi a Venezia le opere, ad esempio, di Ippocrate, Teofrasto, Celso, Galeno che oggi arrichiscono la nostra Biblioteca di storia della medicina e di molti altri luoghi italiani e di altri Paesi. Grazie ad essi, pur nelle critiche vicende eversive setteottocentesche, è stata consegnata all’Europa una delle eredità più fondanti della sua cultura e della sua civiltà. Grazie ad essi possiamo ritrovare oggi il significato profondo di un mondo che sa esprimersi unitariamente come Occidente-Oriente, cioè una realtà con due polmoni dello stesso organismo vitale, la cui distruzione ha provocato danni incalcolabili. La comprensione di questi eventi ci appartiene integralmente, come abbiamo messo in luce nel Colloquio dell’anno scorso sull’influenza dell’esperienza delle fondazioni di carità di Costantinopoli nella costituzione della nostra Scuola Grande di San Marco, nella versione creata nel XIII secolo sub specie diritto veneziano-ordinamento giustinianeo-diritto romano. Questa iniziativa di studio introduce con un ampio respiro la memoria del Bicentenario 1819-2019 degli Ospedali Civili Riuniti di Venezia che tanta scienza, tecnica e morale seppero trovare nella cultura antica.

The full programme of the event has been uploaded here.

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2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

Call for Sessions: Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 45th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference, 17-20 October 2019, Madison, Wisconsin.

Deadline: 10 February 2019

As part of its ongoing commitment to Byzantine studies, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 45th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference to be held in Madison, Wisconsin, October 17–20, 2019. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website. The deadline for submission is February 10, 2019. Proposals should include:

  • Proposed session title
  • CV of session organizer
  • 300-word session summary, which includes a summary of the overall topic, the format for the panel (such as a debate, papers followed by a discussion, or a traditional session of papers), and the reasons for covering the topic as a prearranged, whole session
  • Session chair and academic affiliation. Please note: Session chairs cannot present a paper in the session.
  • Information about the four papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 500-word abstract. Please note: Presenters must be members of BSANA in good standing.

Session organizers must present a paper in the session or chair the session. If a co-organzier is proposed for the session, the co-organizer must also give a paper in the session or chair the session.

Applicants will be notified by February 15, 2019. The organizer of the selected session is responsible for submitting the session to the BSC by February 25, 2019. Instructions for submitting the panel proposal are included in the BSC Call for Papers.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and chair, if the proposed chair is selected by the BSC program committee) up to $600 maximum for North American residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from abroad. Funding is through reimbursement only (check issued in US dollars or wire transfer); advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff, Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

“Beyond Eusebius and Augustine: Rethinking Christian Political Thought in Late Antiquity”, Postgraduate/Early Career Conference, Tuesday 18 June 2019, University of Liverpool.

Deadline: 18 February 2019

Amid the mass of outstanding scholarship on the Christianization of the Roman world in late antiquity (c. 250-700 CE), political thought has been left behind. Even excellent recent accounts tend to fall back on canonical authors (esp. Eusebius of Caesarea and Augustine of Hippo), themes (e.g. the relationship between emperor and churchmen), and early to mid-twentieth century accounts (esp. Baynes, Dvornik, Markus). This project seeks to diversify approaches to late ancient Christian political thought by exploring new topics (e.g. the imperial family, the role of the demonic, the influence of ascetic ideology), authors, regions, and languages. Through an international conference bringing together specialists in Classics & Ancient History, Medieval Studies, Byzantine History, and Early Christianity, leading to a collection of path-breaking essays on specific case studies, it aims to stimulate new approaches and lines of inquiry into a central theme in late ancient history.

We invite proposals for c. 20-minute papers on this theme from postgraduate students and early career researchers. Thanks to generous support from the Royal Historical Society, we will be able to pay for UK travel costs and two nights’ hotel accommodation. Papers given at the conference will be considered for publication in a resulting edited volume/special journal issue.

We would particularly invite proposals which speak to one of the following research themes:

(1)  Developing a more pluralist conception of Christian ‘political thought’

Possible topics might include: gendered praise and invective; classical political ideals in ascetic/monastic literature; ascetic/monastic visions of earthly government; demonology and diabolical agency; ethnic discourse, ethnography, and visions of the church as an ethnic, supra-ethnic, or anti-ethnic community.

(2)  Expanding the canon

We invite paper proposals which consider previously peripheral or understudied authors, languages, and regions of late ancient western Eurasia, to complicate and nuance accounts of the development of Christian political thought in late antiquity.

(3)  Christian political ideology ‘in action’

We invite paper proposals which root Christian political culture in the lived experience of governance in the late ancient world, and consider its influence on concrete interactions between bishops, monks, emperors, officials, and their subjects.

If you are interested in presenting, please e-mail an abstract of no more than 500 words to robin.whelan@liverpool.ac.uk. The deadline for submissions is Monday 18 February; we will aim to provide responses by the end of February. Please feel free to e-mail any of the organisers with questions.

Organisers

Prof. Richard Flower (Exeter) (R.Flower@exeter.ac.uk)

Dr Meaghan McEvoy (Macquarie) (meaghan.mcevoy@mq.edu.au)

Dr Robin Whelan (Liverpool) (robin.whelan@liverpool.ac.uk)

Confirmed Speakers

Prof. Dame Averil Cameron (Oxford; respondent)

Dr James Corke-Webster (King’s College London)

Dr Gerda Heydemann (Freie Universität Berlin)

Prof. Julia Hillner (Sheffield)

Dr Conor O’Brien (Durham)

 

SHERA-sponsored panel at ASEEES 2019, “Belief”, 23-26 November 2019, San Francisco, CA.

Deadline: 15 February 2019

The Society of Historians of East European, Eurasian, and Russian Art and Architecture, Inc. (SHERA) Board invites proposals for the Society’s sponsored panel at the 2019 Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES) Annual Conference. The conference will be held in San Francisco from November 23 to 26, 2019 and the theme is “Belief.” More information on the convention theme can be found here.

As an affiliated society, SHERA may submit one sponsored panel. This session has guaranteed acceptance from ASEEES and will be identified as an Affiliated Society session in all ASEEES conference schedules (printed, online, and in the conference app).

Proposed panels must focus on issues of art, architecture, visual culture, or any of the fields concerning SHERA as a Society and may be from any period.

All members of the proposed panel must be members of ASEEES and SHERA in good standing and must register for the conference. Please submit:

  1. Title and a brief description of the panel (no more than 250 words)
  2. Names of all panel members, including chair and discussants, and a brief CV (no more than two pages) for each
  3. Brief descriptions of each paper (no more than 250 words)

Proposals should be sent to shera.artarchitecture@gmail.com with the subject heading “SHERA-sponsored panel at ASEEES 2019.”

Information on joining SHERA can be found here. Information on joining ASEEES can be found here.

The deadline for submission of panels to ASEEES is February 15, 2019. Therefore, applications must be sent to the SHERA Board at shera.artarchitecture@gmail.com by February 1, 2019 for notification on February 10, 2019.

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 3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES 

The Delphi Academy of European Studies at the European Cultural Centre of Delphi.

Deadline: 15 March 2019

The Delphi Academy of European Studies supported by the Region of Central Greece focuses on the diachronic and synchronic study of European history and culture and the ways in which Europe today responds to the multifaceted challenges of political, economic, and cultural globalization.

The curriculum and academic function of the Delphi Academy of European Studies is overseen by an international Committee consisting of the following Professors:

Homi Bhabha (Harvard; Director of the Mahindra Humanities Center)

Georges Dertilis, (École des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris)

Peter Frankopan (Oxford; Director of the Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research)

Michèle Lamont (Harvard; Director of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs)

Spiros Pollalis (Harvard School of Design)

Panagiotis Roilos (Harvard; founder of the Academy and chair of the committee)

Dimitrios Yatromanolakis (Johns Hopkins University).

The Academy offers two-week interdisciplinary, tuition free Seminars at the Centre’s facilities in Delphi. The Seminars, which are taught in English by world renowned scholars, are open mainly to graduate students/PhD candidates but also to qualified undergraduates. The instructors adopt interdisciplinary approaches to their subjects, with a view to addressing the research interests of students in the Humanities as well as the Social Sciences. The Seminars are accompanied by a workshop and/or invited lectures on current political and cultural developments in Europe.

This year the Academy’s Seminar Programme will focus on environmental studies, ecocritics, and environmental politics in European and global contexts. The Seminars will be offered in June 16-29, 2019.

The 2019 Seminar Programme is as follows:

  1. John Barry, Queen’s University, Belfast; Professor of Green Political Economy, School of History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics, Queen’s University Belfast.

Responding to the Anthropocene, Unsustainability and Climate Breakdown:  Philosophy, Politics and Economics for the 21st Century

The continuing problematic relationship between key dynamics of modern economic and social systems and the non-human world – such as human caused climate change and biodiversity loss – is one, if not the, most pressing issues of the 21st century and will continue to shape the political agenda both nationally and globally. This course will examine some of the key debates of the politics of un/sustainable development in this ‘age of the Anthropocene’.  Topics include: green ethical and political theory; the role of the environment and nature in political theorising; the economic and policy alternatives to unsustainable development; the normative underpinnings of a sustainable society; capitalism, orthodox economic growth and alternative political economies; and low carbon energy and socio-technical transitions.

  1. Verena Conley, Harvard University, Long Term Visiting Professor of Comparative Literature and of Romance Languages and Literatures, and Faculty Associate of the Harvard University Center for the Environment.

Environmental Humanities and New Materialisms

 This seminar will explore the relation between new materialisms and environmental humanities. In all their diversity, new materialisms are comprised of texts that contest Descartes’ taxonomic categories based on primary and secondary qualities that throughout much of modernity have informed the politics of colonialism, served to advocate a separation of nature and culture and been marshalled to control women and other minorities. New materialisms investigate the presence of inhuman forces within the realm of the human and compel us to rethink the nature of subjectivity, notably where they emphasize entanglements and the self-organizing powers of non-human processes. We will study how they explore dissonant relations between those processes and cultural practices, how they reconsider ethics and commend the need to fold a cosmological dimension more regularly into local and global politics. We will sort through the tenets of these new materialisms by exploring critical and fictional texts across national as well as disciplinary boundaries with a comparative focus. Critical readings include Elizabeth Grosz, Jane Bennett, Rosi Braidotti, Didier Debaise, Donna Haraway, Bruno Latour, Brian Massumi,  Timothy Morton, Imre Szeman, Isabelle Stengers, and Jussi Parikka. In fiction, poetry and cinema, we will examine works by Amitav Gosh, Ursula Le Guin, Jamaica Kincaid, Indra Sinha, Anna Tsing, Ken-Saro Wiwa and others.

  1. James Engell, Harvard University; Gurney Professor of English and Professor of Comparative Literature, and Faculty Associate of the Harvard University Center for the Environment.

Writing Nature: Literature, Science, Ethics 

This seminar examines the intersections of literary writing, science, ethics, and creativity. We read the works of several writers—e.g., Rachel Carson, Aldo Leopold, John Muir, Henry David Thoreau, William Wordsworth, the Papal Encyclical of 2015—that embody and explore these intersections. We also examine a few texts from recent ecocriticism, as well as treatments of current environmental concerns, especially climate disruption. The course includes historical, ethical, and spiritual perspectives. Short assignments include creative work (poetry or short fiction), a critical paper, and field notes.

Upon completion of the Seminar Programme, certificates indicating the titles of the Seminars and the names of the Instructors will be awarded to the students.

Students will be offered free lodging and meals (lunch and dinner) by the Academy at the European Cultural Centre of Delphi. The Seminar Programme is tuition-free.

Applicants to the Academy should submit the following documents:

1) CV (no more than 3 pages).

2) Research statement no longer than 200 words.

3) Two letters of recommendation (one from the applicant’s PhD/academic advisor, in the case of graduate students). The letters should include information about the applicant’s coursework and academic performance in areas related to the topics of the seminars.

4) Proof of English language competence.

Applications should be submitted to the European Cultural Centre of Delphi (Mrs. Athena Gotsi, conferences2@eccd.gr) by March 15, 2019. Decisions will be communicated to the applicants by March 30.

To see comments of the participants to the 2017 programme, click here

To see comments of the participants to the 2018 programme, click here

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 20/01/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 20th January 2019
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

Study Day “Women in Archaeology”, 23 February 2019, St Hugh’s College, University of Oxford.

Join us for this fascinating study day on prominent women archaeologists, with a particular focus on those who worked in the Middle East. The study day will culminate with a screening in the early evening of a wonderful new film on the life and work of St Hugh’s alumna, the late Nancy Sandars (Archaeology, 1950), who worked with the hugely influential archaeologist Dame Kathleen Kenyon, Principal of St Hugh’s from 1962 to 1973.

For more information or to register you can click here.

 

“Processions: Urban Ritual in Byzantium and Neighboring Lands”, Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Studies Symposium, 12-13 April 2019, DO Music Room, Washington, DC.

Symposiarchs: Leslie Brubaker and Nancy Ševčenko

Military, civic, and religious processions were hallmarks of the ancient and medieval world; they continued into the Renaissance and, indeed, continue to this day. Yet the Byzantine procession has not yet been subjected to any synthetic, historicizing, contextualizing, or comparative examination.

Understanding processions is critical for our appreciation of how urban space worked and was manipulated in the Middle Ages. For the 2019 Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Symposium, speakers will examine texts, artifacts, and images in order to develop a new understanding of medieval urban life across multiple social registers. For example, records of processions show us what kinds of public behavior were acceptable, and when, and where. Studying processions introduces us to new protagonists as well, for processions involve audiences as well as participants, and groups hitherto virtually invisible, such as the team of people who prepared for the event by decorating the streets, will be brought to light. The Byzantine commitment to processions is striking in terms of the resources and time allocated: there were as many as two processions a week in Constantinople, many involving the patriarch and the emperor. In the Latin West, the Crusader States, and in the Fatimid, Ottoman, and Muscovite worlds, by comparison, processions occurred far less frequently: the procession was significantly more important to the Byzantines than to their neighbors and successors. The comparative study of Byzantine processions to be offered by the speakers at the symposium will reveal how the Byzantines operated in a complex global network defined by local contexts, how the Byzantines positioned themselves within this network, and the nature of the Byzantine legacy to the Islamic, Catholic, and Orthodox inheritors of their culture.

Speakers

  • Nathanael Andrade, “Controlling Material and Semiotic Landscapes: Processions in Late Antiquity”
  • Christine Angelidi, “Sparkling creations, threads of tradition. Marian processions in medieval Constantinople”
  • Leslie Brubaker, “Bridging the gap: processions in early medieval Constantinople”
  • Michael Featherstone, “Public Processions in Middle Byzantine Constantinople”
  • Georgia Frank, “The Things They Carried: Religious Processions in Early Byzantium”
  • Michael Flier, “Changing times, divergent destinies: Processional Imagery in the Age of the Tsar”
  • Niels Gaul, “Processions in the late Byzantine world”
  • Çiğdem Kafescioğlu, “Guild processions in Istanbul: claiming public space in the early modern city”
  • James Norrie, “11th–12th century processions in Milan and Rome – urban conflict or civic integration?”
  • Paula Sanders, “Negotiating power in the Islamic Mediterranean: Urban Processions in Egypt, North Africa, and Iberia”
  • Sebastian Salvadó/M. Cecilia Gaposchkin, “The Latin Processions in Jerusalem”
  • Alexandra Vukovich, “Princely Processions and Peregrinations Itinerant Rulership in Early Rus”

To register follow the link.

 

“Byzantine Worlds” Lecture Series, Cebtre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Cambridge.

The seminar is held on Wednesdays at 5 pm in Room SG2, Alison Richard Bu idling, 7 West Road, Cambridge CB3 90T.

30 January Military Administration in Byzantine Africa: New Evidence

Vivien Prigent, CNRS, Paris, France/Maison Francaise d’Oxford

13 February Translating Sex in the Medical Literature of Muscovite Rus

Rosie Finlinson, Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge

27 February Dalmatius, Eutyches, Victor and the Transmission of Consensus in Christological Controversies

Luise Marion Frenkel, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazil

13 March Attempts at Imitations: Byzantine and Islamic Army and Administration

Marie Legendre, University of Edinburgh

The Byzantine Greek reading group will be held from 1-2 pm on Wednesdays 16 & 30 January, 13 & 27 February and 13 March in SG2, Alison Richard Building. For more information please contact Nick Evans (njbe2@cam.ac.uk)

Byzantine Worlds and the Cambridge Art History Research Seminar will be holding a joint session on 23 January, at 5 pm at the Department of History of Art, 4a Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1 QA:

11 February Councils in perspective:

A colloquium on current projects and new methodologies in the research of late-antique Christian synods

Speakers include Marek Jankowiak, University of Oxford and Richard Price, Heythrop College, University of London

Further information can be found here.

 

Presentation of the volume “Picturing a Lost Empire: An Italian Lens on Byzantine Art in Anatolia, 1960-2000”, January 25, 16:30, Sapienza University of Rome.

The volume is the catalogue of the exhibition currently open in Istanbul, Koç University ANAMED, Arched Gallery, and illustrates the field trips organized by Sapienza University to Anatolia through the photographs of the Center for Documentation of Byzantine Art History.

For further information on the project please visit the website.

 

“Mary, a Multivalent Figure and the Mother of All”, Lecture by Professor Ioli Kalavrezou, 24 January, 2019, 18:00, Dumbarton Oaks Music Room.

The Virgin Mary has become the most venerated figure in the Christian world and beyond, and Marian studies have flourished in Western medieval and Byzantine art history. By discussing a selection of individual established compositions that were created over centuries, this talk will present the different dimensions and themes that define Mary and her role as the MΗΤΗΡ ΘΕΟΥ, the Mother of God, in the art and theology of Byzantium. She not only is the powerful mediator but also becomes an active participant in the various aspects of Christian life. The talk will draw attention to the many and diverse qualities of her character and focus on those aspects that gave her the position she held for many centuries in Orthodox Christianity and still holds today. She had become a multivalent and complex figure in the religious and devotional life of her people.

A prominent Byzantine art historian, Ioli Kalavrezou has focused her scholarship on a variety of research topics including the political and ideological history of the Empire, the place and role of women in Byzantine society, and the cult of the Virgin Mary. Professor Kalavrezou holds the positions of Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Byzantine Art History at Harvard University and of Senior Fellow at Dumbarton Oaks since 1989. She has also served as Chair of the History of Art and Architecture Department at Harvard University.

The lecture will be preceded by a gallery viewing from 5:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

“Juggling the Middle Ages”

Featuring more than 100 objects, Juggling the Middle Ages explores the influence of the medieval world by focusing on a single story with a long-lasting impact—Le Jongleur de Notre Dame or Our Lady’s Tumbler. The exhibit follows the tale from its rediscovery by scholars in the 1870s to its modern interpretations in children’s books, offering viewers a look at a vast range of objects, including stained glass windows, illuminated manuscripts, household objects, and vintage theater posters.

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2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

“Cultural Entanglement, Transfer and Contention in Mediterranean Communities from Antiquity to the Present”, Sixth CEMS International Graduate Conference, 30 May-1 June 2019, Budapest.

Deadline: 15 February 2019

The Center for Eastern Mediterranean Studies (CEMS) at Central European University and its junior members are proud to announce the forthcoming sixth International Graduate Conference on Cultural Entanglement, Transfer and Contention in Mediterranean Communities. The conference will provide a forum for graduate and advanced undergraduate students working on the Eastern Mediterranean to present their current research, exchange ideas, and develop scholarly networks.

Conference Description

Marking the boundary of three continents, the Mediterranean has been one of the world’s premier zones of cultural interaction since antiquity. From the Romans to the Ottomans, the first caliphs to Queen Victoria, the powers who sought dominance over this sea reckoned with this history of multiplicity by appropriating its rich past and attempting to imitate and outdo their predecessors and contemporaries. Diverse communities, moreover, concomitantly sought to survive and prosper in competition and cooperation with one another. The aim of this conference is to work against the grain of disciplinary boundaries to better understand these processes of inheritance, transmission, and exchange both diachronically and synchronically. How were the cultures of Mediterranean communities particularized through accommodation to, modification of, and divergence from their shared pasts? How did rulers manage these shifting webs of diversity? What procedures drew boundaries between cultures, either successive or contemporary, if and when such lines can be drawn? What evidence and methodologies can be brought to bear to read genuine curiosity, selective accommodation, and outright rejection in these exchanges within and across polities in the Mediterranean?

Young scholars from across the globe will be invited to share their work and come to grips with how to conduct research in an academic environment that increasingly demands both specialized expertise and comparative breadth. We seek innovative proposals by graduate students from all disciplines that relate to the Mediterranean world, including but not limited to Anthropology, Archeology, Art History, Classics, Environmental Science, Gender Studies, History, Languages and Literatures, Medieval Studies, Philosophy, Religion, and Theology.

Possible paper topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • The entanglements and diverse heritages of elite artistic, literary, and intellectual cultures
  • Rethinking big processes, e.g. Hellenization, Romanization, Christianization, and Islamization
  • Interaction and diversity in everyday life and popular/vernacular cultures
  • Trans-imperial/trans-national subjects, contact zones, gendered boundaries, and porous identities within and beyond borders
  • Maintaining common identities in diasporas: the connections and differences between communities across far-flung geographies
  • Communities and networks (intellectual, professional, mercantile, civic, military, domestic, etc.) that operate across ethnic and national lines
  • Conquest, colonization, environmental change, and shifting landscapes of diversity
  • Envisioning pluralism in philosophical, theological, and legal discourses of order
  • Intra-communal politics in contexts of social, economic, and gender stratification
  • Migration, urban economies, and the transformation of spatial and social structures
  • The (re)invention of national communities and their relationship to legacies of difference
  • The re-appropriation of imperial pasts in Mediterranean societies

Please submit by February 15, 2019 a short paper proposal (no more than 250 words, together with a brief biography and contact information) to the following address: cemsconference@ceu.edu. Results will be announced on March 4, 2019.

Keynote Speakers:

Nicholas Purcell (University of Oxford)

Arietta Papaconstantinou (University of Reading)

Zeynep Türkyilmaz (Forum Transregionale Studien, Berlin)

Accommodation and Travel Grants:

All participants will be offered accommodation for the full duration of the conference (3 nights) at the CEU Residence Center. In order to encourage the participation of individuals with limited institutional support a small number of partial travel grants will be available to cover travel expenses. Those who wish to be considered for the grant should include an additional justification alongside their paper proposals. Please note that there is no conference fee.

In addition, this year the conference will coincide with CEMS’s Undergraduate Open House, and advanced undergraduates interested in pursuing research or academic career in the history and cultures of the Eastern Mediterranean are invited to attend the Open House as well as apply to present a paper at the conference. For further information, do not hesitate to contact the organizers atcemsconference@ceu.edu.

Organizing Committee:

Dunja Milenkovic (PhD Student, Department of Medieval Studies)

Flora Ghazaryan (PhD Student, Department of History)

John Kee (MA Student, Department of Medieval Studies)

For further information, do not hesitate to contact the organizers here or at our Facebook page.

 

“Nomads and their Neighbors in the Middle Ages”, Eighth International Conference on Medieval History of the Eurasian Steppe, Medieval Nomads (MeN), 20-23 November 2019, Sofia, Bulgaria.

Deadline: 15 April 2019

In 1997, 2000 and 2002, the Department of Medieval History at the University of Szeged organized several conferences on the history of medieval nomads of the Eurasian steppe, the proceedings of which were subsequently published in Hungarian. In 2004, the Department of Medieval History and the Department of Archaeology at the same University, together with the Research Group on Hungarian Prehistory of the Regional Committee of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Szeged decided to convene an International Conference on Medieval History of the Eurasian Steppe. The first conference of this kind was held in Szeged in 2004, the second in Jászberény in 2007, the third in Miskolc in 2009, the fourth in Cairo (Egypt) in 2011, the fifth in Moscow (Russia) in 2013, the sixth again in Szeged in 2016, and the seventh in Shanghai in 2018.

Now, as a continuation of this series, Sofia University “St. Kliment Ohridski” and the Institute for Historical Studies of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences have the pleasure to invite you to take part in the Eighth International Conference on Medieval History of the Eurasian Steppe, “Nomads and their Neighbors in the Middle Ages”, to be held in Sofia, Bulgaria, in November 20–23, 2019.

Panels and individual papers which fall under the following main topics are encouraged:

  • Sources and their creators
  • The Nomads and their Sedentary Neighbors: Warfare, Diplomacy, Economy, Politics and Culture
  • Nomads as marginal groups in the sedentary societies
  • Religious history and conversion of the Eurasian Nomads
  • Military history
  • Social History
  • The no man’s land: cross points between steppe and sown
  • Representation of the Nomads in Material and Written Culture of their Sedentary Neighbors

Length of the papers

  • Individual papers: the length should not exceed 15 minutes, and 10 minutes will be left for discussion.
  • Pre-organized panels: should include 3 or 4 papers of the same length plus 30 minutes for discussion. The papers should be focused a single theme or research-question.

Official language of the conference: English

Fees and accommodation:

There is no registration fee. Travel and accommodation are the responsibility of each participant.

Application:

  • Individual applicants should send the attached form F1_Individual by April 15, 2019 on the address: medieval.nomads.sofia.2019@gmail.com Abstracts should not exceed 250 words.
  • Panel proposals should follow the attached form F2_Panel and be sent by April 15, 2019 on the same address: medieval.nomads.sofia.2019@gmail.com The proposals should include an abstract (300 words maximum) for the entire panel explaining its content, in addition to an individual abstract (250 words maximum) for each paper.

All application will go through a selection process by the Organizing Committee and applicants will be informed by June 15, 2019.

 

“Religion and War from Antiquity to early Modernity”, King’s College London, 24-26 June 2019.

Deadline: 30 January 2019

The conference, hosted by the Departments of Classics and War Studies, and the Sir Michael Howard Centre for the History of War at King’s College London, will mark the launch of a new international research network Religion and War through the Ages dedicated to exploring the nexus between religion and war as a recurring cross-cultural phenomenon attested in a great variety of historical societies from antiquity to the present and presenting a particularly poignant modern challenge.

Proposals from young researchers and established scholars in the Late Antique and Medieval history are now invited for papers of 20 minutes exploring historical cases that explore the influence of religion on war, from motivation and moral justification to rules of conduct.  Proposals, of up to 350 words, should be sent to Irene Polinskaya by 30 January 2019.  Successful applicants will be notified by 15 February 2019.  A selection of papers will be considered for publication in peer-reviewed conference proceedings.

What role do religious ideas play in human conflicts? Citing direct divine command or posing as guardians of divine interests, actively seeking divine approval or drawing courage from imagined divine support, armies from ancient times to the present and across diverse regions and cultures, have gone to battle with one another.  The conference will investigate specific historical cases and contexts that illustrate the influence of religion on war, from motivation to rules of conduct.  Major themes include: the demands of different sets of religious beliefs that in the past provided a cause for war; the conditions under which religious considerations became a dominant force among the reasons for and against war; the role religion played in escalating war or putting limits on violence and how that influence was felt; finally, how religion, in turn, was affected by the conduct of war in past societies.

With wide geographic coverage encompassing the Mediterranean basin, Near East, North Africa, and Europe, and taking Classical Antiquity as a starting point, but looking as far back as the second millennium BCE and forward to the Westphalian settlement of 1648, this conference will be a comparative and cross-cultural exploration of the persistent question about the role of religion in motivating, guiding, and explaining the causes and conduct of war.

Confirmed speakers include: Ian Morris (Stanford), Anthony Spalinger (Auckland), Penny Roberts (Warwick), Amir Gilan (Tel Aviv), Yannis Stouraitis (Edinburgh), Amira Benison (Cambridge).

Inquiries may be sent to Yannis Papadogiannakis or Irene Polinskaya.

 

The 45th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference, BSANA, 17-20 October 2019, Madison, Wisconsin.

Deadline: 25 February 2019, 11:59 EST

The Forty-fifth annual Byzantine Studies Conference (BSC) will be held in Madison, Wisconsin, from Thursday evening, October 17, through Sunday afternoon, October 20, 2019. For information on BSANA, please consult the BSANA website.

The Local Arrangements Chairs for 2019 are Dr. Leonora Neville, from the Department of History, and Dr.Thomas E. A. Dale, from the Department of Art History, at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

The BSC is the annual forum for the presentation and discussion of papers on every aspect of Byzantine Studies and on related topics relevant to the field. Conference attendance is open to all, regardless of nationality or academic status.

The BSC is also the occasion of the annual business meeting of the Byzantine Studies Association of North America (BSANA). All conference attendees are warmly encouraged to attend and participate in the annual BSANA business lunch and meeting, which will be conducted on Saturday, October 19th. BSANA’s officers will lead this meeting:

President: Benjamin Anderson (Cornell University, Ithaca, NY) (bwa32@cornell.edu)

Vice President: Galina Tirnanic (Oakland University, Rochester, MI) (tirnanic@oakland.edu)

Secretary: Hannah Ewing (Rollins College, Winter Park, FL) (bsanasec@yahoo.com)

Treasurer: Elizabeth Williams (Dumbarton Oaks) (bsana.treasurer@gmail.com)

Submission Overview

Submission Date/Time:February 25, 2019, Monday, 11:59 pm EST

BSANA Vice President, Galina Tirnanic (tirnanic@oakland.edu), will oversee the submission process and will confirm receipt of each submission.

Notification Date: March 15, 2019, Wednesday

The 2019 BSC Program Chair, Annie Labatt (alabatt@sbc.edu), will oversee the blind-review process conducted by the 2019 BSC Program Committee, and will send out notifications of acceptance or rejection on March 15th.

Submissions, in summary, consist of:

A single PDF copy of the individual blind abstract (paper title only, no names of author/s), 500-word maximum, formatted and submitted online according to the detailed instructions that follow. In the case of abstracts proposed within an organized panel, each abstract must be submitted individually and will be assessed on its own merits; see below for fuller instructions on organized panels.

Successful abstracts will present all of the following to a reader well-versed in Byzantine

Studies writ large, but who is not an expert in your own subject:

  1. a clarifying and articulate introduction to your topic
  2. the major points of your argument, and an overview of the evidence supporting your argument
  3. a convincing statement on the significance of your work
  4. the conclusions you propose

Commitment to Present-Accepted Abstracts

Your submission and its acceptance represent a commitment from you to present the paper in person at the 2019 BSC. Those who cannot attend must withdraw no later than June 1, 2019.

Failure to notify the Program Committee in a timely fashion will adversely affect future chances to present at the BSC.

BSC Presenters Must Have Current BSANA Membership

To deliver your paper at the 2019 BSC, you must be a current member of BSANA in good standing. If speakers are not members in good standing by the beginning date of the conference, they will not be permitted to present.

To join or renew your BSANA membership, consult the website.

 

“Hieronymus noster: International Symposium on the 1600th Anniversary of Jerome’s Death”, Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts, 24-26 October 2019, Ljubljana.

Deadline: 31 March 2019

The International Symposium on the 1600th Anniversary of Jerome’s Death, Hieronymus noster, will take place in Ljubljana, on October 24th–26th, 2019, at the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts. It is being organised by the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts; the Universities of Ljubljana, Zagreb, Graz, and Warsaw; Central European University (CEU); International Network of Excellence “Europa Renascens”; DANUBIUS Project (Université de Lille); and the Institut des Sources chrétiennes.

Call for Papers:

Hieronyme, veni foras, “Jerome, come out,” Jerome himself wrote in his letter to a friend (Ep. 4), stating a personal desire addressed to God. His own call will provide the starting point of the international scholarly symposium in 2019, commemorating the 1600th anniversary of Jerome’s death. The encounter will highlight recent research trends related to Jerome’s life, to his opus, and to the reception of this ancient ascetic, Biblical scholar, biographer, traveller, epistolographer, theologian, exegete, satirist, and controversialist. The meeting will take place in Ljubljana, Slovenia, among the archaeological sites of Roman Emona from his letters (Ep. 11–12), whose genius loci remains influenced by the proximity of Jerome’s birthplace, Stridon. While the exact whereabouts of Stridon remain unknown, an excursion will be offered by symposium’s organizers in order to discuss some of its potential locations. The conference will be interdisciplinary and will present Jerome in the light of the latest discoveries; its particular focus will be the archaeological finds of Christian Emona from 2018. The papers invited will consider – but will not be limited to – researching Jerome within the framework of historical context, archaeology, biblical exegesis, patristics, classical philology, and theology.

To Offer a Paper:

Please email simpozij.hieronim@teof.uni-lj.si. Provide a title and an abstract in 200 words for a twenty‐minute paper, to be followed by a five‐minute discussion, in English, German, French, or Italian, until March 31st, 2019. Please make sure the title is concise and reflects the contents of the paper. There will be some funds available for food and accommodation. A separate session will be dedicated to graduate students; their applications are particularly encouraged. The Committee will reply by April 30th, 2019. Papers will be published in Bogoslovni vestnik: Theological Quarterly – Ephemerides theologicae, and in Keria: Studia Latina et Graeca.

Organizing Committee:

Pablo Argárate, Institute of Ecumenical Theology, Eastern Orthodox Church and Patrology, Faculty of Catholic Theology at the Karl‐Franzens‐University Graz

Ivan Bodrožić, Department of the History of Christian Literature and Christian Teaching, Catholic Faculty of Theology Zagreb

Jan Dominik Bogataj OFM, Patristic Institute Victorinianum, Ljubljana, secretary

Rajko Bratož, Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts

Alenka Cedilnik, History Department, Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana

Antonio Dávila Pérez, Department of Classical Philology, University of Cádiz – International Network Europa Renascens

Laurence Mellerin, Institut des Sources chrétiennes (HISOMA‐UMR 5189 research centre) Dominic Moreau, DANUBIUS Project (Université de Lille/HALMA‐UMR 8164 research centre)

David Movrin, Department of Classical Philology, Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana Elżbieta M. Olechowska, Faculty of Artes Liberales, University of Warsaw

Katalin Szende, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University in Vienna

Miran Špelič OFM, Patristic Institute Victorinianum, Faculty of Theology, University of Ljubljana, president of the committee

Rafko Valenčič, Faculty of Theology, University of Ljubljana

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3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Research Associate and Lecturer in Late Antique Christianity at UVA

Although review of applications will begin on January 15, applications will continue to be accepted until the position is filled.

The Department of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia invites applications for a Post-Doctoral Research Associate and Lecturer in Religious Studies, with a specialization in late antique Christianity for the 2019-2020 academic year. The anticipated start date is August 25, 2019.

We seek a candidate who is conversant with and has a demonstrated research agenda in the history, literatures and cultures of Christianity from the second to eighth centuries c.e. This position works closely with colleagues in the department’s Judaism and Christianity in Antiquity area and, as such, the candidate should have a grounding in the religions of the Greco-Roman world. Additional capacities in one or more of the following are desirable: art and material culture; gender studies; race studies; and/or literary theory.

Candidates must have a PhD in Religious Studies or a related discipline by the appointment start date. Preference will be given to candidates who possess the ability to teach Syriac and/or Coptic language and literature. The successful candidate will teach three courses over the course of the academic year and be expected to carry on a program of research.

The listing and application instructions can be found here.

 

Tarrant and Webster Fellowships

Deadline: 31st January

The Institute of Classical Studies intends to appoint two visiting fellowships for 2019-2020, in memory of Dorothy Tarrant and the other in memory of Tom Webster.

These Fellowships are awarded to scholars from universities outside the UK with research interests in any field of classical studies. The successful candidates are each expected to spend a minimum of six weeks at the Institute within academic year 2019-2020, and to deliver a named lecture. She or he is provided with a stipend of £5000 toward the cost of travel and accommodation. Further details, including eligibility, are available here.

Applicants for one or more of these fellowships are encouraged to send here a CV, a short account of the research project they intend to pursue with the aid of the Fellowship, the subject of the lecture they would give, and the names and addresses of two referees. The deadline for applications will be 31st January 2019. Results are normally announced in April. Successful candidates are encouraged to lecture elsewhere in the UK if invited and some funds are available to make this possible.

 

Posted in Byzness

OXFORD LISTINGS: HT 2019 / Week 2

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 2

Hilary Term 2019

= = = = =

MONDAY 21st January

14.15   Seminar in Palaeography and Manuscript Studies

Weston Library, 1st Floor, Horton Room

Daniel Sawyer

Against dullness: some ways to learn from (and enjoy) ‘average’ manuscripts

[+]

15.00   Medieval Archaeology Seminar

Institute of Archaeology Lecture Room

Helena Hamerow

Feeding Anglo-Saxon England: The bioarchaeology of an agricultural revolution

[+]

16.15   Gender in Classical Archaeology Seminar Series

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Dr Glenys Davies (University of Edinburgh)
Gender and body language in Roman art revisited

[+]

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, Warton Room

Dr Amy Singer (Tel Aviv / All Souls)

An Ottoman Capital Idea: Edirne 1402-1453

_ _ _

TUESDAY 22nd January

12.00   Climate and Chronology Group

School of Archaeology, 1 South Parks Road, Lecture Theatre

Prof. Christopher Bronk Ramsey, University of Oxford
Progress towards an integrated approach for chronological projects

[+]

14:00   Later Medieval Seminar – Commemoration

St John’s College, 21 St Giles seminar room

Emily Guerry (Kent)

Picturing the Passion in the Capetian present

[+]

14:00   Byzantine Epigraphy

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Dr Ida Toth

Byzantine Epigrams with Andreas Rhoby

[+]

17:00   Medieval Church and Culture

Harris Manchester College, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Ben Williams (Oriental Institute)

In the Clothes of Men:  Women’s Mobility and the Book of Ruth

_ _ _

WEDNESDAY 23rd January

12.00-13.00     Money in the Medieval West and Byzantium

Ashmolean Museum, Floor 2, Coin Study Centre, off Gallery 36 Japan after 1860

Dr Julian Baker

The Byzantine “Dark Ages”, ca. 600-800

[+]

13.00-14.00     Early Medieval Britain Network

Balliol College

Janina Ramirez

Translating the Medieval World for Young Readers

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Andreas Rhoby (Vienna)

Byzance après Byzance? Metrical inscriptions c. 1450-1650

[+]

17.00   The Slade Lectures 2019: Islam and Image: Beyond Aniconism and Iconoclasm

Maths Institute, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter

Mimesis and Magic: The Lives of Images Revisited

[+]

17.00   Oxford Archaeological Fieldwork Seminar

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Dr. Emily Forster (FeedSax Project)

Investigating Early Medieval Land Use: Pollen Coring at Sydlings Copse, Oxfordshire

_ _ _

THURSDAY 24th January

11.00-12.30     Byzantine Art and Archaeology Seminar

Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, First Floor Seminar Room

Andreas Rhoby (Vienna)

“The light of Christ shines for all” – the meaning of crosses with tetragrams for Byzantine society

[+]

12.00   RLAHA Martin Aitken Seminar

School of Archaeology, 1 South Parks Road, Lecture Theatre

No Seminar. All day presentations for the Associate Professorship in Archaeological Science – All welcome to attend

[+]

14.00   Celebrities, Saints & Scholars: Fannish Devotions, Medieval and Modern

45 St Giles (St John’s Research Centre, Lecture room)

Dr Alicia Spencer-Hall (QMUL)

Celebrities, Saints & Scholars: Fannish Devotions, Medieval and Modern

[+]

17.00   Late Roman Seminar

Corpus Christi College

Bryan Ward-Perkins (Oxford University)

Diversity in the late antique cult of saints

[+]

17.00   Khalili Research Centre Seminars

Wolfson College

Alya Karame (Khalili Research Centre)

Change, Continuity and Rupture: Qur’an Manuscript Production in the Central and Eastern Islamic Lands of the 11th Century

[+]

17.00   Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance music

All Souls, Wharton Room

John Milsom (Liverpool Hope University)

Polyphony, in four parts: composing, performing, listening, reflecting

_ _ _

FRIDAY 25th January

10.00-11.30     Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Center, 66 St Giles

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

11.00-12.45     KRC Manuscript Viewing Sessions

Weston Library, Horton Seminar Room

Qurʾan manuscripts (UG)

Registration is required. Please contact teresa.fitzherbert@orinst.ox.ac.uk

[+]

12.00-13.00     Byzantine Literature

Ioannou Center, 66 St Giles

Professor Lauxtermann

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 15/01/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 15th January 2019
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

Workshop “Holiness on the Move: Travelling Saints in Byzantium”, Newcastle University, 22 February 2019, Newcastle.

Venue: Keeton-Lomas Lecture Theatre | Armstrong Building, Ground floor | SHCA | Newcastle University

This workshop brings together researchers in the field of Byzantine literature, and especially hagiography, in order to explore travel and monastic mobility in Byzantium in connection to Byzantine ideals of sainthood, as reflected in hagiographic compositions.

For more information on the workshop (programme, abstracts, registration, etc), please visit the webpage of the event and @SacredByzantium on Twitter.

 

“Women in Archaeology” Conference, St Hugh’s College, 23 February 2019, 11:30 am, Oxford.

Join St Hugh’s for this fascinating study day on prominent women archaeologists, with a particular focus on those who worked in the Middle East. The study day will culminate with a screening in the early evening of a wonderful new film on the life and work of St Hugh’s alumna, the late Nancy Sandars (Archaeology, 1950), who worked with the hugely influential archaeologist Dame Kathleen Kenyon, Principal of St Hugh’s from 1962 to 1973.

For more information or to register you can click here.

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2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

“Hellenic Political Philosophy and Contemporary Europeium”, Podgorica Centre for Hellenic Studies, 29 September – 04 October 2019, Herceg Novi (Montenegro).

Deadline: 1 March 2019

Center for Hellenic Studies, from Podgorica (Montenegro) is happy to announce the international conference on the topic “Hellenic Political Philosophy and Contemporary Europe”, to be held in Herceg Novi (Montenegro), from 29 September to 04 October 2019.

The Conference is organized under the auspices of Ministry of Science of Montenegro, and is of an interdisciplinary character, addressing different social and political issues from perspectives of history, philosophy, economics, theology, history of ideas, anthropology, political theory and other disciplines. Such conception of the scholarly exchange does not fulfill only the purpose of an historical investigation, but will provide a systematic treatment of the topic, thus clarifying existing ideas and advancing new ones. We welcome papers on topics like

  1. The concept of the polis in antiquity and modernity
  2. Freedom and democracy
  3. Politics and economy
  4. Democracy, liberalism, totalitarianism
  5. The philosophy of the polis: Citizen, polis and cultural ideals
  6. Autonomy and responsibility in politics
  7. The philosophy of the cosmopolis
  8. The polis and happiness
  9. Ethics and politics

and other relevant themes. Please see the full call for papers here.

Abstracts of up to 200 words should be submitted by 1 March 2019, via the registration form, or sent by email here.

For more information please visit the website which will be constantly updated with new information.

 

“Byzantine Materiality”, The Sacred Arts Initiative of St. Vladimir’s Seminary, 8-11 May 2019.

Deadline: 1 February 2019

Popular descriptions of Byzantium often emphasize the mystical and immaterial while overlooking the mediating role of matter implied by the Christian belief in the incarnation. In the field of art history and across the humanities, a new interest in matter and materials constitutes what is now being referred to as the “material turn” or “new materialisms.”

This conference explores matter, materials, and materiality in Byzantine art and culture. It aims to examine material strategies of objects, makers, and users; the agency and affective properties of materials and objects; Byzantine depictions and descriptions of matter in images and texts; and the senses and embodied experiences in Byzantium.

In addition to our speakers, limited space is available for additional 20-minute papers.

We invite scholars and graduate students from a range of fields—including but not limited to history of art and architecture, archaeology, liturgical studies, musicology/sound studies, theology, philosophy, and history—to submit paper proposals.

Please send your abstract (300 words maximum) and academic CV to Evan Freeman here by February 1, 2019.

Limited financial aid is available for graduate students giving papers.

For more information, please visit the website.

 

“Transition and Transformation: The Early Reception of the Greek and Roman Inheritance (3th-8th c. CE)”, 12th Celtic Conference in Classics, University of Coimbra, 26-29 June 2019, Portugal.

Deadline: 28.02.2019

Panel coordinators:

Giulia Agostini (‘Sapienza’ – University of Rome)

Elisa Nuria Merisio (‘Sapienza’ – University of Rome)

Anna Salsano (‘Sapienza’ – University of Rome)

Emanuele Zimbardi (‘Sapienza’ – University of Rome and ‘Freie Universität’ Berlin)

As well known, the Greek and Roman civilization underwent a period of transition between the 3th century and the 8th century. Through a complex process of transformation and adaptation to new demands, the Greek and Roman inheritance was preserved in many different forms and could fulfil new functions in the various regions of the Empire.

Although many administrative and legal reforms had been implemented from the 3th century onwards, there was always an ideal continuity with the Roman past and its institutions. One of the main consequences of the reforms of Diocletian and Constantine was the widespread adoption of Roman government practices and status standardization of the provinces, so that even in multicultural contexts (e.g. Egypt and Asia Minor) the influence of Graeco-Roman culture became more and more evident. At the same time, the regions of the Empire developed a certain degree of autonomy, and in the provincial cities new social and ethnic players (e.g. ‘barbarians’ or Christian bishops) started to be involved in the local political life, taking up the Graeco-Roman inheritance of civic engagement.

The extent to which Greek and Latin inheritance was filtered and re-shaped in different contexts can be fully measured in the regions where local cultures emerged under the surface of the overwhelming Greek and Roman culture. This is quite apparent in the case of written languages that appeared for the first time in literary and/or epigraphic sources during Late Antiquity (e.g. Coptic in Egypt, and Syriac in the Eastern provinces). In this multifaceted phenomenon, Christian religion played a pivotal role, assuming and readapting (in a multilingual context) the oecumenical ‘spirit’ of the Graeco-Roman culture.

The aim of this panel is to compare results of different researches about Graeco-Roman inheritance in different geographical areas and in different languages, in order to achieve a multidisciplinary and innovative perspective on the way classical culture was received.

This panel welcomes papers dealing with (but not limited to):

– reaction of local culture and society to Greek and Roman influence (e.g. hybridization, foreignization, naturalization, and domestication, …)

– influence of classical παιδεία on foreign literatures (e.g. Coptic, Syriac, Arabic, Armenian, Ethiopian, and Georgian)

– translations of classical texts into other languages and adaptations (metaphrasis, paraphrasis, …) of Greek and Latin works

– Greek and Roman myths and saga filtered and/or re-invented by local folklore, literature, and art

– Christianization of classical and pagan inheritance

– reshaping Greek and Roman models and styles in local art (architecture, painting, sculpture, and minor arts)

– spread of institutions and law of the Empire in local contexts and their different developments

Each paper (25 minutes) will be followed by a 10-minute discussion. Abstracts must not exceed 300 words. The submission deadline for abstracts is 28th February 2019. Please include a short biography and specify your affiliation.

Submissions are to be here.

Notification of acceptance will be given by 31st March 2019.

 

“Church Fathers in the Margins: Patristic Traditions in Biblical Manuscripts”, ParaTexBib Project, Ludwig-Maximilian University, 24-25 June 2019, Munich.

Deadline: 10 February 2019

Within the framework of the ERC project Paratexts of the Greek Bible (ParaTexBib), led by Martin Wallraff and Patrick Andrist, a workshop will take place from Monday, June 24th through Tuesday, June 25th, 2019 at the Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich on the topic Church Fathers in the Margins: Patristic Traditions in Biblical Manuscripts.

The ParaTexBib project aims to identify, classify, and edit every kind of paratextual content accompanying the biblical text in Gospel manuscripts. Many of these paratexts bear, in quite varied forms, the heritage of patristic traditions. During this event we would like to consider the following question: how do the biblical manuscripts (Old and New Testaments) receive patristic traditions, transform them, and contribute to their transmission? We are particularly interested in the phenomenon of excerption and in the methods and intentions that underlie these processes. How is the meaning of the extracts modified by their selection, by their possible transformation, and by the proximity of other extracts? Do these phenomena, along with the choice of authors and works, allow us to define centers of interest or theological projects, possibly even controversial ones? Does the presence of such excerpts reveal particular uses and audiences – can we form hypotheses about the available sources, and hence about the production environments? We are particularly interested in biblical manuscripts in Greek prior to the fifteenth century. However, we also particularly encourage contributions relating to other linguistic areas (Latin, Eastern languages).

We welcome submissions in German, English, French, and Italian for 20-minute papers.

Applicants are invited to submit an abstract (250 words max.), along with their title and institutional affiliation. Please submit your abstract here by February 10th, 2019.

Organisers: Saskia Dirkse, Marie-Ève Geiger, Agnès Lorrain and Emmanuel Van Elverdinghe.

 

====

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

ANAMED Short-Term Fellowships for Spring 2019

Deadline: 10 February 2019

Short-Term Fellowships are available to post-doc and senior applicants for intensive collaborative research opportunities for durations between 2 weeks and 2 months. These fellowships are open to individuals or groups of 2–4 people and are intended to provide support for ongoing projects, such as finalizing a publication or conducting intensive material analysis or conservation-restoration projects. Collaborative fellowships with Koç University faculty, centers, and facilities are preferred. In such cases, applicants must demonstrate previously established connections in the project description, and collaborating Koç University faculty must supply a reference letter as part of the application. Fellowships provide accommodation at ANAMED, five meals a week, and a modest stipend.

APPLICATIONS

  • Applications must be completed at the latest by FEBRUARY 10, 2019
  • Before applying please refer to ANAMED’s Frequently Asked Questions concerning the application process.
  • Questions concerning the fellowship and application process should be directed here.
  • All applicants should complete the application form. (ONLINE FORM)
  • Owing to the functionality of the online form, the application must be completed and submitted in one session without closing the browser window. We recommend, therefore, that application information be gathered and prepared in a different document or place first and then entered into the form and submitted in one session. For a list of information required by in the application form, click here
  • Short-Term Fellowships are residential fellowships open only to non-Istanbul residents. Requests for non-residential Short-Term Fellowships will be denied.
  • Short-Term Fellowships cannot accommodate spouses/partners/companions.
  • Short-Term Fellowship terms are configured on a two-week basis and should always begin on the 1st or 15th of a month. They are limited to between one and four two-week periods and thus can run between a term of two weeks to two months.
  • Recommendation letters should be submitted directly by email here at the latest by FEBRUARY 10, 2019.
  • Recommendation letters should comment directly on the proposed fellowship project and the ability of the applicant to undertake it. For this reason, ANAMED recommends that applicants share project proposals with recommenders in advance.
  • Applicants are responsible for the completeness and accuracy of all application information. ANAMED reserves the right to withhold applications from full review owing to incompleteness and/or inaccuracy.

RE-APPLYING

  • Short-Term Fellowships cannot be converted into Regular/Joint Fellowships and vice versa.
  • Unsuccessful applicants and applicants who decline Short-Term Fellowship offers can reapply the following year but should provide an appropriately updated application, including updated recommendation letters.
  • Unsuccessful applicants who have not been awarded fellowships two years in a row should wait five years before applying again.
  • Former holders of Regular/Joint/Short-Term Fellowships can re-apply for a fellowship after five years have passed since their previous fellowship year. For example, if an applicant applied in December 2012 and held a 2013–2014 academic year fellowship, that applicant is ineligible to apply again before December 2018 for a 2019–2020 academic year fellowship.
  • Scholars who have held two ANAMED fellowships are ineligible to apply again.

 

Mary Jaharis Center Grants 2019-2020

Deadline: 1 February 2019

The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture is pleased to announce its 2019-2020 grant competition. Our grants reflect the Mary Jaharis Center’s commitment to fostering the field of Byzantine studies through the support of graduate students and early career researchers and faculty.

Mary Jaharis Center Dissertation Grants are awarded to advanced graduate students working on Ph.D. dissertations in the field of Byzantine studies broadly conceived. These grants are meant to help defray the costs of research-related expenses, e.g., travel, photography/digital images, microfilm.

Mary Jaharis Center Publication Grants support book-length publications or major articles in the field of Byzantine studies broadly conceived. Grants are aimed at early career academics. Preference will be given to postdocs and assistant professors, though applications from non-tenure track faculty and associate and full professors will be considered. We encourage the submission of first-book projects.

The application deadline for all grants is February 1, 2019. For further information, please see the website.

Contact Brandie Ratliff, Director, Mary Jaharis Center, with any questions.

 

Funded Graduate Studies (PhD and Master’s) at Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.

Deadline: 31 January 2019 (23:59, Central European Time)

Study the medieval world from Late Antiquity to the Early Modern period, Byzantium, or the Ottoman empire from various angles in a multidisciplinary department with a highly spirited and international student body. Learn Greek, Latin, Syriac or Ottoman Turkish on a stipend.

The Department currently offers four internationally recognized degree programs:

The Department provides an inspiring and dynamic research environment and a culturally diverse, friendly and close-knit social community. The faculty/student ratio is 3:1.

An MA in Medieval Studies from CEU will prepare you for the best doctoral schools in the world, where some of our alumni are currently pursuing their postgraduate careers. At the same time, our PhD graduates have gone on to assume leading positions in regional academia or win highly competitive postdoctoral fellowships in international research centres in preparation for an international career.

Follow the links for more reasons why one should study at CEU and to find out more on

studying and applying to CEU.

CEU Master’s Scholarships:

The CEU Master’s Scholarship covers up to 100% of the tuition fee, health insurance and also includes a monthly stipend to assist with living costs. Please note that Vienna stipends, offered for the period you study there, reflect the higher cost of living associated with that city. Single or shared housing in the Budapest Residence Center or in Vienna (details to be announced in Spring 2019) may also be offered to eligible candidates.

Master’s Stipend Budapest                             Master’s Stipend Vienna
HUF 50,000 (c. €160)                                           €240

Master’s Excellence Stipend Budapest        Master’s Excellence Stipend Vienna
HUF 96,000 (c. €310)                                            €470

Please note:

1) Students who permanently reside in Budapest are not eligible for CEU housing whilst based in Budapest for study purposes.

2) Students who permanently reside in Vienna are not eligible for CEU housing whilst based in Vienna for study purposes.

3) Scholarship recipients who are granted housing in the CEU Residence Center may choose to decline. In this case, however, CEU does not cover the costs of alternative accommodation.

Read more about:

 

CEU Doctoral Scholarships

CEU has an international reputation for high-quality postgraduate education delivered in a research-led environment. In pursuit of our mission, we strive to attract the very best graduates worldwide for our doctoral program. Candidates who apply by the financial aid deadline are automatically considered for the CEU Doctoral Scholarship, covering the full cost of tuition and health insurance, complete with a monthly stipend to assist with housing and living costs.

Doctoral Stipend Budapest                             Doctoral Stipend Vienna
HUF 242,000 (c. €780)                                          €1,180

Doctoral Stipend ECBS Budapest                   Doctoral Stipend ECBS Stipend Vienna
HUF 275,000 (c. €890)                                          €1,350

Housing

Doctoral students receive a monthly stipend to help with housing and living expenses. They can choose to rent private accommodation or book a room at the Budapest Residence Center or the Vienna Residence (details to be announced in Spring 2019), depending on availability.

Please note:

The CEU Doctoral Scholarship is awarded for a period of 36 months in total.

Read more about:

Posted in Byzness

OXFORD LISTINGS: HT 2019 / Week 1

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 1

Hilary Term 2019

= = = = =

 

MONDAY 14th January

 

_ _ _

 

TUESDAY 15th January

12.00   Climate and Chronology Group

Welcome back pub lunch at the Royal Oak

Get to know one another better with drink + food + informal discussion. Meet at SPR1 entrance at 12pm for 12.10 pm reservation. Email co-ordinators to reserve space.

[+]

 

14:00   Byzantine Epigraphy

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Dr Ida Toth

Byzantine Epigraphy: An Introduction

 

_ _ _

 

WEDNESDAY 16th January

12.00-13.00     Money in the Medieval West and Byzantium

Ashmolean Museum, Floor 2, Coin Study Centre, off Gallery 36 Japan after 1860

Dr Julian Baker

The Roman heritage, the inception of Byzantine coinage, Ostrogoths and Vandals, ca. 300-600

 

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar (OCBR LECTURE)

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Claudia Rapp (Vienna)

The Vienna Euchologia Project: New Sources for the Social History of Byzantium

 

[+]

17.00   The Slade Lectures 2019: Islam and Image: Beyond Aniconism and Iconoclasm

Maths Institute, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter

Finbarr Barry Flood (Director, Silsila: Center for Material Histories, New York University)

The Making of an Image Problem

 

_ _ _

THURSDAY 17th January

11.00-12.30     Byzantine Art and Archaeology Seminar

Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, First Floor Seminar Room

Dr Efthymios Rizos (Oxford)

The Trier ivory conundrum: New remarks on old theories

 

[+]

12.00   RLAHA Martin Aitken Seminar

School of Archaeology, 1 South Parks Road, Lecture Theatre

RLAHA termly meeting

 [+]

17.00   Late Roman Seminar

Corpus Christi College

Ilaria Ramelli (Durham University)

Social justice, slavery and asceticism in Late Antiquity

 

_ _ _

 

FRIDAY 18th January

10.00-11.30     Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Center, 66 St Giles

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

12.00-13.00     Byzantine Literature

Ioannou Center, 66 St Giles

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

13.00   Pitt Rivers Museum Research Seminar in Visual, Material And Museum Anthropology

Pitt Rivers Museum (entry via Robinson Close), Lecture Theatre

Chris Dorsett (University of Northumbria / Pitt Rivers Museum)

Rituals of refurbishment: an introduction

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 07/01/2019

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 6th January 2019
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

Symposium “Eclecticism at the Edges: Medieval Art and Architecture at the Crossroads of the Latin, Greek and Slavic Cultural Spheres”, 5-6 April 2019, Princeton University.

On April 5-6, 2019, the Index will co-host “Eclecticism at the Edges: Medieval Art and Architecture at the Crossroads of the Latin, Greek, and Slavic Cultural Spheres,” along with the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies, the Department of Art & Archaeology at Princeton University, the International Center of Medieval Art, and the Society of Historians of East European, Eurasian, and Russian Art and Architecture. This two-day symposium focuses on the art, history, and culture of Eastern Europe between the 14th and the 16th centuries.

In response to the global turn in art history and medieval studies, “Eclecticism at the Edges” explores the temporal and geographic parameters of the study of medieval art, seeking to challenge the ways in which we think about the artistic production of Eastern Europe from the fourteenth through the sixteenth centuries. This event will serve as a long-awaited platform to examine, discuss, and focus on the eclectic visual cultures of the Balkan Peninsula and the Carpathian Mountains, the specificities, but also the shared cultural heritage of these regions. It will raise issues of cultural contact, transmission, and appropriation of western medieval and Byzantine artistic and cultural traditions in eastern European centers, and consider how this heritage was deployed to shape notions of identity and visual rhetoric in these regions that formed a cultural landscape beyond medieval, Byzantine, and modern borders.

Keynote Lectures:

Dr. Jelena Erdeljan (University of Belgrade): Cross-Cultural Entanglement and Visual Culture in Eastern Europe c. 1300–1550

Dr. Michalis Olympios (University of Cyprus): “Eclecticism,” “Hybridity,” and “Transculturality” in Late Medieval Art: A View from the Eastern Mediterranean

Symposium Speakers:

Dr. Vlad Bedros (National University of Arts, Bucharest): A Hybrid Iconography: The Lamb of God in Moldavian Wall Paintings

Dr. Elena Boeck (DePaul University): A Timeless Ideal: Constantinople in the Slavonic Imagination of the 14th–16th Centuries

Dr. Gianvito Campobasso (University of Fribourg): Eclecticism Among Multiple Identities: The Visual Culture of Albania in the Late Middle Ages

Krisztina Ilko (Ph.D. Candidate, Metropolitan Museum of Art Fellow): The Dormition of the Virgin: Artistic Exchange and Innovation in Medieval Wall Paintings from Slovakia

Dr. Nazar Kozak (National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine): Post-Byzantine Art as a Network: Mobility Trajectories of the Akathistos Cycle in the Balkans, the Carpathians, and Beyond

Dr. Dragoş Gh. Năstăsoiu (Centre for Medieval Studies, National Research University, Moscow): Appropriation, Adaptation, and Transformation – Painters of Byzantine Tradition Working for Catholic Patrons in 14th- and 15th-century Transylvania

Dr. Ovidiu Olar (Nicolae Iorga Institute of History of the Romanian Academy, Bucharest): A Murderer Among the Seraphim: Prince Lăpuşneanu’s Transfiguration Embroideries for Slatina Monastery

Dr. Ida Sinkević (Lafayette College): Serbian Royal Mausolea: A Reflection of Cultural Identity?

Dr. Christos Stavrakos (University of Ioannina / Greece): Donors, Patrons and Benefactors in Mediaeval Epirus between the Great Empires: A Society in Change or a Continuity?

The symposium is free, but registration is required to guarantee seating. Please register here. For any queries, please contact the organizers at eclecticism.symposium@gmail.com.

 

“Textual Criticism of the New Testament “, 11th Birmingham Colloquium, 4-6 March 2019, Birmingham.

Booking is now open for the Eleventh Birmingham Colloquium on the Textual Criticism of the New Testament, to be held in Birmingham from Monday 4 to Wednesday 6 March 2019.

The colloquium will consist of thirty papers on New Testament textual criticism, focussing on matters relating to versional evidence (Latin, Syriac, Coptic, Arabic, Gothic) and other indirect sources (e.g. biblical quotations). There will be two highlight lectures, Prof. David Taylor (Oxford) on “New Developments in the Text of the Old Syriac Gospels” and Prof. Reinhart Ceulemans (Leuven) on “Biblical Lexicography in Late Antiquity and Byzantium”.

There is an early bird rate for bookings made and paid in full by 13 January 2019 and booking closes on 13 February 2019. Please see here.

Further information about the Birmingham Colloquium may be found here.

 

Les p’tits déj’ « Humanités numériques » de l’IRHT

Les p’tits dej’ «Humanités numériques» de l’IRHT sont organisés par Jérémy Delmulle et Emmanuelle Kuhry dans le cadre de leur post-doctorat en «Humanités numériques» mené à l’IRHT et financé par l’InSHS (2017-2019). Ce séminaire bimestriel entend explorer les problématiques nées de la confrontation entre sciences de l’érudition et développement des Humanités numériques, en particulier dans le contexte de l’étude et de l’édition des sources anciennes et de l’histoire des textes et des bibliothèques. Il pose la question des modalités de l’appropriation de nouvelles technologies par le chercheur lui-même et des conditions de sa reprise en main du processus de traitement des sources. Le programme du séminaire s’articule autour de la présentation de nouvelles méthodologies pour aborder l’histoire des textes, les modalités de leur diffusion et leur traitement (analyse, édition), illustrées par des exemples concrets (projets d’édition en cours, recherches sur les outils de visualisations de big data, etc.).

Les séances, qui se veulent participatives, jusqu’à prendre la forme de tables rondes ou d’ateliers, se composeront de deux présentations ou plus suivies d’une discussion générale à laquelle tous les auditeurs sont invités à participer. Elles se dérouleront vendredi matin  au Centre Félix-Grat de l’IRHT (40, avenue d’Iéna – Paris 16e), de 9h30 à 12h30 autour d’un café et de viennoiseries.

Programme:

25 janvier 2019
XML-TEI et LaTeX pour l’édition scientifique
Marjorie Burghart (Ciham-CNRS/Université Lyon 2), Maïeul Rouquette (Université de Lausanne), Michael Stenskjær Christensen (University of Copenhagen)

22 février 2019
Édition des textes difficiles : gloses, florilèges
Franck Cinato (HTL-CNRS), Frédéric Duplessis (IRHT), Silverio Franzoni (Scuola Normale Superiore/EPHE), Emmanuelle Kuhry (IRHT), Elisa Lonati (Scuola Normale Superiore/EPHE), Martin Morard (IRHT), Mariken Teeuwen (University of Utrecht)

22 mars 2019
Vers des méthodes et pratiques communes dans les projets d’humanités numériques
Jérémy Delmulle, Emmanuelle Kuhry, Cyril Masset, Henri Seng (IRHT) et le pôle «Document numérique» de la MRSH de Caen

12 avril 2019
Stemmatologie assistée
Jean-Baptiste Camps (ENC), Jean-Baptiste Guillaumin (Université Paris-Sorbonne), Caroline Macé (Universität Frankfurt), Dominique Poirel (IRHT)

juin 2019

Visualisation de données

Jérémy Delmulle, Martin Grandjean (Université de Lausanne)

Informations pratiques :

Un vendredi par mois ou tous les deux mois, de 9h30 à 12h30 e
Institut de Recherche et d’Histoire des Textes – Centre Félix-Grat – 40, av. d’Iéna (Paris, 16 ) – Salle Jeanne-Vielliard contact: Jérémy Delmulle et Emmanuelle Kuhry.

====

 

 2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

“Blood in Byzantium”, 52nd Annual Spring Symposium of the Society for the Promotion of Byzantine Studies, 30 March- 1 April 2019, Churchill College and Trinity College, Cambridge.

Communications Deadline: 27 January 2019

In 2019, the Symposium will be returning to Cambridge for the first time since 1990.  The theme which has been chosen is ‘Blood in Byzantium’. This theme will facilitate inter-disciplinary discussion of research and ideas embracing Byzantine religion, art history, military history, social history, and law, as well Byzantine medicine and philosophy, drawing upon the extensive theoretical and historical literature that has emerged on the body, blood, and medicine in Antiquity and the Middle Ages, but which has yet to be systematically applied to Byzantium and its neighbours. Sessions will be arranged around the themes of ‘The Blood of Christ’; ‘The Blood of the Martyrs’; ‘Blood, Dynasty and Kinship’; ‘Bloodshed’; and ‘Blood in Medicine, Philosophy and Art’.

The main sessions of the conference will be held at Churchill College, with a reception and dinner at Trinity College.

Confirmed speakers include Claudia Rapp, Jane Baun, Phil Booth, Ioannis Pappadogiannakis, Stavroula Constantinou, Anne Alwis, Elena Draghici-Vasilescu, Caroline Goodson, Philip Wood, Nick Evans, Ruth Macrides, Andrew Marsham, Peter Frankopan, Alexandra Vukovich, Teresa Shawcross, Theodora Antonopoulou, Mike Humphreys, Maroula Perisnadi, Yannis Stouraitis, Petros Bouras-Vallianatos, Rebecca Flemming and Barbara Zipser.

Communications

The 52nd Spring Symposium invites Communications (of 10 minutes in duration) on current research and warmly invites abstracts (of not more than 500 words) from scholars within and without the UK and in fields linked to Byzantine studies. Abstracts should be sent to Peter Sarris by 27 January 2019.

Practical Information

Symposium Website

Please keep checking the website periodically: further information will be added in due course, and continuously updated. The complete programme will be available in January 2019.

Contact

If you have any queries, please contact Peter Sarris.

Registration

A link to register for the 52nd Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies will be available on the website.

Venue

The conference sessions will take place in the designated conference centre at Churchill College which has excellent transport connections and parking for cars, and is within walking distance of the city centre.

Travel

Train tickets can be purchased online and collected at any UK train station from www.thetrainline.com. Cambridge is connected to London via fast trains that run via King’s Cross/St. Pancras and a slower train that runs via Liverpool Street. The closest airport is London Stansted (www.stanstedairport.com) but there are also good transport connections via London to Heathrow, Gatwick, and London Luton Airports. Within Cambridge, Churchill College is served via the X5 and Citi4 Bus (see www.chu.cam.ac.uk/about/visit-us/find-us). A highly reliable taxi service is provided by Panther Taxis (01223 715715). For further details of transport connections, see here.

Places to Stay

Accommodation is available on a first-come first-served basis at Churchill College. Alternatively, details of other options are available here.

Places to Eat

Cambridge is home to many excellent (and inexpensive) restaurants. A list of suggested eateries will be included in the delegate pack.

 

“The Tabula Peutingeriana: Recent Approaches and New Results”, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, 19- 20 September 2019, Vienne

organized by the DFG-Projekt „Commentary on the Tabula Peutingeriana“.

Deadline: 15 February 2019

This international and interdisciplinary conference aims to discuss innovative methodical approaches and recent results of research on the Peutinger Map and its antique, medieval and early modern traditions. Established scholars as well as junior researches from all relevant disciplines are cordially invited to contribute to this meeting, which will take place at the Österreichische Nationalbibliothek in Vienne.

Accordingly, one of our focal points will be research considering the Tabula Peutingeriana as a material object of art, especially concerning

  • the TP’s structure, concept and arrangement, e. g. centration(s), symmetries, distortions, handling of lineworks and spaces, arrangement of toponyms
  • its aesthetic design from an art-historical point of view, mainly its colouring, vignettes and other pictograms, including its relations to antique, medieval and early modern conventions of representing geographic space.

We also warmly welcome other TP-focused papers covering topics such as

  • dating of map entries
  • distinction of different historical strata and stages of copying
  • representations of certain places, regions or routes on the TP
  • relations to ancient geographical texts and itineraries
  • impact on medieval and early modern maps and texts.

We would like to invite papers of max. 30 minutes length, followed by a 15-min. discussion. There will also be the opportunity for shorter project presentations of up to 15 min.

If you are interested in participating, please submit your abstract of 300-500 words together with a short bio-sketch by Friday, 15th February 2019. Please include: Name, Institution, Title of presentation, and Email address. Expressions of interests and requests for further information will be taken herehere or here.

A partial reimbursement of expenses is granted.

If desired, the contributions will be published in the periodical Orbis Terrarum.

 

“New Research on Ancient Armenia”, 2nd Geneva Workshop for Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Researchers, 31 May – 1 June 2019, University of Geneva.

Deadline: 18 February 2019

Concept:

Given the great success of last year’s workshop, the Armenian Studies team (Unité d’arménien) at the MESLO Department, University of Geneva, is pleased to invite once again graduate students and early career researchers – those not yet holding a permanent position in Academia – to present their current research on any aspect of Ancient and Medieval Armenia to an audience of their peers

The workshop has been conceived as an international forum in which the newest generation of researchers in the field can engage in meaningful discussion on methodologies, problems and perspectives. Presentations detailing work in progress, research projects, and innovative approaches are welcome.

In the interest of drawing attention to comparatively less-known topics, preference may be given to subjects other than ‘Classical’ 5th-century language, literature, history and art. Papers dealing with topics and/or authors as late as Sayat Nova (d. 1795) will be considered for acceptance, as long as they show clear links with pre-modern issues and practices.

Abstracts and Deadlines:

Participants will have 20 minutes each to present their papers, plus 10 minutes for questions and discussion.

Applicants are invited to submit a title, short abstract (no more than 300 words) and a brief academic biography (no more than 150 words) by 18 February 2019. Please send your documents as .pdf files here.

Working Languages:

French, English, and Armenian.

Travel Grants:

Limited grants are available to assist with travel and accommodation expenses: those who cannot obtain financial support from their home institution or other sources and would otherwise be unable to attend are invited to submit a short statement in support of their request along with their abstracts. Applications for grants of up to 300 CHF each will be considered (to be paid after the workshop). The organizers reserve the right to make decisions on the matter at their sole discretion. Prospective participants are invited to explore other sources of funding as well.

Further Information:

For any clarifications, please do not hesitate to contact Dr Irene Tinti.

Scientific Committee:

Prof. Valentina Calzolari (University of Geneva)

Dr Irene Tinti (University of Geneva)

Dr Federico Alpi (Fondazione per le Scienze Religiose Giovanni XXIII, Bologna)

Ms Sara Scarpellini (University of Geneva)

 

“Based on a true story? Fictionalizing imperial and late antique biographies”, 12th Celtic Conference in Classics, 26-29 June 2019, Coimbra, Portugal.

Deadline: 31 January 2019

Organizers: Anna Lefteratou (Heidelberg) and Fotini Hadjittofi (Lisbon)

Keynote Speaker: Koen de Temmerman (Ghent)

The number of biographical narratives that are analyzed as fiction has been steadily increasing and expanding to ever wider generic and geographic areas. From Perry’s (1971) early discussions of the novels and Bowersock’s (1994) important contribution on fiction and historiography to more recent analyses of the ‘formalities of fiction’ in biography (de Temmerman, 2016) and epistolary narrative (Hodkinson et al., 2013), we have come to explore fictional elements in a variety of texts and genres, including Jewish and Christian narratives (Futre Pinheiro et al., 2012; Brant et al., 2005; MacDonald, 1994).

This panel aims to examine the characteristics that bind biographical narratives to fiction, ranging from the 1st to the 7th centuries CE and including secular, Jewish, and Christian narratives. We would firstly like to explore fiction-related allusions and their self-referential character (Hodkinson, 2016; Ni-Mheallaigh, 2008). In this context, intertextuality will be examined through the prism of fiction and metafiction, i.e. how do / which allusions help to create a fictional world and how do they comment on the process of world-creating? Secondly, the panel will attempt a diachronic overview of fictional touches to biographical narratives, mainly in Greek and Latin, although discussions of Jewish, Syriac, and Coptic material will be equally welcome. The following questions are of particular interest:

  1. How do themes and motifs structure a biographical narrative along the formal requirements of fiction? (e.g., wedding and death; wonders and miracles; travel as metaphor and a marker of world-creating). To what extent does the presence of such themes model the lives of Apostles, Saints, and philosophers (theioi andres) as fiction?
  2. Do these texts draw attention to their own status as mediated (oral) accounts or as written texts (e.g., commenting on witnesses and means of transmission; addressing the reader; emphasizing ‘as if’- expressions, or even alluding to their material form, i.e. the scroll)? Do they comment on make-belief as well as belief/ faith? How do they employ gnomae and moralizing and how do these cross the boundary between text/fiction and real life? Is didacticism diachronically present in ancient biographical narratives?
  3. How are prose biographical narratives different from poetic ones? Does Fortunatus’ Life of St. Martin turn the Saint more into a classical epic hero because of the genre in which it is written? Is the poetic rendition of St. Cyprian’s Life, written by the empress Eudocia, more fictionalized than the several prose recensions?
  4. Does intertextuality underscore fiction and metafiction? Do biographical narratives that allude to, e.g., epic, tragedy, or comedy prompt any particular scenarios that are evocative of those genres?

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent by 31.01.2019 to both Fotini Hadjittofi
and Anna Lefteratou.

Participants will need to cover their own lodging and travel expenses.
Depending on the quality and consistency of the presentations, a publication of (some of) the contributions is envisaged.

Works Cited

Bowersock, G. W. (1994), Fiction as history: Nero to Julian (Berkeley).
Brant, J.-A., Hedrick, C. W., Shea, C. (eds.) (2005), Ancient fiction: the matrix of early Christian and Jewish narrative (Society of Biblical Literature

Symposium series) (Leiden: Brill).
Futre Pinheiro, M., Perkins, J., Pervo, R. (eds.) (2012), The ancient novel and early

Christian and Jewish narrative. Fictional intersections (Ancient Narrative

Supplementum 16) (Groningen: Barkhuis).
Hodkinson, O. Rosenmeyer, P. A., and Bracke, E. (eds.) (2013), Epistolary narrative

in ancient Greek literature (Leiden: Brill).
Hodkinson, O. (2016), Metafiction in Classical Literature: The Invention of Self-

Conscious Fiction (Routledge Monographs in Classical Studies)
MacDonald, L. M. (1994), Christianizing Homer: the Odyssey, Plato, and The Acts of

Andrew (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
Ni-Mheallaigh, K. (2008), ‘Pseudo-documentarism and the limists of ancient fiction’,

American Journal of Philology, 129 (3), 403-31.
Perry, B.E. (1967), The ancient romances (Berkley: University of Berkeley Press).
de Temmerman, K. (2016), ‘Ancient biography and formalities of fiction’, in K. de

Temmerman and K. Demoen (eds.), Writing biography in Greece and Rome: narrative techniques and fictionalization (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 3-24.

 

Byzantine Greek Summer School in Istanbul (8–26 July 2019), Bogazici University.

Deadline: 15 February 2019

The Byzantine Studies Research Center is pleased to announce the organization of its third Byzantine Greek Summer School to be held at Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey, from July 8 to July 26, 2019. Students will have the chance to participate in an intensive program in Medieval Greek with Prof. Niels Gaul and Dr. Athanasia Stavrou, while enjoying various attractions of the Bogazici University campus on the Bosphorus and the Byzantine sites of Istanbul.

For more information and available scholarships please see the attachment or visit here.

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3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Visiting Position at the Center for Humanistic Inquiry at Amherst College

The Center for Humanistic Inquiry (CHI) at Amherst College seeks scholars from across the disciplines for full-time, two-year appointments as CHI Fellows and visiting lecturers.  In colloquy with one another and the Amherst faculty, CHI Fellows will explore the theme of “Home.” We invite applications from scholars whose research takes up some aspect of our theme (described in more detail below) from a humanistic perspective.  Within the last decade, Amherst College has profoundly transformed its student body in terms of socioeconomic status, ethnicity, race, and nationality.  Today, nearly one-quarter of Amherst’s students are Pell grant recipients; 45 percent of our students identify as domestic students of color; and 10 percent of our students are international students.

Fellows will have offices in the center and are expected to be fully in residence during the 2019–2021 academic years and to participate in seminars, conferences, and other programming organized to explore our theme.  A Ph.D. or equivalent terminal degree is required.  Fellows will also teach at least one course during the period of the fellowship. These fellowships include an annual salary of $50,000 and, in addition, an annual $2,500 allowance for professional travel and research support and additional support for moving expenses.

Candidates are asked to submit electronically here a cover letter that addresses the connection between the candidate’s scholarship and the center’s theme, a CV, a research statement, a writing sample, and three confidential letters of recommendation addressed to Professor Martha M. Umphrey, director, Center for Humanistic Inquiry, Amherst College.  Review of applications will begin on January 15, 2019 and continue until the positions are filled. Applications received by this date will be assured of full consideration.

The college is committed to enriching its educational experience and its culture through the diversity of its faculty, administration, and staff. Amherst College is an equal opportunity employer and encourages women, persons of color, and persons with disabilities to apply.

Home

Across time and space and culture, there has been perhaps no more resonant an idea than that of “home.”  Both material and affective, home is a space of origin and dwelling, set apart from spheres of promiscuous public interaction and of emptiness.  To have a home is to be more than housed:  it is to be given an identity, to feel belonging, to find refuge, to constitute private or domestic life, to gather people and material objects, and to generate memory.  By contrast, to be without a home is to be outside of or excluded from that centering and protective space, to feel estrangement or abandonment, to wander detached from place, or perhaps from another perspective to take on a new and cosmopolitan identity, self-willed and multivalent. 

Yet home and homelessness are also constituted from the outside – constructed through policy, imbued with ideology, and elaborated aesthetically in relation to other times and traditions.  Authorities construct and destroy homes; institutions proclaim their economic and moral value; designers imagine their utopic possibilities.  What is home’s force or energy as a thing and an idea?  How is home imagined, deployed, and conjured as an object of desire?  How is home simultaneously a mechanism of protection and of exclusion?  Who can have a home, and what are the conditions of its possibility?  How has the home evolved historically and manifested differently across cultures?  What is home’s relation to language and identity, exile and migration? 

For further information see here.

 

Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellowships

Deadline: 1 February 2019

The Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies offers post-doctoral Fellowships to be used for research at the Institute in the medieval field of the holder’s choice.  Mellon Fellows will also participate in the interdisciplinary Research Seminars.

The Mellon Fellowships are intended for young medievalists of exceptional promise who have completed their doctoral work, ordinarily within the previous five years, including those who are starting on their professional academic careers at approximately the Assistant Professor level.  Fellowships are valued at approximately $40,000 (CDN).

Applications for the academic year 2019–2020 should be e-mailed in PDF format to the Institute Secretary. Reference letters may also be e-mailed directly by the referee to the Institute Secretary. Completed applications, as well as all supporting documentation, must be received no later than 1 February 2019. The awarding institution must send official confirmation that the PhD has been examined and approved to the postal address below. All documentation must be received by the application deadline.

Application forms and further details may be obtained from the website.

 

Princeton Hellenic Studies Visiting Fellowships, 2019-20

Deadline: 6 February 2019

Over 800 scholars have been supported by Princeton Hellenic Studies since the inception of this program in academic year 1979-80.

Full information and how to apply can be found here.

Current and former fellowship recipients can be accessed here.

Publications by former Hellenic Studies visiting fellows, based on their research at Princeton can be accessed here.

 

Princeton Hellenic Studies Postdoctoral Fellowships, 2019-20

Deadline: 6 February 2019

Over one hundred (100) early-career scholars have been supported by our postdoctoral fellowships since the inception of this program in academic year 1992-93.  The overwhelming majority of our postdoctoral fellows have gone on to successful academic careers around the world.

Full information and how to apply can be found here.

Current and former recipients are listed here.

Publications by former Hellenic Studies postdoctoral fellows, based on their research at Princeton can be accessed here.

 

Postdoctoral Fellowship at Case Western Reserve University.

Deadline: 31 January 2019 (5pm GMT)

The Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities at Case Western Reserve University seeks applicants for the inaugural offering of the “The Virginia and Walter Nord Fellowship in the Humanities.”

The purpose of the BNC Post-Doctoral Fellows Program is to support research in the humanities by providing scholars in the early stages of their careers with the time and resources necessary to advance their work.  During their time at the Baker-Nord Center, Fellows will pursue individual or collaborative research and writing for the full academic year.  An essential feature of the program is that Fellows make intellectual contributions to the CWRU community, through their participation in workshops, lectures and courses.  Fellows will be affiliated with one or more of the humanities departments represented on the BNC Steering Committee: Art History and Art, Classics, English, History, Modern Languages and Literatures, Music, Philosophy, Religious Studies, and Theater.  BNC Post-Doctoral Fellows will be expected to offer an undergraduate course during the spring of their fellowship year, following consultation with their host department.

The Fellowship may be renewed for a second-year, during which candidates will be expected to offer an undergraduate course in each term.

In order to be considered for the program, applicants must submit:

  • A cover sheet with contact and biographical information.
  • An academic c.v. of no more than 10 pages including detailed information on your projects and publications, degrees and awards, teaching experience, expert skills, etc.
  • A project title and an abstract with a statement of the project’s scholarly significance (250 word maximum).
  • A project description (1,000 word maximum), stating clearly the objectives, methodology, contribution and originality of the project in a manner that is clear to a range of scholars in the humanities who may not be specialists in your field.
  • Three reference letters.

Eligibility:

  • Candidates must have the Ph.D. in hand before the start date of the fellowship from an institution other than Case Western Reserve University.
  • Candidates must have a demonstrable potential to contribute to one of the academic departments affiliated with the Baker-Nord Center.

The term of the fellowship will commence on or about August 15 2019.  Candidates should submit their applications by January 31, 2019 through CWRU’s Interfolio portal here.

In employment, as in education, Case Western Reserve University is committed to Equal Opportunity and Diversity. Women, veterans, members of underrepresented minority groups, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Case Western Reserve University provides reasonable accommodations to applicants with disabilities. Applicants requiring a reasonable accommodation for any part of the application and hiring process should contact the Office of Inclusion, Diversity and Equal Opportunity at 216-368-8877 to request a reasonable accommodation.

Determinations as to granting reasonable accommodations for any applicant will be made on a case-by-case basis.

 

The University of St Andrews Global Fellowship Scheme.

The Global Fellowship Scheme provides prestigious awards to enable talented scholars from around the globe to spend anywhere between one week to a month at St Andrews. During this time, you will be able to undertake a course of research and study, explore potential collaborations, enhance existing relationships, advance research work, and find the space to think in an inspirational environment.

This scheme builds on one of the University’s most ancient traditions, that of attracting the best minds from every corner of the globe to this historic and dynamic intellectual corner of Europe.

For more information see here.

 

Research Assistant/Associate x 3 (Fixed Term), Cambridge Greek Manuscripts. 

Deadline: 3 January 2019

The Polonsky Foundation Greek Manuscripts Project: a Collaboration between the Universities of Cambridge and Heidelberg is a two-year project which aims to conserve, catalogue and digitise the medieval and early modern Greek manuscripts across Cambridge collections, including the University Library, the Fitzwilliam Museum and the colleges, alongside the Greek manuscripts of the Bibliotheca Palatina.

Three posts are available for Research Associates with responsibility for researching, cataloguing and describing the Greek manuscripts in Cambridge. They will produce catalogue descriptions in TEI format following in-house guidelines and prepare them for publication via Cambridge Digital Library. They will also be responsible for disseminating project research via conference presentations, seminars and written publications and for planning and delivering a programme of public outreach activities.

Applicants should hold a post-graduate qualification in a relevant field, preferably a doctorate, and have a proven ability to read and catalogue manuscripts in ancient and medieval Greek; knowledge of Greek palaeography and codicology would be an advantage. Demonstrable research skills in Classics, History, Literature or Library Studies are essential. They must possess excellent written and verbal communication skills, IT skills, and have the ability to work both on their own and as part of a team. Experience in using XML/TEI to create catalogue records would be an advantage.

*Appointment as research associate is dependent on having a PhD (or equivalent experience is recognised), including those who have submitted but not yet received their PhD. Where a PhD has yet to be awarded or submitted appointment will initially be made at research assistant and amended to research associate when the PhD is awarded. If an individual has not submitted a PhD or is not working towards one, they could be appointed as a Research Assistant if they have either a degree (and/or Master’s) in a relevant area or equivalent experience.

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 2 years in the first instance.

To apply for this vacancy, please click on the Cambridge University Job Opportunities link. This will direct you to the University’s web-based recruitment system, where you will be able to log in to create an online application form.

Informal enquiries are welcomed by Dr Suzanne Paul, Keeper of Rare Books and Early Manuscripts, 01223 333149, e-mail: sp510@cam.ac.uk

Closing date for applications is Thursday 3rd January 2019.

Interviews are expected to be held the week commencing 21st January 2019.

This post is available with immediate effect for two years from the date of appointment.

Please quote reference VE17439 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity. The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

 

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 16/12/2018

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 16th December 2018
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

“Mary, a Multivalent Figure and the Mother of All”: Juggling the Middle Ages and Byzantine Studies Public Lecture by Professor Ioli Kalavrezou (Harvard University), Thursday, January 24, 2019 | 6:00 PM, Dumbarton Oaks Music Room.

The Virgin Mary has become the most venerated figure in the Christian world and beyond, and Marian studies have flourished in Western medieval and Byzantine art history. By discussing a selection of individual established compositions that were created over centuries, this talk will present the different dimensions and themes that define Mary and her role as the MΗΤΗΡ ΘΕΟΥ, the Mother of God, in the art and theology of Byzantium. She not only is the powerful mediator but also becomes an active participant in the various aspects of Christian life. The talk will draw attention to the many and diverse qualities of her character and focus on those aspects that gave her the position she held for many centuries in Orthodox Christianity and still holds today. She had become a multivalent and complex figure in the religious and devotional life of her people.

A prominent Byzantine art historian, Ioli Kalavrezou has focused her scholarship on a variety of research topics including the political and ideological history of the Empire, the place and role of women in Byzantine society, and the cult of the Virgin Mary. Professor Kalavrezou holds the positions of Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Byzantine Art History at Harvard University and of Senior Fellow at Dumbarton Oaks since 1989. She has also served as Chair of the History of Art and Architecture Department at Harvard University.

The lecture will be preceded by a gallery viewing from 5:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Juggling the Middle Ages

Featuring more than 100 objects, Juggling the Middle Ages explores the influence of the medieval world by focusing on a single story with a long-lasting impact—Le Jongleur de Notre Dame or Our Lady’s Tumbler. The exhibit follows the tale from its rediscovery by scholars in the 1870s to its modern interpretations in children’s books, offering viewers a look at a vast range of objects, including stained glass windows, illuminated manuscripts, household objects, and vintage theater posters.

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2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

Medieval Greek Summer Session at the Gennadius Library, summer 2019.

Deadline: 15 January 2019

The Gennadius Library of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens announces the summer session focused on the teaching of Medieval Greek, from June 30 to July 31, 2019.

Founded in 1881, the American School is the most significant resource in Greece for American scholars in the fields of ancient and post-classical studies. One of the two major research libraries of the School, the Gennadius Library, which houses over 146,000 volumes and archives, is devoted to post-classical Hellenic civilization.

The Library invites applications for a month-long Summer Session for Medieval Greek at the Intermediate to Advanced Level. The objective is to familiarize students who have a sound foundation in Classical Greek with Medieval Greek language and philology by exposing them to primary sources, different kinds of literary genres, paleography and epigraphy, drawing on the resources of the Gennadius Library. The two Professors leading the session are Professor Alexander Alexakis, University of Ioannina and Professor Stratis Papaioannou, Brown University/University of Crete.

Format
The month-long full-time program will include daily translation of Byzantine texts; introduction to Greek paleography and Byzantine book culture; use of the collections of the Gennadius Library; visits to area museums and libraries including the Byzantine, Benaki, and Epigraphical Museums; and visits outside Athens including Corinth, Mistra, Thessaloniki, and Hosios Loukas. Individual tutorials and assignments for each student will be determined by specific needs and field of study. The language of instruction is English. Participants should plan to arrive on June 30 and depart on July 31.

Eligibility
The program is offered at the intermediate to advanced level for up to twelve students enrolled in graduate programs in any field of late antique, post-antique, Byzantine or medieval studies at any university worldwide; preference may be given to students who have limited access to instruction in Byzantine Greek at their home institutions. A minimum of two years of college-level or post-doctoral Classical Greek (or the equivalent) is required. If there are available slots, faculty or postdoctoral scholars affiliated with any university worldwide may also be considered. A diagnostic test (available electronically) may be administered to finalists before the final selection of students is made.

Academic Credit
The American School is not a degree-granting institution. No grades are given for its programs, nor are transcripts provided. Upon request, an optional final exam at the end of the program may be provided and the directors will write a letter to the participant’s home institution, recommending that credit be granted, provided that the student has satisfactorily participated in the program and passed the final exam.

Costs and Scholarships
Twelve Leventis Foundation scholarships
 cover the costs of tuition, School fees, housing, required travel within Greece, and museum and site fees. International airfare to and from Greece, meals, and incidental expenses are the participant’s responsibility.

Applications
Submit online application, curriculum vitae, two letters of recommendation (one from the academic advisor and one from a Greek language teacher). Direct link to application: https://ascsa.submittable.com/submit/116263/ascsa-gennadius-library-summer-session-application

Applicants are required to submit scans of academic transcripts as part of the online application. Application fee is US$25.

Web site: www.ascsa.edu.gr or https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/programs/gennadius-library-medieval-greek-summer-session
E-mail: application@ascsa.org

The selection results will be announced March 15.

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens does not discriminate on the basis of race, age, sex, sexual orientation, color, religion, ethnic origin, or disability when considering admission to any form of membership or application for employment.

 

“Iconotropy: Symbolic and Material Changes to Cult Images in the Classical and Medieval Ages”, 4 – 5 April 2019, School of Philosophy and Letters of the Autonomous University of Madrid and the National Museum of Archaeology.

Deadline: 15 January 2019

Iconotropy is a Greek word which literally means “image turning.” William J. Hamblin (2007) defines the term as “the accidental or deliberate misinterpretation by one culture of the images or myths of another one, especially so as to bring them into accord with those of the first culture.” In fact, iconotropy is commonly the result of the way cultures have dealt with images from foreign or earlier cultures. Numerous accounts from classical antiquity and the Middle Ages detail how cult images were involved in such processes of misinterpretation, both symbolically and materially. Pagan cultures for example deliberately misrepresented ancient ritual icons and incorporated new meanings to the mythical substratum, thus modifying the myth’s original meanings and bringing about a profound change to existing religious paradigms. Iconotropy is a fundamental concept in religious history, particularly of contexts in which religious changes, often turbulent, took place. At the same time, the iconotropic process of appropriating cult images brought with it changes in the materiality of those images.

The earliest approach to the concept was in Robert Graves’s The Greek Myths (1955), where Graves justified his own ideas about the origins of many Greek myths, claiming that classical Greek culture had essentially misinterpreted images from the Bronze Age. In some cases, Graves conjectured a process of iconotropy by which a hypothetical cult image of the matriarchal period had been misinterpreted by Greek culture. More broadly, since the 1970s, cultural anthropologist Leopold Kretzenbacher published a large number of meticulous studies on European religious iconography. In these critical studies, Kretzenbacher focused on reinterpretations of both religious and secular images whose original meaning was lost, forgotten or even ignored on purpose. In Kretzenbacher’s view, iconotropy refers to the conversion of religious iconography from one mode of spiritual organization to another. Apart from Graves’s and Hamblin, scholars have paid only attention to a concept that is fundamental for the articulation of an integrative discourse on the visual culture and anthropology of the ancient and medieval cult image.

The conference hopes to generate new research questions and creative synergies by initiating conversation and the exchange of ideas among scholars in the arts and humanities. We invite researchers from ancient and medieval periods to propose contributions engaging questions on themes such as:

  • Changes in the symbolism and materiality of the religious image
  • Iconotropy and rituality
  • Reinterpretation of non-Western cult images
  • Mythology and cult image in Antiquity
  • Symbolic and material appropriation of pagan images in the Middle Ages

general information

The workshop will take place in April 4 and 5 of 2019 at the School of Philosophy and Letters of the Autonomous University of Madrid and the National Museum of Archaeology.

Keynote speakers:

Prof. Michele Bacci (Universität Freiburg); Prof. Cecilie Brøns (Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhague); Prof. Adolfo Domínguez Monedero (UAM); Prof. Alejandro García Avilés (Universidad de Murcia). Participants accepted will present papers up to a maximum length of twenty minutes.

deadlines

  • January 15, 2019: submission of paper proposals (including title, abstract of 300 words maximum and brief CV)
  • February 15, 2019: announcement of accepted proposals
  • July 31, 2019: submission of articles for publication

address for submissions and contact

Paper   proposals, questions and articles should be sent to: icam.uam@gmail.com.

Organizers: Jorge Tomás García (UAM), Sandra Sáenz-López Pérez (UAM)

Secretary: David Vendrell Cabanillas (UAM)

Narration in Byzantium Synchronic and Diachronic Narratological Perspectives”, 3rd Byzantine Colloquium of the University of Buenos Aires, 29–30 August 2019. 

Deadline: 31 May 2019

The last years have witnessed a surge of narratological studies focusing on the vast Byzantine literary and artistic production, a recent example being the volume Storytelling in Byzantium. Narratological Approaches to Byzantine Texts and Images (ed. Ch. Messis – M. Mullett – I. Nilsson, 2018). Today, Byzantinists apply sophisticated narratological techniques not only to narrative texts, but also to images and, in line with M. Fludernik’s theory, to non-narrative texts. A common language and a shared theoretical framework would be instrumental in making Byzantine narratological studies more unitary, in fostering the transdisciplinary dialogue with other fields of research, such as Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and in popularizing it among wider audiences.

In that context, the present colloquium wishes to provide Byzantinists and specialists in other disciplines with a forum of discussion and reflection on the narratological tools applied to their respective corpora, in order to conceptualize the specificity (or absence thereof) of Byzantine narration, from a synchronic and diachronic point of view, and to compare it, utilizing well-stablished and shared analytical categories, with other literary and artistic productions, contemporary or not.

We invite 20-minute papers on any topic pertinent to narrative in Byzantium in the widest sense. Please send your abstract no later than May 31, 2019 to Tomas Fernandez or Pablo A. Cavallero and Reinhart Ceulemans. Abstracts should count 1000 characters or less (blank spaces included, but not counting bibliographical references), and should clearly state the hypothesis, goals and (expected) conclusions of the presentation. Full papers must be sent no later than July 19, 2019 (8 pp. Palatino Linotype 11; line spacing 1½; margins 2 cm.). Attendance of the conference will amount to 30 US$ ($500 for Argentinian residents; $400 for members of SAEMED, AADEC or CAEBIZ). For students, doctoral students and research assistants, attendance is free.

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3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Lectureships in Greek Archaeology and Late Antique Archaeology, Edinburgh.

Deadline: 7 January 2019 (5pm GMT)

The School of History, Classics, and Archaeology at the University of Edinburgh is pleased to invite applications for two lectureships, one in Greek Archaeology and one in Late Antique Archaeology, created as an investment in the flourishing area of Classical Art and Archaeology within the department of Classics. The closing date for both posts is 7 January 2019 (5pm GMT), and both posts are available from 1 September 2019.

1) We seek to appoint a specialist in Ancient Greek Archaeology, broadly understood in terms of period and approach. The successful candidate will have a track record of internationally excellent publications, proportionate to career stage, and will continue to publish and research at the highest level in this and related disciplines. They will be expected to make a significant contribution to the teaching of Greek art and archaeology and related disciplines at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, as well as to doctoral supervision, and will be expected to collaborate with other Classical Archaeologists and Hellenists. For further details see here.

2) For the Late Antique Archaeology post, we seek a specialist in approximately the fourth to eight centuries with a geographical focus on the later Roman empire, early Byzantium, and the post-Roman Western Mediterranean. The successful candidate will have a track record of internationally excellent publications, proportionate to career stage, and will continue to publish and research at the highest level in this and related disciplines. They will be expected to make a significant contribution to the teaching of late antique archaeology at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, as well as to doctoral supervision, and will be expected to collaborate with other Roman archaeologists and other late antique and Byzantine specialists. For further details see here.

 

Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in Byzantine Studies, Bogazici University, Istanbul, offered by the Byzantine Studies Research Center (2019-2020).

Deadline: 31 January 2019

 The Byzantine Studies Research Center at Bogazici University invites applications for a postdoctoral research position in the fields of Byzantine history, art history, and archaeology. Conceived in the framework of expanding the scholarly activities of the Byzantine Studies Research Center, the nine-month position is expected to start in September 2019. The successful candidate will be required to contribute to the development of the Byzantine Studies Research Center, as well as taking part in the Center’s activities.

The position is funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation on the basis of a monthly total of $2,000 net for nine months.

Candidates with a Ph.D. degree in a relevant field and excellent command of English should submit their application to the Byzantine Studies Research Center before 31 January 2019. The application file should include a cover letter, a detailed research project proposal, a CV and list of publications, a sample of written work, and two letters of recommendation. The project proposal must comprise the following: title, summary (up to 100 words), complete proposal (up to 1,000 words), work plan, and select bibliography.

Applications should be sent both in electronic format by e-mail and as a hardcopy to:

E-mail: byzantinestudies@boun.edu.tr

Address: Byzantine Studies Fellowships Committee, Department of History, Bogazici University, Bebek 34342, Istanbul, Turkey

 

Andrew W. Mellon short-term postdoctoral research grant in Byzantine Studies for scholars holding academic positions in Turkey offered by The Bogazici University Byzantine Studies Research Center (2019).

Deadline: 31 January 2019

The Byzantine Studies Research Center at Bogazici University is pleased to announce one short-term postdoctoral research grant in the field of Byzantine studies for Turkish citizens and foreign scholars holding academic positions in Turkey. The aim of the grant is to sponsor the expenses of the successful candidate for travel within or outside Turkey for research in 2019. Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the grant offers up to $2,500 for the abovementioned expenses to be spent in 2019.

Candidates with a Ph.D. degree in Byzantine studies should submit their application to the Byzantine Studies Research Center at Bogazici University before 31 January 2019. The application file should be in English and include a research project proposal with a time line (up to 1,000 words), an expected budget for expenses, a CV and list of publications, a sample of written work, and two letters of recommendation.

Applications should be sent both in electronic format by e-mail and as a hardcopy to:

E-mail: byzantinestudies@boun.edu.tr

Address: Byzantine Studies Fellowships Committee, Department of History, Bogazici University, Bebek 34342, Istanbul, Turkey

 

Past & Present Fellowships 2019-20.

Deadline: 11 January 2019

The Past & Present Society and the Institute of Historical Research will offer up to four two-year postdoctoral Fellowships in History for 2019–21, tenable at the Institute. Preference will be given to applicants who demonstrate a broad interest in processes of social, economic, political and cultural change, as manifested in their particular field of study. The Society wishes to promote work of a kind that might be published in the journal Past & Present and its book series, which is published by the Oxford University Press.

The Fellowships will be awarded to postdoctoral applicants who have recently completed a doctoral degree in history, or who will have submitted their thesis for examination by 1 October in the academic year in which the Fellowship is to be held. It is a strict condition of the Fellowship that the thesis should have been submitted by that date. Applicants may be of any nationality, and their PhD (or equivalent) may have been awarded in any country. Those who have previously held another stipendiary postdoctoral research fellowship of 12 or more months, with a salary or stipend attached to it, or a full-time lectureship, will not be eligible. The Fellowship cannot be held in conjunction with any other substantial maintenance grant, nor can it be used to fund a sabbatical year for the holder of a permanent academic position.

A condition of the award is that Fellows should undertake further historical research and writing. The Fellowships are envisaged as an opportunity for Fellows to develop their doctoral research for publication and to begin work on a postdoctoral project; applicants should clearly indicate their plans in both respects. Fellows will be encouraged to submit their articles or books to the editors of Past & Present for consideration. Fellows will also be asked to curate a ‘virtual issue’ of the journal. Fellows will not be required to be resident in London, but should participate in the activities of the Institute, by regular attendance at and presentation of papers to appropriate seminars and by giving information and help to fellow scholars working in the same field. Fellows are expected to develop their own ideas for collaborative activities while at the Institute and some limited funds will be available to help support these activities.

At the discretion of the Director of the Institute, Fellows may engage in teaching or other paid work for up to six hours a week (note however that some categories of non-national may need to obtain a work permit in order to undertake this).

For more information see https://www.history.ac.uk/fellowships/past-present-fellowships

 

Assistant Professorship in Byzantine Studies, Central European University.

Deadline: 31 January 2019

The Department of Medieval Studies at Central European University (CEU) invites applications for the position of Assistant Professor of Byzantine Studies. The successful candidate will be an outstanding researcher and teacher in the field of Byzantine Studies, with the ability to teach subjects and supervise theses at the MA and PhD levels in a broad chronological range from ca. 500 to 1500, or even beyond.

Starting date: August 1, 2019

The Department of Medieval Studies has a distinguished record in both teaching and research. It provides comparative and multi-disciplinary postgraduate education on all aspects of the history and culture of the period from c.300 to c.1600.

The Department currently offers four degree programs:

  • MA in Late Antique, Medieval and Early Modern Studies (one year)
  • MA in Comparative History: Interdisciplinary Late Antique, Medieval and Renaissance Studies (two years)
  • PhD in Late Antique, Medieval and Renaissance Studies (three to six years).
  • MA in Cultural Heritage Studies: Academic Research, Policy, Management (two years) – interdepartmental and interdisciplinary program of CEU

For more information, please visit https://medievalstudies.ceu.edu/

Duties and responsibilities:

The successful candidate will be responsible for maintaining and further developing the profile of Byzantine Studies at the Department of Medieval Studies and is expected to be an active member of the Center for Eastern Mediterranean Studies (CEMS). S/he will work in close collaboration with other members of the Department teaching subjects in the Western Middle Ages, early and eastern Christianity, the history of philosophy and theology and art history. Possible research foci of the applicants may include (but not be restricted to) Byzantine history; literature and literacy; material culture and daily life in Byzantium; philosophy and theology; manuscript studies and philology; contacts of the Byzantine Empire to its peripheries and neighboring territories; archaeology, art and architecture of the Byzantine Empire.

Qualifications:

The successful candidate must have a PhD in a field relevant for Byzantine Studies, and must have demonstrated outstanding research in the field.

Teaching experience, particularly at graduate level, is considered an asset.

Compensation

We offer a competitive salary that is commensurate with experience as well as an international academic environment. The initial contract is for four years with the possibility of renewal.

How to apply:

Applicants need to submit by 31 January 2019:

  • CV
  • list of publications
  • letter of application including a statement about the applicant’s research and teaching plans
  • the names and addresses of three referees

Questions of an academic nature may be addressed to Dr. Katalin Szende, Head of the Department of Medieval Studies (szendek@ceu.edu)

Please send your complete application package to: advert101@ceu.edu – including job code in subject line: 2018/101

The privacy of your personal information is very important to us. We collect, use, and store your personal information in accordance with the requirements of the General Data Protection Regulation. To learn more about how we manage your personal data during the recruitment process, please see our Privacy Notice here.

CEU is an equal opportunity employer.

About CEU

Central European University (CEU) is a graduate research-intensive university specializing in the social sciences, humanities, law, public policy and management. It is accredited in the United States and Hungary.

The language of instruction: English.

For more information, please visit www.ceu.edu

AKMED Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship.

Deadline: 31 December 2018

The Koç University Research Center for Mediterranean Civilizations (AKMED) will sponsor a post-doctoral researcher in the field of numismatics. The appointee’s primary duty will be to catalogue the coins held in the collection of the Suna & İnan Kıraç Kaleiçi Museum, as well as preparing a catalogue for future publication. The appointee will also be expected to participate in academic activities organized by AKMED and to assist the curator of a temporary exhibition on numismatics planned for the autumn of 2019. The post is full time and will begin on February 1, 2019 and continue for 6 months thereafter. The appointee will reside in Antalya and receive a monthly stipend, as well as a meal card; if the appointee is from outside Antalya, he or she will also receive monthly accommodation assistance, and transportation support to/from Antalya. Candidates who have completed a doctorate in numismatics should have received their degree no earlier than 5 years prior to the date of appointment, and candidates should be no older than 45 years of age. At the time of application, candidates should not be employed at any institution. Candidates who satisfy the above conditions must apply directly to AKMED by December 31, 2018.

The application documents are as follows:
– A letter of application, including contact information
– Curriculum vitae, including lists of publications and projects in which the candidate has
taken part
– A research plan (maximum 1,000 words) detailing the candidate’s views, methods, and
planning in regards to the research and work expected
– Two letters of reference
– Application documents must be sent electronically to oyanardag@ku.edu.tr by December
31, 2018. Applications sent later than this date will not be taken into consideration.

GABAM-AKMED Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship in Byzantine Art and Archaeology.

Deadline: 31 December 2018

Koç University Stavros Niarchos Foundation Center for Late Antique and Byzantine Studies (GABAM) and Koç University Research Center for Mediterranean Civilizations (AKMED) will sponsor a post-doctoral researcher in the fields of Byzantine art and archaeology. The post is full time, and will begin on February 1, 2019 and continue for 6 months thereafter. The appointee will be expected to present a research project in the areas of Byzantine art and archaeology, as well as to participate in academic activities organized by AKMED. The appointee will reside in Antalya and receive a monthly stipend, as well as a meal card; if the appointee is from outside Antalya, he or she will also receive monthly accommodation assistance, and transportation support to/from Antalya. Candidates who have completed a doctorate in Byzantine art or archaeology should have received their degree no earlier than 5 years prior to the date of appointment, and candidates should be no older than 45 years of age. At the time of application, candidates should not be employed at any institution. Candidates who satisfy the above conditions must apply directly to AKMED by December 31, 2018.

The application documents are as follows:
– A letter of application, including contact information
– Curriculum vitae, including lists of publications and projects in which the candidate has
taken part
– A research statement (maximum 1,000 words) detailing the candidate’s views, methods,
and planning in regards to the research and work expected
– Two letters of reference
– Application documents must be sent electronically to oyanardag@ku.edu.tr by December
31, 2018. Applications sent later than this date will not be taken into consideration.

Three postdoctoral fellowships at the University of Lisbon.

The Centre of Classical Studies is delighted to announce the opening of three postdoctoral fellowships in Classical Studies in the following three-year projects:

  1. Late Achilles in the Classroom and Court/ Aquiles na escola e na corte na antiguidade tardia (for a specialist in mythology / education / rhetoric in late antiquity)

PI: Fotini Hadjittofi.

  1. Gynecia: Rodericus a Castro Lusitanus and the ancient medical tradition about gynaecology and embryology/ Gynecia: Rodrigo de Castro Lusitano e a tradição médica antiga sobre ginecologia e embriologia (for a specialist in Neo-Latin / ancient medicine)

PI: Cristina Pinheiro.

  1. Res Sinicae. A database of Latin and Portuguese sources on China (16th-18th centuries). Survey, Edition, Translation and Studies/ Res Sinicae. Base digital de fontes documentais em latim e em português sobre a China (Séculos XVI a XVIII). Levantamento, edição, tradução e estudos (for a specialist in textual criticism / Neo-Latin)

PI: Arnaldo do Espírito Santo

The Centre of Classical Studies offers a very welcoming environment and currently hosts researchers of five nationalities. We strongly encourage prospective candidates to contact us for detailed information on each position (centro.classicos@letras.ulisboa.pt).

 

Two Assistant Editor Positions, Porphyra international academic journal in Byzantine Studies.

Deadline: 31 December 2018

The AE will help the editorial staff in editing and checking English articles. The AE will also interact with the Porphyra website and its sister FB page in order to fulfil our mission. Successful applicants will also be involved in the review section, especially (but not exclusively) if some of them are written in English. Successful candidates will also be involved in the international academic relationships (in collaboration with the Chief Editor) with other cultural institutions that work with Porphyra. Applicants must hold at least an MA in Byzantine Studies or similar, though preference will be given to PhD (or equivalent) students. Successful candidates will work together with the staff or one year with an opportunity to continue his/her experience for another two.

Essential:

  • Ability to communicate and coordinate him/herself with an international staff
  • Excellent organisational skills
  • Dedicate extra time after the first of the years’ CFP has ended in order to organise the future issue on time (mainly end of May, end of November)

Desirable: Speak another language, preferably Italian

SALARY

All positions are considered as voluntary. We provide a great opportunity to work with an international staff. We offer a unique opportunity for someone to gain excellent experience with an international accredited academic journal, dedicated to Byzantine Studies.

APPLICATION

Please send us an email to editorporphyra@gmail.com

  • Letter of statement (intent)
  • UpdatedCV
Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 10/12/2018

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 10th December 2018
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

“Byzantine Centres of Magnificence”, Oxford University Byzantine Studies Summer Course for Adults, 13-20 July 2019, Rewley House, Oxford.

Deadline for enrolment: 1 May 2019

Apart from Constantinople, the political and cultural capital of the Byzantine empire for over a thousand years, there were other wealthy cities and towns as well as monastic communities in the empire which produced exquisite cultural and artistic products. Using contemporary texts and visual aids, the course will trace the development of Constantinople and certain other Byzantine centres and examine the cultural, artistic and everyday life in those centres from the fourth to the fifteenth century.

The course will be taught by Dr Aphrodite Papayianni, who teaches at the University of London and OUDCE. She has a particular interest in the Byzantine-Western relations and has published articles in various topics of Byzantine History.

Full information regarding the course can be found here.

 

Différents métaux, différents besoins?: Le monnayage dans l’Europe occidentale et méditerranéenne (Ve–VIIIe s.)”, 12-15 December 2018, Institut d’études avancées de Paris.

Colloque organisé par Ruth Pliego (Université de Séville / IEA de Paris 2017-2018) et Marc Bompaire (EPHE | PSL), avec le soutien de l’IEA de Paris et du laboratoire SAPRAT (EPHE)
Présentation

The Germanic kingdoms, as successors of the Roman Empire, were attached to many aspects of the Roman tradition and tried to perpetuate them, and one of the most important was the production of gold and silver coinage as an expression of power and prestige. Numismatic researchers have had at their disposal an important repertoire of precious metal coins from different kingdoms coming from finds and old collections due to the interest and value of these pieces. Nevertheless, besides the high-quality issues in precious metals, the numismatic repertoire of this period also includes small and humble pieces with crude technique and general poor state of preservation which may explain their near-total absence from ancient excavation inventories. Notwithstanding the aforementioned, currently we count with many ensembles of these bronze coins –generally known as minimi–, even the material is in itself problematic, essentially due to the large amount of cleaning and restoring involved, so this material is sent to the ‘back of the queue’ in the priorities of the Museums, which explains why so many of the specimens are reported to feature ineligible legends, this has hampered their analysis and publication.

The different monetary metals do not imply different methods of manufacture but probably a different way of approaching the production of coinage and certainly a different care. However, minting different metals may involve different issuing authorities, and generally and almost certainly involves different social uses and different dispersion of coins. Broadly speaking, we would have different environments of coin circulation that rarely match exactly: the coinage in precious metals, principally in gold, minted for every kingdom and is used principally (but not only) in a ‘regional’ economy of gifts, being, thus, limited in explaining the market economy, and on the other hand, the minimi, minted by diverse authorities unlike the gold and silver coins, circulated all mixed together during the sixth and seventh century, and likely extended beyond that period. The wide circulation of these minimi through the Mediterranean indicates that they played an essential role in the economic life of the period.

This Study Day is focused to show the coin repertoire of the Early Middle Ages in several metals and in the different areas of Europe, and trying to establish a nexus between them up to the first decades of the eight century which leads to important changes, that will be notably accentuated with the sudden Umayyad conquest of the Iberian Peninsula and the rise of the Carolingian Empire.

Further details here.

Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-LettresSéance publique Vendredi 14 décembre 15h30

Entrée : 23, quai de Conti, Paris 6e.

Communication de Mme Cécile Morrisson, membre de l’Académie, et M. Vivien Prigent, chargé de recherche au CNRS : « Les bulles de plomb, source pour l’histoire de l’administration de la province byzantine d’Afrique ».

Résumé : Le musée national de Carthage possède plus d’un millier de sceaux de plomb byzantins la plupart frappés sur place, soit la plus grande collection au monde de ces séries qui constituent une source relativement méconnue de l’histoire de l’Afrique byzantine. Après un rappel historiographique, on donnera quelques exemples des thèmes iconographiques avant d’insister sur d’autres spécificités du bullaire africain telle l’épigraphie mixte gréco-latine, revêtant une multiplicité de formes concomitantes et qui ne peut aider à la datation. Quelques exemples montreront le témoignage des sceaux sur la survivance des institutions urbaines (chartulaires du sitônikon), sur le rôle croissant au VIIe siècle des membres du cubiculum impérial à la tête de l’armée byzantine en Afrique et l’évolution de la structure de ce commandement entre magister militum Africae et magister militum de Numidie ou de Byzacène introduits avec des corps permanents dans les provinces sous Maurice. L’un de ces magistri militum de Numidie, Théoctiste, attesté par Jean de Biclar en 570, fut aussi baiulus (tuteur d’un prince de la famille impériale) et amènera à s’interroger sur les monnaies du jeune Théodose frappées seulement à Carthage, anomalie restée une énigme pour les numismates. Cet aperçu non exhaustif conclura sur l’absence surprenante de toute bulle d’exarque, amenant à s’interroger sur la réalité de la fonction.

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 2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

Fourth Biennial Conference on Iranian Studies, University of Cambridge, 9-10 April 2019, St John’s College, Cambridge.

Deadline: 13 January 2019

We welcome proposals that engage with any aspect of Iranian studies within the arts, humanities and social sciences. These include but are not limited to prehistory through to the ancient and post-antique, modern, and contemporary histories; historiography; art and architecture history; anthropology; archaeology; cultural heritage; film and cinema; music and musicology; new media and communication studies; the performing arts; poetry and literature; languages and linguistics; Diaspora and migration studies; diplomatic studies, international relations and political science; social and political theory; law and legal studies; economics, philately and numismatics; sociology; philosophy; religions and theology.

Comparative themes and interdisciplinary approaches are also very welcome.

SUBMISSIONS

Proposals are open to early career scholars at postgraduate and post-doctoral levels from any disciplinary background within the arts, humanities and social sciences:

  1. Postgraduate students (MA, MPhil, MSt, etc. who are currently enrolled or who graduate/d in 2019 or 2018);
  2. PhD students and PhD candidates at any stage of their degree; and
  3. post-docs who graduated within the last three years (2018, 2017, 2016, 2015).

Persons falling into any of these categories are eligible to submit a proposal for an individual paper or pre-arranged panel. Submission is conducted electronically through the website. For any questions, please email us at office@symposia-iranica.com.

The language of the conference is English. All submissions undergo double-blind peer review.

ABOUT US

Symposia Iranica is Iranian studies’ leading forum for early career scholars. A dedicated, multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed platform open to emerging scholars working on any aspect of Iranian or Persian Studies within the arts, humanities, and social sciences, our three previous conferences were hosted by the University of St Andrews at St Mary’s College in 2013 and the University of Cambridge at Downing College in 2015 and Pembroke College in 2017.

The full call for papers is on our website: symposia-iranica.com

Updates will be posted to our Facebook page: facebook.com/SymposiaIranica

A virtual preview of our programme is at: symposia-iranica.com/preview

Highlights from all three conferences to-date: symposia-iranica.com/past

PARTNERS

We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Shahnama Centre for Persian Studies and the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Cambridge; St John’s College, Cambridge; Trinity College, Cambridge; British Institute of Persian Studies; Iran Heritage Foundation; Soudavar Memorial Foundation; Ancient India and Iran Trust; Institute of Iranian Studies, University of St Andrews; Pembroke College, Cambridge; Brill Publishers; I.B. Tauris Publishers; Edinburgh University Press; and the German Oriental Studies Trust.

 

The Maritime Archaeology Graduate Symposium (MAGS 2019), University of Southampton, Centre for Maritime Archaeology / University of Oxford, Oxford Centre for Maritime Archaeology (OCMA), 29-31 March 2019, University of Southampton, Avenue Campus

Deadline: 30 December 2018

As the field of maritime archaeology continues to mature into a multifaceted sub-discipline, advances and developments are occurring at a rapid pace. The Maritime Archaeology Graduate Symposium (MAGS) will allow the next generation of scholars in the field to gather in Southampton to share their research, engage with like-minded individuals, and foster interdisciplinary cooperation. From masters’ students to post-doctoral academics, we encourage all early career researchers of maritime archaeology and related sub-disciplines to attend, either as audience members or presenters of papers.

This three-day symposium will feature talks on maritime archaeology of the eastern Mediterranean, as this is the region in which Honor Frost, a pioneer in the field, primarily worked. In addition, researchers focused on subjects beyond the eastern Mediterranean are encouraged to present any work related to general methodological advances or legislative issues in maritime archaeology on Day 3.

Travel bursaries will be provided for those who wish to attend or present thanks to the generous support of the Honor Frost Foundation. For further information and updates regarding the bursary scheme or the conference in general, please refer to the MAGS 2019 official website and Facebook page. Please send abstracts to the email provided below. Abstract submissions should consist of 250 words with the applicant’s name, abstract title and intended day of presentation. Deadline for submission is December 30.

Schedule:

Day 1: Registration and wine reception

Day 2: Eastern Mediterranean maritime archaeology

Day 3: Methodological advances, new techniques, and legislative issues in maritime archaeology

Email: magsymposium2019@gmail.com

Sponsors: The Honor Frost Foundation and the Oxford Centre for Maritime Archaeology (OCMA)

“Enigma in Medieval Slavic Culture”, Symposium, 14-16 November 2019, The Slavic Institute, University of Cologne.

Deadline: 13 January 2019

Organiser: Agnes Kriza PhD (Alexander von Humboldt fellow, University of Cologne)

“A wise man will understand both a parable and a hidden saying, both wise words and riddles” (Prov. 1:6). These words of King Solomon’s Proverbs had special relevance for the culture of medieval Rus and, more broadly, for the Orthodox Slavs. According to the ninth-century Life of Saint Cyrill, before creating the Slavic letters, the Apostle of the Slavs had solved the riddle of the inscription on King Solomon’s chalice in the Constantinople Hagia Sophia. The earliest extant book from Rus, dated 1073, consists of riddles embedded in a Byzantine compilation of questions and answers. In Church Slavonic literature “parables and hidden sayings” existed either explicitly, in questions-and-answers, theological commentaries, or implicitly, inserted in different narratives. The riddles, however, appeared not only textually, but also visually. A remarkable phenomenon of the fifteenth century is the appearance of novel, extremely complex and barely comprehensible images in Russian art, often accompanied by written commentaries. In 1553 an icon-debate erupted in Moscow, because “parables” had replaced the icons of Christ and the saints in the Kremlin churches. Riddles thus had primary relevance in medieval Russian and Orthodox Slavonic epistemology, cognition and learning.

The last decades have seen the appearance of hermeneutical and semiotic approaches in historical studies as a response to the emerging problems of obscurity and incomprehensibility of texts and images in medieval Rus. To decipher textual and visual evidence and to decode phenomena of everyday life or symbols of power, they applied innovative methodologies inspired by hermeneutics, semiotics, literary structuralism, phenomenology and iconology. Not only texts and objects of art, but also historical phenomena have been studied, including liturgical and para-liturgical rites, processions or gestures that convey complex symbolical meaning and have historical significance. Despite their relevance for modern historiography the problems of medieval riddles have never been subject of specific analysis in early Slavonic studies. This interdisciplinary conference aims to create a forum for discussion between scholars of different disciplines: Slavonic and Byzantine philology, history, theology, as well as art history. Through case studies across disciplinary and medial boundaries, it aims to find methodologies by which medieval enigmas, both textual and visual, can be deciphered. It seeks to identify their common characteristics, but also their transformation across space and time.

The conference’s main topics and research questions include but are not limited to the following problems:

  • Patristic allegorical exegesis and its implications for medieval Orthodox Slavic culture
  • “Questions-and-answers” in Slavic literature
  • Liturgy and enigma
  • Riddles and learning in Slavia Orthodoxa
  • Enigma and the semiotics of medieval Russian culture
  • Decoding medieval Slavic texts
  • Riddles on Byzantine and Post-Byzantine icons and images
  • Russian iconographic innovations after the fifteenth century
  • Iconography of Russian Old Believer icons

The conference will include a visit to the Icon Museum in Recklinghausen. Depending on the funds available, travel and accommodation expenses will be partly or fully covered. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20-minute paper, together with a CV, to agnes.kriza@uni-koeln.de no later than 13th January 2019.

 

1st International Contest “FuMaSt – The Future of Manuscript Studies”, 3-4 October 2019, Gaeta.

Deadline: 17 February 2019

Co-organised by
CIPL – Comité International de Paléographie Latine
APICES – Association Paléographique Internationale Culture Écriture Société
CNRS- Institut de Recherche et d’Histoire des Textes
AIMD – Associazione Italiana Manoscritti Datati
AIPD – Associazione Italiana Paleografi e Diplomatisti
Società Internazionale di Storia della Miniatura
Università degli studi di Cassino e del Lazio meridionale

Early-stage researchers working on mediaeval Greek and Latin manuscripts are widely present within PhD courses in various disciplines and subjects, funded projects, universities and research institutions. Their research activities, which contribute in an essential way to building the future of manuscript studies, would highly benefit from a broader comparison of methods and results, both among young scholars and within the whole scholarly community.

The First International Contest “FuMaSt – The Future of Manuscript Studies” aims to bring together experienced scholars and young researchers engaged in the study of Greek and Latin manuscripts, coming from a variety of countries and scholarly traditions, and working in different and often not directly connected contexts.

Proposals are expected from PhD students and early-stage researchers (under 35 years of age, PhD earned not more than 5 years before the application). They may concern ongoing projects as well as first results of scholarly undertakings in the field of manuscript studies (palaeography, codicology, history of illuminated manuscripts, cataloguing). Interdisciplinary approaches are most welcome. Topics not centred on the study of manuscript books (i.e. those of a purely philological, text-historical, literary or art-historical nature) will not be considered.

Ten papers will be selected for a 20-minute oral presentation, followed by a 10-minute discussion. A further selection of proposals (up to a maximum of 20) will be included in a PDF brochure, to be widely circulated on the main scientific websites, mailing lists, newsletters and social networks.
The papers will need to conform to a few formalia, in order to make communication more efficient, and should contribute to shaping ‘good practices’ in the oral presentation of palaeographical and codicological research. These requirements – which will be sent to the selected speakers – mainly concern the structure of the papers, the relevance, technical quality and organisation of illustrations, and the drafting of a longer abstract in two of the contest’s official languages.

The proposals for papers should be written in French, English, Italian, Spanish or German, and contain the following information:

  • author’s name and affiliation (if applicable)
  • a short curriculum vitae (max. 2,500 characters)
  • title
  • summary (min 4,000/max. 6,000 characters), offering sufficient information on the context, methods and results of the presented research

The ten selected speakers will be granted hotel accommodation in Gaeta and a refund of 100 € max for travel expenses.

The best three presentations, chosen by a panel representing the organizing institutions, will be awarded a prize consisting in:

  • a certificate jointly issued by the organizing institutions;
  • the opportunity of publishing the contribution in a recognised scientific journal.

The proposals, in PDF format, should be sent to the Secretariat (PhD student Antonia Cerullo) not later than 17 February, 2019. The selected papers will be announced by the 31 March, 2019. The complete texts of the papers must be sent by 15 June, 2019 to the Scientific Advisory Board (SAB), which may then make some suggestions to authors for the definitive version of their work.

For further information please contact Antonia Cerullo

Local organizers: Marilena Maniaci and Giulia Orofino

“Religion and War from Antiquity to early Modernity: Historical Varieties of a Recurring Nexus”, 24-26 June 2019, King’s College London.

The conference, hosted by the Departments of Classics and War Studies, and the Sir Michael Howard Centre for the History of War at King’s College London, will mark the launch of a new international research network Religion and War through the Ages dedicated to exploring the nexus between religion and war as a recurring cross-cultural phenomenon attested in a great variety of historical societies from antiquity to the present and presenting a particularly poignant modern challenge.

What role do religious ideas play in human conflicts? Citing direct divine command or posing as guardians of divine interests, actively seeking divine approval or drawing courage from imagined divine support, armies from ancient times to the present and across diverse regions and cultures, have gone to battle with one another.  The conference will investigate specific historical cases and contexts that illustrate the influence of religion on war, from motivation to rules of conduct.  Major themes include: the demands of different sets of religious beliefs that in the past provided a cause for war; the conditions under which religious considerations became a dominant force among the reasons for and against war; the role religion played in escalating war or putting limits on violence and how that influence was felt; finally, how religion, in turn, was affected by the conduct of war in past societies.

With wide geographic coverage encompassing the Mediterranean basin, Near East, North Africa, and Europe, and taking Classical Antiquity as a starting point, but looking as far back as the second millennium BCE and forward to the Westphalian settlement of 1648, this conference will be a comparative and cross-cultural exploration of the persistent question about the role of religion in motivating, guiding, and explaining the causes and conduct of war.

Confirmed speakers include: Ian Morris (Stanford), Anthony Spalinger (Auckland), Penny Roberts (Warwick), Amir Gilan (Tel Aviv), Yannis Stouraitis (Edinburgh), Amira Benison (Cambridge).

Proposals from young researchers and established scholars in all fields of history (from Near Eastern Studies, Classics, Medieval and Byzantine to Early Modern) are now invited for papers of 20 minutes exploring historical cases that fit within the geographic and chronological framework outlined above and explore the influence of religion on war, from motivation and moral justification to rules of conduct.  Proposals, of up to 350 words, should be sent to Irene Polinskaya by 15 December 2018.  Successful applicants will be notified by 15 January 2019. A selection of papers will be considered for publication in peer-reviewed conference proceedings.

Inquiries may be sent to Irene PolinskayaAlan James and Hans van Wees.

 

“6th Salzburg International Conference on Syriac Christianity in China and Central Asia”, Center for the Study of the Christian East (ZECO) and the Archaeological Institute of Kazakhstan Academy of Sciences / Department of Nestorian Studies, 20-27 June 2019, Almaty, Kazakhstan.

Deadline: 1 March 2019

We invite paper proposals on all aspects of Syriac Christianity in China and Central Asia. Papers should be original, concise and to the point. They should take 20 minutes to deliver and be presented in English.

Registration

Please download and fill out this reply form including an abstract (100-150 words) and submit it here  before March 1, 2019

Registration Fee (mandatory): € 85. This covers lunch, coffee breaks, rent of the conference room, technical facilities, conference folders, photocopies, administration fees etc.

Excursion (Optional): For those who want to participate in our 2-day excursion, there will be a ticket charge of €55 per person. The ticket covers tour bus, admissions, accommodations incl. breakfast.

Extra Information

Kevin White, head of the Department of Nestorian Studies, has written an introduction letter for you to get better acquainted with the newly formed department that has the privilege to host this conference.  This letter also gives more information pertaining to the field trips on the 24th and 25th of June. You can view or download a copy of this letter here.

Details regarding payment, visas and hotel bookings can be viewed here.

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3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Research Assistant in Medieval Manuscripts and Late-Antique and Medieval Christianity, Radboud University Nijmegen

Deadline: 17 December 2019

Radboud University Nijmegen is advertising a position for a parttime research assistant in Medieval Manuscripts and Late-Antique and Medieval Christianity to be part of the research teams of the ERC Project PASSIM (Patristic Sermons in the Middle Ages. The dissemination, manipulation and interpretation of Late-Antique sermons in the Medieval Latin West), which kicks off on 1 January 2019, and the NWO Project Alanus (On the trail of Alanus of Farfa. Tracing the formation of Augustine’s authority in medieval sermon collections for the liturgy), which commenced on 1 October 2018.

The research assistant will contribute to the gathering of data on Medieval manuscripts that contain collections of Late-Antique sermons, from manuscript catalogues and online repositories. He/she will also be expected to undertake field trips to manuscript libraries in Europe and organise the exchange of data on the manuscripts with existing databases and online catalogues.

Location: Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Contract: Education/Research Officer, Level 3

Duration: 1 year initially, with the possibility of extension up to 4 years
Starting date: 1 February 2019 or as soon as possible thereafter
Contract type: Parttime (0,5 FTE)

Deadline for the application: 17 December 2018

Full details of the job offer can be found here.

More information on the research projects can be found here.

Morgan Library & Museum, Assistant Curator, Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts (Full-time)

The Morgan Library & Museum invites applications for a new position of Assistant Curator in the Department of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts. The Assistant Curator organizes exhibitions, researches the collection, hosts class visits and other educational activities, assists with collection development and acquisitions, cultivates donors and fundraising opportunities, performs reference services, inventories collections, maintains departmental files, and creates or revises records for collection items. The position reports to the Melvin R. Seiden Curator and Department Head of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts, and will work alongside the present Assistant Curator.

The Morgan Library & Museum is committed to diversity and is proud to be an equal opportunity employer.

Qualifications

  • Ph.D. in art history with an emphasis on manuscript illumination and medieval art required.
  • Experience in museum work and/or the academic field of art history; curatorial experience in medieval manuscripts preferred.
  • Specialized knowledge of medieval and Renaissance manuscript illumination essential, as well as general familiarity with medieval and Renaissance art.
  • Ability to organize exhibitions, write and edit publications (both scholarly and popular) and didactics, and give public lectures and tours.
  • Ability to communicate and deal with a broad range of people in promoting the department’s collection, be they scholars, students, collectors, Fellows and Friends of the Morgan, the department’s visiting committee, or the public.
  • Proven record of independent scholarly research and publications of the highest standards; excellent writing skills.
  • Knowledge of Latin and fluency in French, Italian, or German.
  • Able to work for extended periods at a computer workstation. – Able to lift moderately heavy boxes and books and move items to and from shelves. – Able to climb ladders, wheel carts with collection items through the facility, and tolerate moderate levels of dust generated during normal activities and movement of objects.

Compensation: Salary commensurate with experience. Excellent benefits.

To apply: Interested applicants should e-mail a cover letter, CV, and salary requirements here. The position has an anticipated start date on or after April 2019. Select candidates will be asked to supply writing samples and references. All inquiries regarding the position should be addressed to the aforementioned email address. Please note that due to the high volume of applicants, we are only able to contact those candidates whose skills and background best fit our needs.

The Morgan is an Equal Opportunity Employer. We do not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of race, creed (religion), color, sex (including gender expression), national origin, sexual orientation, military status, age, disability, marital status or domestic violence victim status.

Junior Research Fellowship in Medieval History, University of Oxford – University College 

Deadline: 16 January 2019

University College invites applications for a Junior Research Fellowship (JRF) in any period or geographical region of Medieval History c 400 to c 1500 CE, tenable for three years with a start date expected to be at the beginning of October 2019.  The appointee will be based in University College, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BH.

JRFs provide research opportunities to outstanding academics at the beginning of their careers.  The primary duty of the post is to carry out a coherent programme of high-quality publishable research, but most JRFs choose also to offer a limited amount of teaching for the College in the interests of career development.  Any such teaching will be remunerated separately. Ordinarily, the College has between 8 and 10 JRFs across a range of subjects.  JRFs play an important part in the intellectual and social life of the College.

Further details about University College, including the research interests of current Fellows, are available from our website here.

The primary criterion for appointment to the JRF will be research excellence.  Candidates must:

(1) have a strong educational record

(2) hold a doctorate, or be near completion

(3) have research expertise demonstrated by publications, or demonstrate promise of such achievement

(4) have a coherent plan of research for the duration of the fellowship.

The potential to become an effective teacher will be a secondary consideration.

Candidates must be confident that they will have obtained their doctorates by the start of their appointment.  This position is not intended for those who have already held another stipendiary JRF or equivalent or for those who obtained their doctorates more than two years prior to the application date (except in special circumstances).

The current stipend for a Junior Research Fellow not in receipt of other emoluments is £24,983 per annum.  If a JRF receives a stipend from elsewhere (such as a UK Research Council) then the College stipend would be reduced by the amount of salary received from that other source, with a minimum stipend of £2,500 plus housing allowance provided.  Free meals and free accommodation for the JRF in College, ordinarily a one bedroom flat, will be offered if available, or a housing allowance in lieu (£5,512 pa).  The total salary package is therefore £30,495, plus generous additional benefits, including an academic allowance (£2,284), an entertainment allowance (£192), membership of USS, and private health insurance.

Selected candidates may be asked to submit written work, which may be one or two published or submitted articles, or a chapter from their thesis.  Applicants should indicate on their application form what material they propose to submit, but should not at this stage submit any written work.

Application forms (downloadable from the College website) should be sent to recruitment@univ.ox.ac.uk, by 12 noon (UK time) on Wednesday 16 January 2019.  Applicants should arrange for three referees to send their references to recruitment@univ.ox.ac.uk by the same date.  Interviews for shortlisted candidates are expected to be held on Friday 1 March 2019 (to be confirmed).

3 research positions in Jewish Studies / Classics in the research project “Lege Josephum: Ways of Reading Josephus in the Latin Middle Ages”, University of Bern.

Deadline: 31 January 2019

The Institute of Jewish Studies and the Institute of Historical Theology at the University of Bern invite applications for three PhD positions (full-time and limited to four years):

(1)   Jewish Studies or Classics (2) and (3) Theology, Classics or History

The three positions are funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation SNF and are part of the larger “Sinergia” research project “Lege Josephum: Ways of Reading Josephus in the Latin Middle Ages”, co-directed with the Classics department.

Position 1, Jewish Studies or Classics: The successful candidate will write a dissertation on the use of Latin sources in the 10th century historiographical work Yosippon. Candidates must hold an MA degree in Jewish Studies, Classics or an affiliated field and demonstrate thorough knowledge of both Latin and (biblical) Hebrew.

Positions 2 and 3, Theology, Classics, Medieval Latin or History: The successful candidates will write a dissertation on the use and interpretation of Josephus in historiographical works by the Circle of St Victor: in Petrus Comestor’s Historia scholastica (Position 2) and in the crusader chronicles of the 12th century (Position 3). Candidates must hold an MA degree in Theology, Classics, or History and demonstrate thorough knowledge of Latin.

The annual salaries for each position range from CHF 47’040 to CHF 50’040. The appointment will begin on July 1, 2019, or shortly thereafter. Applications should be submitted in German or English and should contain a cover letter, a curriculum vitae, as well as a sample of academic writing (one pdf-file). Applicants for position 1 are invited to send in their applications (and enquiries about the project) electronically to the following address: Prof. Dr. René Bloch, Institut für Judaistik, Länggassstrasse 51, 3012 Bern, Switzerland, rene.bloch@theol.unibe.ch. Applicants for positions 2 and 3 are invited to send in their applications (and enquiries about the projects) electronically to the following address: Prof. Dr. Katharina Heyden, Institut für Historische Theologie, Länggassstrasse 51, 3012 Bern, Switzerland.

Applications for all three positions should be sent in no later than January 31, 2019.

 

Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Rank of Instructor, Oriental Institute, University of Chicago.

The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago invites applications for the Oriental Institute’s Annual Post-Doctoral Fellow Conference program for the 2019-2021 academic years. This is a twenty-four-month, non-renewable appointment. During the first year of the appointment, the Post-Doctoral Fellow will organize and conduct a two-day conference at the Oriental Institute on key comparatively oriented theoretical or methodological issues in the field of ancient studies (archaeological, text-based, and/or art historical avenues of research). We encourage cross-disciplinary proposals that deal with the ancient Near East (including Egypt) or that compare the Near East with other cultural areas. Applicants should take into consideration the research interests represented at the Oriental Institute. The conference will take place in early March 2020. Following the conference, the Post-Doctoral Fellow will work with publication staff to assemble and edit the proceedings for publication in the “Oriental Institute Seminars” series. During the second year of the appointment, the Post-Doctoral Fellow will assist in organizing a series of faculty seminars at the Oriental Institute and may have the opportunity to teach one quarter-length course on a topic of his or her choosing. The incumbent is also encouraged to pursue his or her own research while in residence and to interact with the Oriental Institute community.

Information on past Oriental Institute Annual symposia can be viewed here.

Qualifications: Ph.D. in a discipline relating to ancient studies must be complete at the time of appointment. Applicants should send:

a. Cover letter
b. 5-page proposal outlining the nature and structure of the conference (including the names and paper topics of six to eight key participants who have agreed to make presentations, should the conference be funded; for budgetary reasons, international participants should constitute no more than half of the list of six to eight invited speakers)
c. Curriculum vitae
d. 3 letters of reference

Please apply online to the University of Chicago’s Academic Career Opportunity website here.

Review of applications will begin on Monday, January 28th, 2019. Start date is September 1st, 2019. Inquiries can be directed to oi-administration@uchicago.edu with the subject heading “Post-Doctoral Fellow”.

Posting Link here.

Tutorial Fellowship and Associate Professorship (or Professorship) in Medieval Eurasian History, Trinity College and the Faculty of History, University of Oxford. 

Deadline: 12 noon (UK time) on Monday 14th January 2019.

Trinity College and the Faculty of History wish jointly to appoint to a Tutorial Fellowship and Associate Professorship in Medieval Eurasia c.300-c.1300, commencing in October 2019. The combined University and College salary will be on a scale from £47,263 to £63,463 p.a. Additional allowances provided by the College include a (taxable) housing allowance, if the successful candidate chooses not to live in College accommodation, of £14,250 p.a.

Applications are invited from candidates who have an excellent record of research and teaching expertise in Medieval Eurasia c.300-c.1300, namely East Asia including China, Central Asia and the steppe, India, the Indian Ocean, the Islamic World, but not the Western European and Byzantine worlds. All other things being equal, a preference may be given to a candidate whose research contributes to one or more of the following fields: gender history; women’s history; cultural history; religious history; inter-cultural connectivities; environmental history, as well as social, political, and economic history. The appointee will be expected to research at the highest level; to teach undergraduates for the College and Faculty, and to supervise graduates for the Faculty; and to undertake relevant administrative duties for both the College and the Faculty.

The Associate Professor will be a member of the University and the College communities and will be part of a lively and intellectually stimulating research community which performs to the highest international levels in research and publications, with access to Oxford’s excellent research facilities. Candidates must have received their doctorate by the closing date for applications. While early-career candidates are welcome to apply, this is not intended as an early-career appointment. The person appointed will be expected to play a full and active role in College and Faculty teaching, research and administration from appointment.

Closing date: 12 noon (UK time) on Monday 14th January 2019.

Interviews will be held in Oxford on 7th and 8th March 2019.

Lectureship in Late Antique and Early Byzantine Archaeology, University of Edinburgh.

Deadline: 7 January 2019 (5pm GMT)

The School of History, Classics, and Archaeology at the University of Edinburgh is pleased to invite applications for two lectureships, one in Greek Archaeology and one in Late Antique Archaeology, created as an investment in the flourishing area of Classical Art and Archaeology within the Department of Classics. The closing date for both posts is 7 January 2019 (5pm GMT), and both posts are available from 1 September 2019.

For the Late Antique Archaeology post, we seek a specialist in approximately the fourth to eight centuries with a geographical focus on the later Roman empire, early Byzantium, and the post-Roman Western Mediterranean. The successful candidate will have a track record of internationally excellent publications, proportionate to career stage, and will continue to publish and research at the highest level in this and related disciplines. They will be expected to make a significant contribution to the teaching of late antique archaeology at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, as well as to doctoral supervision, and will be expected to collaborate with other Roman archaeologists and other late antique and Byzantine specialists. For further details see here.

Research Residencies 2019-2020, Center for the Art and Architectural History of Port Cities, Naples.

Deadline: 15 February 2019

Opened in Fall 2018, the Center for the Art and Architectural History of Port Cities / Centro per la Storia dell’Arte e dell’Architettura delle Città Portuali is a collaboration between the Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte in Naples and the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History at the University of Texas at Dallas, with the participation of the Université Paris-Sorbonne.

Housed within the Capodimonte’s bosco in a rustic eighteenth-century agricultural building called La Capraia (the goat farm), the Center is a laboratory for new research in the cultural histories of port cities and the mobilities of artworks, people, technologies, and ideas. Research and programs at La Capraia are dedicated to exploring global histories of art, architecture, and cultural production, while grounded in direct study of artworks, sites, and materials in Naples as well as southern Italy. Through Research Residencies and regular site-based Research Workshops and Symposia, the Center at La Capraia supports scholarly access to Naples, fosters new research on Naples and on other port cities, and creates a network of students and scholars working on related projects.

The Advisory Committee of the Center for the Art and Architectural History of Port Cities invites applications for Research Residencies for PhD students in the earlier stages of their dissertations. Projects, which may be interdisciplinary, may focus on art and architectural history, music history, archeology, or related fields, from antiquity to the present. All projects must address the cultural histories of Naples as a center of exchange, encounter, and transformation, while making meaningful use of research materials in Naples and southern Italy including artworks, sites, archives, and libraries.

This year, Residencies will run for 9 months (2 September 2019 – 29 May 2020). Residents will be awarded free lodging and work space at La Capraia and a modest award of 5,200 EUR, administered by the Amici di Capodimonte, to help defray the cost of living during the nine-month period. Residents will be granted privileged access to collections and research resources at the Capodimonte; access to other sites, collections, and research materials will be arranged as needed. Residents will be responsible for obtaining appropriate visas (the Center will provide official letters of support) and for providing proof of health insurance. During their time in Naples, Residents are expected to share their research in a public lecture, gallery talk, or site visit, to participate fully Center’s organized activities, and before the end of the residency period to submit a written report on their progress.

We welcome applications from scholars of any nationality. Applicants are invited to submit a CV, a letter of intent, and a proposal of 1,000-1,500 words that outlines the research project and the resources that will be used in Naples. Materials should be sent in a single PDF file to the Center’s Research Coordinator, Dott.ssa Francesca Santamaria. In addition, applicants must invite three recommenders to send letters of support directly to the same email address. All materials, including letters of recommendation, are due by Friday, February 15, 2019.

Learn more about the Center here.

Mary Jaharis Center Grants 2019-2020

Deadline: 1 February 2019

The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture is pleased to announce its 2019-2020 grant competition. Our grants reflect the Mary Jaharis Center’s commitment to fostering the field of Byzantine studies through the support of graduate students and early career researchers and faculty.

Mary Jaharis Center Dissertation Grants are awarded to advanced graduate students working on Ph.D. dissertations in the field of Byzantine studies broadly conceived. These grants are meant to help defray the costs of research-related expenses, e.g., travel, photography/digital images, microfilm.

Mary Jaharis Center Publication Grants support book-length publications or major articles in the field of Byzantine studies broadly conceived. Grants are aimed at early career academics. Preference will be given to postdocs and assistant professors, though applications from non-tenure track faculty and associate and full professors will be considered. We encourage the submission of first-book projects.

The application deadline for all grants is February 1, 2019. For further information, please see here. Contact Brandie Ratliff, Director, Mary Jaharis Center, with any questions.

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