The Byzness 26/03/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 26th March 2019
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

‘Funerary Landscapes of the Late Antique oecumene: Contextualizing Epigraphic and Archeological Evidence of Mortuary Practices’, 30 May – 1 June 2019, Heidelberg, Germany.

Funerary practices and epitaphs are a central research field of Classical Studies. Especially in times of social, political and religious change, evidence from the tombs and their surroundings is a key factor in our understanding of continuity and transformation processes on multiple cultural levels. Late Antiquity was doubtlessly one of such transitional phases. However, research on burial practices and tomb inscriptions of this period is still very uneven. Although hundreds of necropoleis, coemeterial churches and individual tombs are known across the Late Antique World, a holistic documentation including epigraphic, iconographic, spatial and social analysis, as well as anthropological examination and natural scientific data, is mostly lacking.

Through this conference we would like to undertake a start to fill some lacunae on Late Antique funerary research. First, we will try to link as many disciplines as possible in order to draw a more complete picture of sepulchral habits of Late Antiquity as it hitherto has been done. Secondly, we intend to give – for the first time – a Mediterranean-wide overview on Late Antique funerary landscapes, not only examining global trends, but also local and regional habits. Thirdly, we want to illustrate the potential of new contextual approaches; questions on the materiality and design of epitaphs and tombs, their visibility, perception and accessibility will be central guidelines of our conference.

Venue: Heuscheuer, Große Mantelgasse 4, 69117 Heidelberg

For further information and the full programme visit the website of Material Text Cultures.

 

‘Interactions, Exchanges, Contributions’, The Eighth North American Syriac Symposium Syriac Worlds, Brown University, 16-19 JUNE 2019, Providence, RI.

The Eighth North American Syriac Symposium will convene at Brown University on June 16-19, 2019.  Held every four years since 1991, the North American Syriac Symposium brings together scholars and students for exchange and discussion on a wide variety of topics related to the language, literature, and cultural history of Syriac Christianity, extending chronologically from the first centuries CE to the present day and geographically from Syriac Christianity’s homeland in the Middle East to South India, China, and the worldwide diaspora.

Further information is now available at these links:

Local Steering Committee:

Susan Ashbrook Harvey, Brown University, Chair
Sargon Donabed, Roger Williams University
Jae Hee Han, Brown University
Sandra Keating, Providence College
Nancy Khalek, Brown University
Ute Possekel, Harvard Divinity School

For more information, contact nasyriacsymposium@gmail.com.  Additional information will be posted in due course.

Generously supported by Classics Department, The Cogut Institute for the Humanities, the Program in Early Cultures, the History Department, the Joukowsky Institute for Achaeology and the Ancient World, the Program in Judaic Studies, Middle East Studies, the Department of Religious Studies, and the Starr Lectureship Fund.

 

Symposium ‘Eclecticism at the Edges’, Princeton University, 5-6 April 2019, McCormick Hall 106. 

On April 5-6, 2019, the Index will co-host “Eclecticism at the Edges: Medieval Art and Architecture at the Crossroads of the Latin, Greek, and Slavic Cultural Spheres,” along with the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies, the Department of Art & Archaeology at Princeton University, the International Center of Medieval Art, and the Society of Historians of East European, Eurasian, and Russian Art and Architecture. This two-day symposium focuses on the art, history, and culture of Eastern Europe between the 14th and the 16th centuries.

In response to the global turn in art history and medieval studies, “Eclecticism at the Edges” explores the temporal and geographic parameters of the study of medieval art, seeking to challenge the ways in which we think about the artistic production of Eastern Europe from the fourteenth through the sixteenth centuries. This event will serve as a long-awaited platform to examine, discuss, and focus on the eclectic visual cultures of the Balkan Peninsula and the Carpathian Mountains, the specificities, but also the shared cultural heritage of these regions. It will raise issues of cultural contact, transmission, and appropriation of western medieval and Byzantine artistic and cultural traditions in eastern European centers and consider how this heritage was deployed to shape notions of identity and visual rhetoric in these regions that formed a cultural landscape beyond medieval, Byzantine, and modern borders.

You can view the program here.

The symposium is free, but registration is required to guarantee seating. Please register here. For any queries, please contact the organizers at eclecticism.symposium@gmail.com.

 

‘Polities of Faith: Theology, Ecclesiology, and Spatiality in the Christian World’, Institute of Classical Studies, 2019 Byzantine Colloquium, 4-5 June 2019, Senate House, University of London.

In 1932 Olof Linton’s dissertation Das Problem der Urkirche in der neueren Forschung overturned the existing consensus that presented the Church as a historical construct that followed the triumph of Christianity. According to Linton, the Church already existed in the minds of the earliest Christian thinkers, who had envisaged a structured community of believers and clerics. More recently, sociologists have similarly responded to previous approaches focused on the efficiency of institutions by emphasizing the key role that intellectual legitimisation plays in the survival of organisational structures. While Late Antique and Medieval historians have underlined the importance of discourse and ritual in the construction of a Christian world-view, there is still much work to be done in assessing how theological and ecclesiological discussions shaped the structure, organisation and on-going development of the Christian Churches. The Colloquium explores this theme bringing together classicists, historians and theologians working on the construction of the Christian Churches from Late Antiquity to the thirteenth century, and beyond:

  • James Corke-Webster (London), The Church in Eusebius’ Life of Constantine
  • Anthony Dupont (Louvain), Keeping the Church in the middle. Augustine of Hippo’s interrelated theoretical and practical ecclesiology
  • Tom Hunt (Birmingham), The Influence of Trinitarian Theology on Jerome’s Hierarchical Ecclesiology in Against Jovinian and Letter 52
  • Andrew Jotischky (London), Knowledge, Mediation and Tradition in Thirteenth Century Pilgrimage in the Eastern Mediterranean
  • Chrysovalantis Kyriacou (Nicosia), Of monks and bishops: Cypriot clerical networks and the circle of Maximus the Confessor
  • Ioannis Papadogiannakis (London), The Body Politic in 6th-7th Byzantium: Religious, Social and Political Implications
  • Richard Price (London), One Empire, One Church

For the programme of the Colloquium please click here.

For information and to reserve a place please contact Sapfo.Psani@rhul.ac.uk by 15 May 2019.

Organising Committee: David Natal Villazala, Brian McLaughlin, Christopher Hobbs, Sapfo Psani, and Charalambos Dendrinos

 

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

‘Art as Commodities / Commodities as Art: An Interdisciplinary Conference’, Friday 14 June 2019, Berrick Saul Building, University of York.

Deadline: 29 March 2019

‘Cultural entities typical of the culture industry are no longer alsocommodities, they are commodities through and through’. Theodor Adorno, “Culture Industry Reconsidered” (1967).

When art makes the headlines, it is usually about money. In 2017, Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi sold for over $450 million at Christie’s New York. Just how can a painting be worth more than a penthouse on Fifth Avenue?

A propensity for truck, barter and exchange is one of visual art’s defining characteristics. This conference will explore the conceptual interrelationships between art and commodities, encompassing a range of media from paintings to artefacts.

Are artworks ‘commodities through and through’, or are they economically exceptional? The brand equity of a Picasso or Fabergé, compounded with their provenance or “social life”, suggest so. As desirable objects, artworks are often meta-desirable. The Paston Treasureis a mirror of luxury that was itself luxurious to own. Mundane objects, meanwhile, have a history of aesthetic transfiguration, especially materials of the craft. Did artists possess a kind of Midas touch?

This conference will demonstrate the centrality of markets to art’s modern cultural ascendancy, while also recasting art objects as bodies of knowledge and vehicles of cultural exchange through networks of global trade.

Co-organised by Adam Sammut (University of York), Simon Spier (University of Leeds) and Apurba Chatterjee (University of Sheffield). Please send a short speaker profile and an abstract of 300 words maximum to art.as.commodities@gmail.com by 29 March.

Generously funded by WRoCAH, CREMS and ALCS.

 

‘Lost for Words – Theological and Philosophical Vocabulary in the Aftermath of Chalcedon’, Review of Ecumenical Studies.

Deadline: 1 July 2019

The peer reviewed journal Review of Ecumenical Studies invites papers  for a special issue dedicated to Theological and Philosophical Vocabulary in the Aftermath of Chalcedon:

The Council of Chalcedon (451) has been responsible for one of the most remarkable and long-standing splits within Christianity. Conceptual differences between Chalcedonian and (Miaphysite) Non-Chalcedonian Christianity have been lasting for more than fifteen hundred years, and, despite the advancement of the ecumenical dialogue in recent decades, these conundrums prove to be hard to overcome. One of the results of the contemporaneous theological interchange has been the acknowledgment of differences in the vocabulary employed by the supporters and the detractors of the Council. One such example is the use of philosophical language in sixth and seventh century debates, which consequently made room for different terminological interpretations of the nature(s) of Christ. This special issue of RES aims to bring together studies on the understanding of vocabulary differences and similarities between the Chalcedonian and non-Chalcedonian Christian traditions. We invite papers from historians, philologists, theologians and philosophers on the debates that took place in the aftermath of Chalcedon till nowadays. We are particularly looking to contributions on the use of philosophical concepts in a theological frame, such as (but not limited to) genus, species, definition, predication, existence, participation, motion, activity, power, soul, body etc. that may prove relevant for understanding their similarities and differences of use within the Greek, Syriac, and Latin languages. Papers emphasizing the social and political background related to the emergence and development of Chalcedonian debates are also warmly welcome.

The papers must be submitted to: res@ecum.ro

About RES: The Review of Ecumenical Studies About RES publishes articles, essays and reviews which come from the theological field, but also have an interdisciplinary dimension, especially from the fields of philosophy, history, ethics and social sciences, and go through a process of peer review. Decisions are made within four months. The contributions will be published in English or German and must comply with RES’s editorial guidelines: http://www.res.ecum.ro/guidelines/

 

‘Hellenic Political Philosophy and Contemporary Europe’, First International Conference of Hellenic Studies, Center for Hellenic Studies (Podgorica, Montenegro), 29 September – 04 October 2019, Herceg Novi, Montenegro.

Deadline: 1 May 2019

The Conference is organized under the auspices of the Ministry of Science of Montenegro and will be held in Herceg Novi, an ancient town on the coast of the Adriatic Sea, and an intersecting point of different cultures during ancient and medieval times.

As one of the institutions participating in the COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action entitled Reappraising Intellectual Debates on Civic Rights and Democracy in Europe, the Center for Hellenic Studies organized a series of lectures, presentations and round tables, participated by eminent experts in philosophy, history, political theory, theology, classics, and other disciplines. As the final phase of the project, the Center deemed opportune to initiate a debate on the achievements, values and guide marks that Hellenic political philosophy can have for contemporary Europe, in which the apprehension of the political is chiefly reduced to the interests of powers and corporations, being thus exclusively linked to the technique of conquering and maintaining dominance.

Ancient Hellenic conception, that gave birth to notions like freedom, democracy, parrhesia, publicity and other, reminds us that ancient Greeks understood politics not only as a fundamental designation of human beings – as, according to Aristotle, anyone who does not partake of society is either a beast or a god – but also as inseparably linked to ethics.

If politics in the modern world, according to Napoleon’s famous dictum, became a sort of fatalité moderne, or what the ancient Greeks called moira, then dealing with questions and issues posited by the conference’s topic does not represent a subject of a mere intellectual exhibition and strictly academic discussion, but a crucial question of human destiny and human being’s position in the contemporary world.

The Conference is of an interdisciplinary character and aims at addressing different social and political issues from perspectives of history, philosophy, economics, theology, history of ideas, anthropology, political theory and other disciplines. Such conception of the scholarly exchange does not fulfill only the purpose of an historical investigation, but will provide a systematic treatment of the topic, thus clarifying existing ideas and advancing new ones. The themes to be covered include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. The concept of the polis in antiquity and modernity
  2. Freedom and democracy
  3. Politics and economy
  4. Democracy, liberalism, totalitarianism
  5. The philosophy of the polis: Citizen, polis and cultural ideals
  6. Autonomy and responsibility in politics
  7. The philosophy of the cosmopolis
  8. The polis and happiness
  9. Ethics and politics
  10. The “political” before and after Machiavelli: Similarities and differences
  11. Imperialism and (neo)colonialism – political, ideological, cultural, linguistic
  12. Democracy and revolution
  13. Intellectuals and social change: The free intellectual and “secular priesthood”
  14. Politics and the media
  15. Globalization, unification, otherness
  16. European Union: Foundation, possibilities, perspectives
  17. Law and justice
  18. International law: Sovereignty and territorial integrity
  19. The politics of difference and the problem of interventionism
  20. Cultural politics

The official language of the Conference is English. There are five categories of participation:

  1. Keynote lectures by invited speakers (30min)
  2. Presentations of original papers (20min)
  3. Presentations of short communications (15min)
  4. Passive participation (without paper)
  5. Participation as accompanying persons

All participants (except invited speakers) are required to register through the registration form and pay their registration fees. Participants wishing to present a paper should include an abstract (max 200 words) in their registration form. In case of technical issues, participation applications (including title, name, address, affiliation) and abstracts can be sent via email to conference@ichs.me. All participants will be notified by e-mail regarding the status of their submission.

The deadline for submission of abstracts is 1st May 2019. Registration fees and payment instructions can be found here.

The Organizing Committee reserves the right to accept or reject papers that do not comply with the academic standards of the Conference. Selected full papers will be published in the proceedings after the Conference.

 

‘True Warriors? Negotiating Dissent in the Intellectual Debate (C. 1100 – 1700)’, 9th LECTIO International Conference, 11-13 December 2019, Leuven.

Deadline: 15 April 2019

Dissent, polemics and rivalry have always been at the center of intellectual development. The scholarly Streitkultur was given a fresh impetus by the newly founded universities in the High Middle Ages and later turned into a quintessential part of early modern intellectual life. It was not only mirrored in various well-known intellectual debates and controversies – e.g. between Aristotelians and Augustinians, scholastics and humanists, Catholics and Protestants – but also embodied in numerous literary genres and non-literary modes of expression – e.g. disputationes, invectives, consilia, images, carnivalesque parades, music, etc. – and discursive or political strategies – patronage, networks and alliances. Moreover, the harsh debates notwithstanding, consensus was also actively searched for, both within particular disciplines and within society as a whole.

The aforementioned genres and strategies are all modes of negotiating dissent, which raises several important questions regarding these intellectual ‘warriors’. What were the most important issues at stake and how were they debated? Did the debates in the public sphere reflect the private opinions of the scholars involved? What access do we have to those private opinions? Can we approach such controversies in terms of authenticity and truthfulness, or consistency and coherence? Is there a contrast between ego-documents and the published part of an author’s oeuvre?

Starting from these questions, the aim of this conference is to study the polemical strategies and the modes of rivalry and alliance in scholarly debate from the twelfth through the seventeenth centuries.

Topics of interest may include, but are not limited to:

the role of alliances and polemics in establishing intellectual networks;
the presentation of rivaling views and the depiction of adversaries;
the discrepancy or congruency between private and public persona;
hitherto neglected disputes or new perspectives on well-known controversies;
non-literary modes of negotiating dissent;
the relation and connections between various literary and non-literary genres, also across different semiotic modes (literature, visual arts, performative arts, …);
the role of socio-cultural and economic background in polemics;
the role of language (e.g.: vernacular vs. Latin);
similarities and differences across disciplines (philosophy, civil and canon law, theology, medicine….) with regard to polemization and the negotiation of dissent.

We actively invite papers from a variety of perspectives and disciplines (civil and canon law, philosophy, theology and religious studies, literary studies, historiography, art history, etc.) and aim to study texts in Latin, Greek and the vernacular, as well as pictorial and performative traditions. We do not only welcome specific case studies, but also (strongly) encourage broader (meta)perspectives, e.g. of a diachronic or transdisciplinary nature. The conference will span the period from the twelfth until the seventeenth centuries.

The conference will be organized by the Leuven Centre for the Study of the Transmission of Texts and Ideas in Antiquity, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (LECTIO). It follows upon last year’s conference on polemics, rivalry and networking in Greco-Roman Antiquity.

Confirmed keynote speakers:

Laura Beck Varela (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)
Leen Spruit (Radboud Universiteit – Nijmegen)
Anita Traninger (Freie Universität – Berlin)

We invite submissions for paper proposals in English, French, German and Italian. Proposals should consist of a (provisional) title, an abstract of 300-400 words, and information concerning the applicant’s name, current position, academic affiliation, contact details and (if applicable) related publications on the topic. Applicants who intend to speak in French, German or Italian, are expected to include an English abstract as well. Accepted papers will be awarded a 30 minutes slot (20 minutes presentation, 10 minutes for discussion).

Please submit your proposal via email (lectio@kuleuven.be) by April 15, 2019. Applicants will be notified by email within 5 weeks from this date.

Successful applicants are expected to submit their paper for inclusion in a thematic volume to be published in the LECTIO series (Brepols Publishers). All submitted papers will be subject to a process of blind peer-review.

For any further queries, please mail to lectio@kuleuven.be.

 

Biblical Poetry: the Legacy of the Psalms in Late Antiquity and Byzantium’ Psalms 2020 Colloquium, Ghent University.

Deadline: 31 June 2019

The Psalms, in their Greek Septuagint translation, were a fundamental corpus of biblical poetry, and as such were continuously referred to in Christian literature. They played a key role in the daily life and in the development of religious sensitivity of late antique and Byzantine people. The production of Psalm-related literature, notably exegetic, was impressively widespread. The Psalms, however, influenced other genres of religious literature as well, and their poetical nature remained an important feature that later authors were well aware of.

In preparation of a volume on the reception of the Psalms in poetry from Late Antiquity and Byzantium, we invite scholars of all levels of experience to present a paper at a colloquium on this subject.

Confirmed speakers are Andrew Faulkner, Antonia Giannouli, Christian Høgel and Maria Ypsilanti.

We welcome contributions on the following topics especially:

  • the appreciation of the Psalter’s poetical nature in exegesis and in the biblical manuscript tradition (e.g. recognition, by patristic and Byzantine exegetes, of the presence or absence of poetical features);
  • rhetorical aspects of the Psalms as highlighted in late antique and Byzantine treatises;
  • the influence of the Psalms on Byzantine poetry (e.g. what was their role in the composition of eis heauton poems? How does self-expression in Christian poetry relate to the Psalms?);
  • the reception of the Psalms in hymnographic poetry;
  • the reception of the Psalter in specific genres of poetry, such as Byzantine catanyctic poetry;
  • the metrical metaphrases by ps-Apollinaris and Manuel Philes;
  • metrical paratexts on the Psalms.

These examples are not exclusive and papers on other related topics are welcome.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers. Each paper will be followed by a reaction from a respondent, who will open the discussion with the audience. Contributors whose abstract is accepted will be asked to submit prior to the colloquium a rough draft of their full text. After the conference, they are expected to offer their re-worked paper for inclusion (upon acceptance after peer-review) in a volume on the reception of the Psalms in Byzantine poetry.

Please send a title and a short abstract (max. 300 words) of your paper to rachele.ricceri@ugent.be no later than May 31, 2019.

Accepted speakers will be notified by the end of June 2019.

 

The 95th Annual Meeting of The Medieval Academy of America, University of California, 26-28 March 2020, Berkeley, California.

Deadline: 1 June 2019

The 95th Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy of America will take place on the campus of the University of California, Berkeley. The meeting is jointly hosted by the Medieval Academy of America, the Program in Medieval Studies of the University of California, Berkeley, and the Medieval Association of the Pacific.

The Program Committee invites proposals for papers on all topics and in all disciplines and periods of medieval studies. Any member of the Medieval Academy may submit a paper or session proposal; others may submit proposals as well but must become members in order to present papers at the meeting. Exceptions may be made for individuals whose field would not normally involve membership in the Medieval Academy. Please note: the prohibition against presenting a paper more than once every three years is no longer in effect.

Location: Berkeley is a diverse and multicultural city in the greater San Francisco Bay Area. It has its own vibrant culinary, arts, and music communities but is also connected via the BART mass-transit system with the cultural offerings of nearby Oakland and San Francisco. The meetings will take place on the University of California, Berkeley campus. Registration, book exhibits, and other events will be in the Martin Luther King Jr. Building on Sproul Plaza, a short half-mile walk from the Downtown Berkeley BART stop, and sessions will be in historic Wheeler Hall just inside the Sather Gate. Information on accommodations, as well as MAA student bursaries and travel grants, will be made available next fall.

Theme(s): Rather than an overarching theme, the 2020 meeting will provide a variety of thematic connections among sessions. The Medieval Academy welcomes innovative sessions that cross traditional disciplinary boundaries or that use various disciplinary approaches to examine an individual topic. To both facilitate and emphasize interdisciplinarity, the Call for Papers is organized in “themes.” The list provided below is not meant to be exhaustive or exclusive; innovative proposals not related to the themes below are also welcome.

Proposals: Individuals may propose to offer a paper in one of the themes below, a full panel of papers and speakers, a full panel of papers and speakers for a theme they wish to create, or a single paper not designated for a specific theme. Sessions usually consist of three 25-minute papers, and proposals should be geared to that length, although the committee is interested in other formats as well (poster sessions, digital experiences, etc.). The Program Committee may choose a different format for some sessions after the proposals have been reviewed.

For further information visit the website.

 

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Full-time Postdoctoral Position at the Netherlands Institute for the Near East (NINO).

Deadline: 7 April 2019

Every year NINO opens one full-time postdoctoral position for the duration of two years (overlapping tenures). Each NINO Postdoctoral Fellow carries out original research at NINO, organises an international workshop on a related theme, publishes the proceedings in a NINO volume, and teaches a seminar for graduate students at OIKOS, the National Research School in Classical Studies in the Netherlands.

Candidates are recruited through an open call for applications. Successful candidates will have completed their PhD and possess a research CV commensurate to career stage.

A call is opened every year in February, starting from February 2019. The selected Postdoctoral Fellow will start his or her fellowship in September.

Conditions and regulations: Please refer to Leiden University’s terms and conditions, described in the vacancy posting.

Application: The 2019 call is posted on Leiden University’s website (vacancy no. 19-079 6085, deadline for application: 7 April 2019). Applications are processed through Leiden University’s website.

 

Doctoral Scholarship, French School at Athens.

Deadline: 30 April 2019, 15:00 (Paris time).

Dans le cadre du soutien apporté aux actions de coopération internationale, le Ministère de l’Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche et de l’Innovation (MESRI) propose un dispositif de contrats doctoraux fléchés à l’international (ACI). Ce dispositif peut bénéficier à tout candidat à l’inscription en doctorat dont les recherches s’inscrivent dans le cadre des programmes scientifiques d’une des cinq Écoles françaises à l’étranger : École française d’AthènesÉcole française de Rome, Institut français d’Archéologie orientaleÉcole française d’Extrême-Orient, Casa de Velazquez (École des hautes études hispaniques). (Pour en savoir plus)

Les dossiers de candidatures doivent parvenir directement à chacune des EFE concernée, sous forme d’un document PDF unique comprenant:
– un projet de thèse de cinq pages au maximum;
– le CV du candidat pressenti pour entreprendre cette recherche;
– une lettre de présentation du ou des directeur(s) de thèse pressenti(s) ;
– l’avis du directeur de l’ED.

Conformément à ses statuts, l’École française d’Athènes « développe en Grèce et à Chypre, où elle dispose de missions permanentes, ainsi que dans les Balkans, des recherches dans toutes les disciplines des sciences humaines et sociales, depuis la Préhistoire jusqu’à nos jours.». Elle peut donc accueillir en septembre 2019 et pour une durée de trois ans un doctorant travaillant dans ces champs géographiques et chronologiques.

Les documents devront être envoyés sous format électronique (PDF unique) à l’adresse candidatures@efa.gr, avant le 30 avril 2019 à 15h00 (heure de Paris). Les résultats seront transmis au cours du mois de juin, avant la réunion des conseils des Écoles doctorales pour l’attribution des contrats ministériels.

Veuillez prendre note que cette allocation vient s’ajouter au contingent d’allocations dont dispose chaque École Doctorale : elle constitue donc à la fois un renforcement de l’aide aux jeunes chercheurs et un soutien à la recherche française à l’étranger. Pour l’EFA c’est aussi l’occasion de renforcer le partenariat avec les universités françaises.

 

Mejlis Institute Summer School in Languages (Armenian, Persian, Turkish) and Connected Histories, 15 July – 15 August 2019, Yerevan, Armenia.

Deadline: 1 May 2019

Mejlis Institute is pleased to announce the opening of applications for the 2019 intensive summer program that will take place between July 15 and August 15, lasting four weeks. The program will consist of three parallel language courses – Armenian, Persian and Turkish – and a series of seminars devoted to topics in connected histories of Armenia, Iran and Anatolia from the medieval period onwards.

The program is primarily, though not exclusively, targeted at advanced undergraduate and graduate students wishing to study either Armenian, Persian or Turkish and interested in topics of intercultural connections. While applicants of different levels will be considered, preference will be given to those who have already achieved the intermediate or advanced levels. Apart from learning in the classroom, students will be able to practice their language skills in conversations with fellow participants from Armenia, Turkey and Iran.

MA and PhD students engaged in research and interested in working on particular sources will also be given an opportunity to receive additional guidance on individual basis.

For more information please visit https://mejlisinstitute.org/overview-1

 

Environmental Archaeology Training Program, ANAMED, Koç University, 6 – 9 September 2019, Beyoğlu, Istanbul.

Deadline:  15 April 2019

The Environmental Archaeology Training Program will take place at the Koç University Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations (ANAMED) in Beyoğlu, Istanbul from September 6th to 9thIt is designed to introduce participants to environmental archaeology broadly, including a survey of research questions and methods, and to explore in-depth two important subfields: archaeobotany and zooarchaeology. The program will comprise lectures, hands-on practical instruction, and presentations by guest scholars. (For more information: About the Program)

The program is open to undergraduate students, graduate students, and researchers who are engaged with Anatolian Studies. Instruction will be conducted in English, with language support for beginner English speakers. (see: Requirements). There are no fees for participation in this program. Each participant will receive a full program scholarship (see: Scholarships). For more information about how to apply see: Applications.

There are no fees for participation in this program. Each participant selected by the program instructors based on merit, will receive a full program scholarship (see: Scholarships).

Please kindly contact with envarch@ku.edu.tr for further inquiries.

 

Twelve post-doc researchers: ‘The European Qur’an (EuQu): Islamic Scripture in European Culture and Religion (1150-1850)’.

Deadline: 1 April 2019

The Université de Nantes, the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Università di Napoli l’Orientale, the University of Kent and the University of Amersterdam are hiring post-doctoral researchers to join our project “The European Qur’an: Islamic Scripture in European Culture and Religion (1150-1850)” (EuQu).

Project summary

“The European Qur’an. Islamic Scripture in European Culture and Religion 1150-1850” (EuQu) is a six- year research project funded through a synergy grant from the European Research Council (ERC). Its four principal investigators (and host institutions) are Mercedes García-Arenal (Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, CSIC, Madrid, Spain), John Tolan (Université de Nantes), Jan Loop (University of Kent) and Roberto Tottoli (Università di Napoli l’Orientale).

The project studies the ways in which the Islamic Holy Book is embedded in the intellectual, religious and cultural history of Medieval and Early Modern Christians, European Jews, freethinkers, atheists and European Muslims. We will conduct research on how the Qur’an has been translated, interpreted, adapted and used in Christian Europe from the Middle Ages through to early modern history, in order to understand how the Holy Book has influenced both culture and religion in Europe. EuQu will look at the role of the Qur’an in interactions with Islam, in debates between Christians of different beliefs and in critiques of Christianity during the Enlightenment.

The six-year project will produce interdisciplinary research through scientific meetings across Europe, a GIS-database of Qur’an manuscripts, translations and other works in which the Qur’an is discussed, and through PhD theses and monographs. It will bring the fruits of this research to non-academic audiences though a creative multimedia exhibition on the place of the Qur’an in European cultural heritage.

Candidates should consult the full description of the project, available here and here.

Qualifications: Applicants should have a PhD in a discipline in the humanities by the time of application, or at least strong assurance that they will obtain the PhD by August 2019. Candidates should be fluent in English and have strong skills in other languages appropriate to their research topics.

Research profile: Up to twelve positions will be filled. Each candidate should propose an original, innovative research project on an important aspect of the role played by the Qur’an in Medieval and Early Modern European culture. The following is a list of possible broad themes, but in no ways should be seen as restrictive. All innovative research proposals are welcome, as long as they clearly fit the themes and structure of the EuQu project. We also welcome proposals that apply digital technologies such as mapping, textual analysis, visualization, or the semantic web to their topic. Candidates should clearly situate their proposed research in the context of the state of the art and should describe some of the sources they propose to work on.

  • Synthetic comparison of translation strategies and ideologies of language study and translation between early modern polemical works
    • The use that European scholars made of Muslim exegetical literature in order to understand the Qur’an.
    • Translations of the Qur’an written before 1800 (in Latin and in various European vernaculars)
    • Collecting the Qur’an (manuscripts and printed editions)
    • The Politics and Economies of the European Qur’an (including theological and political obstacles that editions and translations of the European Qur’an faced)
    • Polemical responses to the Qur’an
    • The Printing of Arabic in Europe: The Qur’an and Islamic Texts
    • A History of Qur’an Manuscripts in Europe
    • The Qur’an in European literature and thought
    • The Qur’an in Central & Eastern Europe
    • The Qur’an in European Jewish culture and scholarship
    • Colonial Expansion and the European Qur’an
    • The Qur’an and European Legal and Political Thinking

Responsibilities of the researchers: Each post-doctoral researcher will propose an innovative research project on some aspect of the place of the Qur’an in European Culture between the twelfth and early nineteenth centuries. Depending on the specific research topic, responsibilities may include

  • Bibliographical research:
    • Database management:
    • Participating in regular team meetings (including periodic seminars and workshops), at the EuQu partner institutions and in their organization
    • Publication: each candidate will propose contributions to one or more of the collective volumes listed in the EuQu project description. S/he should also propose a monograph or article stemming from his or her own research.

Conditions of employment: The researcher will be hired on a one-year renewable contract employed by one of the EuQu institutional partners, for a total maximum of four years of employment. The date of the beginning of the contract will be negotiated on hiring: it will be no earlier than September 1st 2019. The researcher will be expected to reside in the city of employment for the period of employment and will be provided with office space. The researcher will travel frequently for conferences, workshops and research stays with partner institutions in Europe.

Application procedures: Applicants should send an application, consisting of a letter of application, a project description, a curriculum vitae, and names of three references (with titles and e-mail addresses). In the letter of application, candidates should specify which of the EuQu partner institutions they would prefer to be affiliated with, in order of preference: The Université de Nantes, the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Università di Napoli l’Orientale, the University of Kent or the University of Amersterdam. The project description (5 pages maximum) should outline how the candidate’s previous research is germane to the themes of EuQu and how the candidate would contribute to the EuQu project, giving specific examples of material that s/he would integrate into the database and a tentative description of his/her contribution to one of the planned collective volumes. Before writing the project description, candidates should carefully read the full description of the EuQu project available here and here.

All documents should be sent in PDF format to euqu@cchs.csic.es by April 1st, 2019.

Selected applicants will be interviewed 21-23 May 2019. The interviews will be conducted by EuQu’s four principal investigators. Applicants will be interviewed via videoconference. Those candidates who prefer to be interviewed in person may come to Madrid for interviews, but no travel expenses will be paid to interviewees. Fuller details about interviews will be sent to chosen candidates before May 1st. Applicants will subsequently be informed of the results of their application by the end of May.

Contact and information: euqu@cchs.csic.es

 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History (Greek Art and Architecture), Stockton University.

The Visual Arts Program at Stockton University invites applications for a one-year Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History beginning September 2019. Ph.D. required (or must have Ph.D. by September 2019) with college-level teaching experience and publications record. The preferred candidate will specialize in Greek art and architecture and have access to an active archaeological project in Greece or Cyprus. Consideration is also given to specialists in Byzantine art and architecture or other ancient specializations. Ability to teach more broadly within art history curriculum and academic experience with culturally diverse populations desired.

The successful applicant will teach courses in area of specialization, two-semester art history survey, and other courses as needed, including courses for the University’s General Studies program. One course in archaeology is required each year with preference given to candidates who can offer summer field work for students. The position includes endowed research funding and support for students traveling abroad established through the Pappas Center for Hellenic Studies. The faculty member will participate in Pappas Center for Hellenic Studies programming on campus and beyond.. Teaching load is six four-credit courses per year.

The job is posted here:

To apply visit https://stockton.hiretouch.com

Only electronic documents will be accepted. Please complete the on-line application in addition to providing the following required documents. All required documents must be submitted in order for your application to move forward. You may upload documents using Word or PDF

  1. A letter of interest describing qualifications and accomplishments
  2. A curriculum vitae
  3. Short (1-page) teaching philosophy statement
  4. Documents showing evidence of teaching effectiveness
  5. Short description of Scholarship plans and research capabilities
  6. Samples of scholarly or creative work (e.g. documents, video, etc.)
  7. Unofficial Graduate transcripts
  8. A list of three professional references (included in the application): Name, Organization, Email address and Telephone

 

One doctoral position at the Leibniz project “Polyphony of Late Antique Christianity”, Frankfurt, Germany.

Deadline: 17 April 2019

The Department of Ancient History, Faculty of Philosophy and History, Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main invites applications for a doctoral position as a Researcher in Late Antique Christianity in the Eastern Mediterranean (E13 TV-G-U, 65% part-time) within the Leibniz research project “Polyphony of Late Antique Christianity” directed by Prof. Dr. Hartmut Leppin. The position is to be filled from June 15th 2019 onwards. The duration of the contract will be 36 months and the salary is set according to TV-G-U 13. The project is financed by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. The Leibniz research project “Polyphony of Late Antique Christianity” strives to develop a new picture of Christianity in Late Antiquity by integrating eastern mediterranean and near eastern perspectives.

We are looking for new members of the team who would like to work on this field of research for their doctoral thesis and contribute to analysing the diversity of Christianity in late antiquity. As a member of the team, the researcher will be expected to share the research tasks of the team, preparing workshops, conferences, and publications as well as participating in colloquia.

The ideal candidate will have a M.A. or equivalent in Ancient History, History of Religion, Theology, Oriental Philology, Ancient Judaism, Ancient Christianity, or related fields, a solid knowledge of English, German and an additional modern language and an excellent knowledge of the relevant ancient languages (Latin and Greek and others as necessary).

For further information please contact h.leppin@em.uni-frankfurt.de.

Please submit your application complete with curriculum vitae, copies of your final university degrees, a copy of your M.A. thesis (or other significant research paper) and an outline of the research project (3-5 pages) you would like to pursue no later than April 17th 2019 in electronic form to h.leppin@em.uni-frankfurt.de.

Please note that that costs incurred for the application procedure will not be refunded by Goethe University. Please note that we are not able to reimburse the travel costs for the interview.

 

Intensive Course on Islamic Archaeology, 19-23 August 2019, Princeton, New Jersey.

Deadline: 1 April 2019

Thanks to a number of generous grants from the David A. Gardner ’69 Magic Project, the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University has organized a series of short, intensive courses for graduate students on a variety of subjects in the broad field of Islamic studies not normally covered in the Princeton curriculum. In each case, an internationally-recognized expert has been brought in to teach the course over a period of five weekdays.

This year, we plan to offer such a course on Islamic archaeology.

The course will take place from August 19 – August 23, 2019. The course is intended primarily for graduate students, both from Princeton and from other universities.

The instructor will be Dr. Denis Genequand, a leading expert in the study of Islamic archaeology. The objective of the program is to present the field of Islamic archaeology, which has witnessed a considerable evolution over the past 40 years. The main focus of the course will be on the early Islamic Near East, with a brief excursus into other regions of the Islamicate world.

The program will have three objectives:

Give students a comprehensive picture of the archaeology of Syria-Palestine and Iraq between the 7th and the 10th century (Late Antique context, Islamic conquest, Umayyad and Abbasid periods). This will encompass the archaeology of the main cities, the new urban settlements and the different types of rural settlements, as well as land use and settlement patterns.

Introduce students, using a number of case studies, to different categories of archaeological sources (architectural remains, pottery, faunal or botanical remains, etc.) and their potential for investigating economic and social aspects of early Islamic society.

Give students a wider perspective on Islamic archaeology, with some insights into research conducted in other regions of the Islamicate world (Central Asia, Indian Ocean, North and West Africa).

Applications must be emailed to Julia Gilbert (jb85@princeton.edu) at the Near Eastern Studies Department at Princeton University by April 1, 2019. The subject line of the email should read, “Application for Islamic Archaeology Workshop.”

Applications should comprise the following:

Letter of application with statement of interest CV Names, positions, and email addresses of two referees. All items should be included in a single attachment, which may be a pdf.

Successful applicants will be notified in mid-April 2019 and students accepted for the course but coming from outside of Princeton will receive partial scholarships to help defray travel and accommodation costs. The course itself is free.

Dr Denis Genequand is an archaeologist specialized in the Islamic period, with a main focus on Early Islamic Syria. He has conducted field work in the Near East (Syria and Jordan), Arabian Peninsula (Yemen), Central Asia (Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and Pakistan), and West Africa (Ghana). Until recently, he held a senior lectureship in Islamic Archaeology at the University of Geneva, and is currently the Director of the Museum and Research Centre of Avenches (Switzerland).

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