Byzness 21/01/18

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 21st January 2018
====

1. CALLS FOR PAPERS
2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

====
1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

Call for Sessions: Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 44th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference, 4-7 October 2018, San Antonio, Texas

Deadline: 5 February 2018

As part of its ongoing commitment to Byzantine studies, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 44th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website (https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/44th-annual-annual-byzantine-studies-conference).

Proposals should include:

Proposed session title
CV of session organizer
300-word session summary, which includes a summary of the overall topic, the format for the panel (such as a debate, papers followed by a discussion, or a traditional session of papers), and the reasons for covering the topic as a prearranged, whole session
Session chair and academic affiliation. Please note: Session chairs cannot present a paper in the session.
Information about the four papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 500-word abstract. Please note: Presenters must be members of BSANA in good standing.

Session organizers may present a paper in the session or chair the session. If a co-organzier is proposed for the session, the co-organizer must also give a paper in the session or chair the session.

Applicants will be notified by February 9, 2018. The organizer of the selected session is responsible for submitting the session to the BSC by February 15, 2018. Instructions for submitting the panel proposal are included in the BSC Call for Papers (http://www.bsana.net/conference/2018_BSANA_CFP.pdf).

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and chair, if the proposed chair is selected by the BSC program committee) up to $600 maximum for North American residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from abroad. Funding is through reimbursement only (check issued in US dollars or wire transfer); advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

Novel Saints: Novel, Hagiography and Romance from the 4th to the 12th Century, 22-24 November 2018, Ghent

Deadline: 15 April 2018

The early history of the novel has not been written yet. The oldest representatives of this genre (also called ‘ancient romances’ in scholarship) were written in Latin and Greek in the first few centuries of the Common Era. Often, scholars have observed an interim period between the fourth and twelfth centuries from which no novels are said to have been preserved, and identify a so-called ‘re- emergence’ of the genre in Byzantium. Building on recent research that studies hagiography as literature, this conference of the ERC project Novel Saints (Ghent University) aims to challenge this view by studying hagiography as a continuation of novelistic literature during the so-called ‘dark age’ of the novel. A number of texts from this period have already received attention for their novelistic qualities, such as Ps-Nilus’ Narrationes, Ammonius’ Report on the Slaughter of the Monks of Sinai and Rhaithou, the Historia Monachorum, Palladius’ Historia Lausiaca, The Martyrdom of Galaction & Episteme, Jerome’s Lives of Malchus, Paul and Hilarion, and the Syriac Life of Abraham and his Niece Mary. Moreover, both ancient fiction and some of these (and other) hagiographical narratives are known to have impacted medieval romance (e.g. Metiochus and Parthenope as a source for the Persian love romance Vāmiq & ‘Adhrā and the Life ofSaint Eustace/Placidas for chivalric romance in the West).

The conference aims to examine the persistence of ancient novelistic material in hagiography and instances of continuity of novelistic and/or hagiographical strands in medieval romances in the West, Byzantium and Persia. We invite papers exploring intersections between two or three of the following narrative traditions:

1) ancient novelistic fiction (broadly defined), including Greek novels (both extant and fragmentarily preserved; e.g. Ninus, Achilles Tatius’ Leucippe and Clitophon, Heliodorus’ Aethiopica, etc.), Latin novels (Apuleius’ Metamorphoses, Petronius’ Satyrica and the Historia Apollonii Regis Tyri), Jewish novels (e.g. the Book of Tobit, Joseph and Aseneth) and so-called ‘fringe novels’ or ‘novelistic biographies’ (i.e. the Alexander Romance, the Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles, the Pseudo-Clementines, Philostratus’ Life of Apollonius of Tyana, the Life of Aesop, etc.); and/or

2) hagiography from the fourth to the twelfth century, including Lives, Martyr Acts, hagiographical romances, and edifying tales written in Greek, Latin, Syriac, Arabic, Armenian, Georgian, Ethiopian and Coptic; and/or

3) medieval romance in the West, Byzantium or Persia.

Of particular interest are contributions that study:

•   ancient fiction as a literary model in hagiography alongside other models (such as the Bible);

•   different forms and types of the impact/relevance of the novelistic tradition on/for hagiographical texts: intertextuality, direct or indirect borrowings, common narrative 
techniques, generic topoi, etc.;

•   conceptualizations of overlaps and similarities between novels and hagiography. Which theoretical concepts, tools or frameworks are useful to do so?

•   evidence of the circulation of ancient fiction in Oriental Christian literatures like Syriac, Arabic, Armenian, Georgian, Ethiopian, and Coptic, which can lend support to discussions of the impact of the ancient novel on the hagiographical production in those languages;

•   late antique and medieval literary practice: the role(s) of schools, classical education, ancient rhetoric, metaphrasis for the composition of hagiographical texts; hagiographers as students or readers of ancient prose fiction; etc.;

•   implications of persistences of ancient pagan or Jewish fiction into Christian hagiography (or vice versa in the case of later novels, such as Heliodorus’ Aethiopica): religious implications, literary implications; implications for the concepts of fiction at work, etc.;

•   the continuation of hagiographical narrative traditions into medieval Western and Eastern romance;

•   generic awareness: which are markers in hagiography that proclaim awareness of the novelistic tradition, indicate affinity with and/or a distance from it (or vice versa in the case of later novels)? To what extent and how do writers of novels, hagiography and/or romance present themselves as belonging to a particular genre and/or narrative tradition?

•   the usefulness of the concept of genre: how useful is our current generic classification, labelling texts as ‘novels,’ ‘romance’ or otherwise, and establishing and promoting distinctions between ‘novels,’ ‘romance,’ ‘fictional biography’ and ‘hagiography;’ between ‘core novels,’ ‘fringe novels;’ ‘family romances,’ and ‘hagiographical romances;’ between ‘epic passions’ and ‘historical passions,’ etc.? Are there alternative ways to think about and study these texts and their interrelations? 


 
Please send your abstracts to Flavia Ruani (flavia.ruani@ugent.be) by 15 April 2018


​.​

Abstracts (350 words max, in English or French) should include name, title of proposed paper, affiliation, and position. Notification about participation will be emailed by 15 June 2018. 
For further queries, please contact flavia.ruani@ugent.be or tine.scheijnen@ugent.be


From Homer to Hatzi-Yavrouda – Aspects of oral narration in the Greek tradition, 29-30 September 2018, The Danish Institute at Athens

Deadline: 1 May 2018

The aim of this conference is to analyze and discuss various aspects of orally produced and diffused stories from the Greek tradition, from Antiquity up to the storytelling communities in the 20th century.

In European culture, literature has been orally created and diffused as a parallel to written literature, but until rather recently the two traditions have mostly been studied separately. However, there is a closer interrelationship between the two, and it is not just the orally diffused folk literature that is inspired by the written high-culture literature. It is also vice versa. Therefore, the conference will start with the question: What is orality?

We wish to study orality from different genres and periods within the Greek tradition and from different academic fields, as e.g. classical philology, byzantine studies, folklore, and comparative literature. Proposals in all these fields are welcome as are proposals addressing the interrelationship between oral and written literature, or the influence from and to other cultures. For the modern period special focus will be given to the folktale.

The Greek tradition is taken as a point of departure for a diachronic analysis of orality, from Homer to one of the most intriguing narrators of Greek folktales, Hatzi-Yavrouda of Kos. But it is our belief that the results of the analysis of the Greek case could easily be applied to other European traditions.

It will be a two-day conference with four key-note papers: by Professor Emeritus from the Department of Folklore at the University of Athens, Michalis Meraklis, Professor Emerita from the Department of Classics at the University of Southern Denmark, Minna Skafte Jensen, Assistant Professor Emerita and Senior Research Fellow at the Austrian Academy of Science, Carolina Cupane, and Professor Emerita from the Department of Modern Greek at Harvard University, Margaret Alexiou, in a joint paper with artist Katerina Samara.

To add another dimension to the academic conference, we hope to be able to include two live performances in the programme: by the British storytellers Hugh Lupton and Daniel Mordon, who will do a re-telling of Homer, and by Greek narrator Sasa Voulgari, who will tell Modern Greek folktales.

Abstracts of no more than one page should be sent before 1 May 2018 to: birgit.olsen@diathens.gr

​.​

An academic committee will evaluate the abstracts received.

The acts of the conference will be published in the Monography Series of The Danish Institute (MoDIA). All contributions will be peer-reviewed. Please state in your abstract that you accept publication.
====
2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

MA Scholarships in Syriac Theology, University of Salzburg

The University of Salzburg invites applications now for its MA in Syriac Theology starting in October 2018.  Some part scholarships are available from the Syriac Institute and the Syriac Theological Seminary Salzburg and the course fees are minimal in line with European levels.  The MA is taught in English by leading international lecturers, including Sebastian Brock (Oxford), Herman Teule (Leuven), Hidemi Takahashi (Tokyo) and Shabo Talay (Berlin).

For full details of the MA please see www.uni-salzburg.at/syriac

If you have any questions, please contact mast@sbg.ac.at

 
Two research assistants in Byzantine Greek Philology,

​ ​

University of Ghent

Deadline: 28 February 2018

More information and how to apply here 

Post-doctoral Mellon Fellowships, Institute of Medieval Studies

Deadline: 1 February 2018

More information and how to apply here

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Byzness. Bookmark the permalink.