The Byzness 09/09/16

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

The Byzness, 9th September 2016

 

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  1. NEWS & EVENTS
  2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
  3. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

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  1. NEWS & EVENTS

 

Voices on Late Latin Poetry: European Scholarship in Context, Friday 16th September 2016, 9am-4pm, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford

This study day aims at giving a survey on European scholarship on late Latin poetry. It features six papers, each on the scholarship tradition of one language (French, Italian, Spanish, German, Dutch) or region (Central European). The speakers will present the most important scholars of their language/region, past and present, and situate them in the context of Classics as a discipline as well as explore the educational, historical and social roots from which the individual research traditions have emerged.

 

Everyone is welcome! Please email helen.kaufmann@classics.ox.ac.uk  to book your place.

 

For the full event programme and more on the event context see https://voicesinlatelatinpoetry.wordpress.com

 

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Webinar: Greek Documentary Practice in Egypt from Byzantium to Islam (6th-8th c.)

 

Lajos Berkes (Institute for Papryology, University of Heidelberg) is offering in Winter Semester 2016/17, in cooperation with Heidelberg’s Center for Cultural Heritage, an online seminar on Greek Documentary Practice in Egypt from Byzantium to Islam (6th-8th c.). The course is free of charge and will take place Thursdays, 16:15 – 17:45, Central European Time. The first meeting will be October 20, 2016 and the course will run until February 9, 2017. The language of instruction is English, and good knowledge of Greek is required.  Certificates will be issued upon successful completion of the class.

 

Those wishing to take part should send a statement of interest and CV to Michaela Böttner (boettner@uni-heidelberg.de ) by September 30. Questions about the course can be directed to Lajos Berkes (lajos.berkes@zaw.uni-heidelberg.de ). Please be advised that the number of people who will be permitted to participate is limited to ten.

 

Course Description

Papyri from Egypt are extraordinary sources of information about documentary practice of the early Byzantine empire. Tens of thousands of letters, contracts, receipts and other documents shed light on aspects of everyday life that can barely be seen elsewhere around the Mediterranean. After the Islamic conquest in 642, Greek continued to be employed both in the private sphere and administration, where it was used probably up to the early 9th century. In this webinar we will decipher, translate and interpret documents both on papyrus and other writing materials (ostraca, parchment, etc.) written in Greek from a variety of genres and contexts from Byzantine and early Islamic Egypt. Discussion of the documents will include paleographic, historical and linguistic aspects. Through comparison with parallel material from other provinces we will look at the problem of the uniqueness of the Egyptian papyri: to what extent do they represent realities of the Byzantine empire? Special emphasis will also be placed on the status of the Greek language and Hellenic culture under Islamic rule.

 

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 Armenian Language Winter School, 05 Dec – 16 Dec, 2016, Yerevan, Armenia

Please find all application details: http://armacad.info/armenian-language-winter-school-05-dec-16-dec-2016-yerevan-armenia

The deadline for applications is October 10, 2016.

 

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Upcoming events at the Harvard Faculty Club organized by East of Byzantium

 

East of Byzantium is a partnership between the Arthur H. Dadian and Ara Oztemel Chair of Armenian Art at Tufts University and the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture at Hellenic College Holy Cross in Brookline, MA, that explores the cultures of the eastern frontier of the Byzantine empire in the late antique and medieval periods.

 

All events will be at: Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

 

Friday, September 30, 2016, 10:00 am–12:00 pm

The Late Medieval Anatolian City: Urban Self-Governance and the Question of Democracy

A workshop for students considering the development of the city in late medieval Anatolia. Led by Rachel Goshgarian, Lafayette College

RSVP required. Additional information and registration at https://eastofbyzantium.org/upcoming-events/.

 

Friday, October 21, 2016, 10:00 am–12:00 pm

Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

Workshop: Anti-Jewish Polemic among Syriac Christians during the First Centuries of Islam, led by Aaron M. Butts, The Catholic University of America. Registration opens September 23, 2016.

 

Friday, November 18, 2016, 10:00 am–12:00 pm

Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

Workshop: Which Nubia and Which Byzantium?, led by Giovanni R. Ruffini, Fairfield University. Registration opens October 21, 2016.

 

Friday, March 31, 2017, 9:30 am–5:30 pm

Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

Symposium: Cultural Heritage Across the Christian East

 

Friday, April 7, 2017, 10:00 am–12:00 pm

Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

Workshop: East Syriac Christianity in the Mongol Empire, led by Mark Dickens, University of Alberta. Registration opens March 10, 2017.

 

For more information, please visit http://eastofbyzantium.org .

 

 

  1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

 

Grey-zone saints in Late Antiquity and early Middle Ages (IMC, Leeds 2017)

 

The Cult of Saints is a major five-year research project, based at the University of Oxford, which is investigating the origins and development of the cult of saints in all cultural zones of ancient Christianity up to around AD 700. At the forthcoming Medieval Congress in Leeds (3-6 July 2017) the project-team is organising a strand on grey-zone, or marginal, saints in Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages. A limited number of Christian heroes, mostly New Testament figures and martyrs, were renowned across Christendom. Many more struggled hard to gain a wider prominence, or even local recognition, and often remained saints only in the eyes of single partisans or restricted groups. Their sainthood was suggested but not fully accepted, or promoted but contested; their cults almost succeeded, but finally failed. Sometimes their very existence was put into question.

 

Those interested in presenting papers on such saints and their cults, particularly if focused on the period before c.900, are requested to send title and short abstract (c. 100 words) to Bryan Ward-Perkins (bryan.ward-perkins@history.ox.ac.uk ) or Robert Wiśniewski (r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl ) by 20th September.  Please, note that, sadly, the project is unable to fund speakers’ expenses.

 

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Clerical income and property in Late Antiquity and Early Middle Ages (IMC, Leeds 2017)

 

At the forthcoming Medieval Congress in Leeds (3-6 July 2017) the team of the ‘Presbyters in the Late Antique West’ Project, based at the University of Warsaw, organises a strand on the income and property of clergy. In most literary and normative sources we usally see clerics entirely dependent on diverse types of subsidies related to their ecclesiastical office. But some casual remarks and documentary evidence show that the reality was more complicated. The actual sources of income of clerics were diverse. This session will seek to answer the following questions:

 

  • How much did the clerics rely on church property and revenues?
  • What were other sources of their income, either those linked with the religious expertise or unconnected with ecclesiastical activity?
  • How the frontiers were fixed between the private property and revenues of clerics and those of the church, but also between the resources of diverse groups of clerics?

 

Those interested in presenting papers on such topics, particularly if focused on the period before c. 900, are requested to send the title and a short abstract (c. 100 words) to Robert Wiśniewski (r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl) by 20 September. Please, note that unfortunately the project is unable to fund speakers’ expenses.

 

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In Search of Crusader Art: Current Approaches and New Perspectives at the 4th Forum Medieval Art, Berlin (20-23 September 2017)

 

Paper proposals of max. 1 paper are due by 31 October 2016 for the session organized by Ioanna Christoforaki at the 4th Forum Medieval Art, to be held in Berlin (20-23 September 2017). Send proposals at mail@mittelalterkongress.de

 

Although the concept of crusader art is effortlessly understood by scholars, its precise definition is notoriously elusive. Crusader art has traditionally been described as the figural art and architecture produced for the Crusaders in the Holy Land. The patrons were men and women, laymen as well as clergymen, who arrived to the Holy Land as pilgrims, soldiers, settlers, rulers, or merchants, while the artists were Franks and Italians who were residents in the Outremer, Westerners who travelled to the Latin East, or Eastern Christians who worked for Crusader patrons.

 

In recent decades, however, this conventional definition of crusader art has been challenged. Since it sits on the boundaries of many artistic traditions, its borders have become more porous. The centres of production have shifted beyond the Holy Land, to include places like Cyprus. From Sinai to Cilician Armenia, multifold artistic traditions have converged and numerous people have interacted in the production of what is recognised as crusader art.

 

The aim of this session is to reflect critically on the limitations of terminology, while addressing issues of artistic transmission across the fluid borderland of the Medieval Mediterranean. It will seek to expand the cultural dialogue between the various religious and ethnic groups in the Eastern Mediterranean, by examining how Islamic, Syrian and Jewish artistic traditions interacted with the Byzantine and Western paradigms. It will attempt to identify the varied forms of crusader art that have emerged in recent years and explore how this revised corpus of crusader material challenges accepted notions. Finally, it will inquire whether crusader art, as an essentially transcultural contact zone, acted as an agent of separation, communication, or convergence.

 

This session invites papers which re-evaluate traditional approaches to crusader art, artefacts and architecture and seek to re-examine the interplay between material culture, patrons and artists. Participants are expected to explore the artistic interaction between the different ethnic groups in the region and are encouraged to explore a novel approach in defining the notion of crusader art.

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  1. Forum Kunst des Mittelalters / Forum Medieval Art – 360° – Verortung, Entgrenzung, Globalisierung, 20-23rd September 2017, Berlin and Branenburg

 

Please visit the website of the Forum for full session details:

http://mittelalterkongress.de/mittelalterkongress/wb/pages/posts/call-for-papers—4th-for um-medieval-art—english-48.php

 

Please send your paper proposals of max. 1 page to: mail@mittelalterkongress.de

Deadline: October 31, 2016

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Nea Paphos and Western Cyprus: New Archaeological and Historical Perspectives, 11th– 15th October, 2017, Pafos, Cyprus

Please see the call for papers attached here. The deadline for submission is 31st October 2016.

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Greek Culture and Interaction in the Levant 4th cent. BC – 7th cent. CE, 10th – 11th July 2017, (Oxford University)

ARAM Society for Syro-Mesopotamian Studies is organizing its Forty Fourth International Conference on the Greek Culture and Interaction in the Levant 4th cent. BC – 7th cent. AD, to be held at the Oriental Institute, the University of Oxford, on 10th – 11th July 2017.

 

The conference will start on Monday 10th July at 9am, finishing on Tuesday 11th July at 7pm. Each speaker’s paper is limited to 35 minutes, with an additional 10 minutes for discussion. All papers given at the conference will be considered for publication in a future edition of the ARAM Periodical, subject to editorial review.

 

If you wish to participate in the conference, please contact our Oxford address: ARAM, the Oriental Institute, Oxford University, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE, England.

 

Tel. 01865-514041 Email: aram@orinst.ox.ac.uk The participation form is attached here.

 

 

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Melkite Christianity (the Patriarchates of Antioch, Jerusalem and Alexandria), 1st – 19th Centuries, 12th – 14th July 2017, (Oxford University)

ARAM Society for Syro-Mesopotamian Studies is organizing its Forty Fifth International Conference on Melkite Christianity (the Patriarchates of Antioch, Jerusalem and Alexandria), 1st – 19th Centuries, to be held at the Oriental Institute, University of Oxford, on 12th – 14th July 2017.

The conference will start on Wednesday 12th July at 9am, finishing on Friday 14th July at 7pm. Each speaker’s paper is limited to 35 minutes, with an additional 10 minutes for discussion. All papers given at the conference will be considered for publication in a future edition of the ARAM Periodical, subject to editorial review.

 

If you wish to participate in the conference, please contact our Oxford address:

ARAM, the Oriental Institute, Oxford University, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE, England.

Tel. 01865-514041 Email: aram@orinst.ox.ac.uk The Registration form is attached here.

 

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Arabs Before Islam, 17th – 19th July 2017, (Oxford University)

ARAM Society for Syro-Mesopotamian Studies is organizing its Forty Sixth International Conference on Arabs Before Islam, to be held at the Oriental Institute, University of Oxford, on 17h – 19th July 2018.

The conference will start on Monday 17th July at 9am, finishing on Wednesday 19th July at 1pm. Each speaker’s paper is limited to 35 minutes, with an additional 10 minutes for discussion. All papers given at the conference will be considered for publication in a future edition of the ARAM Periodical, subject to editorial review.

 

If you wish to participate in the conference, please contact our Oxford address:

ARAM, the Oriental Institute, Oxford University, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE, England.

Tel. 01865-514041 Email: aram@orinst.ox.ac.uk The Registration form is found here.

 

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Call for Papers: “Barbarians and Barbarians Kingdoms I-III”: ICMS 52, Kalamazoo, MI, May 11-14, 2017

Debate remains lively concerning the barbarians of late antiquity, their impact on late Roman civilization (and its impact on them), and the manifold continuities and discontinuities within their early medieval kingdoms.  Scholars of all levels are thus invited to submit an abstract for one of three sessions at ICMS 52 that will focus on “Barbarians and Barbarian Kingdoms.”  These sessions are intentionally broad in scope, allowing for a disparate range of topics that might focus on a specific region, time, or development; comment on a vast array of written and/or material sources; or treat a particular theme, person, or event.  What they will all have in common is barbarians and/or barbarian kingdoms, c. 350-700.

 

Please direct inquiries or abstracts with a completed Participant Information Form (here: http://www.wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions ) to Jonathan Arnold (jon-arnold@utulsa.edu ) by September 15.

 

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Call for Submissions for Limes Plus Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities

Title of the Issue: Making and Remaking of Byzantium

Editors: Milena Repajić, University of Belgrade (Serbia), Larisa Vilimonović, University of Belgrade (Serbia)

Deadline for Submissions: 30th September

 

Byzantine history is crucial in understanding geopolitical, economic and cultural development of medieval Balkans, and consequently, how the present state of affairs came to being. More importantly and more precisely, it was crucial in shaping and creating traditions in the entire formerly Byzantine world from the Danube to the lake Van. Political, cultural and territorial claims to Byzantine and medieval heritage, moreover, are a common currency in modern political, as well as scholarly discourse. Therefore, Limes Plus and Seminar for Byzantine Studies (University of Belgrade) came to an agreement that at least one issue on Byzantine history would be mutually beneficial. For a journal focused primarily on modern and contemporary geopolitical and economic issues in the Balkans, a look into premodern history of the peninsula and its Mediterranean framework, often used and abused in modern political context, would mean a fresh perspective. For Byzantine studies, traditionally isolated and reiterrated for and amongst its own specialists, it is a chance for visibility outside of the narrow circle of byzantinists. This unusual cooperation also led to such a general topic, rather than focusing on a single more specific subject of Byzantine history.

 

Possible themes may include perspectives on:

– Discourse and discourse-making in Byzantium and the medieval Balkans, perceptions of Byzantium in different spatial and chronological frameworks, modern scholarship on Byzantium and the medieval Balkans.

– Geopolitical issues in the Eastern Mediterranean in the Middle Ages, the place of Balkans in the Byzantine world, intercultural exchange, centers and peripheries in Byzantium, social history, Byzantine and Slavic medieval narratives, Byzantine art and literature.

Contributions from all fields of Byzantine and medieval political, cultural, social, economic history, art history, and literature are encouraged. Papers from other humanities and social sciences are welcome as well as multidisciplinary approaches.

 

For additional information about the journal, a style guide and the deadlines for publication please see the call for papers here.

 

  1. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

Director, Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute

 

Position Opening: Director, Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute

(CAARI), Nicosia, Cyprus. To begin 1 July 2017.

 

The Institute: Founded in 1978, the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute (CAARI) is an American not-for-profit organization located in Nicosia, Cyprus. The mission of CAARI is to promote the study and knowledge of Cypriot archaeology and related disciplines. With a newly expanded and technologically outfitted library space, CAARI is one of the most important centers for the study of archaeology and related history and culture in the eastern Mediterranean. Affiliated with the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) and the Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC), CAARI offers international and Cypriot scholars comprehensive research facilities through its world-class library and technical support facilities. CAARI also conducts lectures, seminars, and symposia for professional and lay audiences; offers fellowships for U.S. and international students and established scholars; and maintains a residence for overseas students and scholars. See our website www.caari.org  for further information and job description.

 

Responsibilities of the Director: The Director directs and manages CAARI’s research

center, its staff, and its residence in line with the policies and decisions of the Board of

Trustees of CAARI. Responsibilities of the Director include the on-going development of its library, preparation and implementation of scholarly and public programs and events, facilitating and supporting the work of fellows and visiting scholars, and providing services for archaeological projects in Cyprus.  The Director reports to the Executive Committee of CAARI and works with the Board of Trustees in broadening U.S. and international interest in Cypriot studies and on strengthening bonds with the Cypriot community, as well as with U.S. and European research institutions.  Along with the Board of Trustees, the Director prepares strategic plans for CAARI and assists in fund raising.

 

Qualifications: Must have substantial knowledge of archaeology in the eastern Mediterranean with research experience in Cyprus. Ph.D. in archaeology or related field is preferred, but equivalent academic experience will be considered. Knowledge of modern Greek an asset. Administrative management experience, leadership skills, ability to converse with U.S. and international academe, strong people skills, good private and public speaking ability are requisite. Essential is capable interaction with government agencies of the Republic of Cyprus.

 

Compensation: An attractive package of salary and benefits is offered. Specific terms negotiable.

Terms of Service: Three year initial contract preferred, with renewal possible.

 

Deadline for Application: Application comprising a cover letter, curriculum vitae, a statement of not more than two pages setting out the candidate’s vision of CAARI as an American overseas research center, as well as names and contact information for three references must be received by September 20, 2016.

 

Email application to CAARI at following email address: caari@bu.edu . Shortlisted andidates will be interviewed at the annual meeting of ASOR in San Antonio, Texas in November.

 

CAARI is an equal opportunity employer.

 

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Mirela Ivanova

DPhil Candidate in History
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

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