The Byzness

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

The Byzness, 15th of June, 2014

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1. NEWS & EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. SUMMER SCHOOLS

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1. NEWS & EVENTS

Please find here a letter of concern directed to the Minister of Culture of Greece regarding the endangered Byzantine archaeological remains at the intersection of Egnatia and Venizelou Streets in Thessaloniki.  

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The General Assembly of the Christian Archaeological Society, one of the oldest scientific associations in Greece whose goal is to promote research and every other type of scientific activity in the field of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine archaeology and art, expresses its grave concern over the fortunes of the uniquely-important building complex revealed in the center of Thessaloniki at the junction of Egnatia and Venizelou Streets in the course of construction of the city’s Metro.
This monumental building complex of Byzantine Thessaloniki, the Empire’s second city, situated at the intersection of the Mesi Odos (Middle Street) and the perpendicular street leading to the city’s Byzantine harbor, preserves a monumental tetrapylon as it stood in the 6th century at the streets’ crossing.  Also preserved in situ are the central drainage system and the bases for the colonnade of a portico that extended along the street. The remains, which date from the 4th to the 9th century, are one-of-a-kind finds of inestimable historical and cultural value, not only for Thessaloniki but for world cultural heritage.
The General Assembly has decided to appeal to the Greek State to ensure that this unique building complex be preserved in situ as an archaeological site accessible to the public in the heart of Thessaloniki, and to search for solutions to enable the site’s coexistence with the Metro which will ease the modern city’s traffic congestion. Should this urban building complex be moved it will lose its authenticity, even if the finds are later repositioned in the location where they were found.
Sharon E. J. Gerstel
Professor of Byzantine Art & Archaeology
Department of Art History
UCLA

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Announcing The Medieval Globe. Connectivity~Communication~Exchange, a  new biannual academic journal. The Medieval Globe (TMG) is a peer-reviewed journal to be launched in 2014, published in both print and digital formats.  It is based at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and sponsored by CARMEN, the Worldwide Medieval Network.  It is dedicated to exploring the modes of communication, materials of exchange, and myriad interconnections among regions, communities, and individuals in an era central to human history.
The Medieval Globe promotes scholarship in three related areas of study:
  • the direct and indirect means by which peoples, goods, and ideas came into contact,
  • the deep roots of global developments,
  • the ways in which perceptions of “the medieval” have been (and are) constructed around the world.
Contributions to a global understanding of the medieval period need not encompass the globe in any territorial sense. The Medieval Globe advances a new theory and praxis of medieval studies by bringing into view phenomena that have been rendered practically or conceptually invisible by anachronistic boundaries, categories, and expectations: these include networks, communities, bodies of knowledge, forms of movement, varieties of interaction, and identities. It invites submissions that analyze actual or potential connections, trace trajectories and currents, address topics of broad interest, or pioneer portable methodologies.
For more information, please visit:  http://www.arc-humanities.org/the-medieval-globe.html
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Dialogue and Debate from Late Antiquity to Late Byzantium
4-5 July 2014
Convened by Averil Cameron | Niels Gaul
Florin Leonte | Divna Manolova Alberto Rigolio | Foteini Spingou
Venue
Douglas Price Room
Keble College
Oxford ox1 3pg
pre-registration essential
Please register with averil.cameron@keble.ox.ac.uk by 20 June 2014 at the latest
Students | £15 Senior Members | £20
For the full program please see here.
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The Art Institute of Chicago will be hosting a version of the exhibition Heaven and Earth: Byzantine Art from Greek Collections that was previously on display at the National Gallery of Art and the Getty.  The anticipated dates of the exhibition are September 28, 2014-February 15, 2015.  The exhibition will include 63 objects (about a third of those that appeared at previous venues), but will retain the chronological range of the 4th-15th centuries.

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2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

CFP:  Infiltrating the Pedagogical Canon (SHERA at CAA 2015, New York, 11-14 Feb 2015)
Deadline:  July 14, 2014
The Society of Historians of Eastern European, Eurasian, and Russian Art and Architecture (SHERA, http://www.shera-art.org) invites submission of proposals for the following sponsored panel: ‘Infiltrating the Pedagogical Canon’
As researcher-educators in specialized fields, how do we effectively incorporate the content of our scholarly work into our everyday teaching?  In many art and art history departments, rare is the opportunity to teach upper-division courses focused on our field of research.  Art history surveys generally include, at best, a handful of significant objects from the entire history of Eurasian, Eastern European, and Russian art, only a few amongst many global perspectives that traditionally lie beyond the scope of standard art history curricula.  Contextualization of such works within a culturally specific framework, distinct from yet connected to the metanarratives of “Western” and “Non-Western” art, remains challenging.  How do we incorporate the question of the work addressing local concerns versus international art audiences into teaching?  How does this kind of problem open up new perspectives on how our students do art history? Teaching a mixed population of students who may range from recent immigrants and heritage speakers to students for whom the name “Lenin” lacks signification, how do we spark an interest in globally diverse art in students of all levels, from novices to more advanced?
This panel invites submissions of theoretical discussions about the importance of incorporating culturally specific art into standard art history curricula, practical examples of curricular innovations involving global and transnational perspectives on art, as well as specific case studies focused on non-canonical objects or contexts that encourage discussions of both local and global perspectives. Submissions may deal with any chronological period. Papers that explore questions regarding the infiltration of Russian, Eurasian, and Eastern European objects and narratives into the standard teaching canon—as well as transnational projects—are preferred, but we also welcome projects that can provide a broader network of global perspectives to the conversation. This panel seeks to engage questions on both practical and theoretical levels, providing attendees with take-away material to immediately employ in the classroom, rationale for how and why to focus on culturally specific, globally diverse art within a broader art-historical context, and inspiration for bridging the gap between scholarly inquiry and pedagogy in these fields.
Submit proposal abstracts of 500 words or less, along with a current CV of 1-2 pages, to Marie Gasper-Hulvat, Kent State University at Stark, mgasper6@kent.edu.  Submissions must be received by email by July 14, 2014.
This session will be free and open to the public.  Accepted panelists must become members of SHERA, but need not be members of the College Art Association (CAA), nor register for the CAA conference.

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3. SUMMER SCHOOLS

Νέα Ελληνικά για κλασικούς φιλολόγους

Modern Greek for Classicists – Classes Begin Sunday, 6/22

A course designed for students who know ancient Greek and would like to learn the modern Greek language.

To register for a Telepaideia course, send an e-mail to info@paideia-institute.org with your name, e-mail address, phone number, the name of the course in which you’d like to participate, and your Gmail address.

http://www.paideiainstitute.org/programs/telepaideia-latin-and-greek-online

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