The Byzness

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

The Byzness, 19th of May, 2014

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1. NEWS & EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. FELLOWSHIPS & JOB OPPORTUNITIES

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1. NEWS & EVENTS

 

Dear colleagues,
If you would like to sign the petition requesting that Hagia Sophia remain a museum, please send an email providing your name and institutional affiliation to ayasofyaimza@gmail.com.
The petition has been launched by prominent Turkish scholars and is pasted below. Please feel free to share this petition with colleagues who might wish to add their names to the list of signatories.
AYASOFYA MÜZE OLARAK KALMALIDIR
Aşağıda isimleri bulunan bizler Ayasofya Müzesi hakkında kaleme aldığımız metni ilginize sunuyor, ayasofyaimza@gmail.com adresine, 20 Mayıs 2014 tarihine kadar desteklerinizi bekliyoruz. Hazırladığımız bu yazı ve sizlerin desteği ile konunun kamu tarafındaki muhataplarının dikkatini çekmeyi ve kendileriyle ortak bir platformda görüşme olanağı bulabilmeyi ümit ediyoruz.
Saygılarımızla.
AYASOFYA, İSTANBUL VE TÜRKIYE’NIN OLDUĞU KADAR ORTADOĞU, DOĞU AKDENIZ VE AVRUPA’NIN BAŞLICA ORTAK DINI, KÜLTÜREL, SANATSAL VE SIYASI SIMGELERI ARASINDA YER ALMAKTADIR. AYASOFYA’NIN MÜZE OLARAK BÜTÜN ZIYARETÇILERINE EŞIT ŞEKILDE AÇIK OLMASI, BU EMSALSIZ ANITIN EVRENSEL DEĞERINI YANSITAN VE ÇOK KATMANLI TARIHININ HERHANGI BIR DÖNEMINI DIŞLAMADAN KUCAKLAYAN BARIŞÇIL VE KAPSAYICI BIR DAVRANIŞTIR. BU GÜZIDE ESERIN İSTANBUL VE DÜNYA TARIHININ ORTAK MIRASI OLARAK YAŞATILABILMESI MÜZE STATÜSÜNDE KALMASINA BAĞLIDIR.

 

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TORCH Book at Lunchtime | Byzantine Matters, Professor Averil Cameron
Wednesday 21st May, 13:00 – 13:45, with lunch from 12:45
The themes raised by Professor Cameron’s book will be discussed by:
– Dr Jas Elsner (Humfrey Payne Senior Research Fellow in Classical Archaeology and Art)
– Dr Peter Frankopan (Director of the Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research)
– Dame Jinty Nelson (Emeritus Professor, King’s College London)
About the book:
For many of us, Byzantium remains “byzantine”–obscure, marginal, difficult. Despite the efforts of some recent historians, prejudices still deform popular and scholarly understanding of the Byzantine civilization, often reducing it to a poor relation of Rome and the rest of the classical world. In this book, renowned historian Averil Cameron presents an original and personal view of the challenges and questions facing historians of Byzantium today.
The book explores five major themes, all subjects of controversy. “Absence” asks why Byzantium is routinely passed over, ignored, or relegated to a sphere of its own. “Empire” reinserts Byzantium into modern debates about empire, and discusses the nature of its system and its remarkable longevity. “Hellenism” confronts the question of the “Greekness” of Byzantium, and of the place of Byzantium in modern Greek consciousness. “The Realms of Gold” asks what lessons can be drawn from Byzantine visual art, and “The Very Model of Orthodoxy” challenges existing views of Byzantine Christianity.
Throughout, the book addresses misconceptions about Byzantium, suggests why it is so important to integrate the civilization into wider histories, and lays out why Byzantium should be central to ongoing debates about the relationships between West and East, Christianity and Islam, Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, and the ancient and medieval periods. The result is a forthright and compelling call to reconsider the place of Byzantium in Western history and imagination.
Averil Cameron is professor emeritus of late antique and Byzantine history at the University of Oxford and former warden of Keble College, Oxford. Her books include The Mediterranean World in Late Antiquity, The Byzantines, and The Later Roman Empire.
Part of the TORCH Book at Lunchtime series
Free and open to all. For more information please visit www.torch.ox.ac.uk or find us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Friday 30 May 2014
A One-Day Workshop at the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London
Sponsored by the AG Leventis Foundation
The mosaics of Thessaloniki provide the most comprehensive ensemble of Byzantine mosaics in the world, with examples from late antiquity right through to the fourteenth century. They present remarkable testimony to the skills of artists throughout the Byzantine millennium, and give insights into many aspects of Byzantine society and belief. They also document the changing concerns of the city and its relationship with the earthly and divine worlds. The publication of The Mosaics of Thessaloniki, 4th-14th century (Athens: Kapon editions, 2012), edited by C. Bakirtzis, E. Kourkoutidou-Nikolaidou and Ch. Mavropoulou-Tsiumi, has provided an exemplary documentation of the mosaics in the city, with photographs of exceptional quality. In the light of this book as well as the growing quantity of recent work on the mosaics this workshop will look once more at the issues and controversies surrounding the mosaics, especially their dating, contexts and meanings, but also to look at new ways forward in the study of this extraordinary group of monuments. The day includes papers which examine all the major mosaic monuments in the city, but there will be extensive time for discussion so that the controversies and relationships between them can all be discussed.
Booking is available here.
£12 (£7 students, Courtauld staff/students and concessions).
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Here is a link to a new publication of Psellos’s orations on Symeon the Metaphrast and on the Miracle at Blachernae,  both translated, full annotated, and accompanied by introductions and bibliography. (The opening image of an eye-rolling imperial student is particularly winsome at this time of the academic year!)  The material is now available on-line, fully searchable on the Center for Hellenic Studies website as a refereed, “digitally born” publication for which I hold the copyright but which can be freely quoted, downloaded, etc.  Here’s the URN
Sent with best greetings,
Elizabeth Fisher
George Washington University
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Travelogues website (http://eng.travelogues.gr/) was created within the broader project of Aikaterini Laskaridis Foundation to promote Greek culture, and especially Greek literature, on a national and international level. This website aims to make known the graphic materials found in travel accounts of journeys to Greece and the eastern Mediterranean from the 15th century onwards, and thus contribute both to students’ education and scientific research. An important part of the editions that constituted the data base of the website belongs to the Historical Library of the Foundation, currently under construction.
Travelogues will periodically be updated with material from major libraries in Greece, such as Gennadius Library and Benaki Museum Library. This material, already in process, spans the time from the 15th to the early 20th century. Of approximately 4500 images, 560 have already been incorporated in the website’s collections. In the same sense, the bibliography shall be updated with the most recent research contributions. User feedback will be taken into consideration and the pertinent modifications will get reflected.

 

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2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

 

Herewith please find the Call for Papers for the Shifting Frontiers in Late Antiquity conference, to be held in Iowa City on March 26-29, 2015. The CFP is available here.
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Against Gravity: Building Practices in the Pre-Industrial World
20-22 March 2015
University of Pennsylvania
Following on the success of “Masons at Work”(held in spring 2012, and published as  http://www.sas.upenn.edu/ancient/publications.html), the symposium aims to assemble specialists to examine building practices in the pre-industrial world, with an emphasis on Greek, Roman, Byzantine, medieval, and pre-modern Islamic architecture. In addition to invited speakers, we are soliciting 20-minute papers that examine the problems which pre-modern masons commonly encountered – and the solutions they developed – in the process of design and construction.  Evidence may be drawn from a variety of sources, but we encourage studies based on the analysis of well-preserved buildings.
Those wishing to speak should submit by email a letter to the organizing committee, including name, title, institutional affiliation, paper title, plus a summary of 200 words or fewer.  Graduate students should include a note of support from their adviser.  Deadline: 15 November 2014.  The final program will be announced immediately thereafter.  Submit proposals to ancient@sas.upenn.edu with “Against Gravity” in the subject line.
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I’m pleased to announce the official launch of Beth Shean After Antiquity, an online exhibition and archive of the materials excavated at Beth Shean by the University of Pennsylvania from 1921–1933.
Contributors: Megan Boomer, Matthew Chalmers, Victoria Fleck, Joseph Kopta, Robert Ousterhout (project director), James Shackelford, Rebecca Vandewalle, and Arielle Winnik.
BSAA is a collaborative project of Penn’s History of Art Department, the Penn Museum, and the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at Penn Libraries, with support from the Digital Humanities Forum.
Check it out!

 

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Please find here the announcement for the SPBS & Hellenic Centre’s illustrated lecture, with Professor Jonathon Harris. 

 

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3. STUDENTSHIPS & SUMMER SCHOOLS

 

The Institute for Early Christian and Byzantine Studies is an internationally renowned research center which is staffed by two full professors and seven post- and pre-doctoral researchers as well as some associate members. It is home to the Series Graeca of the Corpus Christianorum, which publishes critical editions of Greek patristic and Byzantine texts. For our new project on “Knowledge Transfer in the Macedonian Renaissance” we are inviting applications from MA students and scholars from non-EEA countries to carry out doctoral research on the Byzantine Coislin Anthology. Please find all details here.

 

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http://www.calrbs.org/admissions/

Byzantine Illuminated Manuscripts at California Rare Book School, UCLA

August 4-8, 2014

Inspired by the exhibition Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections that will be on view at the Getty Villa Museum, April 9- August 25, 2014, this course will explore the painted page in Byzantine manuscripts. The Byzantine Empire spanned many centuries (c. 600 – 1453 A.D.) and covered territory from Italy to Syria and from Turkey to North Africa, and yet, despite the wide diversity of people and locations Byzantine imagery appears largely consistent. This course will give a general overview of illuminated manuscripts in the Middle Ages, as well as a survey of Byzantine art. We will study early Byzantine manuscripts and their relationship to Ancient art and Western Medieval art. We will continue through the middle Byzantine period and late Byzantine periods learning to identify the diversity in styles and types of illuminated texts. Attention will also be given to the codicology and technical aspects of medieval manuscripts, using primary manuscript material at UCLA. We will have the opportunity to visit the exhibition at the Getty Villa, as well as a private viewing of Byzantine manuscripts in the Getty Museum Manuscripts reading room. The course will also include a daylong studio workshop, with artist Sylvana Barrett, at the J. Paul Getty Museum Studios. Participants will work with handmade parchments, prepare traditional illuminator’s paints from dry pigments and learn basic gilding techniques while creating a small illuminated image.

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Hamburg, University of Hamburg, Graduate School of the “Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures” (CSMC) / Integriertes Graduiertenkolleg im Sonderforschungsbereich 950 “Manuskriptkulturen in Asien, Afrika und Europa”

2 Ph.D. scholarships (Graduate School Scholarship Programme of the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst – DAAD)

http://www.manuscript-cultures.uni-hamburg.de/cal-details/GradSchool-Scholarships.pdf

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