The Byzness

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

The Byzness, 4th of May, 2014

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1. NEWS & EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

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1. NEWS & EVENTS

 

We are very proud to announce in collaboration with the Oxford Medieval Society ‘1204 and all that’, a friendly debate between east and west on the 810th anniversary of the Fourth Crusade tackling the question ‘Who was to blame for the sack of Constantinople?’ We are particularly pleased to say that our two speakers will beChristopher Tyerman and Peter Frankopan, extremely distinguished crusader historians from eastern and western perspectives. All in all it should be a fascinating and fun evening, and drinks and nibbles will be provided.

The event will be taking place in Ertegun House at 8pm, on Tuesday the 6th May. There will be drinks and nibbles provided between 8 and 8.30 when the debate itself will start, and there will be another short drinks reception afterwards, with the whole event finishing at 10pm. In order to attend you must arrive before 8.25, since after that time there will be no-one to let you into the venue.

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Retired army general wants Egypt’s St. Catherine’s Monastery demolished: Ahmed Ragai Attiya says that the historic UNESCO site in South Sinai poses a threat to Egypt’s national security, after the monks turned it into ‘a place for foreigners’

 

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Leiden University (Leiden Global Interactions – Project ‘Guiding Travelers’) has organized in cooperation with the Hermitage Amsterdam the conference Connecting the Silk Road. Trade, People & Social Networks (c. 400-1300 AD) on May 17 and 18, 2014 (see attached programme). The occasion for this symposium is the exhibition Expedition Silk Road. Treasures from the Hermitage, in the Hermitage Amsterdam on view from March 1 until September 5, 2014. Responsible for the conference organization are: Joanita Vroom (Archaeology, Leiden University) & Gabrielle van den Berg (Area Studies, Leiden University), and Birgit Boelens & Vincent Boele (Hermitage Amsterdam).
For thousands of years, land and sea routes served to exchange goods and ideas over thousands of kilometers from the Pacific East to the Atlantic West. Contacts between east and west are often assumed to have developed first in the Roman period, and then re-established again in the post-Marco Polo era. Exchange however continued, evolving along clusters of networks and changing routes and roads, which were commonly known as ‘the Silk Road’. Networks were created with commercial, social, religious, diplomatic incentives and connected geographical regions over any distance.
In this conference, we aim to highlight the complexity and sophistication of interactions through and between such networks by exploring their diversity, connective infrastructure and organization across natural or human-imposed boundaries. In addition, we hope to discuss development over routes and roads under influence of political, religious, economic and social changes.
Poster presentations for the conference are welcome (please contact: Gabrielle van den Berg:g.r.van.den.berg@hum.leidenuniv.nl, or Maria Riep: m.riep@hum.leidenuniv.nl).
Entrance is free, but registration (from April 23 onwards) for the conference is required. Please contact for further information the Hermitage Amsterdam: pressoffice@hermitage.nl
Programme: see here.
Registration:
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Please find attached and below a reminder about the next British Institute at Ankara lecture:  The Ionian Cities: Myth, migration, and the origins of Greek settlement in Anatolia – Dr Naoise Mac Sweeney – University of Leicester
Simultaneously part of the Greek world and the Near East, the Ionian cities lie on the western coast of Anatolia and the islands of the eastern Aegean. During classical antiquity, a rich body of myths emerged to explain the origins of these cities and the establishment of predominantly Greek-speaking communities in Anatolia. This paper will explore the stories that were told about the foundations of the Ionian cities during the archaic and classical periods (c.800-330 BCE), considering their significance and function as myths, as well as their relation to the archaeological evidence for early Greek settlement and for the establishment of the Ionian cities.
The lecture will take place at The British Academy 10 Carlton House Terrace | London, SW1Y 5AH on Wednesday 14th of May 2014 – 6.30pm – The Wolfson Auditorium
A drinks reception will follow the lecture.
Please visit www.biaa.ac.uk to purchase tickets for non-members and to register for members. Contact Claire McCafferty biaa@britac.ac.uk  | 020 7969 5204 for more help.
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Please join the Center for Byzantine and Greek Studies and the Art Department at Queen College for the latest installment in the Kallinikeion Byzantine Lecture Series, Decline, Prestation, and the Ends of Byzantium.  The talk will be held on Tuesday, May 6 from 5-6 p.m; tea and cookies will be served from 4:30-5:00, preceding the lecture. Please see the flyer for details.

 

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2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

 

Please see here for the Call for Papers from the International Society for Late Antique Literary Studies for their Second Annual Conference at Boston University, November 14-15, 2014. Abstracts are due August 15.

 

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The Institute for Medieval Research welcomes papers for the annual Postgraduate Conference, to be held Saturday 5 July 2014, at the University of Nottingham. Proposals will be accepted for papers relating to the connected themes of contacts and networks focused on any country, culture or geographical region across the middle ages. For more details please see here.

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