The Byzness

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 3 March 2013
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1. CALL FOR PAPERS
2. EVENTS
3. OPPORTUNITIES

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1. CALL FOR PAPERS

Observing the Scribe at Work: Knowledge Transfer and Scribal Professionalism in Pre-Typographic Societies
Macquarie University, Sydney
27-28 September 2013

Prior to the typographic revolution of the 15th century, the figure of the
scribe was one of the keys by which civilisations were able to disseminate
their power, culture and beliefs beyond their geographic, temporal, and even
linguistic limits. Our access to the pre-modern world is mediated by the
material and technological remains of scribal activity, the manuscript as an
artefact of culture and administration. Every text preserved prior to the
advent of printing bears witness to the activities of scribes. Yet as a
social and professional group they are frequently elusive, obscured by other
professional titles, reduced to mention in a colophon, or existing within a
private sphere into which our sources do not reach. While much attention has
been given to the scribe as a literary figure, the manuscripts offer a
unique point of access to this group without the distortions of the literary
tradition. This perspective, however, has frequently been restricted to a
catalogue of errors, reducing the scribe to the transmission of an
acceptable text, without recourse to the physical characteristics of the
manuscript itself.

This workshop is built around the Australian Research Council funded project
‘Knowledge Transfer and Administrative Professionalism in a Pre-Typographic
Society: Observing the Scribe at work in Roman and Early Islamic Egypt’. The
project sets aside the often futile search for the historical figures of the
scribe in favour of a focus on observable phenomena: the evidence of their
activity in the texts themselves. Recognizing that the act of writing can be
a quotidian and vernacular practice, it explicitly includes the documents of
everyday life as well as the realms of the copying of literature, seeking
paths back to an improved understanding of the role and place of scribes in
pre-modern societies.

‘Observing the Scribe at Work’ will bring together specialists in pre-modern
societies of the Mediterranean world and adjoining cultures, from the
ancient Near East, through the Egyptian and Classical worlds to Byzantium
and Renaissance Europe. The papers will contribute to a deeper understanding
of the processes that drive the operation of pre-printing cultures, and
transmit knowledge and traditions forward in human societies.

The workshop will be held at Macquarie University on 27-28 September 2013.
Macquarie University cannot offer full funding for all participants
travelling to Macquarie, but partial financial assistance will be awarded to
select abstracts which closely address the themes of the workshop. Decisions
to this effect will be made by the end of April.
We call for abstracts of up to 300 words that address the objectives of this
workshop. These should be sent to jennifer.cromwell@mq.edu.au by 31 March
2013.

Inquiries: Malcolm Choat (malcolm.choat@mq.edu.au); Jennifer Cromwell
(jennifer.cromwell@mq.edu.au)
Website: http://scribalpractice.com/conference-2013/

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First biennial conference of the ISLALS, “Late Literature in the Sixth Century, East and West,”
October 31 – November 2 at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island
See here for details.

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2. EVENTS

Lecture by Dr Niki Tsironis on ‘Liturgy and re-enactment in the light of Eric Kandel’s theory on memory’
The talk will be to the Fellowship of St Alban and Sergius on Thursday 7 March at 7 pm in the House of St Gregory and St Macrina, 1 Canterbury Road, Oxford OX2 6LU.

 
All Welcome.

As Eric Kandel puts it in his theory regarding the function of memory, each time a piece of sacred drama is performed it takes on new dimensions through its re-enactment. Each reinterpretation opens alternative ways of perception and understanding. Elements of ancient Greek drama were assimilated in the Liturgy of the Christian Church and in this paper Dr Tsironis will tackle the different ways in which certain episodes of Christ’s life are dramatized in East and West, focusing in particular on the function of homiletics in the context of the Eastern Orthodox Liturgy.

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3. OPPORTUNITIES

 

VISITING FELLOWSHIP 2013 – 2014
Applications are invited for a Visiting Fellowship at the British School at Athens for 2-3 months in the academic year 2013-14 in any branch of the arts or sciences related to Greece. The Fellowship is non-stipendiary, but accommodation and airfare and reasonable travelling expenses are provided. The Fellow will be required to submit a report on his/her research and a short general report on their time at the School to the School’s Council.
The Visiting Fellow should be an established scholar who is expected to conduct a programme of his/her own research, give one public lecture at the School and an open seminar as part of the established programme. He/she should also be willing to concern himself/herself with the current students and their work and may wish to contribute additional lectures or seminars as appropriate in discussion with the Director. The most effective time to take the Fellowship is between January and March when the maximum number of long-term students is in Athens and a large number of external events take place.
The Fellow is offered free accommodation in the Visiting Fellow’s flat in the Hostel and accommodation is also offered to accompanying spouse/partner, who is most welcome, at a nominal daily rate. Regrettably, children cannot be accommodated in the Hostel. The School will pay one return airfare London-Athens.
Applicants should submit a covering letter, a Curriculum Vitae and a statement of their proposed programme of research in Greece.
Applications should be sent by e-mail to:
The School Administrator, school.administrator@bsa.ac.uk by Thursday 28th February 2013. Further information about the School can be found at www.bsa.ac.uk
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EARLY CAREER FELLOWSHIP 2013 – 2014
Applications are invited for an Early Career Fellowship at the British School at Athens for up to 3 months in the academic year 2013-14, for research in any branch of the arts or sciences related to Greece. The Fellowship is non-stipendiary, but accommodation and airfare are provided. The Fellow will be required to submit a report on his/her research and a short general report on their time at the School to the School’s Council and Director.
Early Career Fellowships are intended to enable people in first post to spend a period of research leave in Greece. They may, for example, be used to enhance a period of sabbatical or research council funded leave. Fellows will be expected to conduct a programme of original research: the appointment carries no further formal obligations, although involvement in the academic life of the School (for example, in the form of a lecture or seminar) is welcomed. The Fellowship may be taken in either the autumn or the spring term.
The Fellow is offered free accommodation in the School’s Hostels in Athens and/or Knossos, and an accompanying spouse/partner is most welcome to stay with them at a nominal daily rate. Regrettably, children cannot be accommodated. The School will pay one return airfare between London and Athens or Herakleion.
Applicants should submit a covering letter, a Curriculum Vitae and a statement of their proposed programme of research in Greece.
Applications should be sent by e-mail to:
The School Administrator, school.administrator@bsa.ac.uk by Thursday 28th February 2013. Further information about the School can be found at www.bsa.ac.uk

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XVII International Archaeology Course of Mérida
For a second year in a row, the XVII International Archaeology Course of
Mérida (organised by the Consorcio de Mérida and co-directed by Oxford
research students) will include excavations at the site of Casa Herrera
in Mérida (Spain), a late antique suburban basilica linked to a large
building and a Roman aqueduct. The Course itself is organised with
excavation works in the mornings and lectures during the evenings. The
aims of the excavation this year will be to identify the function of the
large building and its link with the Roman aqueduct. The excavation will
run during the first three weeks of July, and 10 places are reserved for
Oxford students, both undergraduates and graduates.

If you want further information on the excavation or the course, feel
free to contact me <javier.martinez@arch.ox.ac.uk>

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