The Byzness, 13/10/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 13th October 2019
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1.       NEWS AND EVENTS

AGBU London Lecture, ‘Vaspurakan: The Making of a Mediaeval Armenian Kingdom, an illustrated talk by Dr. Zara Pogossian’, 28 November 2019, Armenian House, London.

This illustrated talk focuses on the 10th century Armenian Kingdom of Vaspurakan, founded by Gagik Artsruni, on the shores of Lake Van. Our speaker, Dr. Zara Pogossian, will discuss the historical background to the region before Gagik’s ascension, reflect on Vaspurakan’s cultural and religious traditions compared to other parts of Armenia, and make special reference to Vaspurakan’s close geographical links with northern Mesopotamia and Syriac Christianity. She will examine the manner in which Gagik Artsruni transformed Vaspurakan into a kingdom against the centralizing efforts of his Bagratuni cousins in the north of Armenia, a rivalry that led to the establishment of important centres of cultural production in Vaspurakan, such as palaces, churches and monasteries. Many of such centres were established by Gagik, who was celebrated as an indefatigable builder by the contemporary dynastic historian, Tovma Artsruni.

The talk will take place from 7:15-8:15 pm at Armenian House, 25 Cheniston Gardens, London W8 6TG.

Entrance is free, but spaces are limited. To RSVP, see here

Special Lecture: ‘National Byzantiums: Narratives of Empire in the Historiographies of Southeastern Europe’, 8 November 2019, TORCH Radcliffe Humanities, Oxford.

The New Critical Approaches to the Byzantine World Network and the Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research are pleased to announce the Michaelmas Term Special Lecture, which will be presented by Professor Diana Mishkova.

The lecture – based on a book manuscript under contract with CUP – explores the role Byzantium and its legacy have played since the Enlightenment in the historical self-narrations of Greece, Bulgaria, Serbia and Romania—countries once belonging to the Byzantine political and cultural orbit. It looks into the ways the “Byzantine factor” has been perceived, evaluated, interpreted and politically instrumentalized by the historiographies of the modern Balkan “successor states.” The gradual institutionalization of Byzantine studies and the directions these studies took in the individual countries provide the canvass against which the examinations of the various projections or appropriations of Byzantium in the national narratives and the assessments of its role and effects is undertaken.

The emergence of the modern Balkan nations and sovereign states in the nineteenth century from the ruins of the Ottoman empire – itself the heir and, in many respects, the continuation of the Eastern Roman empire – signaled the actual birth of Byzantium as a subject of these nations’ history. Its heritage has been variously appropriated or evaluated ever since, occasionally asserting, but more often subverting, the idea of a shared past. The role and impact of the Byzantine Empire became, and remained, a central theme in the national-historical narratives and identity politics for the countries of Southeastern Europe. While it is largely agreed today that the history and culture of the Byzantine Empire constitute an inherently multicultural field of research, in the countries occupying its historical area, Byzantine culture and legacy were the subject of (usually warring) national interpretations. They were implicated heavily in issues like ethnogenesis and collective identity, state-building and historical “rights,” national patrimony, culture and “mentality.” As such, they were exposed to political and ideological deployment. The mutually warring national images of Byzantium were formed in constant dialogue with each other and with the western and Russian perceptions. The lecture will attempt to highlight, through a selection of case-studies, the internal contestations, tensions and negotiations between different interpretations within and between the national historiographical traditions as well as their transnational entanglements in the region and with western and eastern academic currents.

Professor Diana Mishkova is the director of the Center for Advanced Study, Sofia and a Professor in Modern History. Her work explores the history of scholarship and statehood in nineteenth and twentieth century Southeastern Europe. Her last book, Beyond Balkanism: the Scholarly Politics of Region Making, was published by Routledge in 2018.

The event will take place at 5pm in the Colin Matthews Room, TORCH Radcliffe Humanities. It will be followed by a drinks reception.

The New Critical Approaches to the Byzantine World Network, ‘Bringing Research of the Byzantine World Up to Speed with Post-Butler Gender Theory’, 18 October 2019, TORCH Radcliffe Humanities, Oxford.

Shaun Tougher’s preamble to his methodological chapter of The Eunuch in Byzantine State and Society could serve as a stand-in for summarising Byzantine gender studies more generally: ‘It is evident that some historians have found the subject an uncomfortable one, reflected by the expression of open hostility or a tendency simply to ignore the topic.’

An unfortunate upshot of this prevailing apprehension (or anxiety) around tackling gender as a constitutive feature of later Roman sociality is a certain ‘Meanwhile, in Byzantine Studies…’ effect. Even scholars taken to be especially outspoken feminists within the context of the field, have not integrated methodological breakthroughs current to the humanities more generally.

This session will hone in on the break-out thinking of Judith Butler, and attempt to make some headway in bringing Byzantine Studies into the fold of contemporary gender research.

The session will take place at 4pm in the Seminar room, TORCH Radcliffe Humanities.

For more details about the event, and the reading list for the session, see here.

 

2.       CALLS FOR PAPERS

Graduate and Early Career Workshop: ‘Armenia & Byzantium Without Borders III’, 8–10 May 2020, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna.

Deadline: 31 October 2019

Within the framework of ‘Moving Byzantium: Mobility, Microstructure and Personal Agency,’ a five-year project funded through the Wittgenstein-Prize (http://rapp.univie.ac.at), ‘Armenia & Byzantium without Borders III’ is a three-day workshop focusing on social and cultural mobility between Armenia and Byzantium in the Middle Ages. This workshop continues a scholarly conversation initiated in April 2018 at the University of Vienna by Dr. Emilio Bonfiglio and Prof. Claudia Rapp and now run in joint partnership with Dr. David Zakarian and Prof. Theo Maarten van Lint at the University of Oxford. The 2020 Workshop will be held at the Division of Byzantine Research, Institute for Medieval Research, of the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

We invite advanced PhD candidates and early career scholars working in the fields of Late Antique, Armenian, Byzantine, and Middle Eastern Studies to submit proposals for 20 min. papers connected with the main topics of ‘Moving Byzantium’, with a focus on aspects of social and cultural mobility of persons, objects, and/or ideas between Armenia and Byzantium throughout the Middle Ages. We are particularly interested in new research showing interaction and communication on both literary and material grounds between the Byzantine world and the Armenians.

Papers presented at the workshop will be accompanied by a senior scholar’s 10 min. response, followed by a general discussion. The workshop will be inaugurated with the lecture of our keynote speaker, Dr. Tim Greenwood from the University of St Andrews.

Travel and accommodation expenses of scholars selected for presentation at the workshop will be covered by the ‘Moving Byzantium’ project.

Paper proposals including:

·         University affiliation

·         Graduate level

·         Title of the paper

·         Abstract (300 words max)

·         CV

Must be sent by the 31st of October 2019 to Dr. Emilio Bonfiglio (emilio.bonfiglio@oeaw.ac.at) and our project-coordinator Dr. Paraskevi Sykopetritou (paraskevi.sykopetritou@univie.ac.at).

Call for Papers: Women Intellectuals in Antiquity, 15-16 February 2020, Keble College, Oxford

Deadline: 15 November 2019

Aspasia, Hypatia, Sappho, Lucretia, Cleopatra, Diotima, Lavinia, Monica, Hecuba, Macrina, Radegund: the names of women intellectuals and the whispers of their powerful influence on philosophy, politics, literature, and education are scattered through the ancient evidence.Who were these women teachers and philosophers, thought-leaders and theorists of Antiquity? Beyond how they are presented and used by male authors, how might their own thoughts and voices be fossilized within these ancient texts and other artefacts– and what methodological tools do we need to develop in order to excavate them? What can be recovered of the distinctive ideas and methods these women contributed to philosophy, literature, theology, or politics?

This Symposium aims to bring together scholars from across the humanities disciplines to discuss women intellectuals in Antiquity. In addition to paper sessions, it will feature two round-table discussions led by Peter Adamson (https://historyofphilosophy.net/) and Armand D’Angour (https://www.armand-dangour.com/). The Symposium will provide a forum for further discussion complementing the Carlyle Philosophy Lecture series which will be given in Oxford throughout Hilary Term by Professor Peter Adamson.

You are invited to send proposals (c. 350 words) for papers of 30 minutes to WomenIntellectualsInAntiquity@gmail.com no later than 15 November 2019. Textual case studies on individual women intellectuals in Antiquity (through the 7th century C.E.) are welcome, as well as papers addressing the methodological question more broadly. ‘Women intellectuals’ may be interpreted broadly and can include figures from literature as well as history, but the focus of the paper should be on the distinctive intellectual contributions, or method of engaging in intellectual pursuits demonstrated by the woman in question.

Select papers will be featured on a special edition of the History of Philosophy podcast.

 

3.       JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Two Fully-funded PhD Scholarships in Liturgical Studies, University of Notre Dame

Deadline: 2 January 2020

The Graduate School at the University of Notre Dame accepts up to two, fully-funded PhD students per year in Liturgical Studies. The program in Liturgical Studies integrates three sub-disciplines: Liturgical History; Liturgical Theology; Ritual Studies.

The program offers a wide range of research opportunities with particular strengths in early and late antique Christian ritual and material culture, medieval liturgy, Byzantine Christianity, manuscript studies, contemporary liturgical theology, and ritual studies. Recent dissertations have included topics on ritual at the Second Temple, architecture and liturgy in medieval Salisbury, liturgy and life in Crusader Jerusalem, ritual in Igbo culture, imperial rites for commemorating earthquakes in late antique Constantinople, and liturgy and identity in the California Missions.

The Liturgical Studies program was founded in 1947 as the first graduate program in the Department of Theology and quickly grew to become an international center for the study of liturgy. Pioneers in the discipline who have taught at Notre Dame include Josef Jungmann, Louis Bouyer, Robert Taft, Paul Bradshaw, and many others. The program is currently comprised of seven faculty members and represents one of the largest concentrations of liturgical scholars at one place in the world.

In addition to its core strengths, Liturgical Studies offers a variety of opportunities for research collaboration with other institutions at Notre Dame, including the Medieval Institute, the Program in Sacred Music, other departments at the university (esp. History, Anthropology and Sociology) and other programs within the Theology Department, including Christianity and Judaism in Antiquity (CJA), the History of Christianity (HC), and Systematic Theology (ST). The Hesburgh Libraries system has extensive holdings in theology and one of the nation’s largest collections in medieval and Byzantine studies, including the Milton Anastos Collection. The Theology Department also offers a broad range of ancient languages, including courses in Greek, Latin, Syriac, Hebrew, Coptic, Armenian and Ge’ez, with additional opportunities for studying Georgian, Slavonic, and Jewish Aramaic.

All applications must be submitted to the Graduate School by January 2, 2020. More information and a link to the online application may be found here.

 

Fully-funded PhD Position, University of Mainz  

Deadline: 20 October 2019

The interdisciplinary Research Training Group 1876 “Early Concepts of Humans and Nature: Universal, Specific, Interchanged” established by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz invites applications for one doctoral position (wissenschaftliche/r Mitarbeiter/in, 13 TV-L 65%) starting at the earliest opportunity. Initial appointment will be for two and a half years.

The Research Training Group is directed by scholars from the fields of Egyptology, Ancient Near Eastern Studies, Pre- and Protohistorical Archaeology (Pleistocene Archaeology), Near Eastern Archaeology, Classical Archaeology, Classics (Greek and Latin), Byzantine Studies and Medieval German Studies.

In the Research Training Group’s research programme, the object is to record concepts of humans and nature in the Near Eastern, Northeast African and European area in the period from ca. 100.000 years B.C.E. until the Middle Ages – starting out from textual, pictorial and material sources – by means of examples and to study them in culturally immanent as well as transcultural respects. In order to align the spectrum of potential fields of topics in a targeted manner four main focal points of research have been defined:

·         Primordial conditions and elements, the origin and the end of the world;

·         Natural phenomena, the forces of nature, and natural catastrophes;

·         Flora, fauna, and natural environment;

·         The conceptualization of the human body, of disease, healing and death.

 

Topics for PhD theses must be chosen from one of these four areas and belong to one of the academic disciplines mentioned above. We are looking for dissertation projects that will connect with and complement dissertation projects within the Research Training Group as well as additional dissertation projects belonging to one of the four areas.

For detailed information regarding our research and training programme and for a list of the academic staff involved in our graduate school, please refer to our homepage.  

Requirements for appointment:

·         a diploma or master’s degree (or equivalent) with excellent results in one of the disciplines mentioned above and fulfilment of the necessary requirements for enrolment on a doctoral degree in either Faculty (Fachbereich) 05 or 07 of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (see here).

We offer:

·         a salary based on the German public sector pay scale (TV-L)

·         a PhD programme with clearly defined steps and instruction

·         ample opportunities for intensive professional and interdisciplinary exchange

·         close supervision by two professors of different academic disciplines of the Research Training Group’s core faculty

·         a mentoring programme with cooperating partners in Germany and abroad

·         traineeships within cooperating institutes

·         additional funding for staying for up to four weeks abroad at a research institute cooperating with our programme as well as for attending conferences inside and outside Germany

·         classes helping you to acquire key qualifications (e.g. time-management or academic writing courses)

·         a modern and pleasant working environment

·         optional six months’ funding for developing a new research project once you have completed your PhD

We expect:

·         preparation of a doctoral thesis within our research programme

·         scientific training within a structured dissertation programme

·         continuous participation in the study programme

·         cooperation with other PhD students and scholars from neighbouring fields and disciplines

·         presence at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

·         after the three year funding period: doctorate at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

The following documents must be provided:

·         application form (available on the website for download)

·         a letter of motivation

·         a curriculum vitae

·         a complete transcript of academic records, including the last school report obtained before entering university (Abitur, high-school diploma or equivalent)

·         a résumé of the graduate thesis you submitted (3 pages)

·         your graduate thesis in a pdf-file

·         an exposé for a PhD thesis in one of the areas of the Research Training Group, summarizing the idea, outlining research questions and state of the art, approach and methods to be used, work and time schedule (4 pages)

·         two letters of reference from members of academic staff allowing us to judge your abilities (to be sent before the closing date directly to the spokesperson)

·         if available: a list of attended conferences and publications

Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz is keen to increase the number of women among its scholars and thus encourages women to apply. The university supports its members in reconciling professional and family responsibilities and offers family-friendly study and working conditions. Disabled persons will be given preference if equally qualified. It is recommended to refer to a possible handicap in the application.

Further details regarding the application process and the selection of candidates are available on the homepage of our graduate school. You may also contact a member of the Research Training Group’s staff in your discipline if you have a specific question. For organizational questions you may contact the coordination office.

Please submit your complete application in electronic form (pdf) no later than October 20th, 2019 to the Research Training Group’s spokesperson Univ.-Prof. Dr. Tanja Pommerening (grk1876@uni-mainz.de).

 

The Cotsen Travelling Fellowship for Research in Greece, The Gennadius Library, Athens.

Deadline: January 15, 2020

The Gennadius Library offers the Cotsen Traveling Fellowship, a short-term grant awarded each year to scholars and graduate students pursuing research topics that require the use of the Gennadeion collections.

Eligibility:  Senior scholars (PhD holders) and graduate students of any nationality.

Terms:  Stipend of $2,000. School fees are waived for a maximum of two months. Fellowship does not include costs for School trips, room, or board. Requires residency in Athens of at least one month during the academic year from September 1 to June 1. The recipient is expected to take part in the activities of the Gennadius Library and the School as a whole in addition to pursuing research. A final report is due at the end of the award period, and the ASCSA expects that copies of all publications that result from research conducted as a Fellow of the ASCSA be contributed to the Gennadius Library.

Application:  Submit an online application. The application includes a curriculum vitae; project description (up to 750 words) describing the project and its relation to the Gennadius Library collections, proposed dates, and a brief budget (not more than one page). Applicants should arrange for submission of two letters of recommendation. For more information about the application, visit here.

E-mail: application@ascsa.org

The award will be announced March 15.

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Posted in Byzness

Oxford Listings – Week 1

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 1

Michaelmas Term 2019

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MONDAY 14th October

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, Old Library

Charles Briggs (University of Vermont)

Dominican Political Counsel in Early Trecento Italy

 

TUESDAY 15th October

17.00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar

Harris Manchester College, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Charles Briggs (University of Vermont)

Civil Peace in the Political Thought of Some Early Fourteenth-Century Italian Dominicans

 

WEDNESDAY 16th October

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Ashmolean Museum, Headley Lecture Theatre

Paul Roberts (University of Oxford)

Pompeii — beneath the ash, behind the scenes

[+]

17.00 Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Mihail Mitrea (Newcastle)

Light and Fire: Hesychast hagiography and editorial practice in late Byzantium

[+]

17.00 Oxford Archaeological Fieldwork Seminar

Institute of Archaeology, Lecture Room

Stefan Gant (Northampton)

Intersections of Contemporary Drawing and Spatial Archaeology.

 

THURSDAY 17th October

11.00-12:30 Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, First Floor Seminar Room

Sophie Moore

The Other Çatalhoyük: Historic Cemeteries and Cultural Memory

[+]

16.00 Late Roman Seminar

Corpus Christi College, Seminar Room

Conrad Leyser

From Constantine to the Quinotaur: the Rise of Blood Kinship

[+]

17.15 Khalili Centre Research Seminar

The Khalili Research Centre, Lecture Room

Marijn Van Putten (Leiden University)

The Language of the Qur’an in light of the Arab Grammarians and Early Qur’anic Manuscripts

 

FRIDAY 18th October

16.00 The New Critical Approaches to the Byzantine World Network

TORCH Radcliffe Humanities, Seminar room

Bringing Research of the Byzantine World Up to Speed with Post-Butler Gender Theory

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 06/10/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 6th October 2019
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1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1.       CALLS FOR PAPERS

Meaning Between the Lines: Allegory and Hermeneutics in Greek Imperial and Late Antique Literature, 6-7 February 2020, Trinity College Dublin

Deadline: 21 October 2019

We are pleased to invite proposals for an upcoming workshop on allegory and hermeneutics in Greek imperial and late antique literature.

In the first centuries of the common era, allegorical readings of Greek literature became increasingly commonplace. Canonical works such as the Homeric and Hesiodic poems or the Platonic dialogues were increasingly subjected to interpretations that uncovered hidden meanings and deeper truths under the surface of the text, such as those of Porphyry and Heraclitus. These methods of reading, under the influence of the rhetorical curriculum and developments in philosophy and mysticism, inspired contemporary writers and poets to imbue their own works with (quasi-) allegorical elements. Allegory could be used, for instance, as a tool to convey knowledge that could not be adequately expressed in language, to covertly express political criticisms, or as a means of meta-literary reflection. At the same time, Greek theories and practices of allegoresis influenced the development of Jewish and early Christian Biblical hermeneutics, as exemplified by, for example, Philo of Alexandra and Origen.

Our workshop aims to encompass a wide range of literary texts which practice and/or reflect on allegorical interpretation and Biblical hermeneutics, and through them gain insight into imperial and late antique approaches to literary interpretation and composition. We welcome proposals engaging with, but not limited to, the following topics:

·         Imperial and late antique allegorical reception of earlier Greek literature

·         The influence of allegoresis on the production and interpretation of imperial and late antique Greek poetry (e.g. Hero and Leander, Orphic Argonautica) or novels (e.g. Daphnis and Chloe, Aethiopica)

·         Stoic and (Neo)Platonic allegorical practices

·         Interplay between rhetorical theories of allegory and literary practice

·         Interplay between ‘pagan’ allegoresis and Biblical hermeneutics

·         Allegory as a means of reflection or criticism of contemporary politics

·         Allegory and metapoetics in imperial and late antique Greek literature

·         Parodies of allegoresis

We invite abstracts of no more than 300 words for 30-minute papers, followed by 10 minutes of discussion, to be submitted by October 21st 2019 to the organizing committee (tcdallegory@gmail.com). Please also include a short academic CV in a separate file or the body of your email. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us!

Histoire de genre? Genre, Sciences humaines et Populations au Moyen Âge, 13 February 2020, Bordeaux Montaigne University.

Deadline: 30 November 2019

Les études de genre ont connu un développement tardif dans la recherche française, dont les premiers travaux datent de la fin des années 90. En comparaison, la discipline qui a été initiée aux Etats-Unis lors des premières manifestations pour les droits des femmes dans les années 70, est très développée au Royaume-Uni, en Allemagne, ou dans les pays scandinaves. Cependant, cette « exception française » prend progressivement fin et les travaux sur le genre en sciences humaines sont de plus en plus fréquents quelle que soit la discipline. Les rapports de genre sont en effet au fondement du corps social abordant alors aussi bien l’âge, la hiérarchie sociale, le sexe, etc. Les approches méthodologiques sont donc plurielles, et bénéficient d’un travail comparatif grâce à l’apport des différentes disciplines des sciences humaines et sociales.

Comment le croisement de ces différents domaines peut-il leur permettre de s’enrichir mutuellement tout en mettant au premier plan la diversité des questions de genre?

Cette journée d’étude fait office de deuxième session après un séminaire dédié à la question du genre en archéologie, qui a réuni des chercheurs issus d’horizons différents, de la Préhistoire (Anne Augereau (Inrap – Préhistoire et technologies), au Moyen-Âge (Patrick Périn (MNA), Véronique Gallien (Inrap) Emmanuelle Santinelli (Université polytechnique des hauts de France – CALHISTE), Wendy Bougraud (Bordeaux Montaigne – Ausonius), en passant par la Protohistoire (Caroline Trémeaud (Trajectoires). La nécessité d’une deuxième journée consacrée aux sciences humaines s’impose dans un cadre de recherche transdisciplinaire, afin de faciliter les échanges sur les populations du Moyen Âge, notamment dans les contextes funéraire et de la vie quotidienne.

L’objectif de cette journée est aussi d’encourager les rapports entre les différents acteurs des études genre, à différentes échelles, que ce soit les universités, les laboratoires ou les associations et réseaux.

Propositions thématiques de réflexion (liste à valeur indicative et non exhaustive):

·         Le genre comme catégorie d’analyse des réalités sociales : méthodes, moyens et actualité dans la recherche

·         Les variations de représentations du genre

·         L’identification sociale et l’analyse des normes au travers le prisme du genre

·         Les représentations genrées véhiculées pour les périodes médiévales

Les propositions de communications doivent être envoyées au plus tard le 30 novembre 2019. Les informations à envoyer dans vos propositions sont:

·         Nom, prénom et institution de rattachement

·         Un titre et un résumé de la communication (500 mots maximum en français ou anglais)

·         Une courte présentation personnelle comprenant notamment vos orientations de recherche, vos dernières publications etc. (2-3 lignes)

Pour faire une proposition de communication, voir ce lien.

2.       JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Joint Residential Fellowship, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies and the Byzantine Studies Research Center of Bogaziçi University.

Deadline: 20 November 2019

Villa I Tatti – The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies (VIT, Florence) and the Byzantine Studies Research Center of Bogaziçi University (BSRC, Istanbul) offer a joint, residential fellowship for the 2020-2021 academic year. Scholars will spend the fall term (September – December) in Istanbul and the spring term (January – June) in Florence. The fellowship will focus on the interaction between Italy and the Byzantine Empire (ca. 1300 to ca. 1700). This collaboration aims to foster the development of research on Late Byzantine-Italian relations by supporting early-career scholars whose work explores Byzantium’s cross-cultural contacts in the late medieval and early modern Mediterranean world through the study of art, architecture, archaeology, history, literature, material culture, music, philosophy, religion, or science.

The VIT-BSRC Joint Fellowship is offered for candidates who have received a PhD in or after 2009. Candidates must have their PhD in hand by the time they apply and will be asked to upload a scan of it when submitting their application. Candidates must be conversant in English and have at least a reading knowledge of Italian. They must have a solid background in Italian Renaissance and/or Byzantine Studies. Each successful candidate must be approved by both the BSRC and VIT and will spend the fall term (September – December) at Bogaziçi University in Istanbul and the spring term (January-June) at Villa I Tatti in Florence. During both terms, it must be possible for Fellows to carry out most of their research with the resources available in the city where they are resident. Priority will be given to applicants with no previous association with VIT or BSRC. Renewals, repeats, or deferments of this Fellowship are not granted.

Applications must be written in English and must be submitted electronically by midnight (Cambridge, MA time) on November 15, 2019. Scholars can apply for only one type of fellowship at I Tatti per academic year.

Applicants must have two scholars who know their work well submit recommendations online by November 20, 2019. These recommendations can be written in English or Italian. In order to give your referees adequate time to submit letters of recommendation, click the reference tab and register them as early as possible. Referees will receive an email explaining how to access the system and submit their letters electronically. It is the applicants’ responsibility to inform the scholars writing on their behalf of the nature of the project and the deadline for submission.

For the full details and to apply, see here.

 

Moses and Mary Finley Research Fellowship, Darwin College, Cambridge.

Deadline: 10 November 2019

Darwin College invites applications for election to a stipendiary Moses and Mary Finley Research Fellowship in Ancient History starting from 1 October 2020.

The Fellowship is restricted to research into the ancient history of the Mediterranean world and/or the near East, prior to the end of the 6th century AD. Darwin College is able to elect this stipendiary Research Fellow thanks to a bequest in the Will of Sir Moses and Lady Finley.   In addition, Sir Moses bequeathed his personal library to the College. This may assist the research of the successful candidate. Preference will be given to those whose interests coincide with those of the late Sir Moses Finley.

The Fellowship is open to candidates from any university, irrespective of age. The Fellowship is intended for an outstanding researcher who is completing, or who has recently completed, their PhD Degree, or an equivalently recognised degree.   No candidate should normally have completed in total more than three years of research since the PhD is conferred.  Any career breaks or part-time working will be taken into account.

The Research Fellow is expected to pursue full-time research based in Cambridge.The Research Fellow will be a member of the Governing Body of Darwin College and will be subject to the Statutes and Ordinances of the College.  The Statutes include the obligation to reside in or near Cambridge, for at least two-thirds of each University term, but the Governing Body will normally excuse absences made necessary by the nature of the research undertaken.

The Research Fellowship is tenable for three years, with effect from 1 October 2020 and is renewable for one further year to a maximum of four years at the discretion of the Fellowships Committee.

The starting stipend for the Finley Research Fellow with a PhD will be set at not less than Point 28 on the Darwin College Single Salary spine (2019-20 rate: £22,464.32), subject to an annual cost-of-living uplift and to annual increments (the third year stipend at the 2019-20 rate would be £24,144.56). The stipend will be subject to a 10% reduction until the appointee’s PhD is conferred.

Membership of the Universities’ Superannuation Scheme is optional.

Research Fellows are entitled under the College’s Ordinances to dine (including formal hall) and lunch free of charge at the normal College table whenever meals are served (up to a limit of seven meals in each week).  Guests, not normally exceeding two in number on any one occasion, may be entertained at lunch or dinner, ten of them free of charge within any quarter (note termly guest nights with a special menu are subject to charge).

An allowance of up to £1,000 a year will be available for receipted travel and research expenses. A further £500 a year is available on application as a subsidy for appropriate conferences mounted in the College.

It may be possible to provide limited rented accommodation for up to two years, subject to availability, for which a charge will be made.

A non-pensionable additional allowance of £3,000 per annum (subject to annual review) will be paid to any Finley Research Fellow not resident in College.

Applications should be made by 10 November 2019 and include:

·         curriculum vitae

·         a summary of research for a non-specialist audience

·         an account, in not more than 500 words, of the proposed research and the background to it

·         an assurance that, where necessary, appropriate research arrangements have been made

·         the names and emails of two referees who will also need to submit a reference online by 10 November 2019, and

·         a list of published or unpublished work that would be available for submission if requested

In early December selected candidates will be invited to submit copies of written work and may be called for interview at Darwin College or by skype on Tuesday 28 January 2020. Election will be made as soon as possible thereafter.

To apply, see here.

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 29/09/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 29th September 2019
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1.       NEWS AND EVENTS

Islamic Art Circle at SOAS Monthly Lecture, ‘From the Founder of Constantinople to the Founder of Istanbul: Mehmed the Conqueror and the Church of the Holy Apostles’, 9 October 2019, SOAS.

Julian Raby, the Director Emeritus of the Smithsonian Institution, will be delivering a lecture entitled ‘From the Founder of Constantinople to the Founder of Istanbul: Mehmed the Conqueror and the Church of the Holy Apostles’.

The lecture will take place at 7.00 p.m. on Wednesday 9 October 2019 and will be chaired by Professor Scott Redford.

The new venue of the lecture will be the Wolfson Lecture Theatres, Paul Webley Wing, Senate House (1st floor, room 108).

Enquiries should be directed to:  rw51@soas.ac.uk.

2.       JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Postdoctoral Position, ‘Source of Life: Water Management in the Premodern Middle East (7th-15th century)’, Radboud University Nijmegen.

Deadline: 28 October 2019

Radboud University Nijmegen is advertising a four-year postdoctoral position in the NWO VICI-project ‘Source of Life: Water Management in the Premodern Middle East (7th-15th century)’. This project studies the interrelationship between water installations, governance, and legal and cultural frameworks in five Middle Eastern cities (Basra, Baghdad, Mosul, Damascus and Cairo) from the first Arab conquests to Ottoman rule (7th-15th C). It seeks to:

·         Map the institutional fabric of premodern Middle Eastern cities by taking water as a key service.

·         Identify incentives for institutional innovation in premodern urban water governance.

Your postdoctoral research approaches the two main objectives of the project from an archaeological perspective. You will have three main responsibilities within the project:

·         To analyse geospatial data and remaining visual features in the landscape of Iraq around Basra, Baghdad and Mosul, through the outcomes of the aerial survey based on photography and satellite imagery.

·         To examine archaeological publications and reports and contact archaeological teams for all five cities to gather data relevant to Source of Life and interpret these findings for the rest of the team.

·         To supervise the GIS environment in close cooperation with the GIS specialists from the Radboud Humanities Lab.

For full details of the role, click here.

For further information, please contact Prof. Maaike van Berkel, PI (m.vanberkel@let.ru.nl).

Leon B. Poullada Postdoctoral Research Associate in Central Asian Studies, Department of Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University.

Deadline: 15 November 2019

The Department of Near Eastern Studies invites applications for the position of Leon B. Poullada Postdoctoral Research Associate, or Associate Research Scholar, in Central Asian Studies. The initial appointment will be for one year, September 1, 2020 through August 31, 2021, with the possibility of renewal subject to satisfactory performance and continued funding.

The selected candidate’s primary responsibility while in residence at Princeton will be to pursue and publish research on premodern Central Asia, encompassing the history, politics and cultures of the Muslim areas of the Turko-Persianate world, including the area from the Caspian Sea to Western China and Kazakhstan to historical Islamic North India.

Pending departmental approval and approval from the Office of the Dean of the Faculty, the researcher will also be expected to teach a one-semester undergraduate course on the history of Central Asia, broadly conceived, and to hold on-campus office hours during the semester. When teaching, the successful candidate will carry a secondary title of Lecturer. The candidate is expected to participate in departmental and other campus activities; s/he will be integrated fully into the Department of Near Eastern Studies and into the appropriate programs and centers at Princeton University.

Ph.D. is required. Preference will be given to applicants who have received their PhD within the past three years.

Interested applicants are invited to apply online and are asked to submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, a research statement (maximum length 2 pages), a course proposal, a writing sample, and contact information for three references. Review of applications will begin on November 15, 2019.

Assistant or Associate Professorship in Medieval History (c. 500 – c. 1400), University of Tennessee-Knoxville.

Deadline: 15 November 2019

The History Department at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville seeks to make a full-time, tenure-track appointment at the rank of Assistant or Associate in Medieval History (c. 500—c. 1400). The appointment will begin fall semester 2020. Ph.D. required at the time of appointment. 

The field of specialization is open. We encourage applications from scholars whose fields, thematic focuses and geographic areas complement our department’s existing expertise in European and Mediterranean history. Preference will be given to candidates with a significant record of publication and demonstrated excellence in teaching. The successful candidate will teach both graduate and undergraduate courses, including surveys in Western Civilization and/or World History, more advanced specialized courses, and undergraduate and graduate research seminars, and will participate actively in Marco, UTK’s Medieval and Renaissance Studies Institute. The Knoxville campus is seeking candidates who have the ability to contribute in meaningful ways to the diversity and intercultural goals of the University.

A complete application will include a letter of application, curriculum vitae, three letters of recommendation, and an article-length writing sample. Materials should be emailed here.

Review of applications will begin November 15, 2019 and continue until an appointment is made.

Postdoctoral position in Ancient History, University of Fribourg.

Deadline: 15 October 2019

Within the framework of the project ‘Religious competition in Late Antiquity: A Laboratory of New Categories, Taxonomies and Methods’(2019-2023), funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation and led by Francesco Massa, the Department of History of the University of Fribourg (Switzerland) invites applications for one fully funded postdoctoral position.

Starting date: January 2020

Location: University of Fribourg

Duration: max. 3 years

Gross Salary: approx. 72,000 Swiss francs (= 63,200 euros) / year.

The project seeks to show how religious competition in Late Antiquity between pagans, Jews, and Christians shaped the way we think and talk about religions. The inquiry deals with three related trends:

·         The emergence of a new vocabulary of religion, as well as new ways of defining ‘religion’, in Late Antiquity).

·         The tendency towards organizing the religious traditions of the Roman Empire in the form of a hierarchy.

·         The emergence of a new discourse on the history of religions.

Based on her/his research expertise, the candidate will explore a focused research area and research topic related to religious competitions in Late Antiquity. Proposals with a focus on epigraphy and legal texts are specifically encouraged. The successful candidate will participate in the project’s scientific activities and perform any other duties related to the project as required.

Requirements:

·         Ph.D. in Ancient History, Classics or History of religions (after January 1, 2017).

·         Excellent knowledge of Greek and Latin.

·         Excellent knowledge of French and English.

·         Knowledge of German and Italian desirable.

Documents:

·         CV (max. 4 pages).

·         Research proposal (max. 5 pages).

·         Copy of the Ph.D. dissertation.

·         Two letters of reference.

·         Copy of the Ph.D. diploma (or official document from the university explicitly stating the expected defence date).

·         Copy of the final report of the Commission (if available).

·         Copy of one significant publication representative of the candidate’s work.

Applications must be submitted (in French or English) in one single file (PDF format) to Francesco Massa (francesco.massa@unifr.ch) by October 15, 2019.

Interviews for selected candidates will take place by videoconference on November 6, 2019. Candidates selected for interview will be informed by e-mail before October 25, 2019.

PhD Scholarship, Department of Ancient Civilizations, University of Basel.

Deadline: 15 November 2019

The PhD program of the Department of Ancient Civilizations at the University of Basel announces a one-year scholarship starting at the 01/04/2020 (at CHF 30,000 per year; two tranches with evaluation).

The grant is intended to support a young graduate during the starting phase of his/her PhD research project. It is expected that he/she will develop his/her research project in that time for applying to the Swiss National Science Foundation or other funding institutions at the end of that year.

The scholarship is addressed to students who hold a First-class MA‐degree either in Egyptology, Classical Archaeology, Ancient History, Greek Philology, Latin Philology, Comparative and Historic Linguistics or European Archaeology. It is expected that the PhD student is highly motivated and will personally be involved in the PhD program of the Department of Ancient Civilizations at the University of Basel. Most welcomed are PhD projects that can be linked to the research fields of the Department of Ancient Civilizations at the University of Basel.

The following documents should be sent by email to the coordinator of the Doctoral Program of Basel Ancient Studies Mr. Hans-Hubertus Muench (hubertus.muench@unibas.ch):

·         Letter of motivation

·         CV

·         MA-Diploma

·         1-2 samples of text (max. 20 pages each, including at least 1 academic qualification text, like BA- or MA-thesis)

·         Sketch for the dissertation project (max. 3 pages)

·         Letter of reference

Applications can be submitted in German, in French or in English. The enrolment at the University of Basel is mandatory. The first supervisor must be a member of the Department of Ancient Civilizations at the University of Basel. For further information, please contact the coordinator of the Doctoral Program of Basel Ancient Studies Mr. Hans-Hubertus Muench (hubertus.muench@unibas.ch).

 

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 22/09/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 22nd September 2019
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1.       NEWS AND EVENTS

North of Byzantium: Medieval Art, Architecture and Visual Culture in Eastern Europe

North of Byzantium (NoB) is a new initiative organized by Maria Alessia Rossi (The Index of Medieval Art) and Alice Isabella Sullivan (Getty/ACLS), and primarily sponsored by the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture . Through its annual events, NoB explores the rich history, art, and culture of the northern frontiers of the Byzantine Empire in Eastern Europe between the thirteenth and sixteenth centuries, and aims to connect students, scholars, teachers, artists, and curators to resources related to the medieval and early modern artistic production of Eastern Europe.

Visit the NoB website and subscribe to receive news and updates.

We are in the process of developing this platform and we would be grateful for any further details and relevant information that we could add under “Resources” and “Related Events” – send us a note at northofbyzantium@gmail.com.

Enigma in Medieval Slavic Culture, 14-16 November 2019, The Slavic Institute, University of Cologne

Enigma in Medieval Slavic Culture is an interdisciplinary conference which explores the significance, specifics, function and history of riddles in the culture of medieval Rus and, more broadly, Orthodox Slavs. It will bring together early Slavists, Byzantinists, art historians and historians to examine the problem of enigma in literature, art and various cultural phenomena. Through case studies across disciplinary and medial boundaries, it aims to find methodologies by which medieval enigmas, both textual and visual, can be deciphered. It seeks to identify their common characteristics, but also their change and transformation across space and time.

For more information, and for the full programme, see here.

The symposium is free to attend, but guests must register here.

2.       CALLS FOR PAPERS

Meaning Between the Lines: Allegory and Hermeneutics in Greek Imperial and Late Antique Literature, 6-7 February 2020, Trinity College Dublin

Deadline: 21 October 2019

We are pleased to invite proposals for an upcoming workshop on allegory and hermeneutics in Greek imperial and late antique literature.

In the first centuries of the common era, allegorical readings of Greek literature became increasingly commonplace. Canonical works such as the Homeric and Hesiodic poems or the Platonic dialogues were increasingly subjected to interpretations that uncovered hidden meanings and deeper truths under the surface of the text, such as those of Porphyry and Heraclitus. These methods of reading, under the influence of the rhetorical curriculum and developments in philosophy and mysticism, inspired contemporary writers and poets to imbue their own works with (quasi-) allegorical elements. Allegory could be used, for instance, as a tool to convey knowledge that could not be adequately expressed in language, to covertly express political criticisms, or as a means of meta-literary reflection. At the same time, Greek theories and practices of allegoresis influenced the development of Jewish and early Christian Biblical hermeneutics, as exemplified by, for example, Philo of Alexandra and Origen.

Our workshop aims to encompass a wide range of literary texts which practice and/or reflect on allegorical interpretation and Biblical hermeneutics, and through them gain insight into imperial and late antique approaches to literary interpretation and composition. We welcome proposals engaging with, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Imperial and late antique allegorical reception of earlier Greek literature
  • The influence of allegoresis on the production and interpretation of imperial and late antique Greek poetry (e.g. Hero and Leander, Orphic Argonautica) or novels (e.g. Daphnis and Chloe, Aethiopica)
  • Stoic and (Neo)Platonic allegorical practices
  •  Interplay between rhetorical theories of allegory and literary practice
  •  Interplay between ‘pagan’ allegoresis and Biblical hermeneutics
  •  Allegory as a means of reflection or criticism of contemporary politics
  •   Allegory and metapoetics in imperial and late antique Greek literature
  •  Parodies of allegoresis

We invite abstracts of no more than 300 words for 30-minute papers, followed by 10 minutes of discussion, to be submitted by October 21st 2019 to the organizing committee (tcdallegory@gmail.com). Please also include a short academic CV in a separate file or the body of your email. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us!

3.       JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

One-Month Research Awards, Dumbarton Oaks

Deadline: 1 October 2019

Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection offers One-Month Research Awards of $3,000 to scholars holding a PhD and working on research projects in Byzantine studies or related fields. The awards were established to make the intellectual community, as well as the library, rare book, garden, and museum resources, of Dumbarton Oaks more widely available to a broader range of scholars for shorter terms and with some flexibility in starting dates. Awards are intended especially for those who might not be able to avail themselves of a longer-term fellowship at Dumbarton Oaks, or scholars in related disciplines who seek greater exposure to our fields of study. Applications due October 1, 2019 for January 15 – June 30 award period.

Fellowships, Dumbarton Oaks

Deadline: 1 November 2019

Fellowships (junior, regular, summer, Tyler) are awarded to scholars on the basis of demonstrated scholarly ability and preparation of the candidate, including knowledge of requisite languages, interest and value of the study or project, and the project’s relevance to the resources of Dumbarton Oaks. Applications due November 1, 2019 for the 2020-2021 academic year.

For further information on all awards, please visit the Dumbarton Oaks website.

Avimaleck Betyousef position in Assyrian Studies, Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley.

Deadline: 15 October 2019

The Department of Near Eastern Studies at the University of California, Berkeley seeks applications for the full-time position of Visiting Professor or Adjunct Professor in Assyrian Studies, offered through the Avimaleck Betyousef Foundation. The position has an expected start date of July 1, 2020 for a period of three years. The formal title will be determined by the qualifications of the individual selected to hold the position.

Applications are encouraged from scholars with rigorous training in any period of Assyrian culture, art, or language (including, but not limited to, ancient Assyria, Syriac studies, Neo-Aramaic, and modern Assyrian diaspora). Preference will be given to individuals whose research has strong foundations in philology, art history, or material culture studies. Those in the field of Diaspora Studies are also encouraged to apply.

In addition to teaching responsibilities, duties include engagement with Assyrian communities in the area and with students of Assyrian descent on the UC Berkeley campus. The successful candidate is expected to have an active research agenda.

Basic Qualifications:

  •   PhD or equivalent international degree, or PhD candidacy or equivalent international degree stage, at the time of application.

Preferred Qualifications:

  • Mastery of relevant primary source languages where relevant.
  • Experience teaching at the college level.
  • Potential for successful advising and mentoring of students.
  • Potential for program development and designing new courses.
  • Ability to organize and carry out activities that engage with the Assyrian community in the area.

Preference is for a visiting faculty who can teach topics from a diachronic perspective and to include courses at the introductory level.

The search is opened until filled. Please direct inquiries to: nes@berkeley.edu.

Document requirements

  •   Cover Letter
  •   Curriculum Vitae – Your most recently updated C.V., including the list of publications
  •  Teaching Philosophy – One page
  •  Sample Syllabus for Undergradiate Lecture Class
  •  Three -year Research Plan
  •  Statement on Diversity and Inclusion – For additional information, please visit here.

Reference requirements

  • 3 letters of reference required

To apply, follow this link.

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 04/09/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 4th September 2019
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1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

Graduate and Early Career Workshop: ‘Armenia & Byzantium Without Borders III’, 8–10 May 2020, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna

Deadline: 31 October 2019

Within the framework of ‘Moving Byzantium: Mobility, Microstructure and Personal Agency,’ a five-year project funded through the Wittgenstein-Prize (http://rapp.univie.ac.at), ‘Armenia & Byzantium without Borders III’ is a three-day workshop focusing on social and cultural mobility between Armenia and Byzantium in the Middle Ages. This workshop continues a scholarly conversation initiated in April 2018 at the University of Vienna by Dr. Emilio Bonfiglio and Prof. Claudia Rapp and now run in joint partnership with Dr. David Zakarian and Prof. Theo Maarten van Lint at the University of Oxford. The 2020 Workshop will be held at the Division of Byzantine Research, Institute for Medieval Research, of the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

We invite advanced PhD candidates and early career scholars working in the fields of Late Antique, Armenian, Byzantine, and Middle Eastern Studies to submit proposals for 20 min. papers connected with the main topics of ‘Moving Byzantium’, with a focus on aspects of social and cultural mobility of persons, objects, and/or ideas between Armenia and Byzantium throughout the Middle Ages. We are particularly interested in new research showing interaction and communication on both literary and material grounds between the Byzantine world and the Armenians.

Papers presented at the workshop will be accompanied by a senior scholar’s 10 min. response, followed by a general discussion. The workshop will be inaugurated with the lecture of our keynote speaker, Dr. Tim Greenwood from the University of St Andrews.

Travel and accommodation expenses of scholars selected for presentation at the workshop will be covered by the ‘Moving Byzantium’ project.

Paper proposals including:

  • University affiliation
  • Graduate level
  • Title of the paper
  • Abstract (300 words max)
  • CV

Must be sent by the 31st of October 2019 to Dr. Emilio Bonfiglio (emilio.bonfiglio@oeaw.ac.at) and our project-coordinator Dr. Paraskevi Sykopetritou (paraskevi.sykopetritou@univie.ac.at).

13th Symposium Syriacum and the 11th Conference of Christian Arabic Studies, 6-11 July 2010, Institut national des langues et civilisations orientales, Paris

Deadline: 30 September 2019

Les congrès accueilleront des conférences plénières sur des sujets transversaux aux études syriaques et arabes chrétiennes (1h), une séance plénière consacrée au patrimoine (1h), des ateliers thématiques (1/2 journée ou journée entière), et des communications individuelles (20′) en sessions parallèles.

Les propositions de doctorants et chercheurs en début de carrière sont vivement encouragées, ainsi que des propositions de posters pour les travaux en cours.

Les communications et les posters sont à proposer en s’inscrivant sur ce site avant le 30 septembre 2019. Les résumés seront évalués par le conseil scientifique appuyé sur l’expertise de collègues étrangers. L’acceptation sera envoyée aux intéressés avant le 31 octobre 2019. C’est seulement après acceptation des résumés que se fera le paiement des frais d’inscription.

Boundaries of Holiness, Frontiers of Sanctity, International Medieval Congress, Leeds, 6-9 July, 2020.

Deadline: 15 September 2019

Late-antique Christianity hails ‘the rise of the holy man’, to paraphrase the title of Peter Brown’s seminal work. This new social and religious phenomenon implies the appearance of figures who are believed to be specially chosen by God. The holy men play a crucial role in the religious imagination of the people of those times. As the ‘servants’ or ‘friends, of God’, they occupy an intermediate position between Him and the ordinary man: this is what determines and defines their holiness. Yet, this liminal status renders them the ‘arbiters of ambiguity’, to refer again to Peter Brown: holy men and saints need to operate between the spiritual world and this world. The question thus arises how is their in-between holy position negotiated; what is it that distinguishes them from the material world on the one hand and from the divine realm on the other.

In keeping with the leading thematic strand of the IMC 2020, i.e. the borders, this session proposal will invite abstracts for papers which would address questions of the boundaries of holiness and sanctity as manifest in late-antique and Byzantine culture. Possible lines of inquiry would include the following:

  • How do the saints and the holy persons transgress the boundaries of their humanity?
  • Are these boundaries of holiness clear or blurred?
  • Are the boundaries of holiness gendered?
  • What are the markers of the holy and the unholy?
  • Does their holiness have a spatial dimension as well?
  • How can holiness be defined from the outside and from the inside?

We welcome proposals which explore these and other issues with various approaches, methods and disciplines. Should you be interested, please send an abstract (200 words maximum) including your e-mail address and affiliation by no later than 15 September 2019 to Julia Doroszewska (j.doroszewska@uw.edu.pl). Please note that the organizers cannot cover the conference registration fee and travel and accommodation expenses.

Erasure in Late Antiquity, International Medieval Congress, Leeds, 6-9 July, 2020.

Deadline: 6 September 2019

Various forms of erasure have attracted significant interest in recent scholarship. Whether reassessments of damnatio memoriae, temple desecration and redecoration, or the deliberate denial of links to preceding movements during processes of cultural and religious change, these concerns are particularly relevant to the late antique world. Censorship, the manipulation and alteration of space, and concepts of absence in theology and philosophy are also closely connected to notions of erasure, as well as more sudden processes of replacement and change. Yet there have been few attempts to consider erasure as a more general phenomenon in late antiquity. What were the means by which inclusion and exclusion took place? Were there commonalities in erasing processes? How can scholars recover the traces of what has been erased, and how can the academic community identify and assess its own erasures?

We invite postgraduate and early career researchers from a variety of backgrounds to present and discuss erasure across the field of late antiquity in a series of panels. The Late Antiquity Network was founded in 2012 to provide a unified platform for junior researchers working on a broad range of geographical and disciplinary areas within the period. We hold workshops and organise panels at larger conferences to provide opportunities for junior researchers to build connections with others in the field, present their research in a constructive environment, and discuss key current trends and issues. Participants in these panels are encouraged to interpret ‘erasure’ in a broad sense, thinking about how the theme intersects with their own research interests. Applications from masters students, those early in their PhDs, and individuals without current institutional affiliation are particularly encouraged. Papers should be no more than 20 minutes, leaving 10 minutes for discussion.

Some suggested topics for discussion, which we invite participants to read in relation to their own themes or bodies of evidence:

  • ‘Remembering to forget’ and self-conscious erasure
  • Narrative exclusion and literary erasure
  • Physical and spatial erasure
  • Erasure and the dynamics of censorship
  • Erasure of boundaries (epistemological, ethnic, etc)
  • Erasure and changes in religion and culture
  • Partial erasure, deliberate or accidental
  • Erasure in manuscripts and papyri
  • The removal and replacement of individuals
  • Erasure and power dynamics
  • Concepts of absence and erasure in philosophy and theology
  • Sculptural, pictorial and visual inclusion and exclusion generally
  • Erasure and the problems of sources’ representation
  • Erasure in or by contemporary scholarship

The deadline for abstracts (300 words) is midnight on Friday, September 6th. Please include a brief bio noting your career stage.

Abstracts and queries can be sent to: lateantiquenetwork@gmail.com.

2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Tenure-Track Position, Lectureship/Professorship in the Environmental History of the Mediterranean, University of Haifa

Deadline: 31 December 2019.

The Haifa Center for Mediterranean History (HCMH) and the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Haifa, Israel, invite applications for a tenure track position in Mediterranean history (prehistory to 1800). HCMH, which began its work three years ago, promotes the historical study of the pre-modern Mediterranean in Haifa, and aims to connect it to the vibrant international networks of Mediterranean research. HCMH encourages cross-disciplinary collaboration on Mediterranean themes within the University of Haifa and outside it. Having recently hired a specialist in Mediterranean religions, in this recruitment round we encourage applications from candidates with distinct environmental perspectives.

Environmental history (in various forms) has been at the core of Mediterranean historiography since the early 20th century. Since its foundation, one of the Center’s main goals has been to encourage cross-disciplinary discussion which focuses on aspects of environmental history and human relationship with nature in the Mediterranean region. The University of Haifa already made a breakthrough in developing significant facilities and programs which focus on the natural aspects of the Mediterranean Sea. HCMH aims to harness these resources in order to promote the topic of environmental history in Israel, and to join current international research in the field.

We are looking for candidates with proven academic excellence in their respective fields of expertise, together with an extensive background in Mediterranean studies; a fully-developed Mediterraneanist approach guiding their research; and proven interest in environmental issues in the history of the Mediterranean. While the candidate should be firmly rooted within the historical discipline, additional background in supporting social and natural scientific fields, such as biology, geology, geography, ecology, etc., is a distinct advantage.

The position is open to any rank. Applicants must have a Ph.D. and a demonstrable commitment to both teaching and research. The successful candidate will be expected to teach four courses per year (undergraduate, graduate), supervise theses, and carry usual nonteaching duties. Primary teaching language (eventually): Hebrew. Salary according to scale.  Position beginning October 2020. We expect the successful candidate to take a leading role in the work of HCMH. Ideally, the candidate will be affiliated to both HCMH (in the framework of the School of History) and a relevant department.

Please submit a dossier including: CV and list of publications; short past and future research profile; sample of writing (up to 8,000 words). Application materials in PDF should be emailed to Ms. Shiri Barnhart, HCMH administrator, at hcmh@univ.haifa.ac.il. Please have three references sent directly to this address. Preference will be given to applications received by 31 December 2019. Interviews for shortlisted candidates are expected during the spring term.

Postdoctoral Position, ‘Effects of Contact and Exchange in the Euro-Mediterranean’, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz.

Deadline: 15 September 2019.

One post-doctoral position (wissenschaftliche/r Mitarbeiter/in) (salary scheme 13 TV-L, 100%) is to be filled for a period of 1 year (12 months) within the Research Group ‘Effects of Contact and Exchange in the Euro-Mediterranean’ at the Leibniz Science Campus ‘Byzantium between Orient and Occident’.

The goal of the research group is to examine the short-term and long-term effects of intercultural communication, which took place with considerable Byzantine intermediation and under Byzantine influence in the Euro-Mediterranean sphere. In a comparative perspective, we will ask how the appropriation of foreign knowledge, ideas and objects had an effect on different regions and/or societies, in particular from a chronological perspective which extends beyond the end of the Byzantine Empire.

Furthermore, the history of reception and its impact on these societies will be reflected upon. Participating in this Research Group are the disciplines of Christian Archaeology/Byzantine Art History, Medieval History, Early and Prehistorical Archaeology (with a focus on Medieval Archaeology), Byzantine Studies, Eastern European History, Early Modern Church History, Musicology and Early Modern History. The project covers the period from the Early Middle Ages to the 19th century.

The successful candidate is expected to:

  • develop and submit a project application, e.g. to the German Research Foundation (Walter Benjamin-Programm) or Gerda-Henkel-Stiftung along the lines of the aforementioned topic
  • complete a scholarly paper that merits publication (corresponding to the topic)
  • cooperate in the development of a GIS-referenced digital atlas on reception of Byzantium

The Research Group “Effects of Contact and Exchange in the Euro-Mediterranean” offers intensive specialist and interdisciplinary exchange with colleagues at the Universities of Mainz and Frankfurt, the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum Archaeological research institute (RGZM), the Leibniz Institute of European History (IEG) and diverse opportunities for international networking.

Requirements for the application include an excellent dissertation in a participating field, as well as experience in interdisciplinary work. Additional experience in Digital Humanities and knowledge of GIS are desirable. To increase the proportion of women within the sphere of scholarship applications from female researchers are especially welcome.

The following application materials are to be submitted electronically in a single .pdf file (in German or English):

  • Outline of the planned research project (two pages)
  • A curriculum vitae with list of publications, degree diplomas, information on scientific employment

The application materials are to be addressed to the main office of the Leibniz Science Campus: Dr. Benjamin Fourlas (fourlas@rgzm.de).  For further questions, please contact Dr. Fourlas.

Tsiter-Kontopoulou Short-Term Research Stipends at the Department of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies, University of Vienna

Deadline: 31 October 2019.

The Department of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies of the University of Vienna, thanks to the generosity of the Tsiter-Kontopoulou Fund, invites applications for a Short-Term Research Stipend to enable pre- and post-doctoral scholars to pursue research on Byzantine and early modern Greek culture, with particular emphasis on cultural and intellectual history in the widest sense, including the history of Orthodox Christianity.

For more information about the Tsiter-Kontopoulou Trust see here.

Terms: The duration of the research stay is usually two weeks. During this time, the recipients of the stipend are expected to give an informal lunch-time presentation of their current research.

Eligibility: This stipend is intended to support young and early career scholars, i.e. from the final year of doctoral study to no more than eight years after the completion of the Ph.D.

Amount: The stipend offers the reimbursement of travel expenses plus a daily allowance, for a maximum of 2.500 Euros total (to be reimbursed after the completion of the stay). You are expected to make your own arrangements.

Appointment period: Any two weeks between 1 January 2020 and 31 December 2020, except 1 July to 15 September.

Application: Please send a description of the proposed research including a statement as to why you wish to conduct this research in Vienna, a provisional budget and an indication of preferred dates (max. 300 words), curriculum vitae (max. 3 pages), and list of publications, to Mrs. Petra Greger at the address below.

Doctoral students should also include a short letter of endorsement (max. 1 page) from their adviser. Submissions will be accepted by e-mail only.The decision of the selection committee will be communicated no later than December 15.

Further Inquiries: Mrs. Petra Greger: petra.greger@univie.ac.at

Tenure-Track Assistant Professor Position, Department of Classics, College of the Holy Cross, Worcester MA.

Deadline: 17 September 2019

We seek to hire a colleague who will contribute to maintaining our strengths and developing new ones over the next decade and beyond. Candidates must show promise of achievement in teaching, service, and research, the three areas in which Holy Cross evaluates for tenure. Candidates must be able to teach Greek and Latin at all levels (beginning to advanced); develop courses in translation that serve the evolving needs of our students; and contribute to our department’s cocurricular activities. In addition, we seek candidates who can contribute to one or more of these four areas of departmental emphasis: collaborative student research; diversification of the curriculum; outreach to audiences beyond Holy Cross; and exploration of new language pedagogy. We recognize that many graduate programs offer limited or perhaps no direct opportunities to develop a professional record in these areas, and we welcome applications that show candidates’ interest and initiative in gaining experience relevant to these endeavors. We encourage candidates to seek letters of recommendation that will help our search committee identify their strengths in these areas. We welcome applications from those working in any area of Classics and especially those interested in reception studies and/or digital humanities.

This position carries a 3-2 teaching load with a full-salary one-semester research leave prior to tenure review and generous sabbatical and fellowship leaves for tenured faculty. Tenure track faculty are eligible for travel support and reimbursement of relocation costs within the College’s published policies. All full-time appointments offer competitive salaries and include full benefits. To learn more about faculty life at the College & the Worcester area, candidates are encouraged to visit here.

As a Jesuit, undergraduate liberal arts college, the College values dialogue among people from diverse perspectives as it is integral to the mission and essential to the excellence of our academic program. In your application please highlight how your scholarship, teaching, mentorship and/or service might support the College’s mission and its commitment to diversity and inclusion.

The College of the Holy Cross uses Interfolio to collect all faculty job applications electronically.  Applicants should submit all materials here by September 17, 2019.

We hope to ask select candidates for writing samples in late September, conduct video conference interviews in early October, host candidates for campus visits in early November, and complete our search by the end of November. We will do our best to keep candidates informed at each stage of the process. Please feel free to consult our departmental web site, and, if you have further questions, to contact by email:

Neel Smith, Chair, Department of Classics; co-chair, Search Committee (classics-chair@holycross.edu).

Aaron Seider, co-chair, Search Committee (aseider@holycross.edu).

Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, MF Norwegian School of Theology, Religion and Society, Oslo

Deadline: 1 December 2019

MF Norwegian School of Theology, Religion and Society wishes to recruit a postdoctoral research fellow to work on the project Books Known Only by Title: Exploring the Gendered Structures of the First Millennium Imagined Library. The project is the 2020/2021 Humanities Project of the Centre for Advanced Study at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (CAS), co-chaired by Professor Liv Ingeborg Lied (MF Norwegian School of Theology, Religion and Society) and Professor Marianne Bjelland Kartzow (University of Oslo).

‘Books Known Only by Title: Exploring the Gendered Structures of the First Millennium’ Imagined Library aims to explore the existence and functions of postulated books (“books known only by title”) in first millennium Jewish, Christian, Muslim and other literary corpora of the Mediterranean area and the Middle East. The project focuses on the ascription of books to female figures in particular and studies gendered and intersectional patterns in various literary imaginations of postulated books.

For the full details, and how to apply, see here.

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 19/08/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 19th August 2019
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
====

 1. NEWS AND EVENTS

 

The Byzantine Studies Association of North America’s 45th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference, University of Wisconsin, 17-20 October 2019, Madison, Wisconsin.

For the full programme and registration details, see here.

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

 

Call for Sessions: Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel at the 27th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 6-9 July 2020.

Deadline: 3 September 2019

To encourage the integration of Byzantine studies within the scholarly community and medieval studies in particular, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 27th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 6–9, 2020. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

The thematic strand for the 2029 IMC is “Borders.” See the IMC Call for Papers for additional information about the theme and suggested areas of discussion.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website.

Proposals should include:

  • Title
  • 100-word session abstract
  • Session moderator and academic affiliation
  • Information about the three papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 100-word abstract
  • CV

Successful applicants will be notified by mid-September if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. Successful applicants will be notified by mid-September if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. The Mary Jaharis Center will submit the session proposal to the International Medieval Congress and will keep the potential organizer informed about the status of the proposal.

The session organizer may act as the moderator or present a paper. Participants may only present papers in one session.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse a maximum of 4 session participants (presenters and moderator) up to $600 maximum for European residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside Europe. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

‘Frontiers of Late Antiquity’, 27th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 6-9 July 2020.

Deadline: 16 September 2019

Since the 1980s, scholars have largely abandoned traditional Limesforschungen in favour of a more nuanced approach to the study of Rome’s frontiers. Although many remain interested in imperial strategy and defense, limites are now commonly viewed as a permeable zone of influence and an area of economic and cultural exchange. Yet, these physical limites are just one possible way of thinking about frontiers in the Roman Empire and during Late Antiquity. Indeed, frontiers were also conceptual, about controlling access to power and privilege, and highlighting or minimizing difference, be it geographic or topographical (regional and supra-regional), political, legal, ethnic, economic, cultural, religious, or gender. Frontiers could also be imagined and constructed through rhetoric. Thus, the question of frontiers is intimately bound up with questions of liminality, of insiders and outsiders.

In keeping with IMC 2020 theme of “borders,” papers are being sought for a series of panels on frontiers in Late Antiquity (roughly 250 – 750 CE). We are hoping to include a diverse range of scholars representing as many approaches as possible. We especially encourage late-stage graduate students and early career scholars to apply.

Possible topics might include (but are not limited to):

  • Urban-suburban frontiers (city centre vs. periphery).
  • The frontiers of religious identity and authority (this might include liturgical frontiers; missionary activity; the construction of religious identity vis-à-vis borders).
  • Imagined/imaginary frontiers (perceptions of difference and distinction; spatial frontiers; the rhetoric of the frontier; polemic; perception of insiders and outsiders).
  • Communication, diplomacy, and political integration across the frontiers of the late antique Mediterranean and beyond (local/regional and geographic frontiers such as rovers, mountains, plains or agriculture zones; the reception of Roman territorial divisions).
  • Gender as a frontier (and its transgression).
  • Physical frontiers in late antiquity.
  • Movement of people across frontiers and their reception.

Those wishing to have their paper considered for inclusion are asked to submit a title and short abstract (no more than 250 words) to lateantiquefrontiers@gmail.com by Monday, September 16, 2019. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us collectively at the above email address or any of the individual organizers, listed below:

Samuel Cohen (Sonoma State University) samuel.cohen@sonoma.edu

Jonathan J. Arnold (University of Tulsa) jon-arnold@utulsa.edu

Rebecca Usherwood (Trinity College Dublin) usherwor@tcd.ie

Adrastos Omissi (University of Glasgow) adrastos.omissi@glasgow.ac.uk

 

‘Women and Artistic Production Beyond the Borders of Byzantium’, 27th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 6-9 July 2020.

Deadline: 10 September 2019

The ever-shifting borders of the Byzantine Empire and the spiritual power of Eastern Orthodoxy contributed to the development of new visual forms in regions of the Balkan Peninsula and the Carpathian Mountains between the thirteenth and sixteenth centuries. The rich art, architecture, and visual culture of these eastern European regions remain to be fully explored, as do the key roles women played in the transfer of artistic and cultural knowledge, the development of local artistic styles, as well as in the establishment of diplomatic relations and the transformation of identities and ideologies. Women have been frequently overshadowed by powerful husbands, sons, and communities, and too often relegated to the margins of scholarly inquiry.

This session explores women and female agency beyond the borders of Byzantium, in light of their roles within marital and inter-dynastic relations, as well as in religious and spiritual dynamics. In efforts to gain new perspectives on the nature of cultural contact and transfer, as well as on visual production in late medieval Eastern Europe as a result of the direct involvement of women, either as patrons, artists, mediators, and/or recipients, this session aims to focus on case studies that examine individual female figures from all walks of life (royal courts, noble families, monastic communities, etc.). Moreover, the session seeks to highlight the significance of prosopography, gender, and network studies in historical and art historical research.

Papers could address topics that include, but are not limited to:

  • The role of women as key agents of cultural contact, transfer, and adaptation of knowledge
  • Women as patrons, artists, and recipients of art beyond geographical, socio-political, and religious boundaries
  • Instances of art (icons, embroideries, manuscripts, metalwork) and architecture that speak to women, allow for self-identification, and/or established gender roles and norms

Proposals for 20-minute papers in English should include an abstract (300 words max.) and a brief CV (2 pages max.) and should be sent to Alice Isabella Sullivan (aisulli@umich.edu) and Maria Alessia Rossi (marossi@princeton.edu) by September 10, 2019.

This session is organized under the larger initiative North of Byzantium, which explores the rich history, art, and culture of the northern frontiers of the Byzantine Empire in Eastern Europe between the thirteenth and sixteenth centuries.

Mike Clover and the World of Late Antiquity’, 27th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 6-9 July 2020.

Deadline: 21 September 2019

Following the untimely death of Mike Clover, a much beloved and admired scholar of Late Antiquity in general and the Vandals in particular, his students, colleagues, and friends are proposing a series of conference sessions in his honor for the Leeds International Medieval Conference, 6-9 July 2020. Given Mike’s interests, the theme for next year’s conference, “Borders,” makes this initiative even more appropriate. We would welcome submissions on the kinds of topics that Mike liked to work on, things like barbarians/Vandals, prosopography, the Historia Augusta, Ammianus, hagiography, coinage, and late Roman history in general.

Submissions (title and brief abstract) can be sent to Ralph Mathisen, ralphwm@illinois.edu. The deadline for submissions in September 21.

‘The Lost Latin Historiography of Late Antiquity’, 27th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 6-9 July 2020.

Deadline: 15 September 2019

The project ‘The Missing Link: The Lost Latin Historiography of the Later Roman Empire (3rd-5th century)’, funded by the National Science Centre Poland, aims to collect and study cases of lost or fragmentarily preserved history works composed in Latin in the Later Roman Empire and their authors. In line with this goal we invite scholars at all career stages to submit proposals for twenty-minute papers relating to the subject of ‘The Lost Latin Historiography of Late Antiquity’.

Suggested topics for papers include, but are not limited to:

  • Identity and biographies of authors of lost history works
  • Transmission of fragments
  • Regional idiosyncrasies of history writing in the Roman Empire
  • Audiences and networks of authors – composing history as a social activity
  • Defining history – categories and limits of historical genres in Late Antiquity
  • History writing in the post-Roman West – continuity or a break?
  • History of the scholarship on the lost and fragmentarily preserved Latin historiography

Please send paper proposals in English of no more than 300 words to Aleksander Paradziński (a.k.paradzinski@uw.edu.pl) by 15 September 2019. Please note that conveners are, regrettably, unable to cover the congress registration fee and travel expenses.

Dumbarton Oaks Sponsored Sessions, International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 7-10 May 2020.

Deadline: 15 September 2019

Dumbarton Oaks is sponsoring five sessions at the 2020 International Congress on Medieval Studies. For more information, including the topics of each Dumbarton Oaks sponsored session, please visit their website.

Any proposals or questions can be directed to Nicole Eddy (eddyn01@doaks.org). Please indicate which session you are interested in.

All proposals should include an abstract of no more than one page and a completed participant information form, which can be found here.

Any proposals not chosen for inclusion by the session organizers will be forwarded to the congress organizers for consideration for the General Sessions.

 

Call for submissions for the Early Slavic Studies Association (ESSA) Book and Article Prizes.

Deadline: Final Call

This is the final call for submissions for the Early Slavic Studies Association (ESSA) prizes for best monograph and best article in the field of Early Slavic Studies for 2019. The prize committee is also willing to consider a special award for best translation of primary source material in the field, to be awarded at the committee’s discretion.

Books and peer-reviewed articles published between September 1, 2018 and August 31, 2019 are eligible for the award. All nominated works must be in English. The committee will accept nominations and self-nominations. Authors must be members in good standing of the ESSA. Please contact our secretary, Cynthia M. Vakareliyska (vakarel@uoregon.edu), to confirm your eligibility.

All nominations should be sent to the chair of the prize committee, Olga Grinchenko (olga.grinchenko@gmail.com).

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 28/07/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 28th July 2019
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

 1. NEWS AND EVENTS

Languages of God: Sacred Scripts of Ethiopia and Eritrea, 27 July – 13 October 2019, Weston Library, Oxford.

The collection of Ethiopic manuscripts in the Bodleian Library in Oxford is one of the most significant in Europe. Members of the Ethiopian and Eritrean communities from Oxford, London, and Milton Keynes have worked with the Bodleian to co-curate this display which will help us to find out more about these precious books and manuscripts and share them with the public.

The exhibition is part of an ongoing Bodleian Libraries project in partnership with the Faculty of Classics and the Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research, and is supported by the John Fell Fund and The Helen Hamlyn Trust.

For further details about the exhibition, see here.

For more information about this collaborative project, or to join the mailing list, please email ethiopia-eritrea@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

 

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

‘Acts of Excommunication in the Late Antique and Early Islamicate Middle East’, 12-13 March 2020, Leiden University.

Deadline: 1 October 2019

As part of the ERC-funded project, “Embedding Conquest, Naturalising Muslim Rule (600-1000)”, at Leiden University, this conference aims to bring together both senior and junior scholars to present research which illuminates the dynamics implicit in the act of excommunication and associated practices: ostracism, anathema, and other forms of religio-social exclusion, among the major religious communities of the Islamicate world, 600-1200 CE: including various Christian and Jewish denominations, Sunni, Shiʿi, ‘Khārijī’ and other groups within Islam; Zoroastrians and other relevant groups.

The workshop will focus on “acts of excommunication”, meaning that its primary focus will be specific cases, whether real or imagined, which display the dynamics and implications of excommunicatory practices. The discussion of specifc (pseudo-) documents is particularly encouraged. While participants will be asked to focus on specific cases, they should show how these examples illuminate the larger frameworks within which their cases occurred.

Topics to be covered might include the following:

  • Excommunicatory statements in contracts and oaths
  • Excommunication as a tool in managing institutional hierarchies and hierocracies
  • Maximal and minimalist excommunication
  • Exclusions from ritual, social activities, trade, place and space
  • Political rebels
  • Overlapping or contested jurisdictions
  • Enforcement issues
  • Excommunication at centre and periphery
  • Conversion and apostasy

Scholars of Judaism, Christianity, Zoroastrianism and Islam often study excommunication in separate silos, developing separate vocabularies and models. However, during the early Islamic period, these communities shared space and ideas. When compared, various contexts (theology, ritual, eschatology, social mores) indicate isomorphisms which suggest that different religious communities were as connected as they were divided.

Excommunication is a tool of coercion, and as such, it deserves to be studied in comparative context which might highlight the operation of intersecting power dynamics in society.

This workshop aims to move beyond the idea that acts of excommunication were purely the result of theological issues. Instead, this workshop aims to explore acts of excommunication as social and political as well as religious practice, with important implications for activities in local communities, but also for interactions with wider society and with governing authorities within the early Islamic empire.

While the theological, doctrinal and legal backdrop are important, an act of excommunication does not simply flow from the conceptual force of a doctrinal transgression, but rather it is situated within a set of overlapping fields which may include economic, institutional, familial, political, ethnic, linguistic and generational aspects. These fields, in turn, contributed to how an act of excommunication came to be interpreted and positioned within evolving systems of law, theology and doctrine.

The output of this workshop will be an open-access special issue on the topic of excommunication in and around the early Islamicate empire, to be published in Al-ʿUsur al-Wusta: The Journal of Middle East Medievalists.

Contributions to this workshop will be understood to be works in progress, with final versions to be submitted for the special issue. Please send an abstract of around 300 words to e.p.hayes@hum.leidenuniv.nl by October 1st, 2019. Pre-circulation of papers will not be necessary, but final versions of papers for publication will be requested by September 2020. If you are unable to attend the workshop, but would be interested in submitting to the special issue, please indicate this.

‘Jerusalem: The Holy City’, 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 7-10 May 2020, Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Deadline: 15 September 2019

The Stanford University Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (CMEMS) is pleased to announce that we will sponsor three sessions at the 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan (May 7-10, 2020). Among these are two linked panel sessions entitled ‘Jerusalem: The Holy City’. The first considers medieval imaginings of a distant Jerusalem across textual, visual, and material culture, while the second considers Jerusalem as an interreligious experience among Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Proposals should consist of a short abstract (300 words max) and a completed  participant information form. General submissions guidelines are available here, but please get in touch if you have any questions.

As per ICMS rules, any proposals not accepted for our sessions will be forwarded to the Congress committee to be considered for inclusion in the General Sessions.

Jerusalem (I): The Holy City in Textual, Visual, and Material Culture

Organizer: Mareike Elisa Reisch, Stanford University

This panel will focus on how Jerusalem was imagined from afar in textual, visual, and material

culture. As recent scholarship has shown, Jerusalem existed not only as a geographical space

entangled in local and transregional politics, but also as the subject of imaginations from afar because of its importance as a sacred space in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. People integrated, for example, images of Jerusalem into their personal devotional practices when they embarked on a virtual pilgrimage. As the place of Christian salvation, Jerusalem also inspired textual, visual, and material productions for public devotional practices. The city was imagined as the ultimate acquisition for religio-political expansion, as seen during the crusades. Material objects such as pilgrimage badges and gravesites show one’s personal connections and images of Jerusalem. The different ways in which Jerusalem was imagined from afar are still traceable in textual culture in the form of pilgrimage guidebooks, devotional texts, accounts of the crusades, and literary production, in architectural structures, in visual images such as altarpieces, epitaphs, and maps. This panel welcomes papers from all fields and aims for an interdisciplinary exchange.

Please send enquiries and submissions to mreisch@stanford.edu.

Jerusalem (II): The Holy City as Interreligious Experience.

Organizer: Ana C. Núñez, Stanford University

This panel will focus on the nature of Jerusalem as an interreligious space. As the home of Jews, Christians, and Muslims, as well as the destination of pilgrims, crusaders, and merchants, Jerusalem was a simultaneously shared, contested, and negotiated site. This panel will offer a forum to discuss how texts, architecture, and art reflect the centuries of contestation and negotiation from Late Antiquity to the Late Middle Ages. Pilgrimage texts from the ninth century, for example, detail the travel documents that the Christian pilgrim needed in order to visit Jerusalem under Muslim rule.

The Tomb of David on Mount Zion witnessed competing claims between Jews and Christians in the fifteenth century, until in the first half of the sixteenth century Muslim control resulted in the conversion of the chapel into a mosque, and the banned entry of both Jews and Christians. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre is another example of interreligious experience, in which various Christian communities—Latins, Georgians, Greeks, Armenians, and Ethiopians—vied for control and supremacy. To explore the long and multi-faceted history of Jerusalem as an interreligious space, we welcome papers from across disciplines, from anytime between Late Antiquity and the Late Middle Ages.

Please send enquiries and submissions to ananunez@stanford.edu.

Collectors and Scholars. The Numismatic World in the Long 19th Century, 16-17 April 2020, University of Tübingen.

Deadline: 31 October 2019

In the 19th century, developments in the study and collection of coins set the cornerstone for modern numismatics: major steps included the foundation of learned societies (e.g. Royal Numismatic Society in 1836, Numismatische Gesellschaft zu Berlin in 1843, American Numismatic Society in 1858, etc.) and the publication numismatic journals from the 1830s onwards (Revue numismatique in 1836, Numismatic chronicle in 1838, Revue belge de numismatique in 1842, etc.) leading to a thriving numismatic community.

The 19th century is also the time when previously private (Royal) collections became public institutions (e.g. in Paris following the French revolution, or the Münzkabinett Winterthur in 1861), and when new museums were created (e.g. the Capitoline medagliere in 1873, Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien in 1891, etc.). Subsequently, museum curators began publishing scholarly catalogues of their collections, such as the British Museum’s seminal catalogue series (e.g. Greek Coins from 1873 onwards, or Oriental Coins from 1875 onwards). Some of the works published in the 19th century were aimed at collectors, such as Théodore Mionnet’s or Henry Cohen’s reference works, but it is notably thanks to their publications that scholars were able to process coin finds as source for dating archaeological sites and discussing social history (e.g. Theodor Mommsen identifying Kalkriese as site for the battle of the Teutoburg Forest, as early as 1850, on the basis of numismatics).

At the same time, large and famous collections evolved, were traded, or finally bequeathed to museums leading to new research on the subject. Whilst earlier collectors were almost always generalists (coins being one collecting field among others such as antiquities, paintings, gems, etc.), collectors such as Hyman Montagu or Virgil Brand devoted themselves only to numismatics. These famous collectors were sometimes scholars themselves, writing noteworthy articles. The names of John Evans, Friedrich Imhoof-Blumer, William Henry Waddington, Archer Huntington and King Victor Emmanuel III are the most prominent examples of illustrious collectors with expertise and the desire to promote numismatic scholarship through their collections.

The 19th century is also the time when collectors started paying greater attention to the condition of a coin, and to their provenance, while the new medium of photography and improved book-illustrations allowed for the documentation and recognition of individual specimens in auction catalogues and scholarly works likewise. In the same spirit, numismatists themselves became focus of interest: medals and tokens were struck in their names, and books were written about them (e.g. Médailles et jetons des numismates in 1865).

We may also think of the institutional development of archaeology out of philology around the 1840ies to become a discipline of its own that triggered a shift in perceiving coins predominantly as material manifestations of the past. In addition, we need to take into consideration the large scale professional excavations of the century (e.g. the foundation of the Reichslimeskommission in Germany in 1892) that enabled new methods in studying coins from an academic perspective. Ultimately, this pathed the way for numismatics to become a university subject with the evolution of university coin collections. The 19th century was also a time that saw the growth of nationalism, which was accompanied by a focus on one’s history as mirrored in the practice of collecting and trading coins. Questions may also include to what extend numismatics was received in the realm of contemporary art such as Eugène Delacroix’s engravings, and literature – for example with the many coin references found in the work of Victor Hugo. These are some of the various new avenues and perspectives the symposium wishes to explore.

Our aim is to explore the numismatic world in the long 19th century – including both, the sphere of academia, and that of collecting and dealing – with a focus on ancient numismatics but also on medieval and modern numismatics, with an interest for the political, cultural, economic, and social changes of the era. Thus, a wide range of international experts, including numismatists, historians, archaeologists, anthropologists, and art historians are invited to present their research. Papers that explore specific case studies are particularly welcome, and talks on non-Western numismatics and on medals are hoped for.

Organizers: Stefan Krmnicek (Tübingen) & Hadrien Rambach (Brussels). Abstracts of no longer than 500 words should be sent by email to stefan.krmnicek@uni-tuebingen.de  and coinadvisor@yahoo.co.uk.

For further information, visit the conference website.

The Byzantine Society of Cyprus’s Third International Conference on Byzantine and Medieval Studies, 17-19 January 2020, Nicosia.

Deadline: 6 September 2019

The Byzantinist Society of Cyprus (ΒΕΚ: Βυζαντινολογική Εταιρεία Κύπρου) invites papers to

be presented at the Third International Conference on Byzantine and Medieval Studies. Honorary President: Theodoros Giagkou, Professor, University of Thessaloniki; Keynote Speaker: Enrico Zanini, Professor, Università di Siena.

Scholars, researchers and students are encouraged to present their ongoing research, work-in-progress or fieldwork report on any aspect of the history, archaeology, art, architecture, literature, philosophy and religion of Cyprus and the broader Mediterranean region during the Byzantine, Medieval and Ottoman periods.

The languages of the conference will be Greek, English, French and German. Every paper proposal submission must be accompanied by an abstract between 300 and 500 words summarizing the presented research, report or work-in-progress and indicating its

original contribution.

Please provide the requested information and submit your abstracts using our online application forms: Sessions of up to five papers can be submitted together in the following form by the session organizer. To submit a session proposal, follow this link.

Paper proposals will be reviewed based on their abstract and accepted on merit. This review will be anonymous. Notification of paper review will be sent by email by the beginning of October, 2019. Papers will be grouped in sessions according to their topic and theme. Each participant may deliver only one paper limited to 20 minutes. Accepted paper abstracts will be published in the conference’s ‘Book of Abstracts’. The best graduate student papers will be selected and awarded upon the conclusion of the conference.

The conference is organized by the Byzantinist Society of Cyprus. For membership information please visit the society’s website.

For more details about the conference, see the relevant section of the society’s website.

For inquiries: cbms2020@byzantinistsociety.org.cy

 

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Tenure-Track (Assistant or Associate) Professor in Classical Archaeology, Harvard University.

Deadline: 5 September 2019

The Department of the Classics seeks to appoint a tenure-track professor in Classical Archaeology. Preference will be given to candidates who set material culture within the broader socio-economic and cultural context of the Greco-Roman world writ large. Significant experience in archaeological fieldwork is desirable. The appointment is expected to begin on July 1, 2020. The tenure-track professor will be responsible for teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels and will be expected to participate fully in the activities of the Department of the Classics, the Harvard Art Museums, and the broader archaeological community at Harvard.

Basic Qualifications: Doctorate or terminal degree in Classical Archaeology or related discipline required by the time the appointment begins.

Additional Qualifications: Demonstration of a strong commitment to teaching is desired.

For more details, see here.

Fully-funded PhD position, University of Tübingen.

Deadline: Extended

The Research Group ‘Threatened Orders’ at Tübingen is searching for a candidate to work on a PhD dissertation on the 6th-7th century Visigothic monarchy and its relationship with the Byzantine Empire.

Prerequisites: A degree in Ancient History, excellent knowledge of Latin and Greek, as well as in-depth knowledge of Late Antique and Early Medieval history.

Salary: 65% TV-L 13.

Applications with the usual documents (curriculum vitae, certificates, references) must be sent in PDF format to Prof. Dr. Misha Meier (mischa.meier@uni-tuebingen.de).

For full details, see here.

Tsiter-Kontopoulou Short-Term Research Stipends at the Department of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies, University of Vienna.

Deadline: 31 October 2019

The Department of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies of the University of Vienna, thanks to the generosity of the Tsiter-Kontopoulou Fund, invites applications for a Short-Term Research Stipend to enable pre- and post-doctoral scholars to pursue research on Byzantine and early modern Greek culture, with particular emphasis on cultural and intellectual history in the widest sense, including the history of Orthodox Christianity.

Terms: The duration of the research stay is usually two weeks. During this time, the recipients of the stipend are expected to give an informal lunch-time presentation of their current research.

Eligibility: This stipend is intended to support young and early career scholars, i.e. from the final year of doctoral study to no more than eight years after the completion of the Ph.D.

Amount: The stipend offers the reimbursement of travel expenses plus a daily allowance, for a maximum of 2.500 Euros total (to be reimbursed after the completion of the stay). You are expected to make your own arrangements.

Appointment period: Any two weeks between 1 January 2020 and 31 December 2020, except 1 July to 15 September.

Application: Please send a description of the proposed research including a statement as to why you wish to conduct this research in Vienna, a provisional budget and an indication of preferred dates (max. 300 words), curriculum vitae (max. 3 pages), and list of publications, to Mrs. Petra Greger at the address below.

Doctoral students should also include a short letter of endorsement (max. 1 page) from their adviser. Submissions will be accepted by e-mail only.

Further Inquiries: Mrs. Petra Greger: petra.greger@univie.ac.at

For more information about the Department, its Library, and the Tsiter-Kontopoulou Trust see: https://www.byzneo.univie.ac.at

https://bibliothek.univie.ac.at/fb-byzantinistik/

https://tsiter-kontopoulou-schenkung.univie.ac.at

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings – TT 2019 Week 8

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 8

Trinity Term 2019

= = = = =

MONDAY 17th June

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, High St, Wharton Room

Neta Bodner (Hebrew University of Jerusalem/LMH),

‘Romanesque beyond Christianity – Jewish rituaarchitecture1150-1270′.

[+]

17.30   Perspectives on Education from the Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean

University College, High St, Swire Seminar Room

Eleanor Dickey (Reading)

What Did People Actually Do in a Roman School?

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TUESDAY 18th June

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WEDNESDAY 19th June

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Margarita Gleba (Cambridge)

Textile production in the pre-Roman northern Mediterranean: from qualitative to quantitative approach?

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Seminar

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’, Lecture Theatre

Zachary Chitwood (Mainz)

Orthodox Death, Burial and Commemoration in Late Byzantium and under Ottoman Rule, ca1300-1600.

[+]

17.00   Boethius (historical and philosophical perspectives)

Corpus Christi College, Merton St, Seminar Room

Mark Vessey (The University of British Columbia)

Intimations of the Architext: Boethius and Others of Cassiodorus’ Kind.

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THURSDAY 20th June

17.00   A Conference to Celebrate Bryan Ward-Perkins

Trinity College, Broad St, Danson Room

For the full programme, see here.

The event is free but registration is essential. To register please contact Phil Booth (philip.booth@theology.ox.ac.uk).

_ _ _

FRIDAY 14th June

09:00   A Conference to Celebrate Bryan Ward-Perkins (Day 2)

Trinity College, Broad St, Danson Room

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Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 16/06/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 16th June 2019
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

 

The Mark Whittow Memorial Conference ‘Urban and Rural Landscapes in the Medieval Mediterranean’, St John’s College, University of Oxford, 26th-27thJune 2019.

Attendance is free with a voluntary contribution to the Mark Whittow Memorial Fund, a fund in memory of Mark Whittow, aimed at supporting the work of Byzantinists and historians and those with interests in archaeology, landscape and the material world.

Please contact gillian.cane@orinst.ox.ac.uk to book your place. If you book your place before Monday 17 June, you will be catered for lunch and refreshments.

For the full programme, see here.

A Conference to Celebrate Bryan Ward-Perkins, Trinity College, University of Oxford, 20th-21st June 2019.

Bryan Ward-Perkins is retiring this year, after many years of service to Late Antique and Byzantine Studies and to academic life in Oxford. Please join friends, colleagues, and former students for a series of papers in his honour.

Speakers will include Averil Cameron, Ulrich Gehn, Ine Jacobs, Luke Lavan, Simon Loseby, Carlos Machado, Javier Martinez Jimenez, Neil McLynn, Efthymis Rizos, Claire Sotinel, Robert Wisniewski, George Woudhuysen, and others.

The event is free but please register with Phil Booth (philip.booth@theology.ox.ac.uk) in advance.

For the full programme, see here.

 

2.  JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Studies Award Opportunities, One-Month Research Awards

Deadline: 1st October 2019

Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection offers One-Month Research Awards of $3,000 to scholars holding a PhD and working on research projects in Byzantine studies or related fields. The awards were established to make the intellectual community, as well as the library, rare book, garden, and museum resources, of Dumbarton Oaks more widely available to a broader range of scholars for shorter terms and with some flexibility in starting dates. Awards are intended especially for those who might not be able to avail themselves of a longer-term fellowship at Dumbarton Oaks, or scholars in related disciplines who seek greater exposure to our fields of study. Applications due October 1, 2019 for January 15 – June 30 award period.

For further information on all awards, please visit the Dumbarton Oaks website.

 

Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Studies Award Opportunities, Fellowships

Deadline: 1st November 2019

Fellowships (junior, regular, summer, Tyler) are awarded to scholars on the basis of demonstrated scholarly ability and preparation of the candidate, including knowledge of requisite languages, interest and value of the study or project, and the project’s relevance to the resources of Dumbarton Oaks. Applications due November 1, 2019 for the 2020-2021 academic year.

For further information on all awards, please visit the Dumbarton Oaks website.

Posted in Byzness