The Byzness 28/11/16

= = = = =

 

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

The Byzness, 20th November 2016

 

= = = = =

  1. NEWS & EVENTS
  2. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

= = = = =

 

  1. NEWS & EVENTS

 

Symposium Autocéphalies, second session, French School of Rome 23-25 November 2016

Vous trouverez ci-joint le programme du colloque organisé par Marie-Hélène Blanchet (CNRS, UMR 8167, Paris), et Frédéric Gabriel (CNRS, IHRIM, Lyon) et Laurent Tatarenko (Centre d’études des mondes russe, caucasien et centre européen, Paris) à l’Ecole française de Rome du 23 au 25 novembre 2016 :

 

« Autocéphalies : l’exercice de l’indépendance dans les Églises slaves orientales (Xe-XXe siècle). Seconde session, Pratiques de l’indépendance et rapports d’entités, entre unité(s), schismes et Églises sœurs ».

 

Poster.

 

 

 

  1. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

Lecturer in Byzantine History, University of Birmingham

For full information on the job listing click here.

 

The closing date is December 18.

 

[+]

 

Fully-funded PhD at Nottingham Trent University

Nottingham Trent University (School of Arts and Humanities) is offering a fully funded PhD studentship for a project relating to “Religion and Conflict in the Age of the Crusades” supervised by Dr Nicholas Morton and Dr Natasha Hodgson. For further information about the Project and its scope, please click here.

 

For informal discussion regarding the project please contact: nicholas.morton@ntu.ac.uk or natasha.hodgson@ntu.ac.uk

 

If you are interested in applying then please look at the application guidance and other information available on the Nottingham Trent website. For further information, click here

 

Deadline: 9th December, 2016, 12PM.

 

[+]

 

Woolf Institute Visiting Fellowships 2018

The Woolf Institute, which specialises in the study of relations between Jews, Christians and Muslims from a multidisciplinary perspective, invites applications for its annual visiting fellowship.

 

The Fellowship is tenable for a two to three month period that overlaps one of the Cambridge terms 2018:

 

Lent term: 16 January–16 March 2018

Easter term: 24 April–15 June 2018

 

The successful candidate will be expected to be involved in a project of academic research or public education in an area relevant to the Institute’s work. The Fellow will be asked to present their work at a symposium on the subject of their project proposal.

 

There is no stipend attached to the Fellowships, but Fellows will be entitled to free accommodation in Cambridge and one round-trip journey to Cambridge. They will also have access to the Woolf Institute and Cambridge University libraries.

 

The Fellowship is available for a postdoctoral scholar of any academic rank, a policymaker or analyst in a relevant area of work and will most likely be asked to participate in some of the Institute’s teaching or practice-based activities. Further information about the Institute can be found at: http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk.

 

A letter of application, CV, the names of two referees who may be approached, a project proposal (1,500 words max.), and a sample of work should be sent to:

 

Electors of the Visiting Fellowship, Woolf Institute, 12-14 Grange Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DU, UK or e-mailed to Tina Steiner at bs411@cam.ac.uk .

 

Questions may be addressed informally to the Deputy Director, Dr Shana Cohen at sc736@cam.ac.uk .

 

Deadline for the submission of applications is 17 February 2017.

 

[+]

 

5 Fully funded PhD and 1 post-doc position at the graduate school ‘Factual and Fictional Narration’

The graduate school ‘Factual and Fictional Narration’ at the University of Freiburg, Germany, is inviting applications for several positions starting on April 1, 2017. For further information see the advertisements at http://www.grk-erzaehlen.uni-freiburg.de/application-calls , and a description of the project at http://www.grk-erzaehlen.uni-freiburg.de/english-summary/.

 

 

————————————

Mirela Ivanova

DPhil Candidate in History
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings

= = = = =

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 8

 

Michaelmas Term 2016
= = = = =

 

MONDAY 28 November

15:00 Medieval Archaeology Seminar

Lecture Room, Institute of Archaeology

Adam McBride:

Kingdom Formation and the Distribution of Material Wealth in Early Wessex: a quantitative approach to large-scale power dynamics

 

[+]

 

 

17:00   Medieval History Seminar
Wharton Room, All Souls College

Daniel Lord Smail (Harvard University)

Recycling and the nature of the object in late medieval Europe: household

inventories from Marseille

 

 

[+]

TUESDAY 29 November

 

17:00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar

Carpenter Room, Harris Manchester College

Michael Clanchy (IHR)

What Was Abelard Aiming To Do In The Book He Called Ethics or Know Thyself?

 

 

[+]
WEDNESDAY 30 November

 

 

14:00 Byzantine-Chinese Reading Group

Ioannou Centre

Yegor Grebnev (Merton) and Marek Jankowiak (Wolfson)

 

Contact marek.jankowiak@history.ox.ac.uk for more details.

 

[+]

17:00   Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

Lecture Theatre, Ioannou Centre for Classical & Byzantine Studies
Niels Gaul (Edinburgh):

All the Emperor’s Men (and His Nephews): Paideia and Networking Strategies at the Court of Andronikos II Palaiologos, 1290–1320

 

[+]

20:00 OUBS Christmas Dinner

Mamma Mia Pizzaria, Walton St.

There are still spaces – to come email: byzantine.society@gmail.com

 

[+]

THURSDAY 1 December

17:00 Late Roman Seminar
Seminar Room, Corpus Christi

Peter Heather (King’s College, London):

Decline, Fall, and the Cultural Turn

 

[+]
FRIDAY 2 December
9:30 Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre,

Marc Lauxtermann (Exeter College)

Reading: John Mauropous’ Life of Dorotheos the Younger, a local 11th-C. saint from Chiliokomos in the Pontos region

 

[+]

 

11:00   Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminar
No seminar
[+]

 

12:00 Byzantine Literature Lectures

Ioannou Centre,

Marc Lauxtermann (Exeter College)

The Lesser Known Texts of the Eleventh Century

 

 

 

————————————

Mirela Ivanova

DPhil Candidate, History
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 20/11/16

= = = = =

 

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

The Byzness, 20th November 2016

 

= = = = =

  1. NEWS & EVENTS
  2. CALL FOR PAPER

= = = = =

 

  1. NEWS & EVENTS

 

Workshop Asia Minor in the Long Sixth Century, Friday 2 and Saturday 3 December 2016, St. John’s College, Oxford.

This workshop brings together historians and archaeologists working on diverse aspects of Asia Minor in the sixth century, in order to produce a comprehensive impression of the quality of life during the last century or so before the end of Antiquity. Topics to be discussed include the physical development of large and small settlements, their financial situation, and the proportion between public and private investment. We will compare imperial, provincial, and local initiatives in city and countryside and examine the main motivations, including civic or personal pride, military incentives and, of course, religious stimuli.

 

The workshop will take place on Saturday 3 December. The evening before Andrew Wilson will present recent results of the Aphrodisias South Agora excavations. All are welcome.

 

For a poster with more details click here.

 

[+]

 

“Monastic Journeys from Late Antiquity to the Middle Ages: Religious Aspirations, Political Goals and Economic Concerns”, 17-19 November, Viena

Programme:

 

http://rapp.univie.ac.at

 

http://www.orient-mediterranee.com/spip.php?article3166

 

 

[+]

The New Testament in Syriac Roundtable, November 18, Institut protestant de théologie 83, Bd Arago 75014 Paris

For a full programme click here.

[+]

Late Roman and Early Islamic Discoveries at Metelis (Kom El-Ahmer) near Alexandria, Egypt. Dr Mohamed Kenawi (Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Alexandria Centre for Hellenistic Studies) 11 am, Friday 25 November, Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies,

 

Click here for a poster.

 

[+]

 

 

Marrying in Byzantium: Medieval Christian Liturgies in the Eastern Mediterranean World. Gabriel Radle, Mary Seeger O’Boyle Postdoctoral Fellow, Primceton Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies

Monday, November 21, 2016

 

4:30 p.m.

 

Scheide Caldwell House, Room 103

 

Across cultures, marriage is viewed as a key social and religious rite of passage. Yet no major study has been dedicated to the history of nuptials in Byzantium. The primary reason for this lacuna is the simple fact that the majority of liturgical manuscripts containing marriage rites have never been edited and remain scattered in monastic and national libraries around the world. This lecture will explore the evidence offered by these sources and examine the ways in which Christians of the medieval Eastern Mediterranean formed their marriage bonds through various church services and domestic rituals. The talk will compare these manuscripts to other textual sources, as well as extant visual and material evidence, in order to identify both common traits and regional variance in marriage ceremonies from Southern Italy to Palestine. The lecture will also raise a number of methodological questions regarding the historical study of Byzantine and Hellenic ritual culture.

 

Gabriel Radle specializes in the history of Christian ritual practice in the late ancient and medieval periods. His publications include studies on life cycle rites in the Middle East, monastic liturgy at Mt.  Sinai, medieval Christianity in Southern Italy, Byzantine migration patterns during the Arab conquest, and theories of prayer posture in East and West. He completed his doctorate in 2013 at the Pontifical Oriental Institute in Rome. He went on to hold fellowships at Yale University, Harvard University’s Dumbarton Oaks, and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Center for the Study of Christianity.

 

 

 

[+]

 

Australian Association for Byzantine Studies 19th Conference – Dreams, Memory and Imagination in Byzantium – Registration Open

 

Dreams, Memory and Imagination in Byzantium

 

Australian Association for Byzantine Studies 19th Conference, 24-26 February 2017, to be held at the Monash University Law Chambers, 555 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne.

 

Registration is now open; abstracts and programme are published.

 

Full details on the conference web site at http://www.aabs.org.au/conferences/19th/

 

In the last two decades, the role of dreams, memory and the imagination in the ancient world and its cultural productions have come to receive increased attention, along with the importance of emotions in the Greco-Roman and medieval worlds. This conference will focus on the ways that the Byzantine imagination shaped its dreams and memories from the fourth to fifteenth centuries and the many ways in which these were recorded in the Byzantine world, in its historiography, literature, religion, art and architecture.

 

Guest speaker: Professor Derek Krueger, Greensboro University, North Carolina

 

Convenor: Dr Eva Anagnostou-Laoutides, School of Philosophical, Historical and International Studies, Monash University

 

Enquiries: conference@aabs.org.au

 

 

  1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

CFP: Reception and Transformation of Ancient Sea Power

 

The reception of antiquity in the Middle Ages and especially the Early Modern period has been extensively studied. Sea power and thalassocracy are familiar topics in the fields of classics and ancient history. Nevertheless, only rarely have the two themes been combined, and to date there has been no overarching treatment of the later reception of ancient sea power.

 

In order to fill this gap, we organized a conference in Berlin in May 2015, entitled ‘Thalassokratographie: Rezeption und Transformation antiker Seeherrschaft’. This title was programmatic. On the one hand, we were interested in the act of writing about sea power and thalassocracy, in the act of creating images and ideas that gave ancient sea power a prominent place in later times – ‘thalassocrato-graphy’, so to speak, not ‘thalassocracy’. On the other, we were concerned with issues of transformation. The conference was not focused solely on a one-dimensional process of reception of classical antiquity in later epochs, but aimed above all to ask how, during this process, images and ideas of antiquity were newly created, with which intentions and to what ends, and how these newly-developed ideas about ancient texts, myths and narratives may even have influenced the later scholarly treatment of these phenomena.

 

We intend to publish the proceedingss of this conference, the program of which can be seen here: http://www.topoi.org/event/29492/ in a volume that will then be the first publication dedicated to this topic. It will be published as a volume in the series ‘Transformationen der Antike’ (de Gruyter), depending on a successful peer-review-process. In addition to the papers presented at the conference we would welcome further contributions (in English, German or French) that, while adhering to the approach outlined above, treat one of the following topics:

 

The reception of ancient sea power

 

  • in architecture
  • as part of monuments or fountains
  • in the visual arts, esp. in paintings
  • in music
  • in literature, esp. historical novels
  • in the naming of ships
  • in film, theatre and opera
  • in modern mass media

 

 

Submission Details

Abstracts of no more than 300 words and a short CV should be sent before 30 November 2016 to h.kopp@fu-berlin.de. Those who submitted an abstract will be informed within two weeks after the deadline whether or not their proposals have been accepted. Final versions of accepted papers should then be submitted by 31 March 2017.

 

Christian Wendt (christian.wendt@fu-berlin.de) and Hans Kopp (h.kopp@fu-berlin.de) will be glad to answer any questions you might have.

 

 

[+]

CFP: Building, Bending and Breaking Boundaries in the Eastern Mediterranean World, Fifth CEMS International Graduate Conference, Budapest, 1-3 June

For more information click here.

 

[+]

Call for Applications: Medieval Ascension Narratives in Islamic and European Traditions Workshop

This is an interdisciplinary workshop called Medieval Ascension Narratives in Islamic and European Traditions organised by the Centre for Medieval Literature (CML) and the David Collection that will take place in Copenhagen in March 2017. The workshop will be led by CML researchers and Prof. Christiane Gruber (University of Michigan) who has written widely on Islamic book arts, ascension images and narratives, and depictions of the Prophet Muhammad. It is centred on the topic of ascension narratives, from al-Sarai’s Nahj al-Faradis to the Liber Scale Machometi and Dante’s Commedia and seeks to open new avenues and approaches asking, in particular, how can we conceptualize narratives that travel and are adapted, reformed, and reimagined across various temporal and geographical domains.

 

It is open to researchers from all disciplines but those who are interested in discussing questions of cross-cultural engagement, text and image issues, and medieval narratives across both the Islamic and European traditions.

 

Attached the Call for Applications.  Deadline: 10 December 2016.

 

For more information click here.

 

[+]

Call for articles: a Book Project Concerning Anatolian Bronzes

Dear Colleague,

 

We are now working on a book, entitled „Ancient Bronzes from Anatolia and Neighbouring Regions”. In this book it is our intention to collect new papers on Greek, Roman and Byzantine bronze finds from Asia Minor. These materials could be originated both from the field projects and local museums. We are hoping to submit this book approximately in February 2017 to the publisher. We would be happy if you could consider to send your article about Greek, Roman and Byzantine bronze finds from Asia Minor and other close regions until January 1, 2017. Please contact us about the publication guidelines and do not hesitate to share with us any of your thoughts relating to this book project.

Hoping to welcoming you in Lydia Symposium in May 2017 (circular of which I have attached to hereby), all my best wishes from Sinop, Turkey!

 

Gulseren KAN SAHIN

 

Click here for more info.

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————

Mirela Ivanova

DPhil Candidate in History
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings – Week 7

= = = = =

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 7

 

Michaelmas Term 2016
= = = = =

 

MONDAY 21 November

17:00   Medieval History Seminar
Wharton Room, All Souls College

Rachel Delman (University College)

Elite Women and their Residences in Late Medieval England

 
TUESDAY 22 November

14:30   Seminar on Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Dr Eitan Klein (Israel Antiquities Authority):

Relations between Judaean and Galilean communities in the late Roman period: the archaeological evidence

 

[+]

 

17:00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar

Carpenter Room, Harris Manchester College

Peregrine Horden (All Souls)

Medical Ethics
WEDNESDAY 23 November

 

14:00 Byzantine-Chinese Reading Group

Ioannou Centre

Yegor Grebnev (Merton) and Marek Jankowiak (Wolfson)

 

Contact marek.jankowiak@history.ox.ac.uk for more details.

 

 

[+]

 

17:00   SPBS Autumn Lecture

Lecture Theatre, Ioannou Centre for Classical & Byzantine Studies
Jim Crow (Edinburgh):

Not Just Cheese and Potatoes: Recent Research on Naxos and the Byzantine Aegean

 
THURSDAY 24 November

15:00 Introduction to Medieval New Rome: Themes, Methods and Materials

Rainolds Room, Corpus Christi

Nicholas Matheou (Pembroke College, Oxford)

Identity & Ethnicity

 

[+]

 

17:00 Late Roman Seminar
Seminar Room, Corpus Christi

John Haldon (Princeton University)

Euchaïta and St Theodore: some recent field research

[+]

 

17:00 Inaugural Lecture of Faculty of Theology and Religion

Examination Schools,

Anna Sapir Abulafia, Professor of the Study of the Abrahamic Religions, (Lady Margaret Hall)

The Contested Seed of Abraham

[+]
FRIDAY 25 November

9:30 Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre,

Marc Lauxtermann (Exeter College)

Reading: John Mauropous’ Life of Dorotheos the Younger, a local 11th-C. saint from Chiliokomos in the Pontos region

 

[+]

 

11:00   Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminar
First Floor Seminar Room, Ioannou Centre

Mohamed Kenawi’s (University of Alexandria)

Late Roman and Early Islamic Discoveries at Metelis (Kom al-Ahmer) near Alexandria, Egypt
[+]

12:00 Byzantine Literature Lectures

Ioannou Centre,

Marc Lauxtermann (Exeter College)

The Lesser Known Texts of the Eleventh Century

 

[+]

 

17:00   The Cult of Saints in the First Millennium

Radcliffe Humanities Building, Collin Matthew Room (Ground floor)

Alan Thacker (London):

The Origin of the Cult of Saints: The Evidence from Salona

 

————————————

Mirela Ivanova

DPhil Candidate, History
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 13/11/16

= = = = =

 

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

The Byzness, 13th November 2016

 

= = = = =

  1. NEWS & EVENTS
  2. CALL FOR PAPER
  3. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

= = = = =

 

  1. NEWS & EVENTS

 

Autumn Lecture of the Society for the Promotion of Byzantine Studies, Wednesday 23 November, 5pm, Ioannou Centre, St. Giles Street, Oxford

The Autumn Lecture for the Society of the Promotion of Byzantine Studies will take place on Wedsday 23 November at 5.00 p.m. in the Ioannou Centre, 61 St Giles, Oxford. Professor Jim Crow (Edinburgh) will speak on ‘Not just cheese and potatoes: recent research on Naxos and the Byzantien Aegean’. All are welcome.

For a poster, click here.

[+]

“Anastasius Sinaita and the Bible” Symposium, 12-13 December 2016, Faculty of Theology, KU Leuven

 

For a full programme click here.

 

  1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

The Oxford University Byzantine Society’s 19th International Graduate Conference: Transmitting and Circulating the Late Antique and Byzantine Worlds, History Faculty, 24-25th February 2017

 

Deadline for Abstracts: Midnight, Friday 18th November

 

Movement was the norm rather than the exception in the Late Antique and Byzantine worlds. Things travelled: ideas, religions, foods, materials, money, people. Whether it was a Christian bishop sent to convert the North Caucuses, a coin which found its way to Anglo-Saxon England, or a piece of column which only made its way down a local road, how scholars engage with and taxonomise this constant flux has been key to the way in which we conceptualise the Late Antique and Byzantine worlds.

 

Since Dmitry Obolensky’s seminal 1971, The Byzantine Commonwealth, 500-1453, Byzantium or the Medieval East Roman Empire, has largely been viewed as the centre from which ideas, money, and things were transmitted outwards, and its commonwealth the space in which they circulated. This conference will offer a platform for interdisciplinary discussion on how far this perspective shapes modern scholarly debate, and in what other ways we can begin to reconceptualise transmission and circulation in the Late Antique and Byzantine worlds.

 

Postgraduate scholars are encouraged to engage with and problematise the concepts of transmission and circulation, as well as to offer specific case studies of these phenomena surging or declining at any particular time. Papers might address any of the following, but all contributions, especially those engaging with the so-called ‘peripheries’, whether Eastern, Western, Southern or Northern, of the Late Antique and Byzantine worlds are strongly encouraged.

 

  • Circulation of coinage, luxury and sustenance goods, slaves – where from, where to and why?
  • Transmission of political ideologies, structures of legitimacy, ceremony and bureaucracy – when is transmission adoption and when is it appropriation?
  • The use and re-use of material objects, large and small, locally, regionally and more widely
  • Missions of Christian (and other) conversions and the transportation of religious ideas
  • Migrations, invasions and settlements – how did people and their ethnic identities move?
  • Transmission of knowledge: teaching and education and techniques thereof – could and did ideas circulate without movement of people?
  • The consolidation and circulation of texts, genres norms, and registers of speech and writing
  • How did horizontal transmission (from Constantinople to Baghdad) differ from vertical transmission (from the emperor to the farmer)
  • Circulation below elite level of persons, commodities, texts, etc. – the piecemeal (and potentially subversive) components of any ‘commonwealth’

 

Please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, with a short academic biography in the third person, to the Oxford University Byzantine Society at byzantine.society@gmail.com by Friday, 18th November 2016. Papers should be 20 minutes in length, delivered in English or French.

 

As with our previous conferences, there will be a publication of selected papers chosen and reviewed by specialist readers from the University of Oxford’s Late Antique and Byzantine Studies research centres. Any speakers wishing to have their papers considered for publication should try to engage with the conference theme as closely as possible in their abstract and paper. Nevertheless, all submissions are warmly invited.

 

For a PDF file of this click here or find the text on our website here.

 

[+]

CFP: Concealment and Revelation in the Art of the Middle Ages (Nicosia, 22-24 September 2017)

‘To reveal art and conceal the artist is art’s aim’ – thus Oscar Wilde in his aphoristic Preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891). In the western intellectual tradition, art has repeatedly been conceived and understood as existing at the intersection of the antithetical notions of concealment and revelation – from the old unattributed adage that ‘it is true art to conceal art’ (ars est celare artem) to Robert Rauschenberg’s lapidary statement about the ability of a work of art to reveal something beyond itself (‘A light bulb in the dark cannot show itself without showing you something else too’, scribbled in pencil on the photo collage entitled Random Order, c. 1963). Veiled or unveiled, obscured or illuminated, opaque or transparent, works of art are often invested with meaning(s) and function(s) at the liminal moment of transition from the one state to the next; after all, to resort again to Wilde’s witty prose, ‘the commonest thing is delightful, if one only hides it’.

 

Recent scholarship on medieval art has brought such considerations to the fore, by tackling issues of screening, veiling / unveiling, temporal and performative transformations, the permeability of barriers and the movement of objects in space, among others. The visibility of sacred relics and their reliquaries, the metal revetments and textile curtains of miracle-working icons, the folding wings of northern European altarpieces, the parting womb of the Vierges ouvrantes or Schreinmadonnen and the porosity of choir screens East and West have all received fairly extensive treatment in monographic studies and specialist articles. Nevertheless, the juxtaposition of these individual phenomena within a broader framework, encompassing both the religious and secular sphere, as well as several different religious traditions, has only seldom been attempted.

 

The present conference aspires to explore the role of the concept and the act of concealment and revelation in the arts of the Latin West, Byzantium, Islam and Judaism in the course of the Middle Ages (defined chronologically as c. 500-c. 1500). Subjects to be broached include, but are not limited to, the use of curtains or veils in screening objects or spaces; the function of permeable screens (in a variety of materials and media) in structuring accessibility, whether physical, visual, aural or spiritual; the performative aspect of concealing and revealing in all its civic and private manifestations, and the issues of emotional manipulation thereby raised; the role of gesture and spatial motion in the performance of concealment and revelation; the hierarchy of sacred and secular space as the outcome of its compartmentalisation; and the representation of these practices in the pictorial arts.

 

The conference is planned as a three-day event, to take place at the Archaeological Research Unit of the University of Cyprus, Nicosia, in 22-24 September 2017. Due to budgetary constraints, the speakers’ travel and accommodation expenses cannot be covered, but every effort will be made to secure conference rates at hotels near the conference venue. There is no registration fee for participation or attendance.

 

Prospective speakers are invited to submit electronically a title and a 300-word abstract (in either English or Greek) for consideration by 30 April 2017. Please send all materials and address all queries to the conference convenors, Michalis Olympios (olympios.michalis@ucy.ac.cy ) and Maria Parani (mparani@ucy.ac.cy ).

[+]

The Art of the Network: Visualising Social Relationships, 1400-1600, Annual Renaissance Postgraduate Symposium, Courtauld Institute of Art, London, Friday 28 April 2017

In recent years, the analysis of social networks has generated a fruitful field of scholarly enquiry. Research addressing the dynamics that govern personal relationships within and without communities of various kinds has permeated through historical, anthropological, and sociological studies. These investigations have traced the ways in which societies structured according to gender, family bonds, and neighbourhood ties as well as political, professional, and religious associations regulated social interaction. However, the role of art and architecture in cultivating these interpersonal relationships has not been explored comprehensively. Even art historical approaches have frequently given preference to textual rather than visual evidence in elucidating these social networks.

 

This conference seeks to shed light on the ways in which social networks have been represented visually. Such an approach has great potential to deepen the discussion surrounding the commission,

production, and reception of art and architecture between 1400 and 1600. We invite studies that bring into dialogue social connections on the one hand and visual manifestations on the other. Preference will be given to papers that present unpublished material while engaging with methodological frameworks and/or historiographical perspectives.

 

Topics might include but are not limited to:

– how artistic networks affect the construction of identities

– the mobility of art and artists within networks

– whether formal, iconographic and/or stylistic features denote

adherence to a community

– the identification of specific individuals in works of art

– how issues of display influence social bonds

– the employment of personal, familial, political, ecclesiastical or

professional devices

 

Proposals of no more than 350 words should be submitted together with a short CV to Alexander Röstel (alexander.rostel@courtauld.ac.uk ) and Alexander Noelle (alexander.noelle@courtauld.ac.uk ) by 31 December 2016. Successful candidates will be notified in mid-January. Papers should not exceed 20 minutes in length. Costs for travel and accommodation cannot be covered but partial funding might become available and catering will be provided for all speakers.

 

[+]

CORRECTION: Reception Histories of the Future: a conference on Byzantinisms, speculative fiction, and the literary heritage of medieval empire, University of Uppsala, August 4-6th 2017

The dates of the conference will not be in April, as suggested last week, but in August.

 

The full CFP is found here.

 

  1. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

Fellowships at the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute (CAAR)

 

THE CYPRUS AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE (CAARI) in Nicosia, Cyprus, welcomes scholars and students specializing in archaeology, history, and culture of Cyprus and the eastern Mediterranean. CAARI is located in central Nicosia close to the Cyprus Museum and the Archaeological Research Unit of the University of Cyprus (both with major libraries), as well as the main business and commercial district. In addition to hostel accommodation for a total of twelve residents, the institute has excellent research facilities: a 10,000-volume library, comprehensive map and artifact collections, archival material, and facilities for Internet, scanning, and photography.  For further information on CAARI: http://www.caari.org

 

Deadline for CAARI-sponsored fellowships: December 15, 2016

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON FELLOWSHIPS AND APPLICATIONS PROCEDURES:

http://www.caari.org/Fellowships.html

CAARI at Boston University

656 Beacon Street, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA  02215

Email:  caari@bu.edu

 

Graduate Student Fellowships

 

THE DANIELLE PARKS MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP:

Danielle Parks, author of The Roman Coinage of Cyprus (Nicosia, 2004), directed excavations at the Amathus Gate Cemetery. She first came to Cyprus as an Anita Cecil O’Donovan Fellow. Her death as a young scholar in 2006, deeply felt by the wide circle of her colleagues and friends, is memorialized here by a fellowship designed to open the world of Cypriot culture to young scholars.

 

This is a fellowship of US $2,000 for a graduate student of any nationality who needs to work in Cyprus to further his/her research on a subject of relevance to Cypriot archaeology and culture. The purpose of the fellowship is to help cover travel to and living expenses in Cyprus. Applications are invited especially from students of Hellenistic and Roman Cyprus. During his/her stay, the fellow is expected to give a presentation at CAARI on a subject related to his/her research. The fellow will periodically keep the Director of CAARI apprised of his/her research activities. The fellow will acknowledge CAARI and the Danielle Parks Memorial Fellowship in any publication that emerges from the research carried during the fellowship. Residence at CAARI is required.

Deadline: December 15, 2016.

 

THE HELENA WYLDE SWINY AND STUART SWINY FELLOWSHIP:

One grant of US $2,000 to a graduate student of any nationality in a college or university in the U.S. or Canada to pursue a research project that is relevant to an ongoing field project in Cyprus or that requires work on Cyprus itself. The award is to be used to fund research time spent in residence at CAARI and to help defray costs of travel. Residence at CAARI is required.

Deadline: December 15, 2016.

 

 

THE ANITA CECIL O’DONOVAN FELLOWSHIP:

Founded in memory of musician, composer, and homemaker Anita Cecil O’Donovan, this fellowship offers one grant of US $2000 to a graduate student of any nationality, enrolled in a graduate program in any nation, to pursue research on a project relevant to the archaeology and/or culture of Cyprus; to be used to fund a period of research time in residence at CAARI and to help defray costs of travel. Residence at CAARI is required.

Deadline: December 15, 2016.

 

Fulbright Student Program: http://us.fulbrightonline.org/countries/selectedcountry/cyprus

 

*See also below for CAORC Fellowships open to US doctoral candidates.

Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC)

PO Box 37012, MRC 178

Washington, DC 20013-7012

fellowships@caorc.org

202-633-1599

 

Post-Doctoral Fellowships

CAARI Senior Scholar In Residence: An established scholar who commits to stay at least 30 days in succession at CAARI, ideally in the summer, and to be available in evenings and weekends to younger scholars working there, in return for 50% reduction in residency rate. Must have PhD in archaeology or ancillary field for at least 5 years prior to visit, be fluent in English (but may be of any nationality), and be committed to mentoring students. Travel and other expenses not covered.

Deadline: December 15, 2016.

 

CAARI/CAORC Research Fellowships: Two fellowships provide US $5500 each (up to US $1500 for transportation and an additional US $4000 for research expenses on the island) and are designed for scholars who already have their PhDs, whose research engages the archaeology, history, culture, or geography of Cyprus, and who would derive significant benefit from a month’s research time on the island. Particular consideration is given to applicants whose projects enable them to include Cyprus in their teaching.  A minimum of 30 days residence at CAARI is required. Applicants must be U.S. citizens.

Deadline: December 15, 2016. (NOTE: Amount available is anticipated but depends on federal appropriations which have not yet been finalized)

 

Fulbright Scholars Program: http://www.cies.org/country/cyprus

 

CAORC Fellowships Open To Both Pre- And Post-Doctoral Researchers

 

Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC) Multi-Country Research Fellowships:

Open to scholars who already hold a Ph.D. and U.S. doctoral candidates who wish to conduct research of regional or trans-regional significance. Fellowships require scholars to conduct research in more than one country, at least one of which hosts a participating American overseas research center, including CAARI. http://orcfellowships.fluidreview.com

Deadline: January 30, 2017.

 

Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC) Mediterranean Regional Research Fellowships:

A focused regional fellowship program enabling scholars who have recently (within last 10 years) earned their Ph.D. and U.S. doctoral candidates to conduct research of regional or trans-regional significance in countries bordering the Mediterranean and served by American overseas research centers, including CAARI. http://orcfellowships.fluidreview.com

Deadline: January 15, 2017, check website for details (also for Multi-Country above).

 

*NEW* Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC) NEH Senior Research Fellowships:

 

The Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC) is pleased to announce the National Endowment for the Humanities Senior Research Fellowship Program! This fellowship supports advanced research in the humanities for U.S. postdoctoral scholars, and foreign national postdoctoral scholars who have been residents in the US for three or more years.

 

Scholars must carry out research in a country which hosts a participating American overseas research center. Eligible countries for 2016-2017 are: Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Cyprus, Georgia, Indonesia, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, Senegal, Sri Lanka or Tunisia. Fellowship stipends are $4,200 per month for a maximum of four months. This program is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) under the Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions (FPIRI). http://orcfellowships.fluidreview.com

Deadline: January 30, 2017.

 

 

 

————————————

Mirela Ivanova

DPhil Candidate in History
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings – Week 6

= = = = =

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 6

 

Michaelmas Term 2016
= = = = =

 

MONDAY 14 November

15:00 Medieval Archaeology Seminar

Kate Weikert (Winchester):

The Past in the Present: Anglo-Saxon Memorialization and Identities at Ely Cathedral in the Twelfth Century

 

[+]

 

17:00   Medieval History Seminar
Wharton Room, All Souls College

Maria Elena Cortese (International Telematic University Uninettuno, Rome)

The crystallisation of the aristocracy in post-Carolingian Tuscany, 9th-11th

centuries

 
TUESDAY 15 November

17:00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar

Carpenter Room, Harris Manchester College

Hannah Skoda (St John’s)

Nostalgia and a Moral Ideal in the Fourteenth Century

[+]

 

17:00 Graduate and Early Career Workshop

Swire Room, University College

Johannes Pahlitzsch (Mainz)

Byzantium outside Byzantium: Fellow Christians under Muslim Rule

 

The Melkites differed very much from the other Christian communities in the Near East under Islamic rule because of their special relation to Byzantium. While this relation was quite ambiguous in the Early Islamic period so that the Melkites developed to a certain extent their own identity as an Arab Orthodox, i.e. Chalcedonian, Church, the situation changed after the Byzantine reconquest of Northern Syria in the second half of the 10th century and the establishment of the doukaton of Antioch. From then on the Melkite Church was increasingly “byzantinised”, especially in the field of liturgy and law.

 

Independent of this development although not unaffected by it the priority of the ecclesiastical leaders of the Melkite Church was to preserve their community’s separate identity and to guarantee its survival. The problems they faced and the measures they took to achieve these goals as well as the attitude of the common believer will be discussed with regard to the legal collection of the Melkites and Greek and Arabic hagiographical texts about conversion to Islam from the 9th to the 11th centuries.

 

Please find the texts to be discussed here.
WEDNESDAY 16 November

 

14:00 Byzantine-Chinese Reading Group

Ioannou Centre (note move from last week)

Yegor Grebnev (Merton) and Marek Jankowiak (Wolfson)

 

Contact marek.jankowiak@history.ox.ac.uk for more details.

 

[+]

 

17:00   Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

Lecture Theatre, Ioannou Centre for Classical & Byzantine Studies
Michael Featherstone (Oxford)

Historical symbolism of the Great Palace of Constantinople

 
THURSDAY 17 November

 

17:00 Late Roman Seminar
Seminar Room, Corpus Christi

Jaś Elsner (Corpus Christi College, Oxford):

The Muse casket from the Esquiline Treasure

 

[+]

 

17:00 The Hensley Henson Lectures: Bede and the writing of History

Examination Schools,

Prof. Sarah Foot:

The English

 
FRIDAY 18 November

9:30 Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre,

Marc Lauxtermann (Exeter College)

Reading: John Mauropous’ Life of Dorotheos the Younger, a local 11th-C. saint from Chiliokomos in the Pontos region

 

[+]

 

11:00   Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminar
First Floor Seminar Room, Ioannou Centre

Paul Wordsworth:

The legacy of a Sassanian frontier? Barda’a (Azerbaijan), capital of Arran in the early Islamic period

[+]

 

12:00 Byzantine Literature Lectures

Ioannou Centre,

Marc Lauxtermann (Exeter College)

The Lesser Known Texts of the Eleventh Century

 

[+]

 

00:00 Deadline for Abstracts for the 19th OUBS International Graduate Conferece: Transmitting and Circulating the Late Antique and Byzantine Worlds

 More information here.

 

 

————————————

Mirela Ivanova

DPhil Candidate, History
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 06/11/16

= = = = =

 

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

The Byzness, 6th November 2016

 

= = = = =

  1. NEWS & EVENTS
  2. CALL FOR PAPER
  3. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

= = = = =

 

  1. NEWS & EVENTS

 

MAISON FRANÇAISE D’OXFORD The edition, translation and commentary on Mark the Deacon’s Life of Porphyrios, Monday 7 November 2016, Sutro Room, Trinity College, Oxford at 5pm

 

The Life, the new edition, and the historical context of Gaza will be discussed by Anna Lampadaridi (IRHT, Paris), Catherine Saliou (EPHE, Paris), and Ine Jacobs (Oxford).

For a poster click here

 

[+]

 

Byzantium outside Byzantium: Fellow Christians under Muslim Rule – Graduate and Early Career Workshop with Professor Johannes Pahlitzsch, 5pm, 15th November, University College, Oxford,

The Melkites differed very much from the other Christian communities in the Near East under Islamic rule because of their special relation to Byzantium. While this relation was quite ambiguous in the Early Islamic period so that the Melkites developed to a certain extent their own identity as an Arab Orthodox, i.e. Chalcedonian, Church, the situation changed after the Byzantine reconquest of Northern Syria in the second half of the 10th century and the establishment of the doukaton of Antioch. From then on the Melkite Church was increasingly “byzantinised”, especially in the field of liturgy and law.

Independent of this development although not unaffected by it the priority of the ecclesiastical leaders of the Melkite Church was to preserve their community’s separate identity and to guarantee its survival. The problems they faced and the measures they took to achieve these goals as well as the attitude of the common believer will be discussed with regard to the legal collection of the Melkites and Greek and Arabic hagiographical texts about conversion to Islam from the 9th to the 11th centuries.

The workshop will discuss a small selection of sources available in translation, please read these if intending to attend. The sources are found here.

[+]

 

La théologie byzantine: bilan et perspectives, 15 November, Université Saint-Joseph de Beyrouth,

More details found here.

[+]

Conference in Honour of Robert Ousterhout: Constructing Sacred Space, The Universtiy of Pennsylvania, Friday 7th April – Sunday 9th April, 2017

A short message from the committee here.

  1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

 

Reception Histories of the Future: a conference on Byzantinisms, speculative fiction, and the literary heritage of medieval empire, University of Uppsala, April 4-6th 2017

 

The study of Classical reception in modern speculative fiction (science fiction and fantasy) is an old and broad field, with roots in both the academy and the popular press. However, much as Classics is often reluctant to look beyond the temporal borders of the antique world and venture into its medieval Greek imperial successor, the consideration of classical reception in speculative fiction has mostly neglected the significant impact of Byzantium and other post-Roman imperial formations and their literatures on modern SFF. However, many of the central thematic tenets of the literary heritage of medieval empire – including but not limited to decadence, the post-Roman world, the problem of defining barbarian and citizen, and the use of ‘Byzantine’ settings and symbology as codes for the foreign or exotic – have had deep effects on the development of science fiction and fantasy in the 20th and 21st centuries.

 

This conference aims to bring together some of the most innovative modern writers of speculative fiction with scholars working at the cutting edge of Byzantine reception studies for a two-day discussion of Byzantinism, decadence, empire, and storytelling. The conference will therefore collapse the distance between practitioners and critics, and bring reception studies into a direct dialogue with one of today’s most vibrant genres of popular fiction. Planned activities include public events at local bookstores, presentations of scholarly papers, and group panel discussions between writers and scholars. A post-conference publication will include both essays, academic articles, and commissioned fiction.

 

Details of the Conference

 

The conference is organized by AnnaLinden Weller, a postdoctoral researcher in Byzantine Studies,  who writes speculative fiction under the pen name Arkady Martine. It is supported by the “Text and Narrative in Byzantium” project (principal investigator: Professor Ingela Nilsson) within the Department of Linguistics and Philology at Uppsala University. The conference will bring together scholars working on the reception of Byzantium, scholars working on classical reception in speculative fiction, and active writers producing speculative fiction in order to broaden and deepen the consideration of how medieval literatures and Byzantinism have far-reaching impact on the popular imagination. Since speculative fiction is a crucial mode of popular cultural expression of life in the modern and technological world, exploring the significant reception of medieval literatures – a ‘non-technological’ and foreign/distant subject in comparison – within it is of real interest to both the scholarly community and the general public.

 

There has been substantial recent scholarly interest in the reception of classics (and Classics) in speculative fiction. This interest has come both from the academy (volumes like Rogers, Brett M. and Benjamin Eldon Stevens, eds. 2015. Classical Traditions in Science Fiction. Oxford: Oxford University Press., and Bost-Fiévet, Mélanie and Sandra Provini, eds. 2014. L’Antiquité dans l’imaginaire contemporain: Fantasy, science-fiction, fantastique. Paris: Classiques Garnier) and from the popular SF press (i.e. Liz Gloyn’s “In a Galaxy Far Far Away: On Classical Reception and Science Fiction” in the SF magazine Strange Horizons, available at http://www.strangehorizons.com/2015/20150427/1gloynb-a.shtml). However, very little work has been done to explore the equally prevalent reception of postclassical Greco-Roman subjects and themes in speculative fiction. This conference aims to bring scholars, writers, and the general public together to investigate medieval imperial receptions – and concepts of Byzantinism – which are deeply embedded in speculative fiction. Recent work on Byzantine reception has examined Byzantinism in contemporary film and art, and explored the reception of Byzantium in Enlightenment and fin-de-siècle literature, but has not addressed the presence of post-Roman themes and ideas in speculative fiction. This conference’s three days of discussion and the subsequent publication of a volume of essays from international scholars and commissioned fiction from leading writers in the speculative fiction genre will contribute to the closure of these gaps.

 

The thematic elements of post-Roman imperial formations and the literatures which they produced – including but not limited to decadence, the post-Roman world, the problem of defining barbarian and citizen, and the use of ‘Byzantine’ settings and symbology as codes for the foreign or exotic – are of substantial importance to writers of speculative fiction. Byzantium has been an explicit setting in several significant novels (Turtledove’s Videssos cycle, Guy Gavriel Kay’s Sarantine Mosaic) and many of its central thematic tenets — an empire gone decadent, the permeability of frontiers, the creation of an imperial ideology and the survival of that ideology – appear in others: perhaps most intriguingly in Ann Leckie’s recent Hugo and Nebula-award-winning Imperial Radch books, which, while not being specifically Roman or Byzantine, can be interpreted usefully by being viewed through a Byzantine lens. These and other questions of the reception of post-Roman concepts and literatures are what this conference is meant to engage with.

 

A major aim of this conference is to bring writers and academics – practitioners and analysts – together in innovative ways. While portions of the conference will allow academics to present prepared papers in the traditional format of a short lecture on recent or ongoing with a subsequent question period, the majority of the panels will be themed discussions in which a group of panelists have a public conversation on a pre-arranged topic, guided by a moderator. This method of discussion comes from the world of speculative fiction conferences and produces a focused, vibrant, and wide-ranging exploration of the subject. It is also widely accessible to a popular audience, even when the discussants are specialists. An entire day of the conference will be reserved for this format. Additionally, since there is substantial public engagement with speculative fiction topics — as well as significant public interest in Byzantium – this conference will open up the group panels to the general public on that day, bringing both Byzantium and speculative fiction to the Scandinavian audience in a direct and engaging manner. The public, creative professionals, and academics will all be able to share in the investigation of the effects of Byzantinism on popular culture.

 

The volume that results from this conference will include both academic articles written by leading reception history scholars, critical essays on Byzantium and medieval empire written by members of the speculative fiction community, and new speculative fiction on Byzantine themes commissioned especially for this project from award-winning and bestselling authors.

 

Call for Papers (Academic Track) – Deadline February 28, 2017

 

Please submit an abstract of approximately 300 words which describes research which responds to or contributes to the discussion of Byzantine and post-Roman reception in speculative fiction, to annalinden.weller@lingfil.uu.se .

 

Alternately or additionally, suggest topics for group panel discussions which you would be interested in participating in, alongside writers and other creative professionals.

 

Call for Interest & Panel Topics (Creative Track) – Deadline February 28, 2017

 

If you are a speculative fiction writer or industry professional who would like to participate in the conference, write to arkady.martine@gmail.com  with your contact details, professional experience, and ideas for panels.

[+]

Modulations and transpositions: the contexts and boundaries of ‘minor’ and ‘major’ genres in late antique Christian poetry, Lisbon-Heidelberg, 2017

 

This is a CFP for a two-part workshop on Christian late antique poetry organized by F. Hadjittofi and A. Lefteratou. The workshop will take place in two installments, in Lisbon in June 2017, and in Heidelberg in December 2017. The publication of a proceedings volume will depend on the quality and coherence of the presentations.

 

Important dates:

16.01.2017, deadline for up to 300-word abstracts to be submitted to the organizers:  f.hadjittofi@campus.ul.pt  (Fotini Hadjittofi) and anna.lefteratou@uni-heidelberg.de  (Anna Lefteratou)

31.01.2017, notification of acceptance

01-02.06.2017, Workshop in Lisbon; Keynote speaker : Prof. Gianfranco Agosti (Sapienza, Università di Roma)

15-16.12.2017, Workshop in Heidelberg; Keynote speaker : Prof. Hartmut Leppin (Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main)

 

Description: The aim of the workshop is to explore the impact and transformation of classical forms and genres in the Christian poetry of the 4th – 6th centuries CE. We hope to cover both Greek and Latin Christian poetry, and possibly other, classicizing late antique poems, for which the influence of Christian forms or genres can be demonstrated (see, for example, the transformation of tragedy into moralizing, quasi-Christian apologetic epic in Dracontius’ Medea and Orestis tragoedia). As a rough guide, the Lisbon event will deal with small-scale forms (e.g. epigrams, epyllia, and hymns), while the Heidelberg part will concentrate on larger-scale forms (e.g. epic and tragedy).

 

In music, ‘modulation’ is used to describe the process of changing between the major and the minor keys, while ‘transposition’ is the rewriting of a whole piece onto another key. This might be a good metaphor for thinking about how the Christian poetry of late antiquity breaks free from traditional systems of generic classification. However, just as music keys have a particular mood in them, often culturally constructed, genres too are not only stylistically and thematically defined but their re-construction and reception also depends largely on their cultural milieu.

 

Eudocia’s hexameter poem on St. Cyprian, for example, could be seen as both a ‘transposition’, in that it renders a prose hagiographical account into heroic hexameters, but also a ‘modulation’ of several ‘major’ genres, with echoes from the Homeric epics, the novel, and philosophical biographies such as Philostratus’ Life of Apollonios. In this case, how does the medium, heroic hexameters, influence the reception of the other, non-hexametrical genres in it? To what degree can epic become yet another form of the Philosophenroman? How easily can a poem like this (as well as other, ‘new’ epic forms, such as the cento, the paraphrase, and allegorical epic) fit under the traditional rubric of ‘epic’, and with what kinds of expectations would its readers approach it, if they did classify it as ‘epic poetry’?

 

The workshop will attempt to tackle and disentangle, to the degree that this is possible, (some of) the following questions:

 

  1. Does the metre or genre in which a Christian poem is written influence its reception or interpretation? Do classical genres and metres still evoke an ethos? For example, are iambic metres still associated with invective? How do the various metres of the different poems in Prudentius’ Peristephanon influence our assessment of each poem’s tone and generic affiliation? How are Christian hymns written in hexameters (e.g. Prudentius’ Hymn on the Trinity) different from those written in more unusual metres (e.g. Synesius’ Hymns or the so-called Oxyrhynchus hymn [P. Oxy. XV 1786])?
  2. Were large-scale compositions thought to be more suitable for public performance? Can we detect a connection between genre and the rituals to which these texts may allude? Do small-scale forms and genres suggest a more private or bookish context?
  3. How do the various genres and sub-genres of Christian prose (Gospel, Apocalypsis, homilies, hagiographies, passion narratives) inform the genres of Christian poetry? Do some of these give rise to new genres? How are they identified and received when integrated inside other genres? Are some perceived as more serious or ‘grand’, and perhaps ‘transposed’ more regularly into epic; conversely, do others provide more liberty in the choice of both metre and content?
  4. How are the various stylistic techniques learned in the schools of rhetoric (e.g. prosopopoieia, ekphrasis, encomium) ‘modulated’ when incorporated into Christian poetry? Does their employment within larger- or smaller-scale forms make a difference in how they are received?
  5. When Aratus set the scientific treatise of Eudoxus into verse, he was creating poetry ‘in the second degree’ (Genette [1997] Palimpsests: Literature in the Second Degree). Do poetic paraphrases of Christian texts work within the same, Hellenistic tradition, and to what extent do Christian poets seem to be aware of this?

 

 

[+]

 

Goddess Worship, Marian Veneration and the Female Gender

To compare Marian cult and images to those of ancient goddesses is a well-established route into investigations of Christianity’s holiest female figure. Scholars of the ancient Mediterranean world have also long registered a robust connection between goddesses and social definitions of the female gender. From Briseis, “fair as Aphrodite,” to Hellenistic queens, Roman empresses and ordinary women, numerous studies have explained how female gender roles and qualities were imagined, defined, and articulated through reference to goddesses such as Aphrodite/Venus, Persephone, Demeter/Ceres, and Tyche/Fortuna.

 

Yet, the implications to the female gender of replacing a pantheon of goddesses with a single female holy figure have not received the attention they deserve. Overall, it seems that the new Christian sacred role model offered a more limited conceptualization of womanhood. Even though Christian devotional practices expanded women’s freedoms in a significant way, scholars of early Christianity have demonstrated that for women the road to holiness was often articulated as “becoming male.” Childbearing — the most central of women’s social roles — was epitomized by a virgin mother, who as has been argued, by being “alone of her sex” remained a poor exemplum for women. At the same time, through the lens of other metrics, it appears that with Christianity women gained more freedoms and authority. Scholars have written on the variety of the ways in which women could freely choose to forsake marriage and family obligations and become “virgins of God.” Others have dealt with the prominent role of purple-born women in philanthropy and religious debates. Finally, an analysis of Roman legislation has revealed that in late antiquity a mother was much better protected by the law.

 

This panel invites papers that investigate how ideas about the divine shaped notions about the female gender and gender roles. Preference will be given to papers that most closely adhere to the proposed topic. Ideally, the abstracts should approach this question either conceptually (what categories could we deploy to measure the social implications of religious change?) or comparatively (pre-Christian vs. Christian gender roles as expressed in literature, artworks, inscriptions, laws, and the lives of women (free, freed, or slaves). The goal is to open new routes of inquiry into gender and religion in the ancient Mediterranean, and prompt conversations between disciplines.

 

Abstracts should be submitted as email attachments to info@classicalstudies.org by February 24, 2017; the subject line of the email should be “Goddess Worship, Marian Veneration, and the Female Gender”; and the text of the abstract should not mention the name of the author.

 

  1. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

Koc University ANAHMED Fellowships at the Research Centre for Anatolian Civilisations

A number of short term and longer term post-doctoral and senior fellowships are now open for applications.

 

The deadline is December 15th.  For more information click here.

 

[+]

 

Senior Ancient History position at Tel Aviv University

 

The Department of General History at Tel Aviv University, Israel, invites applications for a tenure-track position in Ancient History, effective October 2017. Applications will be considered from candidates specializing in any period or aspect of Greek or Roman history, but all things being equal, preference will be given to candidates specializing in some area of the History of the Roman World.

 

The position requires the ability to conduct independent research in the relevant field. The position also requires teaching in Hebrew, which the successful candidate will be expected to do by the beginning of the second year of employment. Candidates must have received a Ph.D. before filling the position.

 

Salary and conditions will conform to Tel Aviv University regulations. Appointment procedures will be carried out according to the rules and regulations of Tel Aviv University and are subject to the approval of the University authorities.

 

Candidates should send their applications, including a CV and samples of publications or other written work, by post or by email, by 15 January 2017, to:

Professor Jonathan Price

Chair, Department of History

Tel Aviv University

Tel Aviv 69978, Israel

price@post.tau.ac.il

 

Three letters of recommendation from senior scholars are to be sent directly this address.

The position is open to all candidates. The appointment will be based on candidate qualifications and the Department’s needs. The Department, the Faculty and Tel Aviv University are not obligated to appoint any of the candidates who apply for the position.

 

 

 

[+]

 

Tenure Track Assistant Professorship in Late Antique Jewish History at the University of California, Irvine

 

The History Department at the University of California, Irvine, invites applications for a position in the history of Judaism in Late Antiquity. The appointment will be at the rank of Assistant Professor (tenure- track) in the Department of History. The successful candidate will contribute to the History Department’s undergraduate and graduate curriculum, as well as to the development of the Jewish Studies Program at UCI.

 

Candidates should submit a letter of application that describes research and teaching interests; a current CV; a statement addressing how their past and/or potential contributions to diversity, equity, and inclusion will advance UC Irvine’s commitment to inclusive excellence; an article or book chapter not to exceed 50 pages; and three letters of recommendation.

 

Applications need to be submitted electronically at https://recruit.ap.uci.edu/apply/JPF03754. To ensure full consideration, applications need to be submitted by December 16, 2016.

 

Questions about the electronic submission procedure should be directed to Marc Kanda (mhkanda@uci.edu). All other questions about the position should be sent to the chair of the search committee, Professor Matthias Lehmann (mlehmann@uci.edu).

 

The University of California, Irvine is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer advancing inclusive excellence. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, age, protected veteran status, or other protected categories covered by the UC nondiscrimination policy. A recipient of an NSF ADVANCE award for gender equity, UCI is responsive to the needs of dual career couples, supports work-life balance through an array of family-friendly policies, and is dedicated to broadening participation in higher education.

To learn more about the department, visit http://www.humanities.uci.edu/history .

 

 

 

————————————

Mirela Ivanova

DPhil Candidate in History
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings

= = = = =

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 5

 

Michaelmas Term 2017
= = = = =

 

MONDAY 7 November
17:00   Medieval History Seminar
Wharton Room, All Souls College

Marco Gentile (University of Parma)

Faction as a means of social and political inclusion: the case of late medieval

Northern Italy (14th-15th centuries)

 

TUESDAY 8 November
17:00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar

Carpenter Room, Harris Manchester College

Philippa Byrne (Somerville)

Counsels and Precepts in some Twelfth-Century Commentaries on the Lord’s Prayer
WEDNESDAY 9 November

 

14:00 Byzantine-Chinese Reading Group

Raynolds Room, Corpus Christi (note another change in location)

Yegor Grebnev (Merton) and Marek Jankowiak (Wolfson)

 

Contact marek.jankowiak@history.ox.ac.uk for more details.

 

 

[+]

 

17:00   Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

Lecture Theatre, Ioannou Centre for Classical & Byzantine Studies
Vera von Falkenhausen (Rome):

At the periphery of the Empire: the Byzantine provinces of southern Italy and Constantinople
THURSDAY 10 November
15:00 Introduction to Medieval New Rome: Themes, Methods and Materials

Rainolds Room, Corpus Christi

Nicholas Matheou (Pembroke College, Oxford)

Elites and the Aristocracy

 

[+]
17:00 Late Roman Seminar
Seminar Room, Corpus Christi

Alan Ross (University of Southampton):

Eremitic aemulatio: genesis of genre in Jerome’s Vita Pauli

 

[+]

 

17:00 The Hensley Henson Lectures: Bede and the writing of History

Examination Schools,

Prof. Sarah Foot:

Judgement

 
FRIDAY 11 November
9:30 Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre,

Marc Lauxtermann (Exeter College)

Reading: John Mauropous’ Life of Dorotheos the Younger, a local 11th-C. saint from Chiliokomos in the Pontos region

 

[+]

 

11:00   Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminar
First Floor Seminar Room, Ioannou Centre

Masue Kato (Rikkyo):

The art of Pope Gregory III (731–741): early medieval Rome between Byzantium and the Lombard kingdom

 

[+]
12:00 Byzantine Literature Lectures

Ioannou Centre,

Marc Lauxtermann (Exeter College)

The Lesser Known Texts of the Eleventh Century

 

 

[+]

 

17:00 The Cult of Saints in the First Millennium

Radcliffe Humanities Building, Collin Matthew Room (Ground floor)

Francesca dell’ Acqua (Birmingham):

The Girdle of Mary: from Jerusalem, to Constantinople, Prato and … Pisa?

 

————————————

Mirela Ivanova

DPhil Candidate, History
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 30/10/16

= = = = =

 

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

The Byzness, 30th October 2016

 

= = = = =

  1. NEWS & EVENTS
  2. CALL FOR PAPER
  3. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

= = = = =

 

  1. NEWS & EVENTS

Approaches to Early and Middle Byzantine Settlement Archaeology Seminars, Birmingham 2016-7

Please find the full timetable for the Early and Middle Byzantine Settlement Archaeology seminars by clicking here.

 

Note that the next seminar will take place on  22nd November, and will be given by Andrew Poulter (Birmingham University), on the topic: “Dichin, an Early Byzantine fort and the Balkan countryside in the fifth and sixth centuries: fact or fiction?”

 

Any questions to be directed to the convenor, Archie Dunn a.w.dunn@bham.ac.uk

[+]

‘Colloque “La périphérie savante”, Serres, 11-12 novembre 2016

Please find the full programme for the colloquium here.

 

 

[+]

 

‘Which Nubia and which Byzantium?’ 10am-12pm Friday 18th November, Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

A workshop for students on medieval Nubia and its place in Byzantine society and the larger Mediterranean world. Led by Giovanni R. Ruffini, Fairfield University

 

RSVP required. Registration closes November 16. Additional information and registration at https://eastofbyzantium.org/upcoming-events/which-nubia-and-which-byzantium/ .

 

The workshop is part of the East of Byzantium partnership series. East of Byzantium is a partnership between the Arthur H. Dadian and Ara Oztemel Chair of Armenian Art at Tufts University and the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture at Hellenic College Holy Cross in Brookline, MA, that explores the cultures of the eastern frontier of the Byzantine empire in the late antique and medieval periods/

 

[+]

Symposium: Liturgical and Paraliturgical Hymnology in the East and West, 11th November, 2016

The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture at Hellenic College Holy Cross is pleased to announce an upcoming symposium “Liturgical and Paraliturgical Hymnology in East and West” to be held a Hellenic College Holy Cross, 50 Goddard Avenue, Brookline, MA, on November 11, 2016, from 9:30am–1:30pm.

 

In this symposium, liturgical scholars and musical practitioners present papers discussing themes of poetry and song in the medieval and contemporary religious and musical traditions of Judaism and Christianity.

 

A full schedule of papers and abstracts are available at http://www.maryjahariscenter.org/events/hymnology-in-east-and-west.

 

The event is open to the public.

 

Contact: Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu ), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture

 

[+]

Exhibition “The Hidden Gospels of Abba Garima, Treasure of the Ethiopian Highlands”, 5th November -18th December,  the Outreach room ,the Ioannou Centre, University of Oxford

 

The exhibition is accompanying the Colloquium, advertised last week, Early Ethiopian and Other Eastern Illuminated Gospel Books: Text and Image, which will take place on November 5th also in the Ioannou centre.

 

Places are free, but limited. To book, email: foteini.spingou@classics.ox.ac.uk

 

For a full timetable of the symposium click here.

 

For more information on the exhibition click here.

 

[+]

 

Holy Books: the Garima Gospel Exhibition and Symposium, 4 November 2016 through 26 March 2017 the Allard Pierson Museum, University of Amsterdam

The Symposium will take place on 3rd November, 9:30-6pm.

The morning session will be entitled The Garima Manuscripts Revisited, the afternoon session The Later Legacy of Ethiopian Art and Architecture to the Present. At 4.00 pm the exhibition will be opened and the first copy of The Garima Gospels: Early Illuminated Gospel Books from Ethiopia will be presented.

Places are free, but booking is required. For more information: http://cdn.myclang.com/2/4/1537/1/oyLxUpssyZAbV9iAmZOeulrNMMUx48bcBUmXkMZ1QWKxPJajnOo2COtCWag3eatd

 

[+]

 

Conference: The Emergence of Multiple-Text Manuscripts, Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures, Hamburg

9 – 12 November 2016

Conference website: http://www.manuscript-cultures.uni-hamburg.de/register_mtm2016.html

Program: http://www.manuscript-cultures.uni-hamburg.de/cal-details/CSMC_2016_Emergence_MTM_programme.pdf

 

[+]

 

Symposium and Concert “Icons of Sound”, 5th November, Oshman Hall, McMurthy Building, University of Stanford

I’m writing on behalf of Stanford Live, the university’s performing arts presenter at the Bing Concert Hall, and our partners at Stanford’s Department of Art & Art History and the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA).

 

In early November, we are jointly presenting a concert by the sacred music ensemble Cappella Romana, which features a digital recreation of the distinctive acoustics of the Hagia Sophia. Accompanying this performance will be a daylong scholarly symposium led by Professor Bissera Pentcheva, examining immersive aesthetics that combine architecture, musical performance, digital sonic design, decorative arts to imagine and reconstruct the sensory experiences of medieval liturgies.

 

For a full timetable of the symposium, and how to register: http://live.stanford.edu/content/icons-sound-voice-architecture-and-imagination.

 

 

[+]

 

New Digitised Syriac Manuscripts Resource

Now all collated and accessible here: http://syri.ac/digimss

 

[+]

 

Funeral of Anthony Bryer

 

The family of Professor A.A.M. Bryer have asked that information about his funeral be circulated. It will take place on November 10, 2016 at 2.00 p.m., in St Peter’s Church, Old Church Road, Harborne, Birmingham B17 0BB. There will be a reception at 33 Crosbie Road, Harborne, Birmingham B17 9BG, to which everyone is invited.

 

Directions to the church can be found on its website: http://www.stpeterharborne.org.uk/

 

  1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

 

Call for papers for panel: Documents and Archives in the Mamluk Period at the Fourth Conference of the School of Mamluk Studies, American University of Beirut, 11-13 May 2017

 

Panel organisers: Konrad Hirschler (Freie Universität Berlin), Daisy Livingston (School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London)

 

The Fourth Conference of the School of Mamluk Studies will be taking place at the American University of Beirut, 11-13 May 2017. The first day of the conference, May 11, is themed. The following two days of the conference (May 12 and 13) will be structured in panels. Panel proposals are made by a representative, who will be responsible for its organization. Panels contain three or four papers of twenty minutes each. Further details of the conference (acceptance procedure, fees, practicalities etc.) can be found on the Mamluk Studies Resources website at: http://mamluk.uchicago.edu/sms-conference.html

 

We propose to organise a panel addressing the subject of archives and archival practices during the Mamluk period, particularly in light of surviving documentary sources. The proposed panel abstract is as follows:

 

The non-survival of state archives from the pre-Ottoman Middle East has generated significant scholarly attention. Historians have asked why medieval Islamic societies, so generous in their legacy of surviving narrative, legal, and biographical texts, failed to preserve documentary records to the same degree. In attempting to explain this curious phenomenon the, in fact rather substantial, documentary traces surviving from the medieval period have sometimes been overlooked. The recent ‘archival turn’ in the historical field at large has, however, encouraged scholars to revisit this issue from a more nuanced perspective. It is now recognised that the discussion has been overly informed by comparison with medieval Europe, for which the archival record is extremely rich, and often based on an argument ex silentio, rather than positive evidence from contemporary source material.

 

The papers in this panel continue to look beyond the over-asked question of why such archives did not survive, considering instead the forms of archives and archival practices for which we do have evidence, and exploring the nature of the surviving documentary record from the Mamlūk period. The panel addresses issues such as the materiality of written records, the multiple intentions behind the production of archival documents, and the varied sites and processes in which archival and documentary life-cycles were played out. In doing so, it hopes to provide further reflections on this fascinating topic, and to highlight the significance of the documentary record in addressing this question.

 

Proposals for papers addressing any or all of these issues are welcome. Those interested in participating please contact Daisy Livingston by email (619105@soas.ac.uk ) with a title and abstract of no more than 300 words by 11 November.

 

  1. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago

The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago invites applications for the Oriental Institute’s Annual Post-Doctoral Fellow Conference program for the 2017—2019 academic years. This is a twenty-four-month, non-renewable appointment. During the first year of the appointment, the Post-Doctoral Fellow will organize and conduct a two-day conference at the Oriental Institute on key comparatively oriented theoretical or methodological issues in the field of ancient studies (archaeological, text-based, and/or art historical avenues of research). We encourage cross-disciplinary proposals that deal with the ancient Near East (including Egypt) or that compare the Near East with other cultural areas. Applicants should take into consideration the research interests represented at the Oriental Institute. The conference will take place in early March 2018. Following the conference, the Post-Doctoral Fellow will work with publication staff to assemble and edit the proceedings for publication in the “Oriental Institute Seminars” series. During the second year of the appointment, the Post-Doctoral Fellow will assist in organizing a series of faculty seminars at the Oriental Institute and may have the opportunity to teach one quarter-length course on a topic of his or her choosing. The incumbent is also encouraged to pursue his or her own research while in residence and to interact with the Oriental Institute community.

 

Information on past Oriental Institute Annual symposia can be viewed at: https://oi.uchicago.edu/research/postdoctoral-fellow-program

 

Qualifications: Ph.D. in a discipline relating to ancient studies must be complete at the time of appointment.

 

Applicants should send:

 

  1. Cover letter
  2. 5-page proposal outlining the nature and structure of the conference (including the names and paper topics of six to eight key participants who have agreed to make presentations, should the conference be funded; for budgetary reasons, international participants should constitute no more than half of the list of six to eight invited speakers)
  3. Curriculum vitae
  4. 3 letters of reference

 

Please apply online to the University of Chicago’s Academic Career Opportunity website at: http://tinyurl.com/jgxuv9z  Posting number 03151

 

Review of applications will begin on Monday, January 9th, 2017. Start date is September 1st, 2017. Inquiries can be directed to oi-administration@uchicago.edu  with the subject heading “Post-Doctoral Fellow”.

 

The University of Chicago is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity/Disabled/Veterans Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national or ethnic origin, age, status as an individual with a disability, protected veteran status, genetic information, or other protected classes under the law. For additional information please see the University’s Notice of Nondiscrimination (http://www.uchicago.edu/about/non_discrimination_statement/ ).

 

Job seekers in need of a reasonable accommodation to complete the application process should call 773-702-5671 or email ACOppAdministrator@uchicago.edu  with their request.

 

[+]

 

Incoming Fellowships, Hiob Ludolf Centre for Ethiopian Studies, Universität Hamburg

The project Beta maṣāḥǝft: Manuscripts of Ethiopia and Eritrea (Schriftkultur des christlichen Äthiopiens und Eritreas: eine multimediale Forschungsumgebung) is a long-term project funded within the framework of the German Academies’ Programme (coordinated by the Union of the German Academies of Sciences and Humanities) under survey of the Akademie der Wissenschaften in Hamburg. It aims at creating a virtual research environment that shall manage complex data related to predominantly Christian manuscript tradition of the Ethiopian and Eritrean Highlands. With detailed manuscript descriptions as a starting point, the project collects and manages information on the texts transmitted in the manuscripts and their authors, on the scribes and other historical persons as well as places and networks connected with the manuscript production and circulation. The first project phase places special attention on codicology and manuscript production.

 

The project provides an opportunity for scholars to pursue research in any of the areas relevant to the project with a fellowship endowed with dedicated project funds. The fellowship is awarded on a competitive basis following the present call.

 

Eligibility

 

Applications are welcome from scholars with a background and experience in any of the aspects of Ethiopian/Eritrean manuscript studies. Applicants are expected to demonstrate competences and skills additional to those already covered by the project. The successful applicant should be prepared to conduct research independently within the scope of the Beta maṣāḥǝft project as well as to offer up to two lectures of 2 academic hours each in his or her field of expertise. Applications are welcome from researchers of all nationalities. Doctorate degree or equivalent is desirable.

 

Terms

 

The Beta maṣāḥǝft incoming fellowship covers a residence with the project for up to three consecutive months, with a total grant of up to 10,000 Euro for the entire period. The precise scheduling shall, wherever possible, be set according to the preference indicated by the applicant. In addition to the stipend, the grant also includes office space and access to PC, library, and printing facilities. Travel and accommodation are to be covered from the stipend by the grantee.

 

Application procedure

 

Applicants are asked to apply within 30 November 2016. The applicants should submit the

 

1) filled application form

 

and supply the following attachments:

 

2) project proposal (up to 5 pages) for: (1) project description (please specify which of the project’s components would be pursued while in residence); (2) methodology; (3) expected outcome; (4) project contribution to the Beta maṣāḥǝft project; (5) applicant’s qualifications to execute project; and (6) benefits to project from resources at Hamburg; (7) selected project bibliography

 

3) curriculum vitae

 

4) suggested topic of a lecture(s) with a short summary

 

5) optionally: sample of writing

 

Review process and notification

 

The incoming fellowships are awarded on a competitive basis, based on the application file. In particular, the following aspects shall be considered: an applicant’s past achievements; his or her qualifications to undertake the project; how the project would benefit from the resources at Hamburg, including its library and collections; and, most importantly, how the project would contribute to the advancement of the Beta maṣāḥǝft project.

 

Applicants shall be notified of the decision by 15 January 2017.

 

Contact

 

Please address your applications and inquiries to the project coordinator Eugenia Sokolinski at eugenia.sokolinski@uni-hamburg.de

 

For more details on the project visit https://www.betamasaheft.uni-hamburg.de/

 

 

[+]

 

Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellowships at Trinity College, Dublin

The call for the 2017 Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowships is now open for one or two-year fellowships. Applicants must be supported by an academic mentor at an eligible higher education institute in the Republic of Ireland. TCD Classics has hosted six IRC Postdocs in the past three years (in literature, history and archaeology) and the Department welcomes enquiries from suitably qualified, outstanding candidates for this new call.

 

“The Council funds excellent researchers across all disciplines and encourages interdisciplinary research and engagement with enterprise. The Council facilitates the career development of researchers by funding those at an early stage of their research career to associate with established research teams who have achieved international recognition for their work. This scheme is intended to support suitably qualified applicants at an early stage of their postdoctoral career to associate with established research teams who have achieved international recognition for their work. These Fellowships can be held for either one or two years.”

 

Full details of the scheme at: http://www.research.ie/funding/government-ireland-postdoctoral-fellowship-2017 , but anyone interested should be aware that there is an internal deadline for the sign-off of applications, well ahead of the final submission deadline of 30 November 2016. Please contact the Head of Department Professor Monica Gale (mrgale@tcd.ie) or a potential mentor for further information. A list of staff members of the Classics Department at TCD and details of their research interests can be found at http://www.tcd.ie/Classics/research/staff.php

 

[+]

Three research assistant positions in Palaeography at the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters, UCL

CELL is currently recruiting for three research assistants, to work on our Archaeology of Reading project, including transcribing and translating marginal annotations from digital facsimiles of early modern books. The posts are part-time (2.5 days a week) and are funded for one year in the first instance.

The postholders will have knowledge of the history and culture of late sixteenth-century Europe and current digital research environments, as well as a high level of proficiency in early modern palaeography.

 

The postholders will be expected to have an MA degree or equivalent in a relevant subject area (such as History, literature, languages, Digital Humanities etc – if unsure please email lucy.stagg@ucl.ac.uk ). However, applicants should not have completed a PhD degree.

 

Candidates will ideally have language skills, including a modern language and Latin.

 

For more details and how to apply click here. The closing date is November 4.

[+]

 

 

————————————

Mirela Ivanova

DPhil Candidate in History
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings- Week 4

= = = = =

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 4

 

Michaelmas Term 2017
= = = = =

 

MONDAY 31 October

15:00 Medieval Archaeology Seminar

Toby Martin:

The Origins of Early Medieval Europe: A Gendered Perspective

 

[+]

 

17:00   Medieval History Seminar
Wharton Room, All Souls College

Anna Boeles Rowland (Merton)

Un-gifts in late medieval London

 

TUESDAY 1 November

14:30   Seminar on Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Dr Benjamin Williams (KCL):

Genesis Rabba on the cursing of the ground

 

[+]

 

17:00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar

Carpenter Room, Harris Manchester College

Gustav Zamore (Merton)

Inside the Mind of a Heretic: moral psychology and heresy in the thirteenth century

 

 
WEDNESDAY 2 November

 

14:00 Byzantine-Chinese Reading Group

Ioannou Centre,

Yegor Grebnev (Merton) and Marek Jankowiak (Wolfson)

 

Reading the section on Fulin 拂菻國, that is probably (East) Rome, from the chapter 198 of Jiu Tangshu (Old Tang Annals 舊唐書). Contact marek.jankowiak@history.ox.ac.uk for more details.

 

[+]

 

17:00   Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

Lecture Theatre, Ioannou Centre for Classical & Byzantine Studies
Ufuk Kocabaş and Işıl Kocabaş (Istanbul):

The Byzantine harbour and shipwrecks at Yenikapı, Istanbul: Recent research

 
THURSDAY 3 November

17:00 Late Roman Seminar
Note: in the Rainolds Room, this week only, Corpus Christi

Mattias Gassman (Queen’s College, Cambridge):

A Pagan Rome under Christian Emperors: Rethinking Symmachus on the Altar of Victory

 

[+]

 

17:00 The Hensley Henson Lectures: Bede and the writing of History

Examination Schools,

Prof. Sarah Foot:

Kings

 
FRIDAY 4 November

 

9:30 Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre,

Marc Lauxtermann (Exeter College)

Reading: John Mauropous’ Life of Dorotheos the Younger, a local 11th-C. saint from Chiliokomos in the Pontos region

 

 

[+]

 

11:00   Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminar
First Floor Seminar Room, Ioannou Centre

Simon Ford

Evidence for the Conversion of Synagogues in Late Antiquity
[+]

12:00 Byzantine Literature Lectures

Ioannou Centre,

Marc Lauxtermann (Exeter College)

The Lesser Known Texts of the Eleventh Century

 

 

 

————————————

Mirela Ivanova

DPhil Candidate, History
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Byzness