Oxford Listings at the International Byzantine Studies Congress, Belgrade

 

Dear all,

In light of the forthcoming International Congress, I have put together a (hopefully comprehensive) list of the times of all sessions in which Oxford scholars are involved (speaking or chairing). Unfortunately, the programme does not always supply the institutions of Free Communications speakers, so apologies in advance for any omissions.

Best wishes

Mirela

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MONDAY 22 August
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TUESDAY 23 August
11:00 Round Table:  The Episcopal Palace in Early Byzantium: Historical Development, Architectural Typologies, Domestic Spaces

 

Convener: Isabella Baldini

 

Heleni Saradi,

The Episcopal Palaces: Worldly Splendor in the Style of the Ruling Class Versus Monastic Virtues

 

Natalia Poulou,

Everyday Life and Production in Early Byzantine Episcopeia from the Aegean and the Mainland, Greece: The Material Culture Evidence

 

Alessandro Taddei,

The Episkopeion of Constantinople in the Early Byzantine Period

 

Philipp Niewöhner,

The Bishop’s Palace of Miletus in Caria (Turkey)

 

Efthymios Rizos,

An Archiepiscopal City: Justiniana Prima as the Seat of the Primate of Dacia

 

Pascale Chevalier,

Les espaces domestiques et économies de la résidence épiscopale protobyzantine de Byllis (Albanie)

 

[+]

 

11:00   Round Table: Les relations diplomatiques byzantines (ive-xve siècles): permanence et/ou changements

 

Conveners: Elisabeth Malamut, Nicolas Drocourt

 

Jean-Pierre Arrignon,

La diplomatie byzantine à l’origine de la Kievskaja Rus

 

Alexander Beihammer,

Innovative Features and New Strategies in Byzantine-Seljuk Diplomacy

 

Azat Bozoyan,

L’Arménie cilicienne dans la documentation diplomatique byzantine du douzième au quatorzième siècle

 

Christian Gastgeber,

Language Change in West Directed Correspondence of the Constantinopolitan Chancelleries during the Palaiologan Period

 

Nike Koutrakou,

Summit Diplomacy with a Female Face: Women as Diplomatic Actors in Late Byzantium

 

Ekaterina Nechaeva,

Freedom of Conscience by Treaty: The Return of the Seven Philosophers and the Protection Clause (Agathias 2.31)

 

Nebojša Porčić,

Permanence and Change in Serbian Medieval Diplomacy

 

Jonathan Shepard,

The Emperor’s Long Reach: Imperial Alertness to ‘Barbarian’ Resources and Force Majeure, from the Fifth to the Fifteenth Centuries

 

Jakub Sypiański,

Une mention de l’ambassade « assyrienne » de Photius dans un manuscrit arabe?

 

[+]

 

15:30 Thematic Session of Free Communications: New Feasts, New Sermons: The Cult of Mary on the Eve of Iconoclasm, in Byzantium and Beyond

 

Conveners: Beatrice Daskas, Francesca Dell’Acqua

 

Ernesto Sergio Mainoldi,

The Introduction of Marian Feasts in Byzantium

 

Mary B. Cunningham,

From Palestine to Constantinople: Seventh- and Eighth-Century Greek Homilies on the Dormition

 

Maria Lidova,

The Chalkoprateia Image of the Annunciation and Material Evidence for a Lost Iconography

 

Beatrice Daskas,

The Akathist Hymn in the Early Medieval West

 

Diego Maria Ianiro,

“Credere virginem in corde per fidem.” Images of Mary in the Libri Carolini

 

Natalia Teteriatnikov,

On the Iconography of the Hypapante in Byzantine Art

 

Francesca Dell’Acqua,

On the Iconography of the Hypapante in Western Art (And the Earliest Latin Homilies on the Feast)

 

[+]

 

15:30 Special Session 2: Instrumenta Studorium II: The Future of Editing Byzantine Texts

 

Chairs: Andreas Rhoby, Alexander Riehle

 

Alessandra Bucossi,

Addenda et corrigenda ad libitum

 

Christian Gastgeber,

Byzantine Philology. Joining New Standards and Daring Innovative Approaches, or What?

 

Antonia Giannouli,

Title to be announced

 

Martin Hinterberger,

John Davis, Editing the Metaphrasis of Niketas Choniates’ Χρονικὴ Διήγησις

 

Michael Jeffreys,

Correct Editions, Standard Editions, Well-Punctuated Editions: The Myth of Editorial Uniformity

 

Raimondo Tocci,

Title to be announced

 

Staffan Wahlgren,

The Mid-Byzantine Chronicles

 

Nikolaos Zagklas,

Editing Byzantine Poetry: Neglected Works, Overlooked Editorial Aspects and Future Challenges

 

 

[+]

 

18:30 Special Session 3: Digital Humanities and Byzantine Studies

 

Chair: Staffan Wahlgren

 

Mihailo St. Popović,

Bringing Byzantine Studies to the Public: Web-Based Visualizations for the Dissemination of Scholarly Content

 

Claudia Sode,

A Digital Corpus of Byzantine Seals, or How to Improve the Presentation and Analysis of the Sigillographic Material?

 

Efthymios Rizos,

The Cult of Saints in Late Antiquity: A New Online Searchable Corpus

 

Charlotte Roueché,

Linking Byzantium

 

Johannes Preiser-Kapeller,

Entangling Byzantium. Networks of Individuals, Objects, Places and Narratives

 

Tara L. Andrews,

The Digital Edition as a Tool for Historians: The Chronicle of Matthew of Edessa

 

Christian Gastgeber,

New Approaches in Text Edition, Text Interpretation

 

Albrecht Berger,

The Perils of Electronical Information

 

 

[+]

 

21:00: Oxford Drinks Event

Location TBC,

 

I will send out an email once I am in Belgrade.

 

 

 

[+]

 
WEDNESDAY 24 August

 

11:00 Thematic Free Communications: Byzantine Literary Models and Patterns of Reception: Translation and Transformation in the Slavonic and Middle Eastern Traditions

 

Conveners: Anissava Miltenova, Vassya Velinova

 

Anissava Miltenova,

Divergenced Myth and Transformed Genre

 

Ilse De Vos,

Bridging the Gap: How to Edit the Slavonic Quaestiones ad Antiochum ducem?

 

Lara Sels,

The Quaestiones ad Antiochum ducem in Greek and Slavonic

 

Ida Toth,

The Book of Syntipas the Philosopher: Questions and Answers on Kingship, Morality, and Fate

 

Olga Grinchenko,

Literary Patterns in the Slavonic Anthologies Excerpting the Quaestiones ad Antiochum ducem

 

Yavor Miltenov,

The Making of the Chrysorrhoas Collection

 

Dieter Stern,

Double Translations of Byzantine Hagiographic Texts – Reflections on the Slavonic Translations of the Life of St. Eupraxia of Thebes

 

Diana Atanassova-Pencheva,

Multiple Translations and Their Context: Praxis de stratilatis in the Medieval South Slavic Tradition

 

Ivan Iliev,

The Old Church Slavonic Translation of Hippolytus of Rome’s Commentaries on the Book of Prophet Daniel

 

Ljubica Jovanović,

Byzantine Historiography in Slavonic Disguise

 

 

[+]

 

11:00 Thematic Free Communication Sessions: The Early Byzantine Empire ‒ Part 2

 

Chairs: Katerina Nikolaou, Eirini Chrestou

 

Adrian Szopa,

The Barbarians in Service of the Late Roman Empire in the East

 

Aleksandr Aibabin,

Fortresses of Gothia in the Crimea in the Eighth and Ninth Centuries

 

Eirini Chrestou – Katerina Nikolaou,

Popular Resistance to Authority: From the Circus Factions to the Citizens

 

Hugh Jeffery,

Angel Cult and the Transformation of the Temple of Aphrodite at Aphrodisias

 

Andrzej Kompa,

The Constantinopolitan Authors, the Constantinopolitan Point of View? – Groups and Individuals as Seen by the Authors Active in the Early Byzantine Capital

 

Qiang Li,

Review on the Research about the Age of Justinian in China

 

Vadim Serov,

On the Modern Research Methods of Early Byzantium: New Prospects for Old Theme (The Imperial Finances from the Late 6th to the Middle of the 7th Centuries)

 

 

[+]

 

15:30 Round Table: The Agency of Inscriptions in Byzantium, in the West and in the Slavonic World

 

Convener: Andreas Rhoby

 

Ida Toth – Efthymios Rizos,

Consecrated to God, Written for the Salvation of His People: The Agency of Normative Epigraphy Across Space and Time

 

Salvatore Cosentino,

Epigraphy and Society in Byzantine Sardinia (7th– 10th Century)

 

Vincent Debiais,

In Kendall’s Footsteps: Verse Inscriptions and Romanesque Doors

 

Ivan Drpić,

Jefimija the Nun: A Reappraisal

 

Sophia Kalopissi-Verti,

Language and Identity in Medieval Greece: The Epigraphic Evidence

 

Georgios Pallis,

Legible and Illegible Inscriptions in the Middle Byzantine Churches of Greece

 

Emmanuel Moutafov,

Translating Encrypted Messages: Greek and Slavonic Tetragrams as a Mixture of Languages or as a Universal Code

 

Maria Xenaki,

Graffiti in Medieval Times: A Case Study from Byzantine Cappadocia

 

Andrey Vinogradov,

Inscriptions of the North Caucasus: Greek Literacy on the Periphery of Oikoumene

 

[+]

 

18:30 Thematic Free Communications: Literature and Politics

 

Chairs: Sysse G. Engberg, Ida Toth

 

Georgios Kalafikis,

Orationes parallelae: The Laudations of Q. Aurelius Symmachus and Themistius to the Brother-Emperors Valentinian I and Valens; Propagating Common Principles for Governing and Defending Both “partes imperii” ca. 365-370 A.D.

 

Mattia C. Chiriatti,

Gregory of Nyssa’s Funeral λόγοι as an Early Model of Byzantine Rhetoric and Imperial Propaganda

 

Ryan W. Strickler,

Wolves and Centaurs in Byzantium: Dehumanizing the Enemy in the Seventh-Century Byzantine Literature

 

Oscar Prieto Dominguez,

Writing during the Iconoclasm: Literature as a Political Weapon

 

Sysse G. Engberg,

The Political Use of the Old Testament in Byzantium

 

Dimitrios Georgakopoulos,

Spaneas at the Court of the Lusignan  

 

[+]
THURSDAY 25 August

 

11:00 Round Table: Icons of Space, Icons in Space. Iconography or Hierotopy?

 

Convener: Alexei Lidov

 

Alexei Lidov,

Hierotopy and Iconicity. Spatial Icons versus Iconographic Devices

 

Michele Bacci,

Sacred Spaces vs Holy Sites: On the Limits and Advantages of a Hierotopic Approach

 

Nicoletta Isar,

The Iconicity and Tropes of Spatiality: When Architecture/ Iconography Dissolves into Transparency

 

Jelena Bogdanović,

The Iconicity of Byzantine Architecture: Iconography or Hierotopy?

 

Maria Cristina Carile,

The Great Palace as an “Icon of Space”? On the Iconicity of the Spatial Representation of Power in Byzantium

 

Fr. Maximos Constas,

Rapture, Ecstasy, and the Construction of Sacred Space: Hierotopy in the Life of Symeon the New Theologian

 

Andreas Rhoby,

Speaking Icons: The Mediation of Inscriptions in Byzantine Sacred Space

 

Annemarie Weyl Carr,

Reference, Presence, Place: Seeing Toponymic Icons Hierotopically

 

Maria Lidova,

The Adoration of the Magi: From Iconic Space to Icon in Space

[+]

 

11:00 Thematic Sessions of Free Communications: Venetian Historiography (and Byzantine Studies)

 

Conveners: Andrea Nanetti, Șerban V. Marin

 

Andrea Nanetti,

Engineering Venetian Historiography: A Case Study towards an Algebra of Highly-Crossed-Linked Events and Transformation Processes

 

Șerban V. Marin,

Propagandistic Usefulness or Means to Reconstruct the Past? Few Aspects on the Importance of the Venetian Chronicles

 

Roberto Pesce,

The First Venetians: The Chosen People

 

Andrea Beretta,

The Life of Attila in the Venetian Chronicles

 

Daniele Dibello,

The Art of Mystifying: The Venetian Chronicles and Events that Never Happened

 

Elena Ene Draghici-Vasilescu,

The Church of San Marco in the Eleventh Century

 

Chiara Frison,

The Account of Byzantium and Its Fall in the Cronicha of Giorgio Dolfin

 

Katerina B. Korrè,

Stradioti Mercenaries of Venice and the Virtual Library of Venetian Chronicles: A Case-Study

 

John R. Melville-Jones,

The Battle of Gallipoli 1416: A Case of Irrational Exuberance

 

Dmitry Vozchikov,

Laonikos Chalkokondyles and the Late Byzantine Feedback of the Venetian Myth
[+]
11:00 Thematic Sessions of Free Communications: The Age of the Komnenoi

Chairs: Paul Magdalino, Leonora Neville

 

Ayana Saeki-Katakura,

The Porphyra in the Alexias

 

João Vicente de Medeiros Publio Dias,

The Insubordination of Gregorios Taronites: A Precedent for the Future Fragmentation of the Byzantine Empire?

 

Toni Filiposki,

The Dispute between Theophylact, the Archbishop of Ohrid, and the Paroikos Lazar: An Example of “State Interventionism” during Byzantine Emperor Alexios I Komnenos’ Reign (1081‒1118)

 

Maximilian Lau,

Emperor John II Komnenos and the Imperial Crisis of 1126

 

Jack Roskilly,

Reconstituer le réseau d’un évêque : Michel Chôniatès, métropolite d’Athènes (1182-1205). Sources et problèmes

 

Angelina Volkoff,

The Figure of Alexios III Angelos Komnenos in History and Historiography. A Reassessment

 

Stefan Lazić,

On Dating the Last Norman Invasion of the Byzantine Empire

 

Leonie Exarchos,

Tuae provideas civitati: Identifications and Identities of Latins in the Twelfth-Century Byzantium

 

 

[+]

 

15:30 Round Table: Byzantine World Chronicle as Open Text

 

Conveners: Zoltán Farkas, László Horváth

 

Elizabeth Jeffreys,

Plus ça change …

 

Juan Signes Codoñer,

Movable History: The Author of Theophanes Continuatus I-IV and the Reuse of Ancient History for the Iconoclast Period

 

Sergei Mariev,

Defining Byzantine Chronicles: A Challenge for Historians of Byzantine Literature

 

Tamás Mészáros,

Studying the Byzantine Chronicles: Some Preliminary Remarks

 

Christian Gastgeber,

Open Text Problems of a Chronicle

 

Erika Juhász,

An Intriguing Passage in Chronicon Paschale

 

Iván Tóth,

Plutarch’s Vita Alexandri as ‘Open Text’ in Zonaras’ Epitome Historiarum – Some Minor Observations on Zonaras’ Source Handling

 

[+]

 

18:30 Thematic Free Communications: Literature in the Age of Komnenoi

 

Chairs: Elizabeth Jeffreys, Nikolaos Zagklas

 

Varvara Zharkaya,

Lexical Innovations and Literary Networks in the 12th Century Byzantium

 

Luisa Andriollo,

Le roy est mort, vive le roy: Imperial Succession and Imperial Legitimacy in Kallikles’ Funerary Poems for Alexios I and John II Komnenoi

 

Dmitri Chernoglazov,

Whether Theodoros Prodromos Invented the Russel Paradox?

 

Katarzyna Warcaba,

A Transtextual Analysis of the ‘Katomyomachia’

 

Ranko Kozić,

Il concetto pittorico e il drammatico nel romanzo del Macrembolita

 

Dušan Popović,

Drosilla and Charicles: An Instance of the Ambivalent Conception of Literary Emulation in Middle Byzantine Context

 

Alexey Kryukov,

Byzantine Homilies of the Comnenian Time: Atticism and Asianism

 

 

[+]

 

18:30 Thematic Free Communications Session: Theatre and Liturgy: Performance and Ritual in Christian Worship Part 2

 

Conveners: Andrew Walker White, Niki Tsironis

 

Ouresis Todorovich,

Analogies between the Transition from the Ancient Performative Image to the Byzantine Liturgical Image and Evolving Contemporary Concepts of Digital Imagery

 

Jaakko Olkinuora,

Re-Defining the Liturgical Functions of Canon Poetry

 

Przemysłav Marciniak,

Hypokrisis and Mimesis – Byzantine Concepts of Theatrical and Non-Theatrical Imitation

 

Ida Toth,

Reading Performance: The Late Byzantine Rhetorical Theatron, Reconsidered

 

Margaret Mullett,

Contexts for the Christos Paschon

 

[+]

 
FRIDAY 27 August

 

11:00 Thematic Free Communications: Byzantine and Medieval West Literature

 

Chairs: Michael Jeffreys, Peter Toth

 

Aleksandra Smirnov Brkić,

Greek Tradition on Pannonian Martyrs

 

Daria Penskaya,

“Navigatio Sancti Brendani” and “Narratio Agapii”: Possible Interconnections

 

Anastasia Sirotenko,

The Restoration of the Holy Cross by Heraclius in the Eastern and Western Medieval Traditions

 

Isabela Stoian,

The Veiled Influence of Byzantium on Alcuin of York Byzantium at the Frankish Court

 

Angela Prinzi,

Rapporti tra l’innologia greca di Bartolomeo di Grottaferrata per i santi Savino e Vitale e la relativa agiografia latina

 

Ioannis Kioridis,

Η σύζυγος προσεύχεται για τον σύζυγο: δύο περιπτώσεις εκτενούς προσευχής στο βυζαντινό έπος του Διγενή Ακρίτη (χφ. Εσκοριάλ) και στο καστιλιανό Τραγούδι του Ελ Σιντ

 

Tikhon Pino,

Late Medieval Spiritualities: Gregory Palamas and Francis of Assisi

 

Aleksandr V. Vitol,

Отражение в романе «Тирант Белый» падения Византии

 

 

[+]

 

15:30 Thematic Free Communications: Rhetoric and History – Rhetirc in History. Creating Discourses in Byzantium – Part 2

 

Conveners: Stratis Papaioannou, Anthony Kaldellis

 

Larisa Vilimonović,

The Importance of Being Doukas – Creation of an Alternative Imperial Discourse in the 12th Century Byzantium

 

Tomasz Labuk,

Niketas Choniates and the “Silence of History”: Historical Discourse on the Fringe

 

Milan Vukašinović,

Whose Ideology? Whose Rhetoric?

 

Matthew Kinloch,

Narratives, Significance, and Nodal-Points: The Many Battles of Pelagonia (1259)

 

Bojana Pavlović,

Rhetoric in History: Nikephoros Gregoras and His Portrayal of Andronikos II Palaiologos

 

[+]

 

15:30 Thematic Free Communications: Political Ideology and Heresies

 

Chairs: Demetrios Kyritses, Jonel Hedjan

 

Boris Milosavljević,

The Byzantine Empire in the Typology of States (Typical Medieval State, Byzantine Republic, Modern Absolute Monarchy)

 

Demetrios Kyritses,

The Palace and the City as Political Stage: The Theatrics of Public Deliberation in Byzantium

 

Ioannis Smarnakis,

Plethon’s Reformatory Proposals of the Despotate of Morea. A Paradigm of Early Modern Political Thought?

 

Stefan Staretu,

Two Models of Byzantine Monarchy

 

Carl Stephen Dixon,

Innovation, Intrigue, and Intertextuality: The Paulicians and Byzantine Heresiology

 

Nicholas Matheou,

Heresy and Society in East Roman Caucasia, c. 1000-1071: Re-Imagining ‘Paulicianism’ and the ‘T‘ondrakian Movement’

 

Mirela Ivanova,

Bogomils and Moral Instruction: Rethinking Kozmas’ Discourse against Heretics

 

 

Maja Angelovska-Panova,

Heresy and Social Structure: The Case of Bogomil Communities

 

 

 

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————————————

Mirela Ivanova

MSt Late Antique and Byzantine Studies,
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

 

 

 

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

The Byzness, 31st July 2016

 

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1. NEWS & EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

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1. NEWS & EVENTS

 

Open Letter Condemning the Purge of Academic Institutions in Turkey

 

Turkey’s Hurriyet newspaper reported on 20 July that the country’s Higher Education Council had ordered the resignation of all deans from both public and foundation universities: 1,176 from state institutions and 401 from foundation institutions. Further, over 15,000 education staff had been suspended from their posts. The government is reported to have instituted a travel ban on all academics, and a three-month long state of emergency has been declared. On the same day the European University Association issued a statement condemning ordered resignation of university deans.

 

For those who wish to, an open letter condemning the purge of academic institutions with over 8,000 signatures can be found and signed here.

 

 

 

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

 

Global Byzantium, 50th Spring Symposium of the Society for the Promotion of Byzantine Studies,  Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies, University of Birmingham, 25-27 March 2017

The call for communications is now open. See full CfP here.

 

 If you would like to offer a 10-minute communication on the theme of the symposium, please send an abstract of no more than 250 words to Daniel Reynolds at d.k.reynolds@bham.ac.uk by 1 September 2016.

 

Successful submissions will be informed no later than 1 October 2016. Some bursaries will be available to selected speakers, especially to attendees from outside the UK. If you would like to be considered for a bursary please indicate this on your abstract and we will send you further information about the application process if appropriate.

 

 

[+]

 

Light and Darkness in Medieval Art, 1200–1450 (I–II), Session at the International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 11-14 May 2017

Sponsored by the International Center of Medieval Art, (Convenors: Stefania Gerevini and Tom Nickson)

 

Light has occupied an increasingly prominent role in medieval studies in recent years. Its perceptual and epistemic significance in the period 1200-1450 has been scrutinized in several specialised research projects, and the changing ways in which light and light-effects are rendered and produced in the arts of the Middle Ages, particularly in Byzantium and Islam, are routinely evoked in literature. However, scholarship on these topics remains fragmented, especially for the Gothic period, and comparative approaches are seldom attempted. New technologies of virtual reconstruction and changing fashions of museum display make it an opportune moment to consider these issues in a more systematic manner.

 

These two sessions will investigate how perceptions of light and darkness informed the ways in which art across Europe and the Mediterranean was produced, viewed and understood in the period 1200–1450. In the late 12th century a key set of optical writings was translated from Arabic into Latin, providing new theoretical paradigms for addressing questions of physical sight and illumination across Europe. At this time theologies of light also gained renewed popularity in the eastern Mediterranean – particularly as a result of the Hesychast controversy in Byzantium, and in connection with Sufi notions of divine illumination in Islam. What correlations can be traced between theories of optics, theologies of light, practices of illumination, and modes of viewing in the Middle Ages? Are there similarities in the ways different religious or cultural communities conceptualised light and used it in everyday life or ritual settings?

 

These sessions invite specialists of Christian, Islamic and Jewish art and culture to explore the status of light in broader discourses around visuality, visibility and materiality; the interconnections between conceptualizations of light and coeval attitudes towards objectivity and naturalism; and the ways in which light can articulate political, social or divine authority and hierarchies. The session will also welcome papers that address such broad methodological questions as: can the investigation of light in art prompt reconsideration of well established periodizations and interpretative paradigms of art history? How was the dramatic interplay between light and obscurity exploited in the secular and religious architecture of Europe and the medieval Mediterranean in order to organise space, direct viewers and convey meaning? How carefully were light effects taken into account in the display of images and portable objects, and how does consideration of luminosity, shadow and darkness hone our understanding of the agency of medieval objects? Finally, to what extent is light’s ephemeral and fleeting nature disguised by changing fashions of display and technologies of reproduction, and – crucially – how do these affect our ability to apprehend and explain medieval approaches to light?

 

Proposals for 20 min papers should include an abstract (max.250 words) and brief CV. Proposals should be submitted by 10 September 2015 to the session organizers: Stefania Gerevini (stefania.gerevini@unibocconi.it ) and Tom Nickson (tom.nickson@courtauld.ac.uk ). Thanks to a generous grant from the Kress Foundation, funds may be available to defray travel costs of speakers in ICMA-sponsored sessions up to a maximum of $600 ($1200 for transatlantic travel). If available, the Kress funds are allocated for travel and hotel only. Speakers in ICMA sponsored sessions will be refunded only after the conference, against travel receipts.

 

[+]

 

 The Reproduction of Medieval Identity, Ethnicity and Nationhood session at the International Medieval Congress, Leeds 2017

‘The long history of identity, ethnicity and nationhood’ research network, hosted by The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH) and Birmingham Research Institute for History and Cultures (BRIHC), is organising a series of sessions at the IMC 2017, focusing on the reproduction of collective identities in the middle ages.

 

While a generic constructivist approach is widely shared in research on pre-modern identities, it often remains uncritical. On the one hand, it sometimes conceals latent essentialism (best represented by the formula ‘identities are constructed, but having been constructed become real’), and, on the other hand, restricts our capacity to arrive at a systemic understanding of how exactly collective identities are asserted and reproduced over long periods of time. Hence, our main goal is to tackle the difficult question of long-term reproduction of the same projected identities, often alongside broadly similar constructs, without resorting to essentialist or objectifying explanations.

 

We invite paper proposals focused on any period and region of medieval history exploring how a particular concept of identification, collective identity or polity was reproduced, imposed and reimagined over a long period of time. What were the material, political, intellectual and cultural conditions in which a particular identity can be reasserted and reinterpreted in the longue durée? What theoretical lenses can we use to make sense of certain identities’ persistence, if we accept the contingent and constructed nature of any collective identity and political organisation? Paper proposals addressing these and related questions should be sent to identity@torch.ox.ac.uk  by Monday August 22.

[+]

The Virgin as Bridge. Cultural Exchange and Connection through Images of the Virgin Mary,  Session at the 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies, May 11-14, 2017, Kalamazoo, MI

Organizers: Diliana Angelova (University of California, Berkeley) and Amanda Luyster (College of the Holy Cross)

Across the medieval Mediterranean and beyond, people of many faiths and backgrounds sought the succor of the miraculous virgin and mother, Mary. Christians venerated Mary as the holiest figure of Christianity after Christ, the one thanks to whom the divine mystery of the Incarnation was fulfilled. The Koran also hailed her as chosen by Allah. Converts to Christianity from paganism or Islam were often said to be motivated by their great love of the Virgin. Byzantine churches were incomplete without her image in the holiest of holies, the apse of the sanctuary. In the West, the grandest Gothic cathedrals rose in her honor. Objects such as the thirteenth-century Freer canteen, as well as shared shrines, suggest that Marian images could be appreciated by audiences professing different faiths. Images of the Virgin acted as a shared touchpoint between people of many different backgrounds, socio-economic strata, and faiths.

 

This panel invites 15-20 minute papers that focus on the capacity of the Virgin to act as a bridge or cultural mediator: between regions, between genders, between political factions and cities, and between belief systems. Panel participants could focus on representations of the Virgin as well as references to religious practices associated with images of the Virgin. Icons, cult centers, personal objects such as jewelry, metalwork more broadly, manuscripts, monumental sculpture, wall-painting, architecture, as well as practices associated with all of these, might be considered.

*The deadline for paper proposals is September 15, 2016.

**Please send the abstract of your proposed paper (300 words maximum), CV with current contact information, and completed Participant Information Form, available at https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions to the organizers, Diliana Angelova and Amanda Luyster, at angelova@berkeley.edu  and aluyster@holycross.edu

 

***All abstracts not accepted for the session will be forwarded to Congress administrators for consideration in general sessions.

3. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

Assistant Professor in Late Antiquity at the University of Mannheim

Please see further details about the position here. Deadline for applications is August 10, 2016.

 

 [+]

 

Two Research Associate positions at the University of Cambridge

Applications are sought for a Research Associate who will be one of four postdoctoral researchers on the ERC funded ‘Impact of the Ancient City’ project led by the Principal Investigator Professor Andrew Wallace-Hadrill. The project will re-examine the impact of the ancient, Greco-Roman city on subsequent urban history in Europe and the Islamic world, investigating both the urban fabric and urban ideals. Bringing together researchers trained in historical, archaeological and literary analysis, the project spans the entire Mediterranean region from Greco-Roman antiquity to the present day. The research team will investigate case histories in the western and the eastern Mediterranean, and pose a set of questions about how urban forms responded to changing social needs.

1.      Research Associate: Impact of the Ancient City ERC Project (Eastern Mediterranean)

A full description of the position is found here.

 

2.      Research Associate: Impact of the Ancient City ERC Project (Urban Ideals in the Islamic World)

 A full description of the position is found here.

 The deadline for applications for both is noon September 12th, 2016.

 

 

 

 

 ———————————— 

Mirela Ivanova

MSt Late Antique and Byzantine Studies
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com 
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

The Byzness, 11th July 2016

 

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  1. NEWS & EVENTS
  2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
  3. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

= = = = =

 

  1. NEWS & EVENTS

 

Oxford Summer Workshop on the Sacred in Life and Art, 14-17th July

 

Please find the poster here and here.

 

[+]

 

 

42nd Annual Byzantine Studies Conference at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, 6-9th October, 2016

Dear Colleagues,

 

Attached here you will find the Program draft for the 42nd Annual Byzantine Studies Conference at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. The conference is from October 6th – 9th.

 

The local arrangements committee urges all attendees and participants to register for the conference, book hotels and flights sooner rather than later.

 

The hotel options in Ithaca are limited. Please consult the website for that information: http://bsc2016.weebly.com/. Questions about local arrangements may be directed to the Co-Chair of the Local Arrangements Committee, Benjamin Anderson (bwa32@cornell.edu ).

 

Have a great summer and we look forward to seeing you in Ithaca.

Brenda Llewellyn Ihssen

Chair, Program Committee

 

[+]

 

 

Intertextuality in Greek and Roman Literature Workshop, 10-11th October, University of Oslo

Please find more information here. The deadline for registration is 15th September 2016.

 

[+]

 

7th Sudak International Research Conference “Black Sea region, Crimea, Rus’ in history and culture” 29-30th September, 2016.

 

Please find more information here. The deadline for registration is 15th August, 2016.

 

[+]

 

Χειρόγραφα: Four Summer Lectures about Greek Manuscripts, University of Oxford

Monday 1 August – NIGEL WILSON, The Rewards of Palaeography

Tuesday 2 August – MARC LAUXTERMANN, Byzantine Poetry: Collecting and Copying

Wednesday 3 August – PETROS BOURAS-VALLIANATOS, Byzantine Scientific Manuscripts

Thursday 4 August – MARJOLIJNE JANSSEN, Vernacular Texts and Editions

5:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies

66 St Giles’, Oxford

All welcome

 

  1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

 

4th International Symposium “Days of Justinian I”: ‘The Byzantine Missionary Activity and Its Legacy in Europe’, Euro-Balkan University, University of Bologna, Skopje, 11-12 November 2016

Please find the call for papers here.

 

PAPER SUBMISSION

 

First Deadline for submitting the abstract of the papers: 5 August, 2016

Second Deadline for submitting the abstract of the papers: 15 October, 2016

Notification of acceptance for early applicants: 10 August, 2016

Notification of acceptance for other applicants: 20 October, 2016

Deadline for submitting the full papers for publication: 1 March, 2017

 

Please send the application form to the address: contact@euba.edu.mk ; romaion@gmail.com

 

[+]

 

‘Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era’, One day and a half Symposium & Workshop, 24-25th February 2017, University of Birmingham

 

Please find the call for papers attached here.

 

Titles of proposed papers, abstracts of 250 words, and a short CV should be sent to Maria Alessia Rossi – m.alessiarossi@icloud.com and Andrea Mattiello – axm570@bham.ac.uk by 30 September 2016.

 

[+]

 

‘Platonism and Christian Thought in Late Antiquity’ Workshop in Oslo, in December 2-3, 2016.

 

The Workshop is an opportunity especially for early career researchers (PhD, postdocs, young scholars). All information is available here:

 

http://www.hf.uio.no/ifikk/english/research/news-and-events/events/conferences/2016/platonism-and-christian-thought-in-late-antiquity.html

 

The deadline for submitting Abstracts is: August 10, 2016.

 

[+]

 

Hospes eram et collexistis me: Crisis and Migration in Late Antique and Early Medieval Europe and Byzantium, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, 4-5th November, 2016

 

 

Migration seems to be one of the unifying aspects of human societies: whether in one epic journey to a new homeland or in seasonal trips, whether in search of security or employment, people are often on the move. As we go, we bring objects, foods, diseases, and ideas; opportunities and crises follow. The theme of the Crisis and Migration colloquium is ‘migration’ writ large, incorporating the movement of people, objects, texts, and ideas. The colloquium focuses especially on movements prompted either by crises (e.g political collapse of the Roman or Byzantine Empire) or by boons (e.g. early Carolingian Empire). Were crises connected with large population movements? Was there any cultural flourishing and change brought on by the immigration of new groups? Did the trade and movement of relics and commercial objects remain prevalent during periods of crisis? The colloquium hopes to answer some of these questions, bringing into debate the impact of mobility throughout the period.

 

We would like to invite offers of twenty-minute papers on any aspect of mobility of people, ideas, and objects in the Late Antiquity and Early medieval period. Papers dealing with later periods addressing the topic will also be considered. Abstracts of not more than 300 words should be sent to Grant Schrama at GS82@queensu.ca  by September 16th, 2016. Both established scholars and graduate students are encouraged to submit proposals.

 

Conference Organizers: Grant Schrama (Queen’s University) and Dr. Eduardo Fabbro (University of Toronto). Generous financial contributions have been made to this colloquium from the Nugent Fund at Queen’s University and the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies in Toronto. Questions and queries about the conference can be sent to the email above or to Eduardo Fabbro at eduardo.fabbro@utoronto.ca .

 

[+]

 

Natural Disasters, Sacred Time, and Eschatology in the Eastern Mediterranean, College Art Association Annual Conference, New York, February 15 – 18, 2017

 

Chairs: Armin Bergmeier (Leipzig University), armin.bergmeier@uni-leipzig.de ;

Heba Mostafa (University of Kansas), h797m476@ku.edu

 

The impact of the environment and the natural world on the human condition has incited a growing scholarly interest in recent years. This panel examines representations of natural disasters (fire, earthquakes, plagues, etc.) marking sacred time and asks how catastrophic events in the natural world structured the historical perception of sacred time. In many cultures, the eschaton or the end of time was a crucial moment in sacred time, intimately linked to destructive forces in the natural world. In Judaism, theophanies were often accompanied by frightening natural phenomena. In Middle Byzantine times, Last Judgment scenes began to incorporate a river of fire that leads to hell and opens up into a fiery abyss; while in Islam, the Day of Judgment would be announced by a massive upheaval of the natural order of the world, from cataclysmic earthquakes to the parting of the heavens.

The panel queries how the relationship between natural disaster and any moment in sacred time was visualized and materialized in artifacts, architecture, and the design of specific sites. Some of the questions may include how natural disasters triggered expectations of divine agency or the advent of the eschaton. How were these events imagined, represented, or even counteracted? Which natural sites were associated with events in sacred time, and how were they architecturally and ritually framed or represented visually across various media.

 

PROPOSALS FOR PAPERS TO SESSION CHAIRS are due August 30, 2016

 

For submission guidelines:

http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/2017-call-for-participation.pdf

 

 

 

 

  1. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

Two Teaching Fellowships at the University of Edinburgh, School of History, Classics and Archaeology

1) Teaching Fellowship in Late Roman History

 

The Classics Subject Area seeks to appoint a fixed-term Teaching Fellow in Late Roman History from 1 September 2016, for a period of 12 months. Applications are invited from scholars with research interests and teaching experience in later Roman and late antique history.

 

The appointment is a full time, fixed-term post.

Salary scale: £31,656 – £37,768 per annum

Closing date: 5pm (GMT) on Friday 29th July 2016.

 

For the Further Particulars, please consult https://www.vacancies.ed.ac.uk/pls/corehrrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=036672

 

 

2) Teaching Fellowship in Byzantine Archaeology

 

The Archaeology Subject Area seeks to appoint a fixed-term Teaching Fellow in Byzantine Archaeology (0.9 FTE) from 1 September 2016, for a period of 10 months. Applications are invited from scholars with research interests and teaching experience in Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology.

 

The appointment is part-time, 31.5 hpw, and is fixed-term for 10 months from 1 September 2016.

Salary: £31,656 – £37,768 per annum (pro-rata)

Closing date: 5pm (GMT) on Monday 1 August 2016

 

For the Further Particulars, please consult https://www.vacancies.ed.ac.uk/pls/corehrrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=036675

 

 

 

————————————

Mirela Ivanova

MSt Late Antique and Byzantine Studies
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 29.06.16

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

The Byzness, 29nd June 2016

 

= = = = =

  1. NEWS & EVENTS
    2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
  2. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

= = = = =

 

  1. NEWS & EVENTS

 

Oxford Summer Workshop on the Sacred in Life and Art, 14-17th July

 

Please find the poster here and here.

 

[+]

 

 

42nd Annual Byzantine Studies Conference at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, 6-9th October, 2016

 

Dear Colleagues,

 

Attached here you will find the Program draft for the 42nd Annual Byzantine Studies Conference at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. The conference is from October 6th – 9th.

 

The local arrangements committee urges all attendees and participants to register for the conference, book hotels and flights sooner rather than later.

 

The hotel options in Ithaca are limited. Please consult the website for that information: http://bsc2016.weebly.com/. Questions about local arrangements may be directed to the Co-Chair of the Local Arrangements Committee, Benjamin Anderson (bwa32@cornell.edu ).

 

Have a great summer and we look forward to seeing you in Ithaca.

Brenda Llewellyn Ihssen

Chair, Program Committee

 

 

Concert: ‘Cyprus Between Greek East and Latin West’, Friday 1st July, 7.30 PM in the church of St Giles Cripplegate, Barbican

 

City University London presents the world-renowned vocal ensemble Cappella Romana, directed by Alexander Lingas, in a one-night-only performance of ‘Cyprus: Between Greek East and Latin West’. This concert will take place on Friday, 1 July 2016 at 7.30 PM in the church of St Giles Cripplegate, located in the middle of the Barbican.

 

Students may obtain free tickets to this event by using the discount code UNI or by booking directly using this link:

 

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/cappella-romana-performs-cyprus-between-greek-east-latin-west-tickets-25845116439?discount=UNI

 

More information is available here:

 

http://www.city.ac.uk/events/2016/july/cappella-romana

 

https://www.facebook.com/events/672696702888150/

 

This concert takes place prior to engagements in the Festival de Wallonie in St-Hubert and Namur (Belgium) and the Utrecht Early Music Festival (Netherlands). The ensemble has been presented multiple times at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the J. Paul Getty Center, and Stanford Live at Stanford University. UK engagements have included St Bartholomew-the-Great and St Paul’s Cathedral London.

 

This programme explores the repertoires of Byzantine and Latin sacred music that coexisted on the island of Cyprus in the late Middle Ages. The Crusades brought to Cyprus French kings, whose imported musical traditions flourished alongside those of their Greek subjects. The vibrancy of their Mediterranean soundscape is captured in this programme, which traverses the diverse range of sacred music heard during the fifteenth century in Nicosia’s Orthodox and Catholic cathedrals: Greek and Latin hymns celebrating the divine patronage of St Hilarion of Gaza, lavish prayers for French royalty set to Ars Nova polyphony from the codex Torino J.II.9, and virtuosic Byzantine chants by Constantinopolitan and Cypriot composers.

 

 

 

  1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

 

4th International Symposium “Days of Justinian I”: ‘The Byzantine Missionary Activity and Its Legacy in Europe’, Euro-Balkan University, University of Bologna, Skopje, 11-12 November 2016

 

Please find the call for papers here.

 

PAPER SUBMISSION

 

First Deadline for submitting the abstract of the papers: 5 August, 2016

Second Deadline for submitting the abstract of the papers: 15 October, 2016

Notification of acceptance for early applicants: 10 August, 2016

Notification of acceptance for other applicants: 20 October, 2016

Deadline for submitting the full papers for publication: 1 March, 2017

 

Please send the application form to the address: contact@euba.edu.mk ; romaion@gmail.com

 

[+]

 

‘Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era’, One day and a half Symposium & Workshop, 24-25th February 2017, University of Birmingham

 

Please find the call for papers attached here.

 

Titles of proposed papers, abstracts of 250 words, and a short CV should be sent to Maria Alessia Rossi – m.alessiarossi@icloud.com and Andrea Mattiello – axm570@bham.ac.uk by 30 September 2016.

 

[+]

 

‘Platonism and Christian Thought in Late Antiquity’ Workshop in Oslo, in December 2-3, 2016.

 

The Workshop is an opportunity especially for early career researchers (PhD, postdocs, young scholars). All information is available here:

 

http://www.hf.uio.no/ifikk/english/research/news-and-events/events/conferences/2016/platonism-and-christian-thought-in-late-antiquity.html

 

The deadline for submitting Abstracts is: August 10, 2016.

 

 

[+]

 

  1. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

 

 

[+]

 

 

 

 

————————————

Mirela Ivanova

MSt Late Antique and Byzantine Studies
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness – 12/06/16

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

The Byzness, 12th June 2016

 

= = = = =

  1. NEWS & EVENTS
    2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
  2. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

= = = = =

 

  1. NEWS & EVENTS

 

“Greek Studies in 15th century Europe” – Conference, 14-15th June, Corpus Christi College, Oxford and Website Launch

 

“Greek Studies in 15th Century Europe” is a Marie Curie individual research project held by Dr. Paola Tomè and financed by the European Union at the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages in Oxford. A new website of the project has been launched, featuring the most important research topics and information about ongoing events, activities, resources and people involved”:  http://www.mod-langs.ox.ac.uk/research/greek-studies-15th-century-europe

 

The conference for the launch of the project will take place at Corpus Christi College on 14th-15th June. The title is “MAKING AND RETHINKING RENAISSANCE BETWEEN GREEK AND LATIN IN 15th – 16thc EUROPE“, programme and more detail available here:

 

http://www.mod-langs.ox.ac.uk/events/2016/06/14/conference-making-and-rethinking-renaissance-between-greek-and-latin-15th-16th

 

[+]

 

 

Armenia: Life and Study of an Enduring Culture – Final reception and lecture, 17:30, Thursday June 16th, Pichette Auditorium, Pembroke College, Oxford

 

Robert Thomson and the Quiet Revolutionaries of Armenian Studies

Dr Levon Avdoyan

(Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.)

 

The timetable is as follows:

5:30 Reception

6:15 Oxford Armenian Choir performs Komitas & Shnorhali

7:00 Lecture

 

For full details of the lecture click here.

 

 

 

[+]

 

International Conference on the Importance of Byzantine Studies and Heritage Radboud University, 16-17 June 2016, Nijmegen

 

Please find all details regarding the conference here.

 

 

 

  1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

 

Call for Papers: From the Human Body to the Universe – Spatialities of Byzantine Culture

 

Please find here a link for the Call for Papers for the Conference “From the Human Body to the Universe – Spatialities of Byzantine Culture” to be held in Uppsala University on May 18-21, 2017.

 

If you are interested to attend by oral or poster presentation, please send an abstract of no more than 400 words, the thematic panel to which you would like to contribute and a brief CV to myrto.veikou@lingfil.uu.se by September 30, 2016.

 

[+]

 

Narrative exchanges between Byzantium and Armenia: contact, conflict, & connotation. A workshop for postgraduate and early-career scholars. March 16-17, 2017, Uppsala University, Sweden

 

The shifting borderland between Byzantine and Armenian culture-complexes in Eastern Anatolia and the Armenian plateau was a site of contact and conflict, alliances made and discarded, cultural exchange and cultural imperialism. This two-day workshop will explore narratives of exchange and conflict between Byzantium and Armenia, broadly defined: narrative in its largest and most productive sense of telling stories; and ‘Byzantium’ and ‘Armenia’ encompassing the encounter in the frontier zone, the presence of Armenians in Byzantine society, the exchange of ideas, relics, language, and persons over cultural and cultic boundaries, and the perils and problems of annexation, imperialism(s), and survival.

 

Papers given at this workshop should explore the narrative process behind these moments of contact and conflict. Possible angles of approach might include: the enshrinement of memory (in historiography, relics, art); self-fashioning of Byzantine and Armenian ‘border-crossers’; the process of translation; narratives of enmity or of conversion; nationalist narratives (their problems and their benefits); self-fashioning of modern ‘Armenologists’ and ‘Byzantinologists’ with reference to what we might gain from one another – amongst other topics.

 

Abstracts should be sent to AnnaLinden Weller (annalinden.weller@lingfil.uu.se ) by September 30, 2016.

 

[+]

 

Call for Sessions:  Mary Jaharis Centre Sponsored Panel at Leeds 2017

 

The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 24th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 3–6, 2017. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

 

The thematic strand for the 2017 IMC is “Otherness.” See the IMC Call for Papers (https://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2017_call.html ) for additional information about the theme and suggested areas of discussion.

 

Session proposals should be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website site (http://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/23rd-international-medieval-congress/ ).

The deadline for submission is August 31, 2016. Proposals should include:

**Title

**100-word session abstract

**Session moderator and academic affiliation

**Information about the three papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 100-word abstract

**CV

 

Successful applicants will be notified by mid-September if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. The Mary Jaharis Center will submit the session proposal to the International Medieval Congress and will keep the potential organizer informed about the status of the proposal.

 

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and moderator) up to $600 maximum for EU residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside Europe. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

 

The session organizer may act as the moderator or present a paper. Participants may only present papers in one session.

 

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu ), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

 

[+]

 

  1. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

 

Post-doc in Eastern Christian Manuscript Cataloging (HMML, MN)

 

The Hill Museum & Manuscript Library invites applications for a two-year, full-time, benefit-eligible position of Post-doctoral Fellow in Eastern Christian Manuscript Cataloging. The Fellow will provide vital support for HMML’s efforts to catalog recently digitized Eastern Christian manuscripts. Under the guidance of the Lead Cataloger of Eastern Christian Manuscripts, the Fellow will undertake original cataloging of digital surrogates at HMML as well as revision of existing cataloging.

 

Primary responsibilities include:

  • Original cataloging of Arabic (including Garshuni), Syriac, and possibly Coptic manuscripts from HMML’s digitization projects in the Middle East, India, and Africa.
  • Correction and standardization of existing cataloging.

 

Qualifications:

  • Earned doctorate in history, theology, classics, Semitic languages, or cognate field.
  • Knowledge of Arabic (including Garshuni) and Syriac, and associated literatures; familiarity with Arabic literature beyond the Christian tradition is desirable. Coptic is not required but would be a desirable asset.
  • Direct experience of research using manuscripts, and ideally of description/cataloging of manuscripts.
  • Experience with digital research in the humanities; ease with the use of common software and ability to understand and work with HMML’s digital platforms and tools.
  • Good communication skills in both written and spoken English. Attention to detail; accuracy and thoroughness in work habits; ability to manage multiple, complex tasks.

 

For more information or to apply, visit the Saint John’s HR website (link below); scroll down to the Post-doctoral Fellow position.

https://apps.csbsju.edu/employment/default.aspx?page=jobs

 

[+]

 

Position at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens

 

PROGRAM DIRECTOR

Full-time position in Princeton, NJ.

Deadline: June 22, 2016

 

Established in 1881, the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA) is “the pre-eminent center for the study of the Greek world.”  It is not only the first but also the largest American overseas research center. The ASCSA is a consortium of 192 educational and research institutions and it pursues a broader mandate to advance knowledge of Greece in all periods, train young scholars, sponsor and promote archaeological fieldwork, provide resources for scholarly work, and disseminate research. Virtually all departments of classical studies at the leading institutions of higher education in the United States have benefited from the research and teaching opportunities offered by the School.  Generations of Hellenic scholars have spent time at ASCSA and have taken their formative experience into their academic careers. Although the American School’s physical campus is in Athens, Greece, its central administrative offices are located in Princeton, NJ and it is a U.S.-based 501c3 non-profit organization.

 

Summary

Reporting jointly to the faculty director (Chair, ASCSA Managing Committee) and to the Executive Director of the American School, the Program Director provides critical administrative support to the faculty leadership and to the standing committees. The Program Director also serves as the key liaison to representatives of affiliated institutions. Specifically, this position requires an experienced administrative manager to support many of the School’s programs, fellowships, meetings, member application processing, communicating with members, potential students, and affiliated institutions.

 

Position Requirements

– Excellent written communication skills for preparing correspondence, documents and reports.

– Excellent oral communication and pleasant interpersonal skills for effectively dealing with a broad range of individuals at various levels within an academic organization.

– Administrative experience with the ability to prioritize competing issues, anticipate needs, work under the pressure of deadlines and exercise good judgment, particularly with sensitive or confidential matters.

– Strong self-motivation skills for establishing effective working relationships with member organizations and faculty and staff at all levels of the organization. Liaise with Athens administrative office.

– Demonstrated ability to work as a member of a team.

– Experience in non-profit administration and general business and accounting practices.

– Experience with standard electronic word processing, spreadsheet, database software, online surveys, calendar, and email programs.

– A BA degree is required; a major in in classics, art history, archaeology, or related field is preferred.

 

Application requirements.

Complete online form by linking to:

https://ascsa.wufoo.com/forms/program-director-application/  and attach your statement of interest including salary requirements, resume or curriculum vitae, and contact information for two references.

 

Excellent benefits, pleasant working conditions, salary commensurate with experience.

ASCSA is an EO/AA employer.

 

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens does not discriminate on the basis of race, age, sex, sexual orientation, color, religion, ethnic origin, or disability when considering admission to any form of membership or application for employment.

 

 

————————————

Mirela Ivanova

MSt Late Antique and Byzantine Studies
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

Posted in Byzness

Oxford Listings – Week 8

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 8

 

Trinity Term 2016

= = = = =
Message from OUBS Committee

 

Dear all,

 

Please note that the full OUBS Committee for 2016-7 has now been elected.

The new committee positions are as follows:

 

President: Mirela Ivanova

Secretary: Hugh Jeffery

Treasurer: Adele Curness

 

We extend our warmest thanks to the outgoing committee, Matthew, Anya, David and Joe for all their hard work in 2015-6, and can only hope to match their commitment and success in the year to come.

 

Expect to hear more from us.

 

All best,

OUBS Committee, 2016-7

 

= = = = =

MONDAY 13 June
17:00   Medieval History Seminar
Wharton Room, All Souls College

Leslie Brubaker (University of Birmingham)

The cult of the Virgin, 400–1200: a comparative perspective (Catholic, Orthodox, Islam)

 

[+]

TUESDAY 14 June
14:30   Seminar on Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Professor Kenneth Atkinson (Northern Iowa):

The perplexing reign of John Hyrcanus in the War and Antiquities of Josephus

 

[+]

 

16:00   Patristic Seminar

Christ Church, Room 2

Susanna Elm:

Augustine and the Extra-Ordinary

 

[+]
WEDNESDAY 15 June

 

10:00 Oxford Seminar in Advanced Jewish Studies: “Israel in Egypt: The land of Egypt as concept and reality for the Jews in Antiquity and the early medieval period”

Clarendon Institute

DrMarie Legendre (Aix-Marseille Université):

Jews in Egyptian papyri of the early Islamic period

 

[+]

 

13:00 Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology

Dr Antionio Jakimovski (Ss Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje,

Faculty of Philosophy, Skopje):

The Roman theatre in Scupi: recent finds from excavations

 

 

17:00   Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

Lecture Theatre, Ioannou Centre for Classical & Byzantine Studies
Elena Ene Draghici-Vasilescu (Oxford):

Cappadocian churches: hubs of monasteries or civic shrines?

 

[+]

 

17:00   Gregory of Nyssa: Historical and Philosophical Perspectives

Corpus Christi College Seminar Room

Susanna Elm (University of California Berkeley):

New Romans: Gregory of Nyssa’s life of Moses

 

[+]
THURSDAY 16 June

11:00   Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminar
New Seminar Room, St John’s College
Andrea Zerbini and Michael Fradley:

Endangered Archaeology in Yemen: the role of satellite imagery analysis in surveying the inaccessible

 

17:30 Armenia: Life and Study of an Enduring Culture – Reception and Lecture

Pichette Auditorium, Pembroke College

Levon Avdoyan (Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.)

Robert Thompson and the Quiet Revolutionaries of Armenian Studies

 

Please note that the reception will begin at 17:30, followed by a performance by the Oxford Armenian Choir at 18:15. The lecture will begin at 19:00.
[+]

 

17:00 After Rome: Aspects of the History and Archaeology of the Fifth to Seventh Centuries – OCLA Special Lecture

 

The OCLA Special Lecture has been cancelled.

 

[+]
FRIDAY 17 June
There will be no Byzantine Text Seminar or Byzantine Literature Lecture this week.
 

 

 

————————————

Mirela Ivanova

MSt Late Antique and Byzantine Studies,
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

 

 

 

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings

= = = = =

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 7

 

Trinity Term 2016

= = = = =
Message from Ine Jacobs

 

Guided tour of Sicily – Culture and Conquest. British Museum, 15 June 2016, 9.30 am.

The curator of the Sicily exhibition, Dirk Booms, has offered to give Oxford staff and students an extended and free tour, on 15 June, starting at 9.30 am, half an hour before the normal opening of the museum.

 

If you want to join, please send an email to Ine.Jacobs@classics.ox.ac.uk  before Monday 13 June.

 

All best,

Ine

 

= = = = =

MONDAY 12 October
17:00   Medieval History Seminar
Wharton Room, All Souls College

Alice Rio (King’s College, London)

Carolingian Slavery

 

 

[+]

TUESDAY 13 October
14:30   Seminar on Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Professor Galit Hasan-Rokem (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

Remembering Alexandria in the Galilee: Local adaptation of regional folklore

 

[+]

 

16:00   Patristic Seminar

Christ Church, Room 2

Claire Hall

Prophecy in Origen

 

 

[+]
WEDNESDAY 14 October

 

17:00   Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

Lecture Theatre, Ioannou Centre for Classical & Byzantine Studies
Dominic Brookshaw (Wadham College)

Title to be confirmed

 

[+]

 

17:00   Gregory of Nyssa: Historical and Philosophical Perspectives

Corpus Christi College Seminar Room

Anna Marmodoro (University of Oxford)

Gregory of Nyssa on the Trinity

 

 

[+]
THURSDAY 15 October

11:00   Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminar
New Seminar Room, St John’s College
Agnieszka Lic (Oxford)

The stucco torso from a church in Koke (Seleucia-Ctesiphon) and the art of Byzantium

[+]

17:00   After Rome: Aspects of the History and Archaeology of the Fifth to Seventh Centuries
Ertegun House
Erica Buchberger (College of Charleston. South Carolina):

Identifying Others in the Life of Caesarius of Arles

[+]
FRIDAY 16 October
There will be no Byzantine Text Seminar or Byzantine Literature Lecture this week.
 

[+]

 

17:00   The Cult of Saints in the First Millennium

Radcliffe Humanities Building, Collin Matthew Room (Ground floor)

Robert Wiśniewski (University of Warsaw)

The burials ad sanctos

 

 

————————————

Mirela Ivanova

MSt Late Antique and Byzantine Studies,
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

 

 

 

Posted in Byzness

Byzness

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

The Byzness, 5th June 2016

 

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  1. NEWS & EVENTS
  2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
  3. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

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  1. NEWS & EVENTS

 

SPBS and Hellenic Centre Summer Lecture 2016, 19:15 Tuesday 7th June

 

Please see the poster for the lecture by Professor Liz James on Material Faith: the Mosaic of Archangel Gabriel in Hagia Sophia, Constantinople and the angels of the Panaghia Angeloktistos, Kiti, Cyprus here.

 

[+]

 

‘And you shall be unto me a Kingdom of Priests, a Holy Nation’: Chosen Peoples from the Bible to Daesh, Ertegun House & TORCH, 20-21st June, 2016

 

This two-day, single-strand conference addresses the concept of divine nations and elect peoplehood, forms of ethno-centrism found in countless historical moments. Often perceived as a phenomenon tied to particular, even peculiar examples such as Jewishness, notions of divine election and chosenness are essential to the self-situation and mobilisation of a wide variety of ethno-national actors and political entrepreneurs. Bringing together twelve speakers in comparative sessions, alongside three keynotes assessing the Islamic example from the seventh century to the contemporary world, the event comprehensively opens debate on divine nations and elect peoplehood across time and place.

 

For the poster see here. For the full timetable see here. Please register by Monday 13th June as described in poster.

 

[+]

 

Petition regarding the Hellenic Institute for Byzantine and Post Byzantine Studies in Venice

 

Open petition against recent attempts to reshape the Hellenic institute, which you can find out more about and sign here.

 

 

[+]

 

The 4th International Sevgi Gönül Byzantine Studies Symposium: Byzantine Identity and the Other in Geographical and Ethnic Imagination, 23-25th June, 2016, Koç University Research Centre for Anatolian Civilizations

 

Please see the poster here and the full programme for the symposium here.

 

[+]

 

Conference: “Making and Rethinking Renaissance between Greek and Latin in 15th- and 16th-century Europe,” Oxford, 14-15th June, 2016.

 

Please see the poster here and the full programme here. Note that registration is now open here.

 

 

  1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

 

[+]

 

  1. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

 

PhD fellowship in Greek / Byzantine Studies at Ghent University

 

The Department of Literary Studies at Ghent University (Belgium) is seeking well-qualified applicants for a fully-funded and full-time doctoral research fellowship (4 years), starting between 1 October 2016 and 1 January 2017. The successful applicant will be working on a project entitled Poetry from the Margins, which is closely connected with the Database of Byzantine Book Epigrams.

 

Application deadline: 7 July 2016.

 

For more information and details on how to apply, see http://www.letterkunde.ugent.be/en/node/4542  or the document here.

 

Please direct any queries to kristoffel.demoen@ugent.be .

 

 

 

————————————

Mirela Ivanova

MSt Late Antique and Byzantine Studies
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

Posted in Byzness

Byzness

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

The Byzness, 30th May 2016

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  1. NEWS & EVENTS
    2. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

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  1. NEWS & EVENTS

 

For a list of translations and editions currently in progress, see here. For details please email Dr Alessandra Bucossi at greek.editions.translations@gmail.com.

 

[+]

 

A workshop on “Magical Traditions and Medieval, Religions of the Book” sent by Dr Angusheva-Tihanov.

 

For details see here.

 

[+]

 

 

  1. JOBS & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

[+]

 

 INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL, “GEORGIAN MANUSCRIPTS” (19-28 July, 2016: Tbilisi, Georgia)

 

For details see here.

 

[+]

 

DIRECTOR OF THE CORINTH EXCAVATIONS, Deadline: October 31

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens seeks an active scholar and experienced archaeologist to direct its excavations at Ancient Corinth. Familiarity with the School’s program of excavation and research at Ancient Corinth is highly desirable. The Director works with the staff at Corinth in developing and conducting the fieldwork and documenting the results. The Director supervises the collections of the excavation and the publication of all finds. The Director administers the School’s plant and facilities at Ancient Corinth. The Director participates in the School’s activities, including its academic program and the instruction of students at the School through its field training program. The Director identifies projects for funding and helps to identify possible sources of funds for Corinth. Good command of Modern Greek is essential. Candidates must demonstrate strong qualities of leadership and articulate clearly their vision for the future of the Corinth Excavations.

The term of residency at Corinth is flexible in order to accommodate applicants who teach on semester and quarter terms or other university teaching requirements. The initial appointment is for three to five years. It begins on July 1, 2017, and is renewable. Salary and benefits commensurate with rank and experience, housing and travel provided. The Director of the Excavations at Ancient Corinth reports to the Director of the School and through the Director to the Managing Committee.
The deadline for applications and all supporting materials is October 31, 2016.  Candidates apply online, uploading a curriculum vitae and a statement explaining their interest in the position and their vision for it (max. 750 words), at:
https://ascsa.wufoo.com/forms/director-of-corinth-excavations-application/. Candidates should ask three people familiar with their work to send a letter of support as a Word or PDF file to application@ascsa.org. Address letter to Professor Peter Krentz, Chair, Committee on Personnel, American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 6 – 8 Charlton Street, Princeton, NJ 08540-5232.
———————————–

Matthew Kinloch

DPhil Candidate, History
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

 

Posted in Byzness

Oxford Listings

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 6

 

Trinity Term 2014

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MONDAY 30 May
TUESDAY 31 May
14:30   Seminar on Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Professor John Collins (Yale)

Temple or taxes: the causcabean Revolt

 

[+]

 

16:00   Patristic Seminar

Christ Church, Room 2

Andrew Radde-Gallwitz

To be arranged

 

[+]
WEDNESDAY 1 June

 

17:00   Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

Lecture Theatre, Ioannou Centre for Classical & Byzantine Studies
Michael Jeffreys (University of Sydney / Oxford)

The lives of the women of the Komnenian house under Manuel I, as seen in the poems of Mangeneios Prodromos

A Message from Michael Jeffreys: “This week’s homework: please read the translation (at least) of this poem. It looks like a middle-aged poet gazing at a ten-year-old princess in her party dress and checking her dating potential. The seminar will show (among other things) that the cultural situation is more complex.”

For the text see here.

 

 

[+]

 

17:00   Gregory of Nyssa: Historical and Philosophical Perspectives

Corpus Christi College Seminar Room

Andrew Radde-Gallwitz (University of Notre Dame)

Gregory of Nyssa and the Medical Art

 

[+]
THURSDAY 2 June

11:00   Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminar
New Seminar Room, St John’s College
Kristina Terpoy

Between coast and hinterland: settlement development in Late Antique Lycia.
[+]

17:00   After Rome: Aspects of the History and Archaeology of the Fifth to Seventh Centuries
Ertegun House
Phil Booth (Theology and Religion, Oxford)

A circle of Egyptian bishops at the end of Roman rule (c.600 CE): sources and contexts

 

[+]
FRIDAY 3 June
 

————————————

Matthew Kinloch

DPhil Candidate, History
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

 

 

 

Posted in Byzness