The Byzness, 01/12/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 1st December 2019
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1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1.       CALLS FOR PAPERS

Military History of the Mediterranean Sea, 19 – 20 June 2020, Thessaloniki.

Deadline: 28 February 2020  

Papers are sought for the Second International Conference on the Military History of the Mediterranean Sea to be held at Thessaloniki on 19 & 20 June 2020.

The Mediterranean has attracted the imagination of modern historians as the epicentre of great political entities like the Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Ottomans, Venetians, and the Spanish and so on. Yet, it seems that the Sea was always on the margins of historical inquiry between monographs on the histories of Europe, the Middle-East and North Africa. That was until the publication of the famous 2-volume work by F. Braudel in 1949 that profoundly shaped the way of understanding of how societies living around the Mediterranean interacted in a single period of history, offering what another great historian has coined it “a horizontal history of the Mediterranean.” This conference aims to offer a rather vertical history of war in the Mediterranean from the early Middle Ages to the early Modern period (c. AD1700), putting the emphasis on the changing face of several of war’s aspects and contexts over time.

This international collaboration between scholars from Istanbul and Thessaloniki aspires to bring Thessaloniki to the forefront of academic attention, by organizing the Second International Conference on the Military History of the Mediterranean Sea, to be hosted at the Byzantine Museum of the Thessaloniki between 19-20 June 2020. We welcome papers that explore any topic related to the study and teaching of the military history of the Mediterranean from late Antiquity and the fall of Rome to the seventeenth century. We especially encourage papers that focus on the conference’s theme of ‘models of military leadership’.

Points of discussion could potentially, but not exclusively, include:

•        Secular and ecclesiastical leadership

•        Gender and authority

•        The social strata of military leaders/commanders

•        The role of military ideals and practices in shaping a military leader

•        What could make or break a military leader

•        The effectiveness of leaders/commanders in the battlefield

•        The ‘ideal’ leadership and ‘heroic individualism’

•        Divine authority

We would also consider proposals that target more general themes, like:

•        Primary sources and their value for the military history of the Mediterranean Sea (c. 400-1700)

•        The emergence and consolidation of customs of military obligation

•        Strategy, tactics (battle and siege) and logistics in the regional operational theatres

•        Naval warfare

•        Society at war and the treatment of the defeated

•        Evolution of weaponry in regional operational theatres

The deadline for proposals is 12pm (Athens time +2GMT) on February 28, 2020; late requests cannot be accommodated.

A preliminary program will be circulated on March 30. Please submit an abstract of no more than 250 words and a brief CV to the conference organising committee:

•        Georgios Theotokis (Lecturer, Ibn Haldun University, georgios.theotokis@ihu.edu.tr)

•        Angeliki Delikari (Assist. Prof., Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, adelikar@hist.auth.gr)

•        Agathoniki Tsilipakou (Director, Museum of Byzantine Culture of Thessaloniki)

•        Halil Berktay (Prof., Ibn Haldun University)

•        Andreas Gkoutzioukostas (Assoc. Prof., Aristotle University of Thessaloniki)

•        Hara Papadopoulou (Gen. Secretary, Byzantine Thessaloniki)

•        Dimitrios Sidiropoulos (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki)

 

2.       JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Museum Director, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington D.C.

Dumbarton Oaks is a Harvard research institute, museum, library, and garden in Washington, D.C. Since 1940 the institute and library have supported research and learning internationally in Byzantine, Garden and Landscape, and Pre-Columbian studies. The historic garden designed by Beatrix Farrand was voted among the ten best in the world by National Geographic and features occasional art installations by contemporary artists.

The museum has world-class collections of Byzantine and Pre-Columbian art and select works of European art. It is open to the public free of charge six days/week. Notable architecture on campus includes the Philip Johnson Pavilion that houses the Pre-Columbian Collection. The museum has close ties to local and Harvard communities and engages scholars and visitors from all over the world through exhibitions, gallery talks, and class visits. Dumbarton Oaks is a vibrant home of the humanities with an overarching mission of communicating the value of culture and advanced research to the broadest possible public.

The museum director will lead the museum team in planning and delivering innovative exhibits in a highly collaborative environment. The director will oversee long-term exhibition planning, budget, and all aspects of museum operations. The ideal candidate will combine knowledge of one area of the Dumbarton Oaks collections with strong leadership and administrative skills. The incumbent will join our community at an exciting time of expansion of both our academic and public programs and will contribute to the ongoing Dumbarton Oaks Access Initiative by helping us design and deliver free and open access to the collections through digital and educational initiatives.

Duties and Responsibilities:

•        Oversees all aspects of museum operations including administration, budget, and staff.

•        Oversees exhibition planning and delivery, leading the museum team and collaborating with other departments as well as external partners.

•         Oversees handling,conservation, insurance, and loans of collections.

•        Collaborates closely with other departments on building maintenance and security; outreach; and planning and delivery of public programs

•        Oversees the transition to an updated collections management system.

•        Oversees the digital and print publication of museum collection and exhibition catalogues.

•        Leads the overhaul of the museum digital and web presence, including the provision of open access catalogues and high-resolution images of the museum collections.

•         Engages actively with new scholarship relating to the Dumbarton Oaks collections, as well as with up-to-date museum practices and initiatives.

•        Mentors fellows and interns from Harvard University as part of Dumbarton Oaks’ skillbuilding programs for early-career humanists.

•        Maintains coordination with Harvard University policies as appropriate.

•        Performs special projects and duties as required by the Director and Executive Director.

Supervisory responsibilities:

•        Manage a team of ten full-time museum professionals.

Basic qualifications:

•        Master’s degree in art history or museum studies required

•        Minimum six years’ museum management experience, including responsibility for a professional staff and budget.

Additional qualifications:

•        Advanced degree in any area of the museum’s collections preferred.

•        PhD preferred.

•        Proven administrative and leadership ability, ideally in a museum setting.

•        Strong data and collection management skills.

•        Excellent communication skills; collegiality, initiative, and versatility in a fast-paced environment that is committed to the highest standards of museum and scholarly practice.

The position remains open until filled. Please forward résumé and cover letter detailing relevant qualifications by clicking the link here.

 

Four Funded Doctoral Positions, ‘Metropolitaet in der Vormoderne’, University of Regensburg

Deadline: 14 February 2020

The University of Regensburg invites applications for four doctoral positions as ‘Researchers’ (E13 TV-G-U, 65% part-time) within the DFG research training group “Metropolitaet in der Vormoderne”.

The duration of the contract will 1.5 years, an extension for 1,5 more years is planned. The position is to be filled by 1st April 2020. Please submit your application by 14th February 2020.

For more information, see here.

 

Editor, ‘Studies in Late Antiquity’, University of California Press.

Deadline: 10 February 2020

University of California Press is seeking applicants for the position of Editor of Studies in Late Antiquity. The new editorship will begin in January 2021 following the end of founding Editor, Beth DePalma Digeser’s term.

Launched in 2015, Studies in Late Antiquity (SLA) is an online-only quarterly journal that serves as an international forum for innovation and reflection on global Late Antiquity (150-750 CE). Primary points of interest include interconnections between the Mediterranean and Africa, Iran, Arabia, the Baltic, Scandinavia, the British Isles, China, India and all of Asia, as well as disrupting the assumed connection between the late ancient/Christian Mediterranean and modern, western Europe. In addition to the peer-reviewed articles of original research, the journal also publishes invited essays, book reviews, and exhibition reviews.

Applicants should have a distinguished scholarly record in the field. Journal editorial experience is preferred but not required. Applicants should possess strong organizational and management skills, the ability to work with others, and a commitment to the journal’s mission to publish high-quality, relevant, and engaging scholarship.

University of California Press provides the Editor with a modest annual stipend of financial support.

Primary responsibilities of the Editor include:

•        Developing and implementing a strategic editorial vision and goals for the journal

•        Appointing editorial board members and identifying appropriate peer reviewers

•        Making final decisions on manuscripts

•        Ensuring smooth editorial workflows and processes

•        Adhering to the Publisher’s production schedule for the journal

•        Working collaboratively with journal stakeholders on journal promotion and building a reliable pipeline of high quality submissions

UC Press endeavors to have the new Editor appointed by May 2020 to ensure a smooth editorial transition.

Applicants should send a letter of application including their strategic vision for the journal, a description of their qualifications for the position, a current CV, and a description of any potential institutional support to David Famiano (dfamiano@ucpress.edu).

Applicants are encouraged to submit applications by February 10, 2020 although applications may be considered on an ongoing basis.

 

Late Antique Archaeological Fieldwork Opportunity, July 2020, Son Peretó.

This is an archaeological field school where you will be fully trained in a range of archaeological techniques including: excavation of terrestrial archaeological sites, topographical recording of sites, classification of artefacts, identification and classification of ceramics, preventive conservation, and cataloguing techniques. The course also include lectures about Late Antiquity, the Christian Era and the Islamic Period of the Balearic Islands.

What will you excavate? Late antique and early medieval graves (dating from 5th to 9th centuries), from the graveyard surrounding the basilica of Son Peretó (late 5th c., with mid 6th c. mosaics) or its newly discovered neighbouring buildings. This excavation is co-ordinated from Oxford and fulfils the requirements of fieldwork experience for undergraduate and graduate students. The excavation is led and Directed by Magdalena Salas, Dr Mateu Riera, and Dr Miguel Ángel Cau.

Where?

·         The Eastern Roman Empire’s western frontier on the Spanish island of Mallorca (near Manacor).

When?

·         Two weeks in July 2020.

5 places available: to ensure comprehensive training only 5 students (UG or PG), supervised by two field directors. Early applications are encouraged.

Costs?

·         €1200 per student (for the two weeks).

What’s included?

·         Board and lodging (in a local hostel in twin bedded rooms), daily transportation to and from the site, and excavation tools (we suggest brining your own gloves, knee pads, hat etc.).

What else do you need?

·         Travel/fieldwork insurance required (ask your department about cover provided by the University of Oxford).

·         Airfare to Palma de Mallorca Airport. Bus/Train from Palma Airport to Manacor.

Funding?  

·         Check with your Faculty, College and Department about fieldwork and travel funding.

Further information about this fieldwork opportunity for students is available from the co-ordinators:

Dr Carlos Cabrera Tejedor

Institute of Archaeology | University of Oxford

36 Beaumont Street, Oxford, OX1 2PG – United Kingdom Email: carlos.cabrera@arch.ox.ac.uk

Christopher Lillington-Martin

Oxford Centre for Late Antiquity

Doctoral candidate

Coventry University

Email: christopher.lillingtonmartin@oxfordalumni.org or lillingc@coventry.ac.uk 

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Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings – Week 8

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 8

Michaelmas Term 2019

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MONDAY 2nd December

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, Old Library

Nicola di Cosmo (Institute of Advanced Study, Princeton)

Climate and Empire in Medieval Inner Asia

TUESDAY 3rd December

14:15 Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Vladimir Olivero (Wolfson)

A genealogy of greed: Hesiod’s Theogony and the Greek translation of the Books of Proverbs

WEDNESDAY 4th December

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Ashmolean Museum, Headley Lecture Theatre

Andrew Wilson (University of Oxford)

Roman wine

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17.00 Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Phil Booth (University of Oxford)

Empire, Environment, and Rebellion in Early Abbasid Egypt

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17.00 Oxford Archaeological Fieldwork Seminar

Institute of Archaeology, Lecture Room

Dr Christophe Delaere (Oxford Centre for Maritime Archaeology)

The Recording of Stratified Underwater Archaeological Contexts: Recent

Excavations at Lake Titicaca.

THURSDAY 5th December

11.00-12:30 Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, First Floor Seminar Room

Miroslav Vujovic

Early Christian Burials in Sirmium: Recent Finds

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16.00 Late Roman Seminar

Corpus Christi College, Seminar Room

Catherine Conybeare (Bryn Mawr)

Augustine as Literature?

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16.00 Early Slavonic Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, First Floor Seminar Room

Nick Mayhew (Stanford)

Trans perspectives on medieval and early modern Slavic culture

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17.15 Khalili Centre Research Seminar

The Khalili Research Centre, Lecture Room

Gulfshan Khan (Aligarh Muslim University)

Artistic and Architectural patronage of the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan 

 

FRIDAY 6th December

10.00-11.30 Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

12.00-13.00 Byzantine Literature

Ioannou Centre

Professor Lauxtermann

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 24/11/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 24th November 2018
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

Oxford University Byzantine Society Research Trip to Georgia1-11 April 2020.

We are pleased to announce the dates have been set for the Oxford University Byzantine Society Research Trip to Georgia. These are 1-11 April 2020.

If you would like to find out more about the trip, please email byzantine.society@gmail.com to be included in the mailing list for those who have registered interest.

The deadline for confirming your attendance will be Friday 6th December (Friday 8th week).

 

Interdisciplinary Social for Graduate Medievalists, 3 December 2019, Weston Library, Oxford.

Hosted by the TORCH Early Medieval Britain and Ireland Network, Oxford Medieval Society, Oxford Medieval Studies. Come and meet graduate students from other Faculties working on the Medieval Period. Foster collaborations, build networks, and make new friends.

The event will begin at 3pm and the venue will be the Visiting Scholars’ Centre’ of the Weston Library. Please RSVP using this link so that suitable amounts of refreshment may be arranged.  If you have any queries, please email embi@torch.ox.ac.uk

‘New Approaches to Medieval Romance from the Eastern Mediterranean and Beyond’, c. 1100-1500’, 5 December 2019, The Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies, University of Birmingham.

Registration for the workshop, ‘New Approaches to Medieval Romance from the Eastern Mediterranean and Beyond’, is now open.  Registration for the event is free. Please register for tickets here.

In recent decades, the study of medieval romance literature has benefited from the application of new theoretical and methodological approaches, ranging from gender historical perspectives to global and ecocritical theory. However, in comparison with the still wider body of literature dedicated to western medieval romance, the Byzantine romances remain a relatively under-studied group of texts. Despite clear evidence of intertextuality between the romance literature of Byzantium and other parts of the medieval world, much work remains to be done in order to understand how the romances are situated within their historical, literary, and social contexts, on both the Byzantine and global medieval stage. This workshop aims to examine the value of new historical or literary approaches to these texts, and ultimately consider them from a multidisciplinary perspective. What can new perspectives on the Byzantine romance tell us about the world in which they were created? What can be learned from the theoretical approaches being applied to romance literature from other parts of the medieval world? What links exist between Byzantine romance and romantic texts from other medieval cultures, and what do these reveal about the broader literary and cultural networks of that time?

The papers presented at this workshop explore the medieval Greek romances from multiple theoretical and disciplinary viewpoints. Intertextual and cross-comparative analyses situate the romances in their literary, cultural, and global contexts, whilst other interpretations focus on the roles of narrative voices and authorial perspectives in constructing character and meaning. Other papers viewing the romances through lenses such as gender, spirituality, liminality and materiality explore aspects of identity in the worlds that their authors construct.

The workshop will conclude with a keynote lecture from Elizabeth Jeffreys (Oxford), as part of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies’ annual lecture series.

The event will take place on Thursday 5th December 2019 at:

715 Muirhead Tower

University of Birmingham

Ring Road North

Birmingham UK

B15 2TN.

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

‘The State Between: Liminality, Transition and Transformation in Late Antiquity and Byzantium’, The Oxford University Byzantine Society’s 22nd International Graduate Conference, 28-29 February 2020, History Faculty, Oxford.

Deadline: 25th November 

For many centuries, Byzantium was characterised in historiographical narratives as a transitional state: a retrospective bridge between antiquity and modernity. However, while Byzantium undoubtedly acted as an intermediary between these worlds and eras, it is important to recognise the creativity, originality, and vitality which characterised this empire and its population. Much as Late Antiquity has been reframed recently as a period of evolution rather than decline, so too can the Byzantine world be viewed in a new light through the lens of liminality. This conference aims to explore the fluid and the unfixed, periods of transition and ambiguity; the state of being ‘betwixt and between’.

There are many cases in which liminality can be applied effectively as a historiographical tool to understand aspects of the Late Antique and Byzantine world. For instance, the lives of individuals were shaped by liminal experiences, in both secular and religious spheres. From the experience of widowhood to that of a novice entering monastic life, Byzantine lives were marked by the transition from one social status and identity to another: the middle phase in which liminal personae are simultaneously ‘no longer’ and ‘not yet’, existing between positions assigned and arrayed by law, custom, convention and ceremonial. Liminal spaces permeated societies in the broader Byzantine world, from local landscapes, to religious buildings, to household interiors. As such, liminality provides a constructive framework with which to approach the transition and transformation of the Late Roman city to Medieval Islamic urbanism. On a larger scale, polities formerly on the periphery of the Byzantine world (the peoples of the Arabian Peninsula, the Steppe, the Slavic oecumene) often came suddenly to the foreground of the political landscape, resulting in the formation of new cultural networks and the shaping of identities.

Liminality is often defined in spatial terms, but it is also about process. For the cultural anthropologist Victor Turner, a ‘liminal phase’ can be an event or process which involves the disruption of existing hierarchies and power-structures. This definition of liminality as an inter-structural phase not only applies to political and economic change, but also may be extended to the subjunctive world of ideas and philosophical thought: the realm of what is possible and what may be.

Including contributions on political, social, literary, architectural and artistic history, and covering geographical areas throughout the central and eastern Mediterranean and beyond, this conference aims to provide an interdisciplinary and kaleidoscopic view of the Late Antique and Byzantine world. To that end, we encourage submissions from all graduate students and young researchers, encompassing, but not limited to, the following themes:

·              Borders, Frontiers and Thresholds: cross-cultural engagement and identity formation; negotiation, hybridity and transition.

·              States of Religious Identity and Practice: rituals, conversions, missionaries and pilgrimage.

·              Political and Administrative Transformation: transition, social change and conflict.

·              Gender and Sexuality: social norms, boundaries and transgression.

·              Life on the Margins: mercenaries, merchants, outlaws and slaves.

·              Liminal, Temporary and Transitional Identities: saints, soldiers, scholars and students.

·              Liminal Spaces and Places: staging posts and sites of passage, the natural and the preternatural, the world of the living and of the dead.

·              Conformity and Dissent: the space between dominant and minority discourses.

·              Literary Works, Narratology and Liminality: histories, chronicles, hagiographies and martyrologies.

·              Manuscripts: scribal habits, palimpsests, marginal comments, illustrations and other decorative elements.

·              Architecture and Urbanism: liminal landscapes, changing land use, spolia and reappropriation.

·              Epigraphy: textual content, form and style, interrelations between text and object.

·              Numismatics and Sigillography: exchanges across boundaries, prosopography and social networks.

·              Art, Material and Visual Culture: sensory perception and interactions with art objects, icons, mosaics, statues, altar screens and textiles.

·              Religious Objects: relics, liturgical equipment and vestments.

·              Legal Texts: overlapping legal cultures, boundaries and legal status, legislation related to the life course.

·              Comparative approaches to liminality, in opposition or concordance with Late Antiquity and Byzantium.

Please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, along with a short academic biography in the third person, to the Oxford University Byzantine Society at byzantine.society@gmail.com by Monday, 25th November 2019. Papers should be 20 minutes in length and may be delivered in English or French. As with previous conferences, there will be a publication of selected papers, chosen and reviewed by specialists from the University of Oxford in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies. Speakers wishing to have their papers considered for publication should try to be as close to the theme as possible in their abstract and paper. Nevertheless, all submissions are warmly invited.

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings – Week 6

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 7

 

Michaelmas Term 2019

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MONDAY 25th November

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, Old Library

William Kynan-Wilson (Aalborg University)

Modes of Collecting: Relic Lists in Twelfth-Century England


TUESDAY 26th November

14:15 Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Laliv Clenman (Leo Baeck)

Midrash Torat Cohanim (Sifra) on intermarriage

 

[+]

17.00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar

Harris Manchester College, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Innocent Smith, O.P. (University of Regensburg)

Word and Sacrament: the De Brailes Bible Missal (Bodleian Library, MS Lat. bib. e. 7) and the Dominican Liturgy

WEDNESDAY 27th November

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Ashmolean Museum, Headley Lecture Theatre

Mark Robinson (University of Oxford)

Food remains from Pompeii and the difficulties of reconstructing diet

 

[+]

17.00 Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Gianfranco Agosti (Rome)

Seeing, reading and understanding a metrical inscription in late Antiquity

 

[+]

17.00 Oxford Archaeological Fieldwork Seminar

Institute of Archaeology, Lecture Room

Dr Selin Nugent (School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, Oxford)

Conservation of Human Skeletal Remains in Azerbaijan: Transforming Practice from the Field Onwards

 

THURSDAY 28th November

11.00-12:30 Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, First Floor Seminar Room

Kyriakos Fragoulis

Economic and Urban Realities in Late Antique Dion (Greece) through the Ceramic Evidence

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16.00 Late Roman Seminar

Corpus Christi College, Seminar Room

Christa Gray (Reading)

What to do with a dead saint? Jerome’s Lives of Holy men and a fourth-century debate

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17.15 Khalili Centre Research Seminar

The Khalili Research Centre, Lecture Room

Aila Santi (American University of Beirut)

The ‘Mosque of the Prophet’ and Beyond: A Tentative Reconstruction of the Early Islamic topography of Madina al-Munawwara (622-750) Based on Written Sources

[+]

FRIDAY 29th November

10.00-11.30 Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

12.00-13.00 Byzantine Literature

Ioannou Centre

Professor Lauxtermann

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Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 17/11/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 17th November 2019
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1.            NEWS AND EVENTS

Arabic Epigraphy and Palaeography Reading Group, 20th November 2019, Oriental Institute, University of Oxford.

The Arabic Epigraphy and Palaeography Reading Group is an interdisciplinary forum for students and researchers working with Arabic inscriptions and manuscripts. The group will convene every two weeks during term (beginning MT Week 6), giving participants the opportunity to practice transcription, gain familiarity with different types of Arabic script, and share their own research. The sessions will run on Wednesday from 14:30 to 16:00, and will take place in Lecture Room 2 of the Oriental Institute.

Each session will focus on a different historical period, style or script from across the Islamic world between the 7th and 19th centuries, with hands-on exercises and broader discussion of the documents and inscriptions in their historical context. No preparation or additional work is required, but some prior knowledge of Arabic is essential.

The reading group is open to all members of the University with an interest in Arabic epigraphy, palaeography, codicology, and the material culture of Islamicate societies. For further information and to sign up to the mailing list, please contact Helen Flatley (helen.flatley@stx.ox.ac.uk) or Jessica Rahardjo (jessica.rahardjo@wolfson.ox.ac.uk).

 

Robin Lane Fox, ‘Monks, Hermits and the Natural World, 300-650AD’, Saint Catherine Foundation Lecture, 28th November 2019, Royal Geographical Society.

The holy men and hermits of late antiquity are distinctive features of early Christianity, often linked to its monasteries, including St Catherine’s of Sinai. This lecture considers the realities and textual representations of their relations with animals, landscapes, birds and plants. It contrasts the use and presentation of such items in pagan history, literature and philosophy.

Robin Lane Fox is Emeritus Fellow of New College, Oxford. His books include Pagans and Christians and Augustine: Conversions to Confessions, the 2016 Wolfson History Prize winner. His new book, on early Greek medicine, will be published in 2020.

The lecture will take place from 19:00 – 20:15 at the Royal Geographical Society, 1 Kensington Gore, Kensington, London SW7 2AR.

To purchase tickets, see here.

 

Venice Dialogues: De-Marginalizing Byzantium’, 7-8 December 2019, Centro Tedesco di Studi Veneziani/Deutsches Studienzentrum in Venedig, Venice.

The workshop will explore the question of why Byzantium was and keeps being marginalized within the western academic canon and to a lesser extent in the public discourse. Instead of resurrecting the 19th and early 20th century academic debate known as the ‘Byzantine ques- tion’ (‘Byzantinische Frage’), this workshop examines the historiographical mechanisms and turning points that resulted in the marginalization of Byzantium in art history and related fields.

In an attempt to move past pinpointing single moments of ‘influence’ from Byzantium to the We, the workshop asks why the one hundred-year search to answer the ‘Byzantine question’ was unsuccessful, failing to secure a prominent place for the Eastern Roman Empire within art historical teaching and scholarship. Building on these insights, the workshop will delve into practical aspects, seeking possible places for Byzantium after the end of a linear, chronological art historical canon as described by Hans Belting (Das Ende der Kunstgeschichte: Eine Revision nach 10 Jahren) and others. The talks will focus on historiography and scholarly networks, on questions of collecting, artistic production, national and supranational political thought, and on Byzantium’s place within the boundaries of modern academic disciplines.

For the full programme, see here.

If you would like to attend the workshop, we kindly ask you to register: armin.bergmeier@uni-leipzig.de.  

 

2.            CALLS FOR PAPERS

‘Theandrites: Byzantine Philosophy and Christian Platonism (284-1453)’, International Society of Neoplatonic Studies Conference, 10-14 June 2020, Athens.

Deadline: 1 February 2020

This panel focuses on the reception of Platonism in the Christian philosophy of the Byzantine era (4th-15th centuries), an era marking the creation of a unique dialogue between Hellenic Platonism and the theology of the Church Fathers and Byzantine Christians.

 The panel is open to all issues relating to Byzantine Platonism. This includes: Christians in the Greek-speaking East and their relationship to the Latin tradition in the West, as well as the Christian Platonism found in contemporary church fathers, the Greek-speaking Christians in late antique Gaza, Athens, and Alexandria; the philosophical theology of Pseudo-Dionysius, Maximus, and John Damascene; the later reception of Platonic theories on the soul, time, and eternity, and metaphysics, as well as ritual among Greek Christians and Hellenes. We welcome papers that trace Platonic ideas, terminology, and methodology as they move throughout the Eastern Roman Empire and the Byzantine Orthodox world.

300 word abstract should be sent to Sarah Wear (swear@franciscan.edu) and Frederick Lauritzen (frederick.lauritzen@new.oxon.org). Papers presented in Athens will be published in the series Theandrites: Studies in Byzantine Philosophy and Christian Platonism (284-1453) (after peer review).

 

‘Unfreedom’, Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Conference, 7-8 February 2020, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona.

Deadline: November 30, 2019

The theme of the 2020 annual conference of the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies is unfreedom. Unfreedom marked the lives of various people in the premodern world. Many factors played a role in shaping the forms of unfreedom prevalent in the premodern era: violence and coercion; shame and dishonor; disconnection of kin groups and destruction of social networks; and individual and collective strategies for economic, political, and social success that depended on the subjection of others.

This year’s conference will focus on those whose status was defined primarily in terms of unfreedom, coercion, and constraint rather than the enjoyment of freedoms or privileges, including but not limited to slaves, serfs, captives, prisoners, pledges, hostages, and forced marriage or concubinage. Panels and papers that theorize and/or historicize the status of unfreedom in medieval and renaissance contexts are welcome.

The conference will take place at Arizona State University in Tempe, AZ on February 7-8, 2020. Proposals are due on November 30, 2019 and can be submitted here.

 

 

3.            JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

 

Two Post-Doctoral Assistants, Faculty of Theology and Religion, University of Oxford.

Deadline: 20 November 2019

Reporting to Professor Diarmaid MacCulloch, Professor of the History of the Church. The post holder is a member of a research group with responsibility for carrying out research, which will lead to the publication of a book entitled ‘Sex and the Church: a history of Christian attitudes’. The post holder will provide guidance to the successful post-doctoral assistants.

Two post-doctoral assistants are sought to identify and collate reading lists and bibliographies, which will contribute towards the writing of the aforementioned publication. Candidates should have specialist knowledge of Eastern Christianity and its associate languages. They should be able to identify primary-source material, which they regard as significant but which is not currently available in translation in Western European languages: in particular, but not exclusively, texts in Greek, Russian, Syriac or Coptic. 

The post-doctoral assistants will be employed on a variable hour’s basis with an average of 8-10 hours per month, agreed in advance with Professor MacCulloch. The salary is University Grade 7.1 – 7.8: £32,817 – £40,322 (pro rata) and the closing date for applications is 12 noon (GMT) on 20 November 2019.

For more details, see here.

 

Byzantine Studies Postdoctoral Fellowship 2020-21, Medieval Institute University of Notre Dame.

Deadline: 1 February 2020

Following substantial investment in the area of Byzantine Studies at the University of Notre Dame, including the acquisition of the Milton V. Anastos Library of Byzantine Civilization and generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame is delighted to invite applicants for a nine-month Postdoctoral Fellowship in Byzantine Studies. This fellowship is designed for junior scholars with a completed doctorate whose research deals with some aspect of the Byzantine world. The fellow is expected to pursue promising research towards scholarly publication and/or the development of new subject areas. This Fellowship is open to qualified applicants in all fields and sub-disciplines of Byzantine Studies, such as history (including its auxiliary disciplines), archaeology, art history, literature, theology, and liturgical studies, as well as the study of Byzantium’s interactions with neighboring cultures. The fellowship holder will pursue research in residence at the University of Notre Dame’s famed Medieval Institute during the academic year.

The intent of this Fellowship is to enable its holder to do innovative research drawing on the rich resources held in the Milton V. Anastos Collection, the Medieval Institute, and the Hesburgh Library more broadly. This may include the completion of book manuscripts and articles, work on text editions, or the development of new trajectories of research in one of the aforementioned fields. The Fellowship carries no teaching responsibilities, but the fellow will have the opportunity to participate in the multidisciplinary activities of Notre Dame faculty related to Byzantium, Eastern Christianity, and the history of the Levant. The Fellow will be provided with a private workspace in the Medieval Institute, enjoy full library and computer privileges, and have access to all the Institute’s research tools.

In addition, towards the conclusion of the fellowship period the fellow’s work will be at the center of a workshop organized within the framework of the Byzantine Studies Seminar. Senior scholars, chosen in cooperation with the Medieval Institute, will be invited for this event treating the fellow’s subject matter. The senior scholars will discuss draft versions of the fellow’s book manuscript or articles or discuss the further development of ongoing research projects.

Qualifications: Byzantine Studies fellows must hold a Ph.D. from an internationally recognized institution. The Ph.D. must be in hand by the beginning of the fellowship term.

Application Instructions: Applicants should submit a letter of application (cover letter), a project proposal of no more than 2500 words, a current C.V., and three letters of recommendation. Applicants will also complete an informational sheet in Interfolio.

To apply, see here.

 

A. W. Mellon Junior Faculty Fellowship in Medieval Studies 2020–21Medieval Institute University of Notre Dame.

Deadline: 1 February 2020

The Medieval Institute offers a fellowship for a junior faculty scholar in Medieval Studies, made possible through the generous response of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to a challenge grant awarded to Notre Dame by the National Endowment for the Humanities. This Fellowship is designed for junior faculty who currently hold a position in a United States university as an assistant professor. It is open to qualified applicants in all fields of Medieval Studies. The fellowship holder will pursue research in residence at Notre Dame’s famed Medieval Institute during the academic year.

The intent of this Fellowship is to enable its holders to complete research and writing on a book manuscript in advance of tenure. The Fellowship carries no teaching responsibilities, but holders are expected to participate in the multidisciplinary intellectual life of the Institute and to reside in South Bend. The Fellow will be provided with a private carrel in the Medieval Institute, enjoy full library and computer privileges, and have access to all the Institute’s research tools.

In addition, towards the conclusion of their residency the Fellow’s work will be at the center of a half-day conference. Three senior scholars, chosen in cooperation with the Medieval Institute, will be invited to campus for a half-day public seminar treating the subject matter of the Fellow’s research. The senior scholars will also read and discuss a draft version of the Fellow’s work in an extended private session, a one-to-one conversation following a close reading of the draft, with a view to improving the manuscript before its submission to a press.

The stipend is $50,000, paid directly to the scholar’s home institution.

Qualifications:  Applicants must hold a tenure-track appointment at a U.S. institution, obviously with a completed Ph.D., and should not be more than six years beyond receiving their Ph.D. at the time of the application.

Application Instructions: Applicants should submit a letter of application (cover letter), a project proposal of no more than 2500 words, a current C.V., and three letters of recommendation. An informational form will also need to be completed in Interfolio.

To apply, see here.

 

Bodleian Libraries Visiting Fellowships, University of Oxford.

Deadline: 1 December 2019

The Bodleian Libraries are now accepting applications for Visiting Fellowships for the 2020-21 academic year. Proposals are invited from researchers who will benefit from an uninterrupted period of research in the Special Collections of the Bodleian Libraries. The deadline for applications is 1 December 2019.

·         Humfrey Wanley Fellowships: supporting a short period of research in the Special Collections of the Bodleian Libraries. Up to 3 months.

·         Sassoon Visiting Fellowships: supporting a short period of research in the Special Collections of the Bodleian Libraries. Up to 3 months.

·         Sassoon Visiting Fellowships in South Asian and Black History: offered in collaboration with Somerville College, Oxford, for research into the histories of South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean, as well as their diasporas broadly defined. Up to 2 months.

·         Bahari Visiting Fellowships in the Persian Arts of the Book: up to 6 months.

·         Byrne-Bussey Marconi Fellowships: for research into any aspect of the history of science, technology and business innovation using the archive, manuscript, object and rare book collections of the Bodleian Libraries and the History of Science of Museum, Oxford. Up to 6 months.

·         David Walker Memorial Fellowships in Early Modern History: supporting research into any aspect of Early Modern History. Up to 3 months.

·         Albi Rosenthal Visiting Fellowships in Music: providing for research in the Special Collections of Music in the Bodleian Libraries. Up to 3 months.

For more information, see here.

 

Researcher in the archaeology of Iron Age North Arabia, Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Paris.

Deadline: 26 November 2019

As part of the Dadan Archaeological Project, the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS, UMR 8167 Orient & Méditerranée, Paris) is looking for a postdoc or experienced researcher in the archaeology of North Arabia. Under the supervision of the project’s director, Jérôme Rohmer, the researcher will carry out the excavation, monitoring and publication of one of the main excavation areas of the site of Khuraybah/Dadan (region of al-Ula, Saudi Arabia), the main city and trading center in northwestern Arabia during the Iron Age.

The initial contract is for 6 months (mid-January to mid-July 2020) but it is renewable for three years on a half-time to 75%-time basis depending on the project’s needs. Monthly gross salary between 2700 and 4100 euros depending on experience (including health insurance, unemployment insurance and retirement contribution).

Applications are open until Nov 26, 2019. A detailed CV (with list of publications) and a cover letter are required.

For the complete call for applications, see here.

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings – Week 6

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 6

Michaelmas Term 2019

= = = = =

MONDAY 18th November

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, Old Library

Benjamin Thompson (Somerville)

The Medieval Monastic Enclosure

TUESDAY 19th November

14:15 Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Binyamin Katzof (Bar Ilan)

The Tosefta in the Cairo Geniza and European bookbindings

 

[+]

17.00 Early Slavonic Seminar

Taylorian Institution, Main Hall

Giorgio Ziffer (Udine)

The Sermon on Law and Grace: between textual criticism and interpretation

 

[+]

17.00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar

Harris Manchester College, Charles Wellbeloved Room

 

Henrike Lähnemann (SEH) / Godelinde Perk (Somerville)

Reading and Reform among Cistercian, Benedictine, and Dominican nuns in the Late Middle Ages

 

WEDNESDAY 20th November

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, Lecture Room

Alexandra Livarda (ICAC, Tarragona)

Plants and food culture in Roman Britain

 

[+]

14.30 – 16.00 Arabic Epigraphy and Palaeography Reading Group

Oriental Institute, Lecture Room 2

Helen Flatley and Jessica Rahardjo (Oxford)

[+]

17.00 Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Annika Asp (Birmingham)

From ‘successor state’ to ‘empire’? The relationship between Trebizond and Constantinople during the Palaiologan period

[+]

17.00 Oxford Archaeological Fieldwork Seminar

Institute of Archaeology, Lecture Room

Beth Hodgett (Birkbeck and Pitt Rivers Museum)

Field Notes from the Archive: Searching for O. G. S. Crawford

 

THURSDAY 21st November

11.00-12:30 Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, First Floor Seminar Room

Rowena Loverance

The Day the Sun Stood Still… Representations of Joshua in Late Antique, Byzantine and Crusader Art

 

[+]

16.00 Late Roman Seminar

Corpus Christi College, Seminar Room

Joseph Lewis

Christian Building Patronage in Late (and Post-) Roman Gaul

[+]

17.15 Khalili Centre Research Seminar

The Khalili Research Centre, Lecture Room

Constant Hamès (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales)

Manuscrits Coraniques de l’Afrique, une étude comparative

FRIDAY 22nd November

10.00-11.30 Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

12.00-13.00 Byzantine Literature

Ioannou Centre

Professor Lauxtermann

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 10/11/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 10th  November 2019
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

 

1.            NEWS AND EVENTS

Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research, Logo Design Competition

The OCBR is keen to create a strong brand identity under the University umbrella and would like your help. We would like a striking design to use on our website, social media, and letterheads that will become recognisable at a glance within the Byzantinist world.

The winner will receive a £100 book grant.

The competition closes at noon on Wednesday, 20th November. Please send entries to rosalind.mitchell@theology.ox.ac.uk. If the file type cannot be opened using the regular MS Office suite, please send it as a .pdf.

For more information, see here.

 

‘Documenting Multiculturalism in Norman Sicily and the Islamicate East’, 29 November 2019, University of Oxford.

An all-day workshop will be held in Oxford on ‘Documenting Multiculturalism in Norman Sicily and the Islamicate East’. The workshop is being organised by the Khalili Research Centre (University of Oxford) and will be held on Friday 29 November at Wolfson College. The workshop will consist of a series of 30-minute talks concerning the administrative and legal documents of the Islamicate world.

For the full programme and registration details, see here.

 

‘PAIXUE Symposium: Classicising Learning, Performance and Power: Eurasian Perspectives From Antiquity to Early Modern Period’, 12-14 December 2019, University of Edinburgh

The team of the PAIXUE project is delighted to announce that its international Symposium on ‘Classicising learning, performance and power: Eurasian perspectives from Antiquity to early modern Period’ will take place between the 12th and the 14th of December 2019 at the University of Edinburgh.

The symposium brings together scholars from across North America, Europe and Asia in order to explore how public performances of classicising learning (however defined in each culture) influenced and served imperial or state power in premodern political systems across Eurasia and North Africa. Aiming at encouraging scholarly exchanges among experts in different fields and cultures, the papers relate to the following three interconnected thematic strands:

·         Classicising learning and the social order

·         Classicising learning and the political order

·         Classicising learning and the self

The full programme and the list of abstracts are available in our website Places are limited, so early registration is strongly recommended.

 

The Citizen in Late Antiquity’, 25 November 2019, Utrecht University.

On behalf of the Postgraduate and Early Career Late Antiquity Network and the NWO VICI project Citizenship Discourses in the Early Middle Ages we cordially invite you to our upcoming Postgraduate and Early Career Conference: ‘The Citizen in Late Antiquity’.

This workshop aims at providing an informal, constructive environment for post-graduate and early career researchers to present their work, meet others working in the field, and discuss current trends and issues. The Late Antiquity Network provides a single platform for those working on a broad range of geographical and disciplinary areas within the period of Late Antiquity, and participants are thus encouraged to interpret ‘citizen’ in a broad sense, thinking about how the theme intersects with their own research. Facilitating this will be an address by our visiting speaker, Professor Engin Isin of Queen Mary University London, to which Professor Els Rose will provide a response.

The event will take place from 09:30-17:00 and the venue will be Kanunnikenzaal, Faculty Club (Achter de Dom 7). Attached you may find the conference program, abstract overview and poster. For further information and updates, please visit our website.

Participation is free of charge, but registration is required. Please register by contacting: K.Boers@uu.nl

 

2.            CALLS FOR PAPERS

‘Merchants and Markets in Late Antiquity’, Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting, 7-10 January 2021, Chicago.

Deadline: 7 February 2020

We are inviting the submission of abstracts for the organizer-refereed panel ‘Merchants and Markets in Late Antiquity’ at the 2021 annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies. This annual meeting will be held in Chicago from January 7-10, 2021. The deadline for submitting an abstract is February 7, 2020.

A social, cultural, and economic history of work and trade in the later Roman empire remains to be written. Recent years have seen a renewed interest in labour, professions, commerce, and their organization during the Imperial period, while the last two decades have been a remarkably productive time for the study of the Roman economy in general. The resultant scholarship has presented new approaches which have greatly advanced our understanding of both structural and specific characteristics of the economy. The most influential of these has been the adoption of New Institutional Economics (e.g. Scheidel, Morris, and Saller 2007), but there has also been a steady stream of microeconomic studies focusing on the social elements of economic activity (Terpstra 2013; Venticinque 2016; Hawkins 2016) and sociocultural histories of work and professions (e.g. Verboven and Laes 2016). Some of this scholarship has extended into Late Antiquity, though the most influential work remains Wickham’s magisterial Framing the Early Middle Ages (2006). Nevertheless, scholarship on the later Roman world has not yet sought to integrate the economic theories that have reconditioned the way of writing the socio-economic history of the early Roman Empire.

The future of late Roman social and economic history lies in utilizing and adapting innovative approaches to the Roman economy for the study of Late Antiquity. The institutional change for which this period is known offers plentiful opportunities to consider how individual economic actors were affected by structural, religious, and political changes, and the field is ripe for a re-evaluation of the intersection between social norms and the economy.

This panel hopes to bring together scholars from a wide range of subjects and backgrounds, and to solicit abstracts for papers considering a variety of issues and addressing such diverse questions as:

·         What awareness did local merchants, craftsmen, and transporters have of wider economic change in Late Antiquity?

·         What strategies did these individuals develop to mitigate risk and resolve economic challenges, and are the strategies of Late Antiquity fundamentally different in some way from those used in earlier or later periods?

·         Can we speak of market integration or disintegration in Late Antiquity?

·         What were the outcomes of state institutional and structural changes to the economy at local and regional levels? 

·         What effects did the development of new legal and fiscal systems have on the social and political lives of merchants and craftsmen?

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted as email attachments to info@classicalstudies.org by February 7, 2020. The title of the email should be the title of the panel. Abstracts should contain a title of the paper, but should not have any information regarding the identity of the submitter. All abstracts for papers will be reviewed anonymously. For enquiries, please email Jane Sancinito (jsancini@oberlin.edu) or John Fabiano (john.fabiano@utoronto.ca).

‘Animals in Ancient Material Cultures’, Special Issue of Arts.

Deadline: 31 December 2019

Chiara Cavallo (University of Amsterdam) and  Branko van Oppen
(University of Groningen) are organizing a two-volume special issue of the journal Arts entitled “Animals in Ancient Material Cultures” and would like to invite expressions of interest.

Ever since the Neolithic domestication, animals have been part of everyday human life, imagination, and religion. In antiquity, many human pursuits, from plowing the field to fighting on the battlefield, from consumption of food to sacrificing to the gods, were shaped by, and relied upon, a symbiotic or interdependent relationship with animals. Animals were hunted or tamed, kept for entertainment or even worshipped. Material culture provides important evidence as representations and illustrations, expressions and mediations of ancient ideas and attitudes about, as well as experiences and interactions with the animal world which surrounded them. Iconographic representations may, for instance, reflect social status as much as religious practices. Such imagery can offer visual clues for the dissemination of animal husbandry as well as for beliefs in mythic creatures.

The theme of this Special Issue, “Animals in Ancient Material Cultures”, broadly includes the Mediterranean world and the Near East, from ca. 10,000 BCE to 500 CE (although exceptions in period or region may be considered). Approaching this subject from a broad chronological and geographical perspective allows the contributors to focus on a specific region, period, animal, and/or creature. Papers may draw on (zoo-)archaeological, physical, visual, and/or cultural material to examine the dispersal and exchange, appropriation, and acculturation of practices and beliefs. This Special Issue aims to bring together specialists from different fields of expertise, including but not limited to art history, ancient history, classics, classical archaeology, and zooarchaeology. Proposed subjects comprise topics such as pastoralism, human–animal relations, iconography, and cultic practices.

If you are interested, please submit an abstract (ca. 250-500 words) before the end of the year to Ms. Macie Ma macie.ma@mdpi.com.

 

3.            JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

‘German for Students of Classical Studies’ Summer School, 8-17 June 2020, University of Cologne.

Deadline: 31 January 2020

The Department for Classical Studies of the University of Cologne is now accepting applications for the 2020 “German for Students of Classical Studies” summer course. The course will take place from June 8 to July 17, 2020. It is specially designed to meet the lingustic needs of students of Classics who wish to expand their knowledge of written and spoken academic German.

The program includes a language class, reading tutorials, field trips to archaeological sites in the Rhineland and the opportunity to take part in the academic life of the Classics department of the University of Cologne.

The deadline for applications is January 31, 2020. All the relevant information, including a flyer for download, can be found here. If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to send an e-mail to: german-for-classics@uni-koeln.de.

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings – Week 5

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 5

Michaelmas Term 2019

= = = = =

MONDAY 11th November

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, Old Library

Charles Insley (Manchester)

The Politics of Memory: Charters and the (un)making of the English Kingdom in the mid-tenth century

TUESDAY 12th November

14:15 Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Marieke Dhont (Cambridge)

The Septuagint in Ezekiel’s Exagoge

 

[+]

17.00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar

Harris Manchester College, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Amy Ebrey (St John’s)

Precepts, Counsels, and Caritas: Nicholas Trevet and the Rule of St Augustine

WEDNESDAY 13th November

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Ashmolean Museum, Headley Lecture Theatre

Louise Fowler (Museum of London Archaeology)

Grains of truth? Imagining Londinium

 

[+]

17.00 Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Jonathan Shepard (Oxford)

John Mystikos – an underrated envoy to Rus?

[+]

17.00 Oxford Archaeological Fieldwork Seminar

Institute of Archaeology, Lecture Room

Dr Iain Shearer (UCL)

Methodologies of Repatriating Looted Afghan Archaeology: Case Studies

from the UK and Australia

 

THURSDAY 14th November

11.00-12:30 Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, First Floor Seminar Room

Grace Stafford

Adornment as Public Spectacle in Late Antique Art and Culture

 

[+]

16.00 Late Roman Seminar

Corpus Christi College, Seminar Room

John Whitty

Reading Basil of Caesarea’s Appeal to Non-Scriptural Tradition in Context

[+]

17.15 Khalili Centre Research Seminar

The Khalili Research Centre, Lecture Room

Judith Olszowy-Schlanger (University of Oxford)

Origins of Hebrew calligraphy: from Abbasid Baghdad to Fatimid Cairo

[+]

FRIDAY 15th November

10.00-11.30 Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

12.00-13.00 Byzantine Literature

Ioannou Centre

Professor Lauxtermann

 

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 03/11/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 3rd November 2019

====
1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

The Fourth Annual Public Lecture in Medieval and Early Modern Slavonic Studies, ‘The Empress’s New Clothes: Foreign Brides in Byzantium’, 6 November 2019, University of Cambridge.

Cambridge Ukrainian Studies in association with The Byzantine Worlds Seminar and the Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities invites you to join us for the Fourth Annual Public Lecture in Medieval and Early Modern Slavonic Studies to be delivered by Dr Petra Melichar, Prague.  Dr Melichar will speak on ‘The Empress’s New Clothes: Foreign Brides in Byzantium’.

Dr Petra Melichar earned her PhD from Katholieke Universiteit in Leuven in 2012. At present, she is a fellow of the Slavonic Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague and editor-in-chief of the journal Byzantinoslavica (since 2015). Her recent work centers on late Byzantine elite women in the Palaiologan period (1261–1453).

In her lecture, Dr Melichar will explore the transformation and integration of a foreign bride in the Byzantine environment.  When a foreign princess arrived in Byzantium, she was brought into a splendid tent and dressed in a luxurious purple robe. The aim of this and several similar rituals symbolized a hoped-for transformation, a metamorphosis of a foreigner into a Byzantine. While these rituals could be performed within several days, integration into the Byzantine environment was much more complex and difficult as the stories of Maria of Bulgaria, Helene of Serbia, Anna of Savoy or Anna of Moscow reveal.

The event will take place at 17.00 on the 6th November in Room SG2, Alison Richard Building, University of Cambridge. The event is free and open to the public.

 

‘Origins and Original Moments in Late Greek and Latin Literature II’, 16-17 December 2019, Ghent University.

Late antique texts regularly try to establish a direct link with the literature of the origins by obscuring and erasing the poetic tradition in between. Such yearning for finding a connection between the contemporary and the original moment has received little attention within current scholarship, but, in the view of the conference’s organizers, it is one of the most striking and distinctive characteristics of the textual language of late antique literature.

This event is the result of a co-operation between Fordham University and Ghent University. The first part of the workshop took place at Fordham University in May 2018. This event is generously founded by the Research Foundation -Flanders (FWO) and the Faculty of Arts and Letters of Ghent University.

 

  1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

‘The State Between: Liminality, Transition and Transformation in Late Antiquity and Byzantium’, The Oxford University Byzantine Society’s 22nd International Graduate Conference, 28-29 February 2020, University of Oxford.

Deadline: 25th November 2019

For many centuries, Byzantium was characterised in historiographical narratives as a transitional state: a retrospective bridge between antiquity and modernity. However, while Byzantium undoubtedly acted as an intermediary between these worlds and eras, it is important to recognise the creativity, originality, and vitality which characterised this empire and its population. Much as Late Antiquity has been reframed recently as a period of evolution rather than decline, so too can the Byzantine world be viewed in a new light through the lens of liminality. This conference aims to explore the fluid and the unfixed, periods of transition and ambiguity; the state of being ‘betwixt and between’.

There are many cases in which liminality can be applied effectively as a historiographical tool to understand aspects of the Late Antique and Byzantine world. For instance, the lives of individuals were shaped by liminal experiences, in both secular and religious spheres. From the experience of widowhood to that of a novice entering monastic life, Byzantine lives were marked by the transition from one social status and identity to another: the middle phase in which liminal personae are simultaneously ‘no longer’ and ‘not yet’, existing between positions assigned and arrayed by law, custom, convention and ceremonial. Liminal spaces permeated societies in the broader Byzantine world, from local landscapes, to religious buildings, to household interiors. As such, liminality provides a constructive framework with which to approach the transition and transformation of the Late Roman city to Medieval Islamic urbanism. On a larger scale, polities formerly on the periphery of the Byzantine world (the peoples of the Arabian Peninsula, the Steppe, the Slavic oecumene) often came suddenly to the foreground of the political landscape, resulting in the formation of new cultural networks and the shaping of identities.

Liminality is often defined in spatial terms, but it is also about process. For the cultural anthropologist Victor Turner, a ‘liminal phase’ can be an event or process which involves the disruption of existing hierarchies and power-structures. This definition of liminality as an inter-structural phase not only applies to political and economic change, but also may be extended to the subjunctive world of ideas and philosophical thought: the realm of what is possible and what may be.

Including contributions on political, social, literary, architectural and artistic history, and covering geographical areas throughout the central and eastern Mediterranean and beyond, this conference aims to provide an interdisciplinary and kaleidoscopic view of the Late Antique and Byzantine world. To that end, we encourage submissions from all graduate students and young researchers, encompassing, but not limited to, the following themes:

  • Borders, Frontiers and Thresholds: cross-cultural engagement and identity formation; negotiation, hybridity and transition.
  • States of Religious Identity and Practice: rituals, conversions, missionaries and pilgrimage.
  • Political and Administrative Transformation: transition, social change and conflict.
  • Gender and Sexuality: social norms, boundaries and transgression.
  • Life on the Margins: mercenaries, merchants, outlaws and slaves.
  • Liminal, Temporary and Transitional Identities: saints, soldiers, scholars and students.
  • Liminal Spaces and Places: staging posts and sites of passage, the natural and the preternatural, the world of the living and of the dead.
  • Conformity and Dissent: the space between dominant and minority discourses.
  • Literary Works, Narratology and Liminality: histories, chronicles, hagiographies and martyrologies.
  • Manuscripts: scribal habits, palimpsests, marginal comments, illustrations and other decorative elements.
  • Architecture and Urbanism: liminal landscapes, changing land use, spolia and reappropriation.
  • Epigraphy: textual content, form and style, interrelations between text and object.
  • Numismatics and Sigillography: exchanges across boundaries, prosopography and social networks.
  • Art, Material and Visual Culture: sensory perception and interactions with art objects, icons, mosaics, statues, altar screens and textiles.
  • Religious Objects: relics, liturgical equipment and vestments.
  • Legal Texts: overlapping legal cultures, boundaries and legal status, legislation related to the life course.
  • Comparative approaches to liminality, in opposition or concordance with Late Antiquity and Byzantium.

Please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, along with a short academic biography in the third person, to the Oxford University Byzantine Society at byzantine.society@gmail.com by Monday, 25th November 2019. Papers should be 20 minutes in length and may be delivered in English or French. As with previous conferences, there will be a publication of selected papers, chosen and reviewed by specialists from the University of Oxford in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies. Speakers wishing to have their papers considered for publication should try to be as close to the theme as possible in their abstract and paper. Nevertheless, all submissions are warmly invited.

 

‘The Distribution of Economic and Political Power in Ancient Empires’, 10-11 June 2020, School of Classics, University of St Andrews.

Deadline: 31 January 2020

While the distribution of wealth in modern societies has recently received considerable attention (notably following the recent work of Thomas Piketty), it remains a relatively poorly understood aspect of ancient empires. This is the more unfortunate as the economic top layers played a pivotal role in governing these empires. Administrative posts were generally assigned to wealthy men, while they simultaneously allowed these men to increase their wealth.

This conference aims to explore the distribution of wealth and its mutually constituting relationship with political power for different ancient empires. Modern scholars often assume a simple correlation between political power and wealth. This is illustrated by the pervasive use of social tables (which are based on the socio-political structure of society) to estimate the distribution of wealth. Although economic and political power networks were indeed strongly integrated in many ancient empires and this strong entanglement is further endorsed by our elitist-biased literary sources, detailed studies of premodern economies and administrations reveal a more nuanced relationship between wealth and political power.

Possible topics of papers include, but are not limited to:

  • How were wealth and political power distributed?
  • How different were these distributions? Did wealth and political power always coincide? Were there power dissonances, i.e. men with economic but no political power or vice versa?
  •   How and to what extent were economic and political power networks integrated? Were there institutionalised links?
  • How could wealth be converted into political power and vice versa?
  • How did the political structure influence the process of wealth concentration or vice versa? What role did the centralised government play in the concentration of economic and political power?

Papers can be comparative (comparing different empires/societies), synthetic (on developments in the longue durée) or focus on a particular case study. Papers on any preindustrial empire or society are welcome. The conference language is English. Two bursaries of £100 towards travel expenses and two nights’ accommodation are available for postgraduate speakers. Prospective speakers are invited to send a 300-word abstract to Bart Danon (bd43@st-andrews.ac.uk) by 31 January 2020.

Confirmed speakers: Mirko Canevaro (Edinburgh), Lisa Eberle (Tübingen), Michael Jursa (Vienna), John Weisweiler (Cambridge), Arjan Zuiderhoek (Ghent).

 

‘Shame and Virtue in Antiquity’, 15-17 June 2020, Aix-Marseille University.

Deadline: 20 December 2019

Moral philosophy is nowadays marked by an interest in questions of psychology and anthropology of behaviour, and in the ethics of virtues rather than in the ethics of duties. This context has brought to the forefront the issue of emotions. The dominant paradigm is no longer an opposition between reason and desires or passions, but a complex interaction between the normative and rational principles of action and the emotions of the moral agent. Emotions are understood not as obstacles or disturbances to the morality of behaviour, but as factors that play a positive and driving role in this respect.

In ancient philosophy, this turning point is reflected in the rise of studies devoted to emotions, feelings and passions in the ethical and social register. Major works in this area include those of Douglas Cairns (1993) and Bernard Williams (1994) on shame, William Harris (2004) on anger, and David Konstan on fear, pity or hate (2006). All these feelings have a clear moral dimension, which is developed within an anthropology whose central subject is a social individual, a member of a community constituted by a sharing of values and beliefs, source of both norms and expectations. As a result, these emotional states have an ambivalent relationship with morally right or virtuous behaviour.

The conference Shame and Virtue in Antiquity aims to question this ambivalence by focusing on shame, an emotion that is particularly rich in this respect. Shame is a fundamental social emotion in Mediterranean cultures, which (still nowadays) place a strong and structuring value on honour, and ancient literature bears its mark. From the outset, it is also an ambivalent emotion, with contrasting faces, as evidenced by the semantic differences and overlaps of the doublet αἰσχύνη/αἰδώς. The historical field targeted by the scientific committee of the colloquium is broad, where existing studies preferentially focus on archaic poetic texts (Homer, tragic poets) and on classical authors, Plato and especially Aristotle. The conference Shame and Virtue proposes, from and beyond this period, to extend the investigation to Hellenistic schools, the Roman world and ancient Christianity. In this field, which articulates various types of pluralism (historical, political, linguistic, religious), the papers presented will help to explore the ambivalent relationship between shame and virtue in antiquity.

Abstracts of no more than 500 words are to be submitted in English or French. Please send your proposal and a short bio-bibliography to isabelle.koch@univ-amu.fr and anne.balansard@univ-amu.fr no later than December 20th, 2019. Authors will be notified of acceptance by January 31st, 2020.

 

  1. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

Visiting Research Scholar Program, The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World

Deadline: November 20 2019

The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) is a center for advanced scholarly research and graduate education, which aims to encourage particularly the study of the economic, religious, political and cultural connections between ancient civilizations. In an effort to embrace a truly inclusive geographical scope while maintaining continuity and coherence, the Institute focuses on the shared and overlapping periods in the development of cultures and civilizations around the Mediterranean basin, and across central Asia to the Pacific Ocean. The approaches of anthropology, archaeology, geography, geology, history, economics, sociology, art history, digital humanities, and the history of science and technology are as integral to the enterprise as the study of texts, philosophy, and the analysis of artifacts.

ISAW is now accepting applications for its 2020-21 Visiting Research Scholar program. Applicants for visiting scholar positions should be individuals of scholarly distinction or promise in any relevant field of ancient studies who will benefit from the stimulation of working in an environment with colleagues in other disciplines. Scholars with a history of interdisciplinary exchange and scholars whose academic interests include parts of the ancient Old World that are often underrepresented in traditional academic departments, including Africa, Central Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia, are especially welcome to apply.

Visiting scholars are expected to undertake research projects connected with ISAW’s core academic mission, to be in residence at the Institute during the period for which they are appointed, to take part in the intellectual life of the community, to participate in ISAW seminars, and to give a public lecture on their research at ISAW.

ISAW is prepared to host visiting research scholars in the following categories:

 

  • Two-Year Visiting Assistant Professors: ISAW anticipates appointing up to two Visiting Assistant Professors for 2020-22 (September 1, 2020-August 31, 2022). Holders of these positions are appointed as faculty, teach one graduate-level research seminar at ISAW during the two-year period, and teach one undergraduate course in an NYU department each academic year. Visiting Assistant Professorships are reserved for early-career scholars who received their PhDs on or after May 1, 2017. Current doctoral students in their final year of dissertation work are also welcome to apply, but please note that official conferral of the PhD must take place prior to the start-date of the position (September 1, 2020). To apply, see here.
  • One-Year Visiting Research Scholars: ISAW anticipates appointing up to three funded one-year Visiting Research Scholars for the 2020-21 academic year (September 1, 2020-August 31, 2021). Holders of these positions are typically appointed as professional research staff. One-Year Visiting Research Scholar positions are available to scholars of all post-PhD career stages, from recently minted PhDs to retired academics. Current doctoral students in their final year of dissertation work are also welcome to apply, but please note that official conferral of the PhD must take place prior to the start-date of the position (September 1, 2020). To apply, see here.
  • Externally-Funded Visiting Research Scholars: ISAW is prepared to consider applications from postdoctoral scholars with their own funding from another source. Externally Funded Visiting Research Scholar positions are available to scholars of all post-PhD career stages, from recently minted PhDs to retired academics. Applicants should have their doctorates in hand by the beginning of their period of appointment at ISAW. Holders of these positions do not receive any financial support from ISAW. To apply, see here.
  • Applicants for ISAW’s two-year Visiting Assistant Professorships will automatically be considered for the one-year funded Visiting Research Scholar positions. Please do NOT apply for both positions.

All applications should be made through Interfolio. The application deadline is November 20, 2019, and letters of recommendation are due by December 1, 2019. Note: Applicants should log into Interfolio to confirm that the application and letters of recommendation have been submitted properly prior to the relevant deadlines. Late submissions will not be accepted.

 

Société Mabillon Research Grants

Deadline: 31 January 2020

Pour contribuer au développement des études dans son champ d’activité, la Société Mabillon institue des bourses de recherche en faveur de jeunes chercheurs de toutes nationalités. Ces bourses, d’un montant de 500 à 1 000 €, sont destinées à apporter une aide financière à des recherches dans les archives et bibliothèques, notamment pour la préparation d’articles.

Les bourses sont attribuées à des chercheurs préparant le doctorat ou titulaires de celui-ci depuis moins de quatre ans à la date de candidature. Exceptionnellement, pourront aussi être retenus des candidats n’entrant pas dans ces catégories.

Les dossiers de candidature, rédigés en français, sont à adresser avant le 31 janvier à la Société (aux deux adresses suivantes: querol@cnrs-orleans.fr et sebastien.barret@cnrs-orleans.fr). Ils comporteront :

  • Un curriculum vitae du candidat, incluant une liste de ses travaux et publications antérieurs;
  • Une note de présentation du projet pour lequel il sollicite une bourse (max. 5000 signes);
  • Une évaluation des coûts prévus pour la réalisation du projet ;
  • Une attestation du directeur de thèse ou d’une personnalité scientifique appuyant le projet.

Le Bureau de la Société confie l’examen de chaque dossier de candidature à un membre du Conseil d’administration, qui rédige un rapport écrit. La décision d’attribution des bourses appartient à un comité composé du Bureau de la Société, du directeur de la Revue et du responsable de la Rédaction. Les décisions, qui ne peuvent faire l’objet de réclamations ou de recours, sont notifiées aux intéressés avant le 30 avril suivant.

Les bénéficiaires d’une bourse fourniront à la Société (mêmes adresses que les dossiers de candidature), avant le 31 janvier suivant la date d’attribution, un compte rendu scientifique et financier d’utilisation de la somme allouée. Ils sont invités à accorder une priorité à la Revue Mabillon pour publier une étude éventuellement issue des travaux financés par la bourse. Cet article sera soumis aux procédures ordinaires d’évaluation en vigueur pour les textes proposés à la Revue, qui pourra ou non le retenir.

Le Président de la Société rendra compte à l’Assemblée générale ordinaire des attributions de bourses de l’année précédente et des rapports rendus par les boursiers. La dotation globale destinée au financement des bourses est arrêtée chaque année par l’Assemblée générale ordinaire de la Société, sur proposition du Trésorier. Le comité d’attribution défini à l’article 5 détermine, à l’intérieur de cette enveloppe, le montant alloué à chacun des lauréats qu’il retient en tenant compte de la nature de son projet et des besoins exprimés. Si une partie de la dotation n’est pas distribuée, elle est réaffectée au budget annuel de la Société. La Société et la Revue Mabillon feront connaître le présent dispositif de bourses par tous les moyens qu’elles estimeront appropriés.

—————–

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings – Week 4

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 4

Michaelmas Term 2019

= = = = =

MONDAY 4th November

17.00 Ancient World Research Cluster Special Lecture

Wolfson College, Auditorium

Richard Sorabji

The cross-cultural spread of Greek Philosophy (and Indian moral tales) to C 6th Persian and Syriac

[+]

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, Old Library

Mirela Ivanova (University College)

Institutionalising Slavonic: The Life of Methodios as Latin-ate Hagiography

TUESDAY 5th November

10:30-16:00 Codex Zacynthius: Retracing the Words of Scribes and Early Christian Writers

Oriel College, Centre for the Study of the Bible in the Humanities

[+]

14:15 Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Hallel Baitner (Oxford)

Levitical singers in rabbinic sources: echoes of an ancient dispute

 

[+]

17.00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar

Harris Manchester College, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Peter Jones (King’s College, Cambridge)

Beginning mendicant medicine: English Franciscan views of healing, c. 1250

 

WEDNESDAY 6th November

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, Lecture Room

Gil Gambash (University of Haifa)

Haute cuisine in the Roman Negev

[+]

17.00 Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Chris Wickham (Oxford)

Commerce in Byzantium in the long eleventh century

[+]

 

17.00 Oxford Archaeological Fieldwork Seminar

Institute of Archaeology, Lecture Room

Ross Dannmayr (Visual Skies)

From the Dead Sea to the Peruvian Mountains: Approach, Methods, and

Techniques for Drone-based Surveying

THURSDAY 7th November

11.00-12:30 Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, First Floor Seminar Room

Elodie Powell

Mosaics and Memory: Late Antique Figured Funerary Mosaics from

North Africa

[+]

16.00 Late Roman Seminar

Corpus Christi College, Seminar Room

Mattias Gassman

A feast of the genius of Carthage: paganism and civic life in Augustine, sermo 62

[+]

17.15 Khalili Centre Research Seminar

The Khalili Research Centre, Lecture Room

Doris Behrens Abouseif (SOAS)

The Management of Architectural Heritage in the Mamluk Sultanate

FRIDAY 8th November

10.00-11.30 Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

12.00-13.00 Byzantine Literature

Ioannou Centre

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

17.00 National Byzantiums: Narratives of Empire in the Historiographies of Southeastern Europe

TORCH, Radcliffe Humanities, Colin Matthew Room

Professor Diana Mishkova

National Byzantiums: Narratives of Empire in the Historiographies of Southeastern Europe

Posted in Byzness