Oxford Listings – Week 7

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 7

Michaelmas Term 2017
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MONDAY 20th November

17:00 Medieval History Seminar
Wharton Room, All Souls

Jonathan Conant (Brown)
Envisioning Empire: Space and Power in the Carolingian World

TUESDAY 21st November

17:00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar (Medieval Islam)
Charles Wellbeloved Room, Harris Manchester

Julia Bray (Oxford)
Doing Emotions in Medieval Arabic

WEDNESDAY 22nd November

17:00 Empires of Faith Seminar
Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College

Maria Cristina Carile (Bologna)
Re-approaching the late antique and medieval art of Ravenna: Visuality and artistic culture of a Mediterranean city

THURSDAY 23rd November

11:00 Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Archaeology Seminar
Ioannou Centre

Grace Stafford (Oxford)
Literary and Material Evidence for Early Christian Female Pilgrimage

[+]

14:00 Islamic Art and Archaeology Today: Theories in Practice
Lecture Room Khalili Research Centre

Oliver Watson (Oxford)
An impossibility? Writing a book on Persian Pottery

[+]

17:00 Late Roman Seminar
Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College

Claire Sotinel (Université Paris Est – Créteil)
Constantine’s conversion politics

FRIDAY

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24th November

10:00 Byzantine Text Seminar
Ioannou Centre

Marc Lauxtermann

[+]

12:00 Byzantine Literature Lecture
Ioannou Centre

Marc Lauxtermann

[+]

17:00 The Cult of Saints in the First Millenium
Sutro Room, Trinity College

Edward Schoolman (Nevada)
Saints for Every Age: a Hagiographic Stratigraphy of Ravenna

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Posted in Oxford Listings

Byzness 19/11/17

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 19th November 2017

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1. NEWS AND EVENTS
2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

LECTURE: ‘St Theodore, Euchaita and Anatolia, c.500-1000 CE: Landscape, Climate and the Survival of an Empire, Boğaziçi University, 21 November 2017, 5pm

Speaker: John Haldon

There will be simultaneous translation into Turkish at the event.

LECTURE: ‘A Hut with a View: Monastic Communities and Lay Society in Byzantine Thrace’, Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies, Princeton, 28 November 2017, 4.30pm

Speaker: Georgios Makris (gmakris@princeton.edu),

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Hannah Seeger Davis Postdoctoral Fellow, Hellenic Studies

Respondent:  Jack Tannous, History

In this lecture, I will examine the history and material culture of monasticism in Thrace, the European hinterland of Constantinople, between the tenth and fourteenth centuries. Primarily concerned with important aspects of monastic life, including daily routine and living conditions, property ownership, and patronage as well as the modes of interaction with the laity, this lecture will offer a rare view of the landscape setting and architectural configuration of multiple monastic foundations across Thrace. In the Byzantine world, monasticism was a fundamental institution that touched the lives of virtually all inhabitants regardless of their financial or social status. In investigating the ties between Byzantine monastics and laity, it will be imperative to transcend the political boundaries that now divide Thrace into three modern nation-states: Bulgaria, Greece, and Turkey. Ultimately, by bringing together archaeological material and textual sources, I will attempt to identify and decipher key facets of the cultural and economic relation between hinterland and center, between Thrace and Constantinople.

Georgios Makris holds a B.A. in History and Archaeology from the University of Athens and a Ph.D. in Byzantine Studies from the University of Birmingham. He has held fellowships at the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection (Junior Fellow, 2014-2015) and at Koç University’s Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations in Istanbul (Fellow, 2015-2016). Makris was previously a post-doctoral research scholar in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University (2016-2017). He is currently working on his first monograph on the life-cycle, topography, and spatial composition of monastic communities in the region of Thrace, the hinterland of Constantinople, from the tenth to fourteenth centuries. In his work, Makris follows an interdisciplinary methodology which brings together the systematic analysis of texts associated with religious institutions with the results of archaeological fieldwork in Greece and Turkey.

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2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

‘Byzantium and the Slavs’

Deadline: 31 December 2017

The Slavs, whose presence on the territory of Europe has been recorded starting from the first centuries of our era, profoundly interacted with Byzantium, determining its political choices and shaping its identity: first, the encounter-clash between these two different worlds, which the court of Constantinople had repeatedly attempted through diplomacy or weapons, and hence the progressive formation of the Slavic states in the Balkan Peninsula is undoubtedly among the indispensable factors in the examination of the modern Byzantine scholar. And this is all the more true when thinking about the developments of the historical and social dynamics inherent in Slavic populations that continue to be reflected in the modern world.

In the light of these considerations and in the perspective of dedicating the next issue of Porphyra (XXVII) to the relationship between Byzantium and the Slavs, we invite interested professors, doctoral students, research doctors, young researchers and scholars to send their contributions to editorporphyra@gmail.com before and no later than 31 December 2017.

http://www.porphyra.it/call-for-papers/

‘Byzantium and the Modern Imagination: Patterns of the Reception of Byzantium in Modern Culture’, Masaryk University, Brno, 12-14 September 2018

Deadline: 30 March 2018

The imagery of Byzantium in popular discourse is a culturally and historically constructed notion. As has been noted, the very name “Byzantium” is both a retronym and an exonym, and scholars today very often insist on using a more proper description – “The Eastern Roman Empire”. Writers, playwrights, musicians, and politicians throughout centuries constructed their own versions of Byzantium, which depended on local artistic or political needs. In many cases these constructed versions had very little to do with the “historical” Byzantium. Yet, at the same time, academic discourse might – and did – influence the imagery of Byzantium in the popular imagination. During the conference we would like to discuss these imaginary visions of Byzantium, including the intersections of popular and academic images of Byzantium. We also welcome papers dealing with the use (and abuse) of key events in Byzantine history (such as the Fall of City) and their reworkings in literature and culture.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

–       The reception of Byzantium in schoolbooks in Europe and beyond;

–       Byzantium for the young – Byzantium in children’s literature and games;

–       Literary reworkings of key events and personages in the history of Byzantium;

–       Byzantine Studies and its influence on the popular understanding of Byzantium;

–       The ways of popularising Byzantium;

–       Byzantium in the digital age;

–       Byzantium in popular culture (games, speculative fiction, TV series, films).

Please send the abstract (no more than 300 words) for a 20 minutes presentation to Przemysław Marciniak (przemyslaw.marciniak@us.edu.pl) by March, 30 2018.

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3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Tenure Track Position in Digital Humanities Computing, University of Oklahoma

Deadline: 1 December, 2017.

You may be aware that, among other initiatives, http://syri.ac is hosted at OU. The University is very eager to continue to add major Digital Humanities projects among its faculty, particularly in the area of “Big Data” computing.

More information here: https://apply.interfolio.com/46095

Please also feel free to contact Scott Johnson (sfj@ou.edu) for more information.

ANAMED fellowships, Koç University

Deadline: 15 December 2017

Koç University invites applications for PhD, Post-Doctoral, and Senior Fellowships at Koç University’s Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations (ANAMED). Opportunities include regular fellowships for support of residential and a few non-residential scholars for the full academic year. Several short-term fellowships for individual or group projects with durations between 2 weeks and 2 months are available for post-doc and senior applicants needing to study in Istanbul for shorter periods of time. A few post-doc or senior applications for regular and short-term fellowships that qualify for collaborative fellowships involving Koç University faculty, centers, or facilities will be preferred. Applicants for regular, short-term, and collaborative fellowships are encouraged to consider their applications with one of ANAMED’s research themes. Additionally, several joint fellowships with specific application criteria are available.

All ANAMED fellows are expected to devote themselves full time to their research projects, to be active members of Koç University’s academic community, and, for full-year fellowships, to give two lectures on their work during the course of the year. Applications from scholars of all nationalities are encouraged, yet fellows must be proficient in English, the language of instruction at Koç University.

Established in 2005, ANAMED’s mission is to promote and produce cutting-edge scholarship contributing to the growing body of critical knowledge on Anatolia and its civilizations. Applications focusing on the archaeology, art history, heritage, and history of Anatolia from the Neolithic through the Ottoman eras are welcome from scholars of these and allied disciplines, including those that focus on the management, conservation, and presentation of the past. Located in the Beyoğlu district of Istanbul, ANAMED is near many research institutions, archives, and other scholarly facilities and thus serves as a convenient and comfortable locus for intensive study.

For more information, see: https://anamed.ku.edu.tr/en/fellowships-0 and to apply, see https://anamed.service-now.com/anamed

Numerous Graduate Fellowships, Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute (CAARI)

Deadline: 15 December 2017

THE CYPRUS AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE (CAARI) in Nicosia, Cyprus, welcomes scholars and students specializing in archaeology, history, and culture of Cyprus and the eastern Mediterranean. CAARI is located in central Nicosia close to the Cyprus Museum and the Archaeological Research Unit of the University of Cyprus (both with major libraries), as well as the main business and commercial district. In addition to hostel accommodation for a total of twelve residents, the institute has excellent research facilities: a 10,000-volume library, comprehensive map and artifact collections, archival material, and facilities for Internet, scanning, and photography.

Recipients of fellowships are required to spend time as residents of CAARI and to submit a written report for the CAARI newsletter.

The details of the fellowships, and the application forms, are available here: http://caari.org/fellowships/

Posted in Byzness

Oxford Listings – Week 5

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 5

Michaelmas Term 2017
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MONDAY 6th November

17:00   

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Medieval History Seminar
Wharton Room, All Souls

Merridee Bailey (University of Adelaide)

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The Value of Meekness in Medieval Hierarchies

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TUESDAY 7th November

17:00 

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Medieval Church and Culture Seminar (Medieval Islam)
Charles Wellbeloved Room, Harris Manchester

Umberto Bongianino (Oxford)

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A Quranic Manuscript from Medieval Morocco

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WEDNESDAY 8th November

12.30 

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TORCH Book at Lunchtime
Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building, Woodstock Road

Lunch available at 12:30pm, Discussion 1–2pm

Join the authors of the catalogue of Imagining the Divine (on show at the Ashmolean from 19 October) and the exhibition’s curators, as well as a panel of experts in the field, for lunch and a lively discussion of both catalogue and exhibition. Lunch & talk are free, booking essential.

For further details, visit: http://torch.ox.ac.uk/imagining-divine-art-and-rise-world-religions

[+]

17:00 

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Empires of Faith Seminar
Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College

Alain George (Oxford)

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The temple, church, and first mosque at Damascus: New perspectives

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THURSDAY 9th November

11:00 

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Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Archaeology Seminar
Ioannou Centre

Stefan Faust

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Fun with Achilles. Late Roman Perspectives on the Life of a Greek Hero

[+]

14:00 

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Islamic Art and Archaeology Today: Theories in Practice
Lecture Room Khalili Research Centre

Archie Walls (Independent Scholar)

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Geometry and architecture in Islamic Jerusalem: a Sufi way

[+]

17:00 

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Late Roman Seminar
Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College

Dominique Santos (Universidade Regional de Blumenau, Brazil)

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Connections across the Irish Sea: bilingualism and biliteralism in the ogham stones of Late Antiquity

[+]

17:00 

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Georgian Studies Seminar Series
The Syndicate Room, St Anthony’s College

Sandro Nikolaishvili (Central European University, Budapest)

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The Construction of Royal/Imperial Authority in Georgia and Byzantium in the Age of Davit IV and Alexios I Komnenos, ca. 1081–1125

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FRIDAY 10th November

10:00 

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Byzantine Text Seminar
Ioannou Centre

Marc Lauxtermann

[+]

12:00 

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Byzantine Literature Lecture
Ioannou Centre

Marc Lauxtermann

[+]

17:00 

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The Cult of Saints in the First Millenium
Sutro Room, Trinity College

Susan Walker (Ashmolean), Jaś Elsner (Corpus Christi), and Maria Lidova (Wolfson)

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Book Presentation of: Saints and Salvation: the Wilshere Collection of Goldglass, Sarcophagi and Inscriptions from Rome and Southern Italy by S. Walker, S. Leatherbury, and D. Rini

Posted in Oxford Listings

Byzness 05/11/17

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 5 November 2017
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1. CALLS FOR PAPERS
2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

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1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

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PhD Colloquium on Late Antiquity, 4-5 May 2018, University of Reading

Deadline: 10 November (papers)/15 November (posters

Keynote speech: Dr. Chiara O. Tommasi (University of Pisa): Esotericism in Classical and Late Antiquity

Late Antiquity was once regarded as an age of decadence and barbarisation as well as a ‘marginal’ field of study. Those days are over. Late Antiquity has now its own place in academia and is considered a hot topic by both Classicists and historians of the Early Middle Ages, as well as scholars of religious studies, archaeology, art and philosophy in a fruitful exchange among disciplines.

The study of Late Antiquity involves a wide variety of disciplines. Our PhD Colloquium on Late Antiquity will take place at the University of Reading in May 4-5, 2018. The aim of our Colloquium is to make the most of such diversification by bringing together and achieving synergy among PhD Students from across the UK and abroad working on Late Antiquity.

Each paper (15 min) will be followed by a personalised response from a senior scholar (10 min) assigned by the organisers and a plenary discussion. Each delegate will circulate his or her paper a week in advance to his or her respondent.

Additionally, we will also host a poster session, with a £50 voucher prize for the best poster.

Lastly, the Colloquium will include a visit to the Ure Museum of Classical Archaeology of the University of Reading.

We welcome submissions of papers and/or posters from disciplines including (but not limited to) Greek and Latin Literature, History, Archaeology, Art, Philosophy and Theology:

Option A: papers (15 min)

Send an abstract of your paper (400 words) to readinglateantiquity@gmail.com by 10 November 2017. Please also specify your affiliation.

Option B: posters

Send a brief abstract (200 words) or outline of your poster to readinglateantiquity@gmail.com by 15 November 2017. Please also specify your affiliation.

Please note that, as the event is specifically aimed at PhD students, we can only accept submissions from PhD students. However, Masters students and early career researchers are warmly invited to attend and participate in the debates.

For further enquiries, please contact Lorenzo Livorsi (l.livorsi@pgr.reading.ac.uk), Ilaria Scarponi (ilaria.scarponi@reading.ac.uk) or Fiona McMeekin (f.p.mcmeekin@pgr.reading.ac.uk).
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2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

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Various funding opportunities: Council for British

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Research in the Levant

Deadline: from 30 November, see website for further information

The CBRL is offering the following funding for 2018-19

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Visiting Research Fellowships and Senior Visiting Fellowships

To enable established scholars in university posts and early career postdoctoral candidates to spend time in the Levant region to conduct primary research, develop contacts, give lectures, and write up project results/publications derived from a thesis/research.

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Project Awards

Our Project Awards include funding opportunities for Pilot Study, Project Completion and Team-Based Fieldwork.

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Travel Grants

CBRL Travel Grants cover costs of travel and subsistence for students, academics and researchers undertaking reconnaissance tours or smaller research projects in the countries of the Levant.

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Centennial Awards

In 2019 the CBRL celebrates 100 years since the founding of our active research community.

To commemorate the anniversary, we will be offering a number of Centennial Awards for research or events focusing on the history of British scholarship in the area and early Mandate history, society and politics.

Further information can be found here: http://cbrl.org.uk/funding-and-jobs.

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PhD: ‘Mobility and Geography in the Byzantine World’, Radbound University Nijmegen, Netherlands

Deadline: 17 December 2017

Please note that it is intended that the applicant will begin study soon after 1 March 2018.

A project description, further details, deadlines and contact information can be found here

Posted in Byzness

Oxford Listings – Week 4

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 4

 

Michaelmas Term 2017
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MONDAY 30th October

 

15:00 Medieval Archaeology Seminar

Lecture Room, Institute of Archaeology

Grenville Astill

 

Permeable precincts and changing landscapes: reviewing late medieval monasteries

 

[+]

 

17:00   Medieval History Seminar

Wharton Room, All Souls

David Carpenter (KCL)

New Light on the Treaty of Paris 1259: King Louis IX and the political revolution in England

TUESDAY​ 31st October

 

16:00 Special Slade Lecture

Prof. Salvatore Settis (Chair of the Louvre Museum’s Scientific Council)

 

The Materiality of the Divine: Aniconism, Iconoclasm, Iconography

 

[+]

 

17:00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar (Medieval Islam)

Charles Wellbeloved Room, Harris Manchester

Farouk Yahya (Oxford)

 

The Magic Square
WEDNESDAY 1st November

 

17:00   The Cult of the Saints in Late Antiquity Project

Ioannou Centre

 

Launch of the new online database.

Followed by a drinks reception.

 

[+]

 

17:00 Empires of Faith Seminar

Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College

Nadia Ali (London)

 

Qusayr ‘Amra and the continuity of post-classical art in early Islam: Towards an iconology of forms

 

 

THURSDAY 2nd November

 

11:00 Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Archaeology Seminar

Ioannou Centre

Irina Demetradze

 

Defining Urban Space: Archaeology and Topography of Mtskheta

 

[+]

 

14:00 Islamic Art and Archaeology Today: Theories in Practice

Lecture Room Khalili Research Centre

Lamia Hadda (University of Naples “L’Orientale”)

 

L’architecture palatiale ziride et hammadide et son influence sur l’architecture normande en Sicile

 

[+]

 

17:00 Late Roman Seminar

Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College

Robin Whelan (Oxford/Liverpool)

 

Mirrors for bureaucrats: expectations of Christian officials in the Theodosian Empire

 

FRIDAY 3rd November

 

10:00 Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre

Marc Lauxtermann

 

[+]

 

12:00 Byzantine Literature Lecture

Ioannou Centre

Marc Lauxtermann

Posted in Oxford Listings

Byzness 29/10/17

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 29 October 2017
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS
2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

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LECTURE: “Pωμαιοκρατία ≠ Roman occupation: (Mis)perceptions of the Roman Period in Greece”, University Library, Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection, 1 November 2017

Dr. Anna Kouremenos, Independent Scholar, New Haven, CT.

This paper focuses on the place the Romans hold in the modern Greek national narrative. It brings together evidence from archaeological sites, museums, the media, and education in order to show how the country’s Roman past has been displayed and taught to both Greeks and foreigners.

Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017
Senator Nicholas Petris Room, Library 3023 (3rd floor)
Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection, University Library

Schedule of Events:
7:00 – 8:30 p.m. presentation and discussion

The presentation is free and open to the public.

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TALK: Empires of Faith project’s ‘Imagining the Divine’ exhbition, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Details for a number of talks here.

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EXHIBITION: ‘Those Who Follow’, Ioannou Centre, Oxford

Details here.

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CONFERENCE: Fieldwork in Late Antique Archaeology: Burial and Funerary Practice, 25 November 2017, Birckbeck College London

This seminar reviews the state of funerary archaeology across the late antique world, providing an up-to-date overview of the latest discoveries in the field and in the lab, organised in terms of a series of regional portraits, from the cemeteries of Britain to the caves of Egypt.

*Britain*

10.00-10.30 Paul Booth (Oxford Archaeology)

Southern Britain

10.30-11.00 Sadie Watson* (Museum of London Arch.)

London

11.00-11.30 Jake Weekes (Canterbury Arch. Trust)

Canterbury

*Western Mediterranean*

11.50-12.20 Mauro Puddu (Cambridge)

Sardinia

12.20-12.40 Alexandra Chavarria* (Padua)

Northern Italy

12.40-13.10 Kaja Stembeger (KCL)

Slovenia

*Africa and Egypt*

14:00-14:30 Anna Leone* (Durham)

Africa

14:30-15:00 Elisabeth O’Connell (British Museum)

Egypt

*East Mediterranean*

15:20-15:40 Joseph Rife (Vanderbildt)

Greece

15:40-16:10 Sophie Moore (Brown)

Asia Minor

16.10-16.40 Ádám Bollók (HAS, Budapest)

The Near East

16:45-17.00 John Pearce (KCL)

Conclusion

The conference will be held at Birkbeck College. All are welcome. Admission 15 GBP; Students / OAPs 7.5 GBP.

To register write to michaelmulryan@gmail.com before 20th November. Papers marked * = read in absentia. # = via skype.

Venue: B35 Lecture Theatre inside Birkbeck College, Malet Street, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 7HX
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​​2.

CALLS FOR PAPERS

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51st Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies, ‘The Post-1204 Byzantine World: New Approaches and Novel Directions’, 13–15 April 2018, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, The University of Edinburgh

Deadline: 1 December 2017

The 51st Spring Symposium will return to Edinburgh for the third time, after Prof. Michael Angold’s The Byzantine Aristocracy, IX–XIII Centuries in 1982 and Prof. Jim Crow’s The Archaeologies of Byzantium in 2008. The 2018 symposium will be dedicated to the late Byzantine world, taking its starting point from the cataclysmic events of 1204. Especially in recent years, the late Byzantine period has seen an increasing amount of exciting research activity: from continuing Grundlagenforschung (palaeography, critical editions, translations and commentaries) via the reevaluation of key social, political, and economic practices to the application of new methods such as network studies or sociolinguistics, our understanding of the society and politics of the final two hundred and fifty years of Roman rule in the eastern Mediterranean have much increased. If down to the late 1990s Laskarid and Palaiologan Byzantium was often still perceived as one of the (many) Cinderellas of Byzantine Studies, this is clearly no longer the case.

Wherever one looks these days, exciting postgraduate projects are under way; in an increasing number of universities, Byzantine Studies is taught by colleagues with expertise in the later Byzantine period. The 51st Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies seeks to take stock of these novel approaches to the post- 1204 Byzantine world by bringing together established researchers, new voices, and open communications on all aspects of this newly polycentric world that stretched from Constantinople to Mystras and from Arta to Trebizond: we will explore the functioning of late Byzantine politics – the interaction of emperors and rulers with aristocratic, ecclesiastical, urban elites and the dēmos – look at the cultural, religious, and literary life in the various post-1204 polities from various angles, and explore the fragile position of the dwindling Eastern Roman polities in their wider Mediterranean context, from the Italian powers via the Balkans to the Mamluks, Ottomans, and Mongols.

The 51st Spring Symposium invites contributions for ‘New Voices’ papers and Communications on any of these themes and warmly invites abstracts from scholars within and without the UK and in fields linked to Byzantine studies. ‘New Voices’ papers (20 minutes) are open to post-doctoral scholars as well as doctoral students in the final year of dissertation writing and should introduce an aspect of current research pertinent to the Symposium theme. They will be considered for publication in the Symposium proceedings alongside main papers (subject to peer review). Communications (10 minutes) are open to everybody, and will not normally be published. The call for ‘New Voices’ papers and Communications is now open. If you would like to offer a ‘New Voices’ paper or a Communication on the theme of the Symposium, please send an abstract of no more than 500 words (for a ‘New Voices’ paper) or no more than 250 words (for a Communication) to byzantium2018@ed.ac.uk by 1 December 2017. Successful submissions will be informed no later than 15 December 2017. Some bursaries will be available to selected speakers, especially to attendees from outside the UK. If you would like to be considered for a bursary please indicate this on your abstract and we will send you further information about the application process if appropriate. For further information on the 51st Symposium, please check https://www.ed.ac.uk/history-classics-archaeology/news-events/events/51st-spring-symposium-of-byzantine-studies (if the page does not open, please copypaste the complete link manually into your browser and make sure to remove the hyphen and space in the middle of ‘archaeology’). Information will be updated regularly.

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7th International Hilandar Conference, Preserving and Accessing Medieval Slavic Manuscripts”, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA

Deadline: 10 January 2018

Papers that compare medieval Slavic to other manuscript traditions will also be considered, as will presentations about the establishment of similar libraries and centers that preserve a cultural heritage and promote scholarly access to its materials. Possible session topics related to medieval Slavic manuscripts include:

Conservation and preservation

Description and cataloging

Microfilming, Digitization, and/or Digital Humanities

Watermarks

Hymnography Acrostics and other hidden information in manuscripts

Teaching medieval Slavic manuscripts

Medieval Slavic texts preserved in other traditions

Hilandar Monastery Manuscripts (Slavic and Greek)

Scribes

Hilandar Monastery Edicts – Slavic, Greek, Ottoman, and/or Wallacho-Moldavian

The international series of Hilandar conferences began at The Ohio State University in April 1981, when medieval Slavic scholars from 19 different countries came to Columbus to show their appreciation and support for what was then the Hilandar Research Project (HRP). The HRL, at the invitation of the monks, had microfilmed at Hilandar Monastery nearly 1,000 Cyrillic manuscripts and over 400 medieval charters and edicts (Slavic, Greek, Ottoman and Wallacho-Moldavian), thus creating for the first time opportunities for scholars, especially female scholars (who cannot work with the originals on Mount Athos), to conduct research of nearly 500,000 pages of what was then largely un-researched material. The materials were first housed in the “Hilandar Room,” dedicated December 2, 1978, in the “Main” Library at Ohio State. In 1984, the HRP ended and two units were created: the Hilandar Research Library, a special collection of University Libraries, and the Resource Center for Medieval Slavic Studies (RCMSS) in the College of Arts and Sciences. We invite scholars (researchers, faculty, independent scholars and graduate students) to submit abstracts (not to exceed 500 words) to hilandar@osu.edu. For additional event information, please contact the RCMSS Program Coordinator Jessi Jones, jones.3939@osu.edu.
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3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

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Various Research Opportunities at the French School of Athens

Deadline: from 31 October 2017

Details can be found here and here.

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Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowships

Deadline: 30 November 2017

The call for the 2018 Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowships is now open for one or two-year fellowships. Applicants must be supported by an academic mentor at an eligible higher education institute in the Republic of Ireland. Trinity College Dublin Classics has hosted five IRC Postdocs in the past three years (in literature, history and archaeology) and the Department welcomes enquiries from suitably qualified, outstanding candidates for this new call.

“The mission of the Council is to enable and sustain a vibrant and creative research community in Ireland. The Council is an agency of the Department of Education and Skills and operates under the aegis of the Higher Education Authority. The core function of the Council is to support excellent frontier research across all disciplines and career stages. It places particular focus on early-stage researchers and promotes diverse career opportunities for researchers by partnering with enterprise. The Council also has a particular role in supporting research with a societal focus, and has established partnerships across government and civic society.”

Full details of the scheme at: http://research.ie/funding/goipd/?f=postdoctoral, but anyone interested should be aware that there is an internal deadline for the sign-off of applications, well ahead of the final submission deadline of 30 November 2017. Please contact the Head of Department Professor Monica Gale (mrgale@tcd.ie) or a potential mentor for further information. A list of staff members of the Classics Department at TCD and details of their research interests can be found at http://www.tcd.ie/Classics/research/staff.php.

Posted in Byzness

CALL FOR PAPERS: OUBS Graduate Conference 2018

Call for papers: The Oxford University Byzantine Society’s 20th International Graduate Conference (23-24 February 2018, University of Oxford)

Space and Dimension in Late Antiquity and Byzantium

Whether we are examining the political and military control of vast territories, the creation and maintenance of authority, the ritual surrounding religious practice, or the establishment of social relationships and hierarchies, all  reflected through a rich artistic and literary culture, it is clear: space mattered in the Late Antique and Byzantine world.

However, the inclusion of space in scholarship pertaining to Late Antiquity and Byzantium is still too often the exception rather than the rule, especially in works that do not primarily concern archaeology or art history. Accordingly, this conference will offer a platform for interdisciplinary discussion on the role of space and dimension in scholarly debate, and how its inclusion will change – or not – our understanding of the Late Antique and Byzantine world.

Postgraduate students are invited to engage with various interpretations of ‘space’ and ‘dimension’, in all fields of Late Antique and Byzantine history: including history, archaeology, history of art, theology, literature, and philology. Abstracts from scholars working on the so-called ‘peripheries’ of the Late Antique and Byzantine world are strongly encouraged, particularly those whose research intersects with African and Asian history, as are those from scholars working in Islamic and Jewish Studies.

Topics may include:

  • Space, dimension and other forms of perspective in artistic, manuscript, and literary sources.
  • Closeness and distance and their effects on the circulation of textual and intellectual culture.
  • The form and use of space in public and private buildings; perceptions of and attitudes towards open and closed spaces.
  • The use of space in ritual, whether religious or secular; space and authority.
  • The impact of space and dimension on political and military considerations.
  • The control of movement and access; segregation; real and imagined barriers; binaries and their transgression.
  • The role of space in interpersonal relationships; gendered space.
  • Attitudes to distance and travel; perceptions of the landscape.
  • Space in monastic and ascetic life.
  • Attitudes towards the body and embodied experience.
  • Perception of the invisible; alternate worlds and dimensions; the afterlife.

Please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, with a short academic biography in the third person, to the Oxford University Byzantine Society at byzantine.society@gmail.com by Saturday 18 November 2017. Papers should be 20 minutes in length, delivered in English or French. Please note that abstracts will only be considered if they are by current postgraduate students.

As with our previous conferences, there will be a publication of selected papers chosen and reviewed by specialist readers from the University of Oxford’s Late Antique and Byzantine Studies research centres. Any speakers wishing to have their papers considered for publication should try to engage with the conference theme as closely as possible in their abstract and paper. Nevertheless, all submissions are warmly invited.

 

Posted in International Graduate Conference 2018

Oxford Listings – Week 3

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 3

Michaelmas Term 2017
= = = = =

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MONDAY 23rd October

17:00   

​​

Medieval History Seminar
Wharton Room, All Souls

Oren Margolis (Oxford), Graham Barrett (Lincoln)

​​

Pontifex Maximus: From Numa Pompilius to James I

​​

TUESDAY 24th October

17:00 

​​

Medieval Church and Culture Seminar (Medieval Islam)
Charles Wellbeloved Room, Harris Manchester

Alasdair Watson (Oxford)

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The Education of a Princeps (and a Parvus): Avicenna’s (d. 1037) account of his formative years compared to that of John of Salisbury (d. 1180)

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WEDNESDAY 25th October

17:00   

​​

Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar
Ioannou Centre

Christos Stavrakos (Ioannina)

​​

New Byzantine sigillographic evidence from the Akropolis of Athens

[+]

17:00 

​​

Empires of Faith Seminar
Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College

Susan Walker (Oxford)

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Man with a mission: Charles Wilshere, a Victorian collector of early Christian and Jewish antiquities

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THURSDAY 26th October

11:00 

​​

Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Archaeology Seminar
Ioannou Centre

Rowena Loverance

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A Sculptor and His Workshop in 11th-Century Greece

[+]

14:00 

​​

Islamic Art and Archaeology Today: Theories in Practice
Lecture Room Khalili Research Centre

Georgi Parpulov (Oxford/British Museum)

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Late medieval pottery from Ephesus

[+]

17:00 

​​

Late Roman Seminar
Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College

Hugh Elton (Trent University, Ontario)

​​

Vitalian and his revolt against the emperor Anastasius

[+]

17:00 

​​

Georgian Studies Seminar Series
The Syndicate Room, St Anthony’s College

Ekateriane Gedevanishvili (Chubinashvili Centre, Tblisi)

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The Image of ‘Animated’ Mountains in Medieval Georgian Paintings

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FRIDAY

​ 27th October​

10:00 

​​

Byzantine Text Seminar
Ioannou Centre

Marc Lauxtermann

[+]

12:00 

​​

Byzantine Literature Lecture
Ioannou Centre

Marc Lauxtermann

[+]

17:00 

​​

The Cult of Saints in the First Millenium
Sutro Room, Trinity College

Lorenzo Livorsi (Reading)

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Power, Praise and Prayer in Venantius Fortunatus’ Life of Saint Martin

Posted in Byzness

Byzness 22/10/17

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===
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 22 October 2017
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS
2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====
====

​​

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

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CONFERENCE: ‘Byzantion and Byzantium: The provincialism of the center and the centrality of the provinces’, 24-26 October 2017, Centre for Medieval Studies, National Research University, Moscow

24 October, Tuesday

Chair – Sergey Ivanov
09.30–09.45 Opening
09.45-10.45 Paul Magdalino (University of St. Andrews) “Cappadocia and Constantinople in the 6 th Century”
10.45–11.00 Coffee break
11.00–12.00 Arkadiy Avdokhin (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow) “Far-Off Songs, Close Ties: Early Byzantine Hymns and the Making of Urban Liturgical Identity between the Capital and Provinces”
12.00–13.00 Albrecht Berger (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich) “Recycling Constantinople”

13.00–14.00 Lunch

Chair – Paul Magdalino
14.00–15.00 Philipp Niewöhner (Georg-August-Universität, Göttingen) “The Significance of the Cross before and during Iconoclasm”
15.00–16.00 Andrey Vinogradov (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow) “Architectural Relationships between Constantinople and Asia Minor in the Middle-Byzantine Period”
16.00–16.15 Coffee break
16.15–17.15 Michalis Kappas (Ephorate of Antiquities of Messenia, Kalamata) “The Architectural Idiom of Thessaloniki during the Middle and Late Byzantine Periods: Similarities and Differences from Constantinople”
17.15–18.15 Denis Jolshin (State Hermitage, St. Petersburg) “First Masonry Churches of the Old Rus: Questioning the Origin of Byzantine Builders”

25 October, Wednesday 20

Chair – Albrecht Berger
09.30–10.30 Anna Zakharova (Lomonosov Moscow State University) “The Art of the 10th Century: Constantinople and Cappadocia”
10.30–11.30 Haluk Çetinkaya (Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University, Istanbul) “Reconsidering the Architecture of Pantokrator Monastery at Istanbul in the Lights of Recent Restorations”
11.30–11.45 Coffee break
11.45–12.45 Mikhail Zheltov (Ss. Cyril and Methodius Theological Institute of Post-graduate Studies, Moscow) “Constantinople and the Byzantine State in the Orthodox Liturgy”

12.45–13.45 Lunch

Chair – Andrey Vinogradov
13.45–14.45 Tolga Uyar (Hacı Bektaş Veli University, Nevşehir) “On the Question of ‘Byzantium’ in 13th Century Seljuk Anatolia”
14.45–15.45 Dmitriy Chernoglazov (Saint-Petersburg State University) “Connecting Byzantium and Byzantion: Formation and Use of Model Letter Collections during the Paleologan Period”
15.45–16.00 Coffee break
16.00–17.00 Beatrice Daskas (Università Ca’ Foscari, Venice) “’Venetia Hebbe Principio per la Destrution della Grande Trogia’: (Once More) on the Myth of Venice as Alterum Byzantium”
17.00–18.00 Sergey Ivanov (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow) “No Constantinople: The Image of Byzantium in the Oldest Russian-Greek Phrasebook”
18.00–18.30 Final discussion

26 October, Thursday

07.30 Departure from the hotel
10.00–18.00 Field workshop “Metropolitan City in a Province: The Case of Vladimir & Suzdal”

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CONFERENCE: ‘Byzantium in Space and Time. Constantinople, Syria.’ 10-11 November 2017, Pontificio Istituto Orientale, Rome

Friday, 10 November 2017 – Morning

David Nazar, Rettore PIO
Saluto

Enzo Ruggieri, Pontificio Istituto Orientale – Antonio Rigo, Università di Venezia Ca’ Foscari
I

​n​

troduzione

Marco Di Branco, Istituto Storico Germanico — Roma
La Polis nella Madīna: Damasco greco-romana nelle fonti arabe

Paolo Odorico, EHESS – Paris
Da Costantinopoli allo Yemen: una missione siriana?

Francesco Monticini, Università degli Studi Roma Tre / EHESS – Paris
Fra Bisanzio e l’Islam: lo studio degli astri lungo la Via del Deserto

Friday, 10 November 2017 – Afternoon

Peter Schreiner, Universität Köln
Ricchi e poveri a Costantinopoli

Laura Borghetti, Universität Mainz
Il vento nella Costantinopoli dei Macedoni: Fisica, topografia e ruolo letterario di un fenomeno naturale

Giandomenico Ferrazza, Università degli Studi Roma Tre
Il viaggio di un papa “greco” a Costantinopoli (710-711): l’ultima speranza per una Roma bizantina?

Sergio Basso, Università degli Studi Roma Tre


Viaggiatori cinesi a Costantinopoli: il nome di Bisanzio

Saturday, 11 November 2017 – Morning

Giuseppe De Gregorio, Università degli Studi di Salerno
Contra Iudaeos: manoscritti a Costantinopoli dalla corte di Andronico II Paleologo al Patriarcato ecumenico nel XVI secolo

Marc Lauxtermann, Oxford University
Three Verse Inscriptions in the Petra Monastery

Giulia Maria Paoletti, Oxford University
Costantinopoli, Prodromos Petra e una raccolta oracolare del XV secolo

Yuri R. Saveliev, Accademia Russa delle Belle Arti
Image of S. Sofia of Constantinople in the Neo-byzantine architecture of Russia, Europe and USA

Saturday, 11 November 2017 – Afternoon

Philippe Luisier, Pontificio Istituto Orientale
Alessandria e Costantinopoli. Il patriarcato di Efeso nella tradizione della chiesa copta

Massimo Bernabò, Università degli Studi di Pavia
I cicli miniati in Tur ‘Abdin

Nicolò Sassi, Indiana University
Congregavit nos in unum: il Corpus Areopagiticum e il Libro di Ieroteo di Stefano bar Sudaili

Pia Carolla, Università degli Studi Roma Tre
La Siria e Costantinopoli nei cosiddetti Excerpta Constantiniana de legationibus Romanorum

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CONFERENCE: ‘Charitable Foundations in Byzantium;,  22 November 2017, Scuola Grande di San Marco, Venice

Registration: scuolagrandesanmarco@aulss3.veneto.it 

10.00   

​ ​

Saluto inaugurale
Giuseppe Dal Ben, direttore generale Azienda Ulss3 Serenissima
Mario Po’ direttore del Polo Culturale e Museale della Scuola Grande di San
Marco

10:30   Presiede: Paul Magdalino, St. Andrews
Giorgio Ravegnani, Ca’ Foscari: Venezia e Bisanzio
Claudia Rapp, Vienna: Charitable Foundations in the Early Byzantine Period
Alexey Pentkovski, Sergiev Posad: Il tipikon di Alessio Studita la Pečerskaja Lavra Kiev

12:00   Presiede: Giorgio Ravegnani, Ca’ Foscari
Paul Magdalino, St. Andrews: The endowment of the Pantokratoros
Frederick Lauritzen, Venezia: Fondazioni Bizantine e Scuola Grande di San Marco (XI – XIII)
Discussione

13.30   Light lunch

14:30   Presiede: Silvia Ronchey, Roma
Francesco Monticini, Roma: San Salvatore in Chora e il suo universo intellettuale: rinascenza o nostalgia?
Christian Förstel, Parigi: Xenon del Kralj: centro intellettuale, medico e artistico

Presiede: Bernard J.H. Aikema, Verona.
Ermanno Orlando, Siena: Fondazione, struttura e beneficenza della Scuola

​ ​

Grande
Gabriele Matino, Venezia : Osservare la Regola. Usi e funzioni delle miniature trecentesche della Mariegola della Scuola Grande di San Marco
Discussione e conclusioni

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CONFERENCE: ‘Confessional fluidity and the Byzantine inheritance in early modern Ruthenian society’, 24 November 2017, La Maison française d’Oxford


Registration: CambridgeUkrainianStudies.org

In the late 16th and 17th centuries, the Ruthenian lands—the former southern and western medieval Orthodox Rus principalities with the ecclesiastic centre of Kyiv—formed part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Though multi-confessional and multi-ethnic, by the early seventeenth century, the retreat of Protestantism and Orthodoxy among the noble citizens who formed the Commonwealth’s ruling elite, ensured that Roman Catholicism dominated its high politics and its institutions.

The religious upheaval of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation spanned the Commonwealth and its Ruthenian lands, and the influx of values, concepts, mentalities and innovations associated with early modernity reformed Ruthenian Orthodox culture. After 1596, the formation of the Uniate Church, and the consequent outlawing of the Orthodox Church until 1632, posed fundamental questions concerning Ruthenian religious identity and a period of considerable confessional fluidity ensued.

In Ruthenian lands, Orthodox, Uniates, Catholics and Protestants competed for souls in a process that simultaneously strengthened confessional identities and stimulated the development of syncretic elements among them. Cultural hybridity became manifest in families, communities, and Ruthenian society as a whole. The focus on Ruthenian religious identity raised issues about the position of the Ruthenians within the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, and propositions were put forth to transform the commonwealth of two nations into a Commonwealth of Three Nations.

This conference is devoted to the political, religious and cultural re-visioning that fundamentally reordered the early modern Ruthenian world to accommodate the multiple cultural and historic forces that coalesced in the formation of personal, local, transcultural and ecumenical identities of Ruthenians.  It explores how the Orthodox landscape formed by traditions derived from the past of Kyivan Rus was remapped to accommodate new political and ecclesiastical realities, and how the past was moulded and restaged in the

​ ​

invention of new traditions and identities.

Program:
9.00-11.00 Session I: Literature, print culture and confessions, part 1

Natalia Sinkevych (Kyiv), The 17th-century historical and hagiographical
narrative, between Rome, Constantinople, Moscow and Warsaw

Florent Mouchard (Rennes), Jakub Jan Susza’s hagiographic narrative:
Confessional fluidity as a rhetorical strategy

Simon Franklin (Cambridge),Discussant

11.30-1.00 Session I: Literature, print culture and confessions, part 2

Laurent Tatarenko (Paris/Lublin), Linguistic pluralism and confession
building in the Ruthenian clergies of the 17th century

Vera Tchentsova (Oxford), Shifting confessions: Orthodox co-religionists
from abroad in Moscow in the first half of the 17th century

Ralph Cleminson (Oxford), Discussant

2.30-5.00 Session II: Art and ritual

Maria Takala-Roszczenko (Joensuu), Ruthenian hymnography and ritual and
the construction of confessional identities

Nazar Kozak (Lviv), ‘Dumb as Fishes’: The Akathistos hymn and visual
polemics in the 16th-century Kyivan metropolitanate

Olenka Pevny (Cambridge), ‘Kiouia nostra coelom est’: Petro Mohyla’s
re-visioning of Rus monuments in Kyiv

To be announced, Discussant
===

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2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

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Graduate and Early Career Workshop: ‘Armenia & Byzantium without Borders’ , 20-22 April 2018, Vienna

Deadline: 31 October 2017

We invite advanced PhD candidates and early career scholars working in the fields of Late Antique, Armenian, Byzantine, and Middle Eastern Studies to submit proposals for 20 min. papers for a three-day workshop on ‘Armenia & Byzantium without Borders’ that will take place in Vienna (20–22 April 2018).

Proposals should focus on aspects of social and cultural mobility of persons, objects, and/or ideas between Armenia and Byzantium throughout the Middle Ages. We are particularly interested in new research showing interaction and communication on both literary and material grounds between the Byzantine world and the Armenians.

Travel and accommodation expenses of scholars selected for presentation at the workshop will be covered by a generous grant of the ‘Moving Byzantium’ project.

Further information can be found at the link below: http://rapp.univie.ac.at/

Paper proposals should be sent by the 31st of October 2017 to Dr. Emilio Bonfiglio: emilio.bonfiglio@univie.ac.at. Applications will include: a) university affiliation; b) graduatelevel; c) title of the paper; d) abstract (max 250 words); e) CV.

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The Oxford University Byzantine Society’s 20th International Graduate Conference: ‘Space and Dimension in Late Antiquity and Byzantium’, 23– 24 February 2018, University of Oxford

Deadline: 18 November 2017

Whether we are examining the political and military control of vast territories, the creation and maintenance of authority, the ritual surrounding religious practice, or the establishment of social relationships and hierarchies, all reflected through a rich artistic and literary culture, it is clear: space mattered in the Late Antique and Byzantine world.

However, the inclusion of space in scholarship pertaining to Late Antiquity and Byzantium is still too often the exception rather than the rule, especially in works that do not primarily concern archaeology or art history. Accordingly, this conference will offer a platform for interdisciplinary discussion on the role of space and dimension in scholarly debate, and how its inclusion will change – or not – our understanding of the Late Antique and Byzantine world.

Postgraduate students are invited to engage with various interpretations of ‘space’ and ‘dimension’, in all fields of Late Antique and Byzantine history: including history, archaeology, history of art, theology, literature, and philology. Abstracts from scholars working on the so-called ‘peripheries’ of the Late Antique and Byzantine world are strongly encouraged, particularly those whose research intersects with African and Asian history, as are those from scholars working in Islamic and Jewish Studies.

Topics may include:

Space, dimension and other forms of perspective in artistic, manuscript, and literary sources.
Closeness and distance and their effects on the circulation of textual and intellectual culture.
The form and use of space in public and private buildings; perceptions of and attitudes towards open and closed spaces.
The use of space in ritual, whether religious or secular; space and authority.
The impact of space and dimension on political and military considerations.
The control of movement and access; segregation; real and imagined barriers; binaries and their transgression.
The role of space in interpersonal relationships; gendered space.
Attitudes to distance and travel; perceptions of the landscape.
Space in monastic and ascetic life.
Attitudes towards the body and embodied experience.
Perception of the invisible; alternate worlds and dimensions; the afterlife.

Please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, with a short academic biography in the third person, to the Oxford University Byzantine Society at byzantine.society@gmail.com by Saturday 18 November 2017. Papers should be 20 minutes in length, delivered in English or French. Please note that abstracts will only be considered if they are by current postgraduate students.

As with our previous conferences, there will be a publication of selected papers chosen and reviewed by specialist readers from the University of Oxford’s Late Antique and Byzantine Studies research centres. Any speakers wishing to have their papers considered for publication should try to engage with the conference theme as closely as possible in their abstract and paper. Nevertheless, all submissions are warmly invited.
====

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3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

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Lecturer in Byzantine History, Kings College London

Deadline: 6 November 2017

The Departments of Classics and History are seeking to appoint a Lecturer in Byzantine History to cover for staff on research leave. The successful candidate will teach over a range of topics (as indicated in the Job Pack) in collaboration with colleagues, assist with the pastoral support of students, and contribute to the research life of the two Departments. They will be helped through mentoring and training to develop their career.

Candidates should specialise in any aspect of Byzantine history and culture. They will have a record of inspiring teaching and a commitment to academic development of the subject and its promotion through public engagement.

The selection process will include a brief presentation and a panel interview, and will be held in the week beginning Monday 20 November 2017.

For informal queries about the role please contact Professor Abigail Woods (abigail.woods@kcl.ac.uk), Head of the Department of History, or Professor Dominic Rathbone (dominic.rathbone@kcl.ac.uk), Head of the Department of Classics.

This post will be a Fixed Term Contract for 18 months, starting 1 January 2018.

Application information here

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2 Postdoctoral Positions, University of Bologna

Deadline: 10 November 2017

I am very pleased to draw your attention to two post-doc positions (2 years each) at the University of Bologna (Department of Philosophy and Communication studies) within the ERC project (01.12.2017 – 30.11.2022): “Alchemy in the Making: From ancient Babylonia via Graeco-Roman Egypt into the Byzantine, Syriac and Arabic traditions (1500 BCE -1000 AD)”, Acronym: AlchemEast.

The two appointed candidates will work respectively on the following sub-projects:

(1) Alchemy in the Arabo-Islamic World: Texts, Practises and Traditions. This sub-project aims at exploring the early phases of the Arabo-Islamic alchemy (8th-10th century). The appointed candidate will select and focus on a small corpus of Arabic alchemical texts either attributed to Greek authorities or depending on the Graeco-Egyptian and Byzantine tradition.

(2) Alchemy in the Graeco-Egyptian and Byzantine World: Texts, Practises and Traditions. This sub-project aims at exploring the development of Graeco-Egyptian and Byzantine alchemy. The appointed candidate will select and focus on a small corpus of Greek or Byzantine alchemical writings.

For further information about the two subprojects and how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.aricweb.unibo.it/BandiPubblicati/zz_bandi_din.aspx?strid=956  — Instructions under ‘call for application’; description (Italian and English) under ‘download the attachment’ —

For any doubt or question, please do not hesitate to e-mail me at the address: matteo.martelli@unibo.it.

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Postgraduate Scholarship, Woolf Institute Cambridge (2018-19 entry)

Since 2013, the Woolf Institute and the Cambridge Commonwealth, European and International Trust have collaborated in a scheme of scholarships to support outstanding postgraduate students (PhD and MPhil) at the University of Cambridge.

The PhD scholarship covers the cost of studying for a PhD at the University of Cambridge and is tenable at any of the 31 Cambridge Colleges. The Woolf Institute and the Cambridge Trust co-fund PhD students who are selected from amongst applicants in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. Their research must be relevant to the focus of the Woolf Institute – the multi-disciplinary study of relations between Jews, Christians and Muslims. Applicants are encouraged to contact the Woolf Institute prior to submitting their application to discuss whether their research proposal is relevant to the Institute’s focus. For further details including FAQs: http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk/research/graduate-study/phd

The MPhil scholarship covers the cost of studying for the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Specialisation: Muslim-Jewish Relations) at the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Cambridge and is tenable at any of the 31 Cambridge Colleges. For full details of the MPhil programme: https://www.ames.cam.ac.uk/postgraduate/applying/mphil-pathways/mphil-taught/meis-taught

Applicants for 2018-19 entry are required to apply to the University of Cambridge by the published scholarship application deadline. For further details, see https://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/.

Visit the Woolf Institute website: http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk/research/graduate-study

Contact:

Woolf Institute: PhD enquiries: Dr Emma Harris: eth22@cam.ac.uk; MPhil enquiries: Dr Esther-Miriam Wagner: emw36@cam.ac.uk
Cambridge Trust: cambridge.trust@admin.cam.ac.uk

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Lecturer in Modern Greek Language and Culture, University of California, Los Angeles

Deadline: 4 December 2017

The Department of Classics at the University of California, Los Angeles, has been authorized to make an appointment to a full-time position in the language and culture of Modern Greece at the rank of Lecturer, effective July 1, 2018, with a minimum of three years of funding earmarked for the position. The appointment will be for an initial two-year term, with the possibility of annual renewal thereafter.

This appointment is part of an initiative to build a new center for Hellenic studies, and the successful candidate will teach Modern Greek language at the introductory and intermediate levels, as well as lecture and seminar courses, with readings in translation, on Greek culture and its influence from antiquity to the present. Experience in language teaching will be a primary desideratum; training in ancient and Byzantine Greek will be welcome, but not required, as will expertise in comparative literature, film studies, and other fields relevant to an understanding of Greek culture. We also welcome candidates whose experience in teaching, research, or community service has prepared them to contribute to our commitment to diversity and excellence.

Applicants should submit the following by 4 December 2017, after which date the search committee will begin to review applications:
• Letter of application
• Current curriculum vitae
• Evidence of teaching effectiveness
• Sample syllabi
• Sample of scholarly work (no more than 25 pages)
• At least three letters of recommendation


These materials must be submitted online at: https://recruit.apo.ucla.edu/apply/JPF03342. Informal inquiries may be directed to Professor David Blank, Chair of the Search Committee: blank@ucla.edu . Please cite the reference number for this search in all correspondence: JPF03342.

We plan to interview candidates of interest via teleconference. However, some members of the Search Committee will attend the meetings of the Archaeological Institute of America/Society for Classical Studies in Boston in early January, and informal conversations may be arranged during those meetings, should interested candidates also be in attendance. The successful candidate should plan to have the Ph.D. in hand by the starting date of the appointment.

​​


Fellowships, American School of Classical Studies at Athens

Deadline: 15 January 2018

A considerable number of research fellowships, for both postgraduate students and senior scholars, are detailed here

Posted in Byzness

Oxford Listings – Week 2

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 2


Michaelmas Term 2017

= = = = =


​​MONDAY 16th October

15:00 Medieval Archaeology Seminar

Lecture Room, Institute of Archaeology


Neil Price


​​The Viking Phenomenon

[+]

 
17:00   Medieval History Seminar
Wharton Room, All Souls


Lindy Grant (Reading)


​​The abbey in the palace and the palace in the abbey: the interpenetration of religious and residential space in France in the long thirteenth century

​​TUESDAY 17th October

17:00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar (Medieval Islam)

Charles Wellbeloved Room, Harris Manchester


Martin Whittingham (Oxford)


​​Seeing Muhammed in the Bible: on the lookout – in Isaiah 21: 6-7 and elsewhere

​​WEDNESDAY 18th October

17:00   Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

Ioannou Centre


Irene Giviashvili (SIAS, Oxford)


​​Marking the sacred space in Ani: The evidence of monuments

[+]


17:00 Empires of Faith Seminar

Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College


Richard Hobbs (London)

​​Representing belief on silver plate in late Antiquity

​​THURSDAY 19th October

11:00 Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Archaeology Seminar

Ioannou Centre 


Ekaterine Gedevanishvili


​​Cult and Image of St. George in Medieval Georgian Art

[+]


14:00 OCLA Special Lecture
​ ​
Sutro Room, Trinity College
 
Prof. Stephen Mitchell (University of Exeter)
​​
The Fear Factor … Roman Cities and the Barbarian Threat in the Third Century


[+]

14:00 Islamic Art and Archaeology Today: Theories in Practice

Lecture Room Khalili Research Centre


Jürgen Paul (Martin Luther University, Halle-Wittenberg)


​​How to do things with things. Objects and ceremonies in Seljuq Iran

​​FRIDAY​ 20th October​

10:00 Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre


Marc Lauxtermann

​The Letters of Nicholas Mystikos​

[+]


12:00 Byzantine Literature Lecture

Ioannou Centre


Marc Lauxtermann

S​​cholarship in Byzantium​
 

Adele Curness
DPhil Candidate, Late Antique and Byzantine Studies
President, Oxford University Byzantine Society
byzantine.society@gmail.com 
https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com
https://twitter.com/oxbyz
Posted in Oxford Listings