The Byzness 16/09/2018

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 16th September 2018
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

“Gold Glass Memorial Day for Daniel T. Howells”, Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, Oxford.

A conference, co-hosted by Drs Susan Walker (Oxford University) and Ine Jacobs (Ioannou Centre), in commemoration of the life and work of the late Dr Daniel Howells. Speakers, many of whom knew or worked with Dr Howells, will present papers on the art of ancient gold glass, its historical contexts and influence on later art.

Speakers:

  • Giulia Cesarin, “Gold-band glass: from Hellenistic to Roman luxury glass production.”
  • Yasoko Fujii, “A Study of Continuity: gold leaf techniques on gold glass. From Hellenistic ‘Kirikane’ to Late Roman ‘Scratching’.”
  • Will Lewis, “A Constantinian prince’s guide to religion and culture in the mid-fourth century.”
  • Susan Walker, “Craft, consumers and the value of gold-glass in late antique Rome.”
  • Lucy Grig, “’Cultures of Conviviality’: thinking about the role of the
  • gold glasses in feasting and conviviality.”
  • Eileen Rubery, “Gold glass and the cults of female saints in Rome: whatever happened to the Virgin Mary?”

For online registration, visit the conference’s Eventbrite page here.

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2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

“Syriac Worlds: Interactions, Exchanges, Contributions”, The Eighth North American Syriac Symposium, 16-19 June 2019, Brown University, Providence, RI. 

Deadline: 2 January 2019

Held every four years since 1991, the North American Syriac Symposium brings together scholars and students for exchange and discussion on a wide variety of topics related to the language, literature, and cultural history of Syriac Christianity, extending chronologically from the first centuries CE to the present day and geographically from Syriac Christianity’s homeland in the Middle East to South India, China, and the worldwide diaspora.

We invite paper proposals for the 2019 Brown Syriac Symposium on the theme of “Syriac Worlds: Interactions, Exchanges, Contributions”.

Throughout its long history, Syriac Christianity has flourished in the midst of other languages, religions, cultures, and societies. However turbulent its circumstances, Syriac has enabled distinctive articulations and cultural expressions for its speakers. Moreover, not only have there been constant interactions, but Syriac has been an active medium of exchange. Contributions, borrowings, adaptations, and innovations have characterized the literary, material, philological, and cultural productions of Syriac speakers from the start. This Symposium welcomes proposals for scholarly papers on all topics that address Syriac in any of its historical time periods, within this broad theme.

Proposals may be submitted either for individual papers or as part of a proposed panel. Individual presentations must be limited to 20 minutes, plus 5 minutes of discussion time. Please submit contact information for the presenter(s) and an abstract of 250-350 words. Those wishing to propose a panel of 3 or 4 papers (4 papers maximum) on a specific theme must submit a separate abstract for each presentation, a title for the panel, and full contact information for all presenters and the session moderator.

All proposals should be submitted electronically to here on or before January 2, 2019. Notification of acceptances of paper and panel proposals will be made in early February, with a view to publishing the program in early March.

In addition to papers and panels, the symposium will feature keynote lectures by:

Liv Ingebord Lied, MF Norwegian School of Theology

Oslo Kathleen McVey, Princeton Theological Seminary (emerita)

Ellen Muehlberger, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

Michael Penn, Stanford University

Columba Stewart, St. John’s University

David G. K. Taylor, Oxford University.

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3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Wolfgang Fritz Volbach-Fellowship, Mainz. 

Deadline: 1 October 2018 

The Wolfgang Fritz Volbach-Fellowship was conceived as a link between the centre of research Mainz and international scholarly work within Byzantine Studies. The fellowship reaches out to foreign fellows with a doctoral degree (Post-Doc) who work in a field related to the subject of the Leibniz-WissenschaftsCampus: Byzantium between orient and occident. The invitation consists of a one month research residence with full access to libraries, academic infrastructure and participation in interdisciplinary exchange.

Conditions:

  • Grant of Euro 2000,- for four weeks residence in Mainz either during the summer oder winter term
  • Free accommodation in the guest house of the RGZM if within the following periods:
    • summer term 2019: May 6th – June 30th
    • winter term 2019/20: October 21st – December 15th
  • Fellows are invited to present their current research with a paper in the lecture series Byzanz in Mainz.

Application requirements:

  • Applicants must possess a doctorate or an equivalent academic degree (e.g. PhD) and have a permanent residency abroad.
  • Applicants are engaged in a research project relevant to the subject of the Leibniz-WissenschaftsCampus Mainz: Byzantium between orient and occident.
  • Applications are always welcome considering the following deadlines: until October 1st, 2018 for your stay in 2019
  • Please send applications via mail to managing director of the Leibniz-WissenschaftsCampus Mainz Dr. Benjamin Fourlas (fourlas(at)rgzm.de) including application form and copies of academic certificates.

For more information, visit the website.

ISHR Research Fellowships, International Society for the History of Rhetoric. 

Deadline: 25 October 2018

The International Society for the History of Rhetoric sponsors Research Fellowships to support individuals engaged in advanced research related to the theory and practice of rhetoric in all periods and languages and the relationship of rhetoric to poetics, literary theory and criticism, philosophy, politics, religion, law, and other aspects of the socio-cultural context. (Fellowships may not be used for research designed to further pedagogy in rhetorical speaking and writing.) We are now calling for applicants for next year’s Fellowships.

Note: To encourage a younger membership, ISHR will seek to award one of the annual fellowships to a promising graduate student and/or post-doc.

For further information on how to apply, visit the website.

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowships, American School of Classical Studies at Athens. 

Deadline: 31 October 2018

Founded in 1881, the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA) is the most significant resource in Greece for American scholars in the fields of Greek language, literature, history, archaeology, philosophy, and art, from pre-Hellenic times to the present. It offers two major research libraries: the Blegen, with over 107,000 volumes dedicated to the ancient Mediterranean world; and the Gennadius, with over 146,000 volumes and archives devoted to post-classical Hellenic civilization and, more broadly, the Balkans and the eastern Mediterranean. The School also provides centers for advanced research in archaeological and related topics at its excavations in the Athenian Agora and Corinth and houses an archaeological sciences laboratory at the main campus in Athens. By agreement with the Greek government, the ASCSA is authorized to serve as liaison with the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports on behalf of American students and scholars for the acquisition of permits to conduct archaeological work and to study collections.

Since its inception in 1994, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowship program at the ASCSA has demonstrated its effectiveness by supporting projects for 57 scholars with distinguished research and teaching careers in the humanities.

Eligibility: Postdoctoral scholars and professionals in relevant fields including architecture and art history who are US citizens or foreign nationals who have lived in the US for the three years immediately preceding the application deadline. Applicants must already hold their Ph.D. or have completed all requirements, except for the actual conferral of the degree, by the application deadline.

Terms:  Two to four fellows will be selected for awards of 4, 5, or 9 months duration. The monthly stipend per fellow is $4,200 allocated from a total pool of $75,600 per year. Applicants should indicate their preference for the length and dates of tenure of the award to coincide with the American School’s academic year: 9 months, Sept. 2019-beginning of June 2020; 4 months, Sept. – Dec.; 5 months, January to the beginning of June. School fees are waived, and the award provides lunches at Loring Hall five days per week. The NEH Fellow will pay for travel costs, housing, residence permit, and other living expenses from the stipend. A final report is due at the end of the award period, and the ASCSA expects that copies of all publications that result from research conducted as a Fellow of the ASCSA be contributed to the relevant library of the School. The NEH Fellow is also required to send one copy of all books and electronic copies of articles directly to the NEH.

NEH Fellows will be expected to reside primarily at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (though research may be carried out elsewhere in Greece).

Application: Submit Senior “Associate Membership with Fellowship” Application online on the ASCSA web site by October 31 here.

The following items should be included in the application submitted online on the ASCSA web site:

  1. Short abstract of the project (up to 300 words).
  2. A statement of the project (up to five pages, single spaced), including desired number of months in Greece, a timetable, explicit goals, a selected bibliography, the importance of the work, the methodologies involved, where applicable, and the reasons it should occur at the ASCSA.
  3. Current curriculum vitae. If not a US citizen, state US visa status /date of residence.
  4. Names of three recommenders who are individuals familiar with applicant’s work and field of interest. Include a list of names, positions, and addresses of the referees. Instructions for recommenders to submit letters will be sent through the application portal. Please make sure your recommenders have submitted their letters by November 4. These letters should comment on the feasibility of the project and the applicant’s ability to carry it out successfully.

The following criteria will be used by the Selection Committee when considering applications.

  1. Are the objectives and approaches clearly stated and coherent?
  2. Will the project result in an important and original contribution?
  3. Are the research perspectives and methodologies appropriate?
  4. Is the projected timetable reasonable for the tenure of the fellowship?
  5. What resources are necessary? Does the ASCSA provide resources that are not available at the home institution?
  6. Will residence in Greece contribute substantially to the success of the project?

Web site: www.ascsa.edu.gr or http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/admission-membership/fellowships-and-grants

E-mail: application@ascsa.org

The awards will be announced during February. Awardees will be expected to accept the award within two weeks of notification of funding, but no later than March 1.

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens does not discriminate on the basis of race, age, sex, sexual orientation, color, religion, ethnic origin, or disability when considering admission to any form of membership or application for employment.

Assistant Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (position in Athens).

Deadline: 31 October 2018

Term: A full-time (12 months) position beginning July 1, 2019 for three years, with the possibility of renewal for a final fourth year.

Compensation: Salary commensurate with experience; benefits include room and board at the School.

Qualifications: Candidates must have earned the PhD from a North American university no more than three years prior to the application and must have spent a minimum of a year as a Member of the ASCSA. An active agenda for research and publication, knowledge of Greece and Modern Greek, and teaching experience are expected.

Duties:

  • To help the Director in the administration of School business and to stand in for the Director when needed. Reports to the Director of the School.
  • To assist with the academic program under the direction of the Mellon Professor by lecturing, leading short trips or offering mini-seminars/workshops on area(s) of expertise.
  • To serve as a contact and resource person for all members of the School and to live in Loring Hall.
  • To help with the planning of the Summer Session by suggesting itineraries, speakers, and generally offering support to the Summer Session Directors, but not making actual arrangements.
  • To be a visible presence in the Athenian social and academic scene by attending functions as an official of the School.
  • To pursue research on a project.

Application: The Assistant Director will be appointed by the ASCSA Managing Committee (through the Personnel Committee) in consultation with the Director of the School and the Andrew W. Mellon Professor. Please submit letter of application, curriculum vitae, and research project description (up to three pages in length) online here.

Three letters of recommendation are required. After you submit your online application, your recommenders will receive an automatic email with instructions about how to upload confidential reference letters. Final candidates may be interviewed at the annual meeting of the AIA in San Diego, California, in January.

The appointment will be announced by mid-February 2019.

Fellowships for Research in Turkey 2019-2020, American Research Institute in Turkey (ARIT).

Deadline: 1 November 2018

The American Research Institute in Turkey (ARIT) is pleased to announce 2019-2020 fellowship programs for students and scholars based in the U.S. and Canada:

ARIT / National Endowment for the Humanities Advanced Fellowships for Research in Turkey cover all fields of the humanities, including prehistory, history, art, archaeology, literature, and linguistics as well as interdisciplinary aspects of cultural history.  The fellowships support applicants who have completed their academic training.  The fellowships may be held for terms ranging from four months to a full year.  Stipend per month is $4,200.

ARIT Fellowships for Research in Turkey are offered for research in ancient, medieval, or modern times, in any field of the humanities and social sciences.  Post-doctoral and advanced doctoral fellowships may be held for various terms, for terms from one month up to one academic year.  Stipends range from $2,500 to $15,500.

Applications for ARIT fellowships must be submitted to ARIT by November 1, 2018. The fellowship committee will notify applicants by late January 2019.

For further information please see the ARIT webpage.

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Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 09/09/2018

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 9nd September 2018
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

“The Byzantine Commonwealth 50 Years On: Empires and their Afterlife”, Worcester College, Oxford, with the support of John Fell OUP Research Fund, Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research, History Faculty, Christ Church and Worcester College, Oxford.

2018 sees the centenary of the birth of Sir Dimitri Obolensky, one of the outstanding Byzantine historians of the 20th century. This conference aims to return to some of the lines of enquiry and themes that Obolensky explored in his writings, the singularity of Byzantium and the empire’s place in the Eurasian world, and its interaction with other societies, cultures and powers. This should, we hope, yield some amplification, reappraisal and development of his seminal work, The Byzantine Commonwealth, for the 21st century.

We will address some of the following questions:

  • What were Byzantium’s vital ingredients and how far were they consistent, or stable?
  • In what senses was Byzantium inclusive, exclusive, or expansionist, and was it polycentric in fact if not in ideology?
  • How and why did Byzantium appeal to members of external societies or elites?
  • Which of them proved most impervious to Byzantium? How useful is the centre-periphery model for analysing the formation of pre-modern societies?
  • Was the afterlife of Byzantium wholly a matter of religion?
  • Would ‘Orthodox’ or ‘Slavic’ Commonwealth more aptly characterize the sphere in which Byzantium’s vital ingredients had most repercussions?

For registration visit the Oxford University Store here.

“Hagia Sophia in the Long Nineteenth Century”, 13 – 14 September 2018, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

This symposium seeks out the audiences of Hagia Sophia beyond its Western interpreters, from Ottoman officials to the diverse communities of Istanbul. Chronologically bracketed by the major renovation of the building in the 1740s and its conversion into a museum in 1934, the symposium traces the gradual transformation of Hagia Sophia within the Ottoman imaginary from külliye (mosque complex) to eser (monument), that is, from lived space to archaeological artefact. Participants (historians of art and architecture, scholars of Byzantine and Ottoman studies) will address both the discourses that various actors constructed around the monument and the physical changes to its structure, decoration, and surroundings.

The symposium is sponsored by the Department of Classics, College of Arts and Sciences, and Discovery Theme Initiative at the Ohio State University.

Further information can be found here.

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2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES 

Assistant Professor in Art History – Late Antique to Medieval World before 1400 (tenure-track), The Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory (AHVA) at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver.

Deadline:  10 October 2018

The Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory (AHVA) at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, invites applications for a tenure-track appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor, specializing in the art history of the late antique to medieval period (before 1400) in any region(s) of Western Eurasia and/or North Africa. The anticipated start date of employment is as early as July 1, 2019.

Applicants should practice a comparative critical approach, demonstrate engagement with recent debates in their field and show proficiency in the languages their specialization requires. The successful candidate will be well versed in the most advanced theoretical and methodological concerns of the discipline. The ability to teach across geographical areas and chronological periods would be an asset.

The University of British Columbia, one of the largest and most distinguished universities in Canada, has excellent resources for scholarly research. The art history program offers BA, MA, and PhD degrees as well as a diploma, and partners with departmental programs in visual art and in critical and curatorial studies. For more information, visit the departmental website. The department maintains close ties with the world-renowned Museum of Anthropology and the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery and is a participant in the Bachelor of Media Studies program. This position presents the opportunity to engage with an interdisciplinary group of scholars within UBC’s larger academic community, including the Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies; the Department of French, Hispanic and Italian Studies; Department of Asian Studies; Department of History; Department of English Language and Literatures; and the Medieval Studies program.

Applicants must have a PhD (or have successfully defended their dissertation by the position start date) in art history or a related discipline. They are expected to provide strong evidence of active and excellent research and to demonstrate a record of, or high potential for, teaching excellence at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The successful candidate will be required to teach courses across the late antique and medieval period of art history and will be expected to maintain an active program of research, publication, teaching, graduate supervision and service.

Applicants must submit their application here and upload the following in the order listed within a single PDF (max size 15MB):

  • a letter of application
  • a detailed curriculum vitae
  • a statement of research philosophy
  • a statement of teaching philosophy
  • evidence of teaching effectiveness (from various sources, e.g., teaching evaluations and/or course syllabi)
  • a sample dissertation chapter or scholarly paper
  • a one-page statement identifying the applicant’s contributions, or potential contributions, to diversity, along with their ability to work with a culturally diverse student body

Applicants should arrange to have three confidential letters of reference submitted by email by October 10 here, or by mail to Professor Joseph Monteyne, Chair, Art History Search Committee, Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory; University of British Columbia, 400 – 6333 Memorial Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z2, Canada.

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. This position is subject to final budgetary approval.

Review of applications will begin on October 10, 2018 and will continue until the position is filled.

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Métis, Inuit, or Indigenous person.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 02/09/2018

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 2nd September 2018
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

 “The Byzantine Commonwealth 50 Years On: Empires and their Afterlife”, Worcester College, Oxford, with the support of John Fell OUP Research Fund, Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research,History Faculty,Christ Church and Worcester College, Oxford. 

2018 sees the centenary of the birth of Sir Dimitri Obolensky, one of the outstanding Byzantine historians of the 20th century. This conference aims to return to some of the lines of enquiry and themes that Obolensky explored in his writings, the singularity of Byzantium and the empire’s place in the Eurasian world, and its interaction with other societies, cultures and powers. This should, we hope, yield some amplification, reappraisal and development of his seminal work, The Byzantine Commonwealth, for the 21st century.

We will address some of the following questions:

  • What were Byzantium’s vital ingredients and how far were they consistent, or stable?
  • In what senses was Byzantium inclusive, exclusive, or expansionist, and was it polycentric in fact if not in ideology?
  • How and why did Byzantium appeal to members of external societies or elites?
  • Which of them proved most impervious to Byzantium? How useful is the centre-periphery model for analysing the formation of pre-modern societies?
  • Was the afterlife of Byzantium wholly a matter of religion?
  • Would ‘Orthodox’ or ‘Slavic’ Commonwealth more aptly characterize the sphere in which Byzantium’s vital ingredients had most repercussions?

For registration visit the Oxford University Store here.

“Le livre manuscrit grec: écritures, matériaux, histoire”, IXe Colloque international de Paléographie grecque, 10 – 15 septembre 2018, Sorbonne et l’École normale supérieure, Paris.

The programme is published here.

Registration is free but obligatory. Register here.

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 2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES 

British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship: Outline Stage 2018-19 

Deadline:  17 October 2018, 17:00 (UK time) 

The British Academy is inviting applications from outstanding early career researchers in the Humanities and Social Sciences for our Postdoctoral Fellowship programme.

The British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship offers outstanding early career researchers the opportunity to strengthen their experience of research and teaching in a university environment.

This scheme aims to help develop the award holder’s curriculum vitae and boost their prospects of obtaining a permanent university post. The primary emphasis is on the completion of a significant piece of publishable research, and the integration of the award holder into the community of established scholars within their field.

Applications for the Outline Stage of this scheme must be submitted via the Flexi-Grant system.

The application, reference and institutional approval must all be completed by 17 October 2018, 17:00 (UK time).

Result of Outline Stage announced: Mid-January 2019
The Second Stage is by invitation only.

Earliest start date for Fellowships to begin: 1 September 2019
Latest start date for the Fellowships to begin: 1 January 2020

Further information can be found here.

 

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 26/08/2018

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 26th August 2018
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

“The Cult of Saints in Late Antiquity” Conference, 27 – 29 September 2018, Warsaw, Poland.

Registration is now open for the conference The Cult of Saints in Late Antiquity, to be held at the Institute of History, Warsaw University, 27th–29th September 2018. An online registration form, further information on the conference, as well as a provisional schedule can be found here.

Confirmed key-note speakers include Luigi Canetti, Vincent Déroche, Stephanos Efthymiadis, Cynthia Hahn, Anne-Marie Helvétius, Xavier Lequeux, Maria Lidova, Julia Smith, Raymond Van Dam, and Ian Wood.

If you have any questions concerning the event, please contact Robert Wisniewski or Julia Doroszewska.

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2. CALLS FOR PAPERS 

Two Panels on Byzantine and Medieval Slavic Theological Aesthetics, International Congress for Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, 9 -12 May 2019, Kalamazoo, MI.

Deadline: 15 September 2018

Often remarked upon, the distinctive emphasis on beauty as an organizing principle in Orthodox Christian theology, spirituality, and worship is a subject deserving of further academic inquiry. Towards that end, we have organized two sessions at the upcoming ICMS organized around the broad theme of beauty, as it is realized and addressed in the worship, theology, philosophy, art, and cultures of the Orthodox world. We welcome contributions from a wide variety of disciplines, including but not limited to art history, history, philosophy, religious studies, and theology.

In addition to studies rooted in the Byzantine and Slavic traditions we would be delighted also to consider papers on topics connected to theology and aesthetics in the Arab, Armenian, Coptic, Ethiopian, Georgian, Syriac, and other Eastern Christian cultural communities in late antiquity and the middle ages as well. Comparative work with other religious traditions is also welcome, so long as it demonstrates a firm grasp of the various traditions it addresses.

If you are interested in presenting, please submit an abstract of no more than 200 words to Sean C. Stidd by September 15, 2018 at. Papers will be reviewed by the organizing committee to make a fair determination. Please don’t hesitate to contact Dr. Stidd if you have further questions.

 

“Crusades in Context”, 3 Sessions at the International Congress for Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, 9 -12 May 2019, Kalamazoo, MI.

Deadline: 15 September 2018

One of the biggest problems in the traditional study of the crusades has been taking the crusades as discrete, independent events. Acknowledgement is given to particular reasons to call the crusades, but the armed pilgrimages themselves are studied as a separate field that is largely analysed within itself. From the outside, these seems at best short-sighted, at worst a catastrophic self-imposed limitation on the field. Many of the best works from a Latin perspective being done on the crusades today—Elizabeth Lapina’s Warfare and the Miraculous in the Chronicles of the First Crusade and Cecilia Gaposchkin’s Invisible Weapons: Liturgy and the Making of Crusade Ideology immediately come to mind—have expanded the field of study to take in the vast wealth of Latin literature that impacted crusade chronicles and belief. The Crusades in France and Occitania Project, which is sponsoring these sessions, has worked and will continue to work in these sessions to bring in more of the richness of medieval Latin history into the study of the crusades as we have done the past three years.

In a departure from our normal sessions, however, this year we are going to broaden the context to bring in not only Latin sources, but, we hope, Byzantine, Syriac, Armenian, Georgian, Coptic, and Arabic sources, and properly contextualize the crusades as not only a product of ongoing processes and beliefs in Latin Europe, but also as being an insertion of Latins into a rich, dynamic, multicultural Middle East. Trying to understand the “success” of the First Crusade without understanding the collapse of the Seljuk Empire and the fighting between Seljuks and Fatimids is impossible; attempting to understand the survival of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem without examining Byzantine politics, Cilician Armenia, the rise of the Zengids, and the problematic relationship between Egypt and Syria/Iraq is ridiculous. These are merely surface examples; these sessions, we hope, will bring experts in Eastern Christian and Islamic sources together with scholars of the crusades and crusades-adjacent fields to discuss the crossovers and links between the two. We also hope to have a properly interdisciplinary set of sessions; limiting crusade studies to the traditional documentary sources is, again, a self-imposed limitation that is fundamentally unacceptable in modern medieval studies. Looking at Komnenian poetry? Submit an abstract. Examining Ayyubid architecture? Submit an abstract. Working on Syriac manuscripts produced in the Principality of Antioch? Send it in. Crusades-adjacent but contextually interesting papers are very, very welcome! Email abstracts, inquiries, and PIFs to tlecaque@grandview.edu, or ask questions @tlecaque on Twitter!

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Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 19/08/2018

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 19th August 2018
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
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  1. NEWS AND EVENTS

“Figures: lettres, chiffres, notes et symboles au Moyen Âge”, 7ème Cours de formation doctorale, Université de Fribourg, 3-5 September 2018, Fribourg, Switzerland.

L’Institut d’études médiévales de l’Université de Fribourg a le plaisir de vous présenter le programme et l’affiche de son 7ème Cours de formation doctorale, qui aura lieu du 3 au 5 septembre prochain sur le thème «Figures: lettres, chiffres, notes et symboles au Moyen Âge». En introduction de chacune des journées, nous aurons l’occasion d’écouter les conférences plénières de trois spécialistes de renommée internationale: Daniel Heller-Roazen (philosophie et littérature comparée, Princeton), Michel Pastoureau (histoire et histoire de l’art, EPHE Paris) et Susan Rankin (musicologie et histoire de la musique, Cambridge). Toute personne intéressée est cordialement invitée à assister à l’un ou l’autre des événements de ces journées. Toutes les informations pratiques, ainsi que le descriptif et le programme, sont disponibles ici.

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  1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

“Patterns – Models – Drawings”, International Conference: Art Readings 2019, Institute of Art Studies, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 5 – 6 April 2019, Sofia, Bulgaria.

Deadline: 1 September 2018

The suggested theme focuses research efforts on issues of working methods and practices of artists rather than on questions of politics and ideology in art. We aspire to contribute to the growing discourse on these matters by bringing together an international group of about 25 scholars to renew the state of art by exploring the connection between model and image, between preparatory sketches and the final piece, between religious and secular art, between commission and realisation of art work, between graphic art and painting, sculpture, etc.

Main topics of paper proposals could be:

  • models as starting point for other images
  • model books
  • transfer patterns (anthivola)
  • loose drawings
  • graffiti images and texts
  • woodcut and printing production as a source for artistic and iconographic decisions
  • Roman, Western, Byzantine models in arts from later periods

In addition, participants could explore artistic motifs used to symbolise certain ideas; varieties within overall iconographic patterns; origins of repeated patterns in ornaments.

Scholars working on similar themes in non-art historical traditions are also encouraged to apply. 10 % of the participants will be young researchers, post-docs and PhD students. The working languages of the conference will be English and Bulgarian, but texts will be published in a separate volume in French and German as well.

Funding for the conference has not been yet provided, but the organisers will apply for financial support in 2018. Perhaps limited hotel accommodations and some meals will be provided. Please send abstracts of 300- 500 words, including a brief CV, to moutafov1@gmail.com and margaritakj@gmail.com.

Other Important dates:

15 October 2018: Notification of applicants on the outcome of their proposals

1 March 2019: Deadline for finalising the conference programme

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 12/08/2018

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 12th August 2018
====
1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

  1. NEWS AND EVENTS

====

  1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

“Hellenic Political Philosophy and Contemporary Europe”, 29 September – 04 October 2019, Center for Hellenic Studies Podgorica, Herceg Novi, Montenegro.

Deadline: 1 March 2019

The Center for Hellenic Studies from Podgorica (Montenegro) is happy to announce the international conference on the topic “Hellenic Political Philosophy and Contemporary Europe”, to be held in Herceg Novi (Montenegro), from 29 September to 04 October 2019.

The Conference is of an interdisciplinary character and aims at addressing different social and political issues from perspectives of history, philosophy, economics, theology, history of ideas, anthropology, political theory and other disciplines. Such conception of the scholarly exchange does not fulfil only the purpose of an historical investigation, but will provide a systematic treatment of the topic, thus clarifying existing ideas and advancing new ones. We welcome papers on topics like

  1. The concept of the polis in antiquity and modernity
  2. Freedom and democracy
  3. Politics and economy
  4. Democracy, liberalism, totalitarianism
  5. The philosophy of the polis: Citizen, polis and cultural ideals
  6. Autonomy and responsibility in politics
  7. The philosophy of the cosmopolis
  8. The polis and happiness
  9. Ethics and politics

and other relevant themes. Please see the full call for papers here.

Abstracts of up to 200 words should be submitted by 1 March 2019, via the registration form, or sent by email to conference@ichs.me

 

Material Narratives of Late Antiquity”, IMC, 1-4 July 2019, Leeds. 

Deadline: 15 September 2018

The forthcoming International Medieval Congress in Leeds has ‘Materialities’ as its special thematic strand. The Cult of Saints in Late Antiquity project (though it formally ends in December 2018) will therefore be running a series of sessions on material aspects of the cult of saints. We will focus on objects: holy images, pilgrim tokens, flasks, relics, and reliquaries, and on the close context of the cult, for instance monumental tombs, crypts etc. The sessions aim to address the following questions:

  • In what ways were cults shaped by their physical environment?
  • How important was the presence of holy objects to the establishment and development of a cult and cult site?
  • How did objects help to establish and spread cults beyond the main cult site?
  • In what ways did the material form of cult reflect theological ideas?

Those interested in presenting papers at these sessions, particularly if focused on the period before c. AD 1000, are requested to send a short abstract (up to 200 words) to Robert Wiśniewski (r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl) and Bryan Ward-Perkins (bryan.ward-perkins@history.ox.ac.uk) by 15 September. Please note that the conveners, sadly, cannot cover the conference fee and travel expenses.

 

“Materiality and the Cult of Saints in Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages”, IMC, 1-4 July 2019, Leeds.

Sponsored by the DFG Center for Advanced Studies, “Migration and Mobility in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages”, Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen

Deadline: 15 September 2018

Since its inception, Late Antique Studies has brought material and archaeological evidence into conversation with documentary history. New types of material evidence continue to transform narratives in this field. These include the rise of big data in archaeology, new scientific methodologies like genomics and climate science, and compositional analysis of artifacts. Many such new studies have been published in scientific journals, and Late Antique scholars in the humanities face a field that is increasingly fragmented across disciplines.

Concurrently, advances in interdisciplinary theory have raised new questions about the narratives Late Antique scholars have used material evidence to tell about social collapse and transformation. Theoretical approaches including the Material Turn in cultural studies, Critical Race Theory, postcolonialism, and poststructuralism challenge Late Antique scholars to critically re-examine how new material evidence should shape future narratives in the field.

This session invites participants to investigate how material evidence from Late Antiquity has been used to shape narratives that privilege particular types of people, politics, or evidence; to propose new narratives rooted in new material and theoretical methods; or to offer case studies on the future potential of new advances in archaeological and material studies for our field.

Subjects for discussion might include (but are not limited to):

  • The methodological difficulties of integrating material or scientific data alongside documentary evidence into historical narratives
  • How material evidence can help scholars reassess narratives of ‘transformation’ or ‘Decline and Fall’
  • Applications of critical race theory to established narratives of Late Antique socio-cultural change
  • The appropriation of Late Antique history, archaeology, and narrative topoi by far-right political groups
  • New approaches to the study of ethnicity, migration, and gender in Late Antique archaeology

The organizers invite papers of 20 minutes length from all disciplinary perspectives addressing these issues in the Late Antique World (broadly conceived, c. 200-700 CE). Please send titles and abstracts of no more than 250 words to James Harland (james.harland@york.ac.uk) and Andrew Welton (awelton@ufl.edu) by the 15th of September 2018. We welcome papers from scholars who do not usually present at the IMC and aim ensure appropriate gender balance across the panels. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us.

 

“Modes of Knowing and the Ordering of Knowledge in Late Antiquity”, 18th International Conference on Patristic Studies, 19-24 August 2019, Oxford. 

Preliminary deadline: 31 August 2018

Final deadline: 31 December 2018

We call for papers that investigate modes of knowing and attempts at ordering/organizing knowledge in Christian communities in diverse linguistic and cultural traditions (including Latin, Greek, Coptic, Syriac, Armenian, Georgian, and Ethiopic) for the period 100-850 CE in relation to three themes:

  • contemporary theological, philosophical, medical and rhetorical discourses
  • institutional structures (of empire, education and catechesis, liturgy, church, holy experts)
  • (ithe materiality and embodied social practices of early Christianity (relics, sacred texts, asceticism, pilgrimage, liturgies)

We are also interested in papers that ask how this construction of late antique Christian epistemologies might inform modern theological reflection on Christian traditions engaging with modernity.

The aim of this call for papers is to build upon and further the recent interest in outlining the lineaments of “late ancient knowing” from a variety of angles. Some of these are well established, such as the anthological and archival impulse evident in the way late ancient texts relate to older texts, but other aspects of this topic remain understudied, particularly those that involve material culture and embodied experience. Papers may be general or specific in scope and may employ any theoretical or methodological approach appropriate to the subject matter.

A team of researchers at Australian Catholic University is currently in the midst of a 5-year research program under the title “Modes of Knowing and the Ordering of Knowledge in Early Christianity” (2017-2021; Chief Investigators: Lewis Ayres, Michael Champion, Matthew Crawford, Andrew Radde-Gallwitz, Jane Heath), and at the annual meeting of the North American Patristics Society in May 2018, a separate initiative, led by Jeremiah Coogan and Philip Michael Forness, resulted in three sessions of papers on the theme “Organizing Knowledge in Late Antiquity.” We have decided to combine our efforts to sponsor one or more workshops at Oxford on this topic and are circulating a call for papers now in order to allow us time to vet the abstracts and submit the workshop(s) prior to the Oxford submission deadline of 31 December 2018. Depending on the size of the response we will consider putting together multiple workshops on various topics that would fit within this overarching theme. To make sure that we have sufficient lead-time, we are asking for interested persons to send their abstracts to modesofknowingoxford2019@gmail.com by 31 August 2018. We will make a decision about which papers to include in the workshop(s) by 31 October 2018. Those persons whose papers we do not select would of course then be free to submit their proposals directly to the Oxford call for papers themselves and should have sufficient time to do so.

 

“Following the Holy Fathers: Patristic Sources in the Palamite Controversy”, 18th International Conference on Patristic Studies, 19-24 August 2019, Oxford.

Deadline: 31 August 2018

Opponents on both sides of the Palamite controversy (1338-1368) invoked the writings of the Church Fathers to support their theological claims and positions. Though scholars have long debated the patristic antecedents of the essence-energies distinction, research has tended to focus almost exclusively on the fidelity of St. Gregory Palamas to his patristic sources. This Workshop seeks, instead, to explore the use of the Fathers in the Palamite controversy more generally, from neglected influences on the writings of Palamas himself to the use of patristic authorities by Gregory’s opponents and subsequent defenders. Comprising a philological, historical, and theological exploration, we welcome papers on the following topics:

  • The Fathers in St. Gregory Palamas
  • Patristic sources in anti-Palamite theology (from Barlaam to Manuel Kalekas and beyond)
  • Middle Byzantine and later patristic influences on the Palamite controversy
  • The role of the Liturgy and Hymnography in the Palamite controversy
  • The use of the Fathers by Palamite authors to 1453 (from Dishypatos and Kokkinos to Eugenikos and Scholarios)

Papers may focus on individual Church Fathers or patristic sources and methodology in general on any aspect of patristic theology that enhances our understanding of Palamite and anti-Palamite theology in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.

Abstracts, of no more than 300 words, to oxfordpalamas@gmail.com.

===

  1. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Post-doctoral Fellowships in Representation and in Immateriality, King’s College Cambridge 

Deadline: 9 a.m. on Thursday, 6th September 2018

King’s College Cambridge is advertising two Junior Research Fellowships in ‘Representation’ and in ‘Immateriality’. These are intended for those about to complete a PhD or who have completed a PhD since September 2017, and who wish to work on post-doctoral projects concerned with representation or with immateriality. There is no need for PhD work to have concerned those problems.

Further details can be found here.

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 05/08/2018

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 5th August 2018
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

  1. NEWS AND EVENTS

====

  1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

“Encountering Medieval Iconography in the Twenty-First Century: Scholarship, Social Media, and Digital Methods”, Roundtable at the 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 9 – 12 May 2019, Kalamazoo, MI.

Deadline: 15 September 2018

Organizers: M. Alessia Rossi and Jessica Savage (Index of Medieval Art, Princeton University)

Sponsored by the Index of Medieval Art, Princeton University

Stemming from the launch of the new database and enhancements of search technology and social media at the Index of Medieval Art, this roundtable addresses the many ways we encounter medieval iconography in the twenty-first century. We invite proposals from emerging scholars and a variety of professionals who are teaching with, blogging about, and cataloguing medieval iconography. This discussion will touch on the different ways we consume and create information with our research, shed light on original approaches, and discover common goals.

Participants in this roundtable will give short introductions (5-7 minutes) on issues relevant to their area of specialization and participate in a discussion on how they use online resources, such as image databases, to incorporate the study of medieval iconography into their teaching, research, and public outreach. Possible questions include: What makes an online collection “teaching-friendly” and accessible for student discovery? How does social media, including Twitter, Facebook, and blogging, make medieval image collections more visible? How do these platforms broaden interest in iconography and connect users to works of art? What are the aims and impact of organizations such as, the Index, the Getty, the INHA, the Warburg, and ICONCLASS, who are working with large stores of medieval art and architecture information? How can we envisage a wider network and discussion of professional practice within this specialized area?

Please send a 250-word abstract outlining your contribution to this roundtable and a completed Participant Information Form (available via the Congress Submissions website: https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) by September 15 to M. Alessia Rossi (marossi@princeton.edu) and Jessica Savage (jlsavage@princeton.edu). More information about the Congress can be found here.

“The Other Half of Heaven: Visualizing Female Sanctity in East and West (c. 1200-1550)”, double session, at the 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 9 – 12 May 2019, Kalamazoo, MI.

Deadline: 1 September 2018

The aim of this session is to consider female sanctity in visual terms both in Western Europe and the Byzantine East. By exploring representations of women saints and their changing iconography, it aspires to shed light on their status and experience in late medieval society. It will examine images of holy women as embodiments of cultural models and explore the social and religious environment that shaped their visual constructions. In the highly symbolic world of the Middle Ages, representations of female saints can become a vehicle for multiple interpretations, including social status, gender, identity, ethnicity and collective memory. Some of the issues to be addressed include but are not restricted to:

  • Visual narratives and iconographic attributes defining female sanctity
  • The corporeality of female saints and the representation of the holy body
  • The iconography of transvestite holy women
  • Out of sight, out of mind: forgotten saints and newcomers
  • The relation between female holy images and text in illuminated manuscripts
  • The influence of mendicant literature on picturing female sanctity
  • One saint, many images: changes in iconography and meaning
  • Iconographic variations of the Virgin in East and West

Participants in ICMA-sponsored sessions are eligible to receive travel funds, generously provided by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. The Kress funds are allocated for travel and hotel only. Speakers will be refunded only after the conference, against travel receipts.

Please send paper proposals of 300 words to the Chair of the ICMA Programs Committee, Beth Williamson (beth.williamson@bristol.ac.uk) by September 1, 2018, together with a completed Participant Information Form, to be found here. Please include your name, title, and affiliation on the abstract itself. All abstracts not accepted for the session will be forwarded to the Congress administration for consideration in general sessions, as per Congress regulations.

“Communal Responses to Local Disaster: Economic, Environmental, Political, Religious”, 13th Biennial meeting of Shifting Frontiers in Late Antiquity, 14-17 March 2019, Claremont, California.

Deadline: 1 October 2018

The 2019 meeting will examine the impact of disasters on late-antique communities, including their susceptibility to disaster, the means by which they coped, and factors that increased resilience and facilitated recovery from disasters. In order to foster the thematic breadth and interdisciplinary perspective for which Shifting Frontiers is known, we invite papers concerned with the full range of traumatic events, and also long-term processes, that could distress communities: economic, environmental, political and religious. The aim of this conference is to move beyond the descriptive and stimulate analytical and theoretical approaches to understanding how distressed communities behaved in the short and long term.

Potential topics include:

  • Economic trauma and its impact (fiscal, commercial, etc.)
  • Environmental distress and disaster relief (volcanos, earthquakes, tsunamis, etc.)
  • Attitudes toward the environment owing to fragility and the potential for disaster
  • Alimentary and agricultural disasters (famine, drought, interrupted shipping)
  • Urban disasters (fires, rioting, siege)
  • Military disasters on the battlefield
  • Philosophical and ethical notions of mortality, inevitability and causation connected to disaster
  • Rhetorical exploitation and literary responses to, or explorations of disaster
  • Philological footprints in language and idiom related to disaster
  • Representations of, and psychological responses to disaster in art
  • Archaeological and architectural evidence of disasters
  • Religious explanations of disaster and liturgical and cultic responses
  • Differentiation between sudden, cataclysmic and long-term, slow moving disasters
  • The memory of specific events

Proposals for 20-minute presentations should clearly explain the relationship of the paper to the conference theme, describe the evidence to be examined and offer tentative conclusions. Abstracts of no more than 500 words (not including optional bibliography) should be submitted by October 1, 2018. Please submit abstracts as a Word document attached to an email to both Shane Bjornlie (sbjornlie@cmc.edu) and Michelle Berenfeld (michelle_berenfeld@pitzer.edu). Please do not embed proposals in the text of the email. The conference steering committee will review all proposals, starting October 1, with accepted papers receiving notification by November 15. Due to budgetary constraints, bursaries for expenses will not be available, although conference registration fees will be waived for participants presenting papers and for the chairs of sessions. Registration for all other participants will be $100 US.

Further information on the conference can be found here.

26th International Medieval Congress:

 “Moving Byzantium III”, 26th International Medieval Congress, 1-4 July 2019, Leeds.

Deadline: 3 September 2018

We invite scholars at all career stages to submit proposals for fifteen-minute papers connected with the main topics of “Moving Byzantium”, with a particular focus on aspects of geographical, social and cultural mobility within and beyond the Byzantine Empire, and with or without direct focus on the thematic strand of the 2019 IMC “materialities”. We are particularly interested in research based on new material, novel interpretations and innovative methods which also locates Byzantium and its neighbours in a wider comparative framework.

For scholars selected for presentation in the sessions of “Moving Byzantium”, the Full Four Day Registration for the IMC (standard rate or student rate) will be covered by our project, while we expect participants to secure their own funding for their expenses for travel and accommodation.

Please send paper proposals (300 words max.), in English, accompanied by a short (300 words max.) CV including affiliation, career stage and research interests, by 3 September 2018 to Ms. Paraskevi Sykopetritou, Project Coordinator: paraskevi.sykopetritou@univie.ac.at. Papers will be selected by 10 September 2018 and successful candidates must confirm their participation by 17 September 2018.

Further information can be found here.

“Material Narratives of Late Antiquity”, 26th International Medieval Congress, 1-4 July 2019, Leeds.

 Deadline: 15 September 2018

Sponsored by the DFG Center for Advanced Studies, “Migration and Mobility in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages”, Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen

Since its inception, Late Antique Studies has brought material and archaeological evidence into conversation with documentary history. New types of material evidence continue to transform narratives in this field. These include the rise of big data in archaeology, new scientific methodologies like genomics and climate science, and compositional analysis of artefacts. Many such new studies have been published in scientific journals, and Late Antique scholars in the humanities face a field that is increasingly fragmented across disciplines.

Concurrently, advances in interdisciplinary theory have raised new questions about the narratives Late Antique scholars have used material evidence to tell about social collapse and transformation. Theoretical approaches including the Material Turn in cultural studies, Critical Race Theory, postcolonialism, and poststructuralism challenge Late Antique scholars to critically re-examine how new material evidence should shape future narratives in the field.

This session invites participants to investigate how material evidence from Late Antiquity has been used to shape narratives that privilege particular types of people, politics, or evidence; to propose new narratives rooted in new material and theoretical methods; or to offer case studies on the future potential of new advances in archaeological and material studies for our field.

Subjects for discussion might include (but are not limited to):

  • The methodological difficulties of integrating material or scientific data alongside documentary evidence into historical narratives
  • How material evidence can help scholars reassess narratives of ‘transformation’ or ‘Decline and Fall’
  • Applications of critical race theory to established narratives of Late Antique socio-cultural change
  • The appropriation of Late Antique history, archaeology, and narrative topoi by far-right political groups
  • New approaches to the study of ethnicity, migration, and gender in Late Antique archaeology

The organizers invite papers of 20 minutes length from all disciplinary perspectives addressing these issues in the Late Antique World (broadly conceived, c. 200-700 CE). Please send titles and abstracts of no more than 250 words to James Harland (james.harland@york.ac.uk) and Andrew Welton (awelton@ufl.edu) by the 15th of September 2018. We welcome papers from scholars who do not usually present at the IMC and aim to ensure appropriate gender balance across the panels. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us.

Late Antique Materialities”, 26th International Medieval Congress, 1-4 July 2019, Leeds.

Deadline: 24 August 2018

Late antiquity was born out of a growing appreciation of the cultural and material unity of the period of transition from the ancient to the medieval world. Materiality is at the heart of what we appreciate as distinct about the late antique world, both through the development of this concept in a number of fields and also the creation of new forms of material culture. These material traces are therefore central to any attempt to reconstruct the intellectual, religious, economic and political history of late antiquity, as well as the ordinary and extraordinary experiences of the people who lived through it.

In keeping with the overall IMC 2019 theme of “Materialities”, we invite submissions which offer new critical insight on issues surrounding the broad concepts of materiality and material culture in late antiquity. Our aim is for these sessions to be as inclusive as possible, bringing together scholars working on a wide range of fields, periods and geographical areas in the study of late antiquity, and ensuring an appropriate gender balance across panels. We particularly invite submissions from scholars who have not previously—or do not usually—present at the Leeds IMC, to encourage new and fruitful intellectual exchanges between those who work on late antiquity/the early middle ages within different departments, disciplines and cultures. Possible themes include:

  • the changing forms, styles, and meanings of material culture as the ancient world slowly transitioned into the medieval
  • how material from the earlier Roman past could be preserved, reassessed, adapted, or rejected in new cultural, social, and political realities
  • the increasingly distinct articulations of Christian materiality in late antiquity and the contradictions that the materiality of the Church implied
  • networks of exchange for people, objects and ideas
  • interactions between the written word and the material world, including their intertwining in the conception and experience of church space, monastic rules, religious objects and ascetic practices
  • reality and materiality in the late antique imagination
  • the age-old question of material decline in late antiquity

If you are interested in presenting a 20-minute paper, please email an abstract of no more than 250 words to Richard Flower (r.flower@exeter.ac.uk). The deadline for submissions is 24th August 2018.  And if you have any questions, feel free to write to us.

Richard Flower (Exeter) (r.flower@exeter.ac.uk); Adrastos Omissi (Glasgow) (adrastos.omissi@glasgow.ac.uk); Rebecca Usherwood (St Andrews/Trinity College, Dublin) (rlfu@st-andrews.ac.uk); Robin Whelan (Liverpool) (robin.whelan@liverpool.ac.uk); Veronika Wieser (Vienna) (veronika.wieser@oeaw.ac.at).

Call for Sessions: Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 26th International Medieval Congress 1-4 July 2019, Leeds.

Deadline: 1 September 2018

To encourage the integration of Byzantine studies within the scholarly community, and medieval studies in particular, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 26th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 1–4, 2019. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

The thematic strand for the 2019 IMC is “Materialities.” See the IMC Call for Papers for additional information about the theme and suggested areas of discussion.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website. The deadline for submission is September 1, 2018. Proposals should include:

  • Title
  • 100-word session abstract
  • Session moderator and academic affiliation
  • Information about the three papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 100-word abstract
  • CV

Successful applicants will be notified by mid-September if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. Successful applicants will be notified by mid-September if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. The Mary Jaharis Center will submit the session proposal to the International Medieval Congress and will keep the potential organizer informed about the status of the proposal.

The session organizer may act as the moderator or present a paper. Participants may only present papers in one session.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse a maximum of 4 session participants (presenters and moderator) up to $600 maximum for European residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside Europe. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

“Research on Psalter Catenae: Current Trends and Future Perspectives”, 18th International Conference on Patristic Studies, 19–24 August 2019, Oxford. 

Deadline: 15 November 2018

Earlier this year, the fifth and last volume of Gilles Dorival’s Les chaînes exégétiques sur les Psaumes was published (Leuven, 2018). This book completes a major study of the Greek catenae on the Psalter, and in that sense its publication provides an occasion to reflect on past, current and future research in this field.

Significant progress has been made since G. Karo & H. Lietzmann’s classification (Göttingen, 1902), but much of what undoubtedly is the most complex corpus of catenae remains to be explored. Guided by G. Mercati, R. Devreesse, M. Richard and E. Mühlenberg, twentieth-century scholarship reached insights that charted the tradition (or at least identified its backbone) in a definite way. Their approach was dominated by a desire to retrieve in the Psalter catenae remains of patristic commentaries.

In the last two decades, research has been continuing that line—and rightly so. In addition, the Psalter catenae are now being approached by patristic, Byzantine and biblical scholars in other ways and with different goals. Their work reflect the trends in the broader field: next to being used to retrieve remains of patristic commentaries, Psalter catenae are now studied as literary products in their own right, included in projects of digital editing, subjected to detailed palaeographical and art-historical analyses etc.

With this workshop, we want (a) to reflect on this evolution and on what can and should be expected from future research, (b) to discuss what is going on at present. We invite presentations of 30′ and in English on any kind of ongoing or planned research that involves Psalter catenae (individual MSS, patristic or Byzantine commentaries, methodological considerations, biblical tradition, catenae in other languages etc.). We also welcome contributions that reflect on past research and on what you believe the field needs.

Please send before 15 November 2018 a title and short abstract (max. 250 words) of your proposed presentation to: reinhart.ceulemans@kuleuven.be AND bandt@bbaw.de BEFORE submitting your abstract through the website of the Oxford Patristics conference. (Please use the email address that you will use to later submit your abstract through the conference website.)

Further information on the conference can be found here.

====

  1. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Opportunities for Scholars at Dumbarton Oaks

Fellowships:

Deadline: 1 November 2018

Fellowships are awarded to Byzantine, Garden and Landscape, and Pre-Columbian scholars on the basis of demonstrated scholarly ability and preparation of the candidate, including knowledge of the requisite languages, interest and value of the study or project, and the project’s relevance to the resources of Dumbarton Oaks. We place great value on the collegial engagement of fellows with one another and with the staff.

Application and instructions are available online. The application deadline is November 1.

Fellowships are awarded to scholars who hold a PhD or appropriate final degree, or who have established themselves in their field and wish to pursue their own research.

Junior Fellowships are awarded to degree candidates who at the time of application have fulfilled all preliminary requirements for a PhD or appropriate final degree, and plan to work on a dissertation or final project while at Dumbarton Oaks, under the direction of a faculty member from their own university.

Summer Fellowships in Pre-Columbian and Byzantine studies are awarded to scholars on any level beyond the first year of graduate (postbaccalaureate) study.

Additional Research Opportunities:

  • One-Month Research Awards support scholars with a PhD or other relevant final degree who are working on research projects that require use of Dumbarton Oaks’ books, objects, or other library or museum materials.

Application deadlines: October 1 & March 1

  • Project Grants support scholarly projects by applicants holding a PhD or the equivalent. Support is generally for archaeological research, preservation of historic gardens, and the recovery, recording, and analysis of materials that would otherwise be lost. Application deadline: November 1
  • Short-Term Predoctoral Residencies support advanced graduate students preparing for their PhD general exams, writing doctoral dissertations, or expecting relevant final degrees. Each residency provides up to four weeks of lodging and weekday lunches. Applications must be submitted at least sixty days before the preferred residency dates.

More information is available here.

Post-doctoral researcher positions for Greek and Latin teams, ERC project “Documenting Multiculturalism” 

Deadline: 16 August 2018

The Università degli Studi di Palermo has advertised two post-doctoral positions for the Greek and Latin teams. For further details please see here: Greek, Latin.

Posted in Byzness

Lecture Series on Greek Manuscripts, 30/07/2018-02/08/2018, Ioannou Centre

Monday, 30 July, 17.00: Nigel Wilson, “The rewards of palaeography”

Tuesday, 31 July, 17.00: Georgi Parpulov, “A private collection of Byzantine miniatures”

Wednesday, 1 August, 17.00: Michael Jeffreys, “From Thucydides to Procopius to popular Byzantine literature and beyond: the progressive irrelevance of traditional editorial methods”

Thursday, 2 August, 17.00: Michael Zellmann-Rohrer, “Byzantine and later Greek manuscripts for the occult sciences: an introduction”

——————————-

Venue: Lecture Theatre of Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’, Oxford OX1 3LY

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 15/07/2018

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 15th July 2018
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

SCHOOL: Influencers and Followers: Medieval Philosophy Between the Latin

West, The Byzantine Empire and The Islamicate World, Autumn School in Medieval Languages and Culture 2018, 16-19 October 2018, Ghent.

Application Deadline: 10 September 2018

This Autumn School is organized for PhD- and MA- students in Medieval Studies (art history, history, philosophy, literature, linguistics, etc.) who did not have a training as philosopher during their regular study programme, but nevertheless need some basic knowledge and methodology for their current research.

The course aims to give an overview of the philosophical problems, concepts, and debates that are specific to the Middle Ages. Equal attention will be paid to three cultural areas: the Latin West, Byzantium, and the Islamicate world. Hence, the intercultural exchange of philosophical ideas will be an important focus throughout the course. Also, the course will develop insights into the thorny relationships of philosophy with religion in the Middle Ages, and will discuss relationships between philosophy and literature, science, and art. Moreover, time will be devoted to a specifically medieval problem in philosophy, namely the relationship between commenting texts of ancient authorities and developing independent ideas.

The Autumn School consists of four days during which participants will be able to combine plenary sessions with interactive workshops. All sessions will be taught in English by leading experts in the field of medieval Latin philosophy, Byzantine philosophy and Islamicate philosophy.

  • Maximum of 20 participants
  • First-come, first-served.
  • Registration fee of EUR 150, waived for students from Ghent University & The Dutch Research School for Medieval Studies
  • Venue: Campus Book Tower, Blandijn Building, Blandijnberg 2, 9000 Ghent
  • For registration, full programme and folder see here.

CONFERENCE: XIVe colloque international Grégoire de Nysse, 4-7 September 2018, Paris.

The XIVth international conference on Gregory of Nyssa will take place in Paris, Collège des Bernardins, from Tuesday 4th to Friday 7th of September 2018. It will focus on the Homilies on the Lord’s Prayer and their reception in the byzantine world. For all information see here.

CONFERENCE: 44th Annual BSANA Conference, 4-7 October 2018, San Antonio, Texas

Registration for the Byzantine Studies Conference is now open. Early registration fees apply until the 20th of September, two weeks before the conference begins.  The conference will start on the evening of Thursday the 4th of October and conclude midday on Sunday the 7th of October.

For all information and registration see here.

====

 2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

“Editing Byzantine Learned Texts: Problems and Prospects”, 4th “Parekbolai” Symposium         on Byzantine Literature and Philology, 14 December 2018, Thessaloniki, Greece.

The editorial board of the e-journal Parekbolai organizes the journal’s fourth Symposium on Byzantine Literature and Philology on Friday, December 14, 2018. The Symposium aims to bring together scholars who work on various aspects of Byzantine texts, in order to exchange research experiences and discuss their projects and results. Specialists, Ph.D. candidates and postgraduate students are invited to deliver a twenty-minute paper in Greek (or in English) on a relevant topic. Prospective speakers are asked to submit a title and a short abstract to Ioannis Vassis (ivassis@lit.auth.gr) or Sofia Kotzabassi (kotzabas@lit.auth.gr) by 30 September 2018.

“Late Antiquity I-III (sponsored by the Society for Late Antiquity): ICMS 54”, 9-12 May 2019, Kalamazoo, MI.

Deadline: 15 September 2018

The Society for Late Antiquity is pleased to announce the return of its sponsored sessions to the International Congress on Medieval Studies, May 9-12, 2019 at Western Michigan University.  These sessions are intentionally broad in scope, allowing for an extensive range of topics relating to the history, literature, religion, art, archaeology, culture, and society of Late Antiquity, that is, the European, North African, and Western Asian world, c. 250–750.

Inquiries or Abstracts and a completed Participant Information Form (here) should be submitted to Jonathan Arnold (jon-arnold@utulsa.edu) by the congress deadline of September 15.

“Reception, Appropriation, and Innovation: Byzantium between the Christian and Islamic Worlds”, 2nd Annual International Graduate Edinburgh Byzantine Conference, 30 November-1 December 2018, Edinburgh.

Deadline: 1 August 2018

Reception and appropriation (whether reuse, imitation, or variation) have long been recognised as necessary tools for the interpretation of Byzantine literature, art, architecture and archaeology, while research on innovations is still at a relatively early stage.

The key theme of this conference is dialogue – dialogue between Byzantium and its neighbouring cultures. The conference will be hosted by the Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Research Group of the University of Edinburgh from 30 November-1 December 2018 and will explore all three of the fundamental modes of dialogue and discourse (reception, appropriation and innovation) between Byzantium and its neighbours during any time period from the 5th-15thc. Confirmed invited speakers include Prof. Claudia Rapp (Vienna), Dr. Andrew Marsham (Cambridge), and Fr. Justin Sinaites (Librarian of St. Catherine’s, Mt. Sinai), in addition to confirmed internal speakers, both Byzantinists and Islamicists.

We strongly encourage papers highlighting exchange in both directions: Byzantium receiving from other cultures and/or others receiving from Byzantium. Possible topics include, but are certainly not limited to:

  • Before the Christian and Islamic Worlds: reception and appropriation of Classical Greek or Latin heritage within Byzantium – perspectives from culture, text, legislation, gender, symbolism, art, etc.
  • Contemporary exchange and attempts at imitation (concepts of culture, text, gender, legislation, symbolism etc.) between Byzantium, the Islamic World, Latin Europe and imperial courts
  • Artistic similarities (visual art, sculpture, painting, etc.), whether as a result of promotion or prohibition, as an expression or mode of cultural exchange or identification across East and West
  • Production, circulation and demand for luxury goods or household artefacts as evidence for dialogue and/or interaction between Byzantium and its neighbours
  • Urban layout and rural landscape: military, civil and religious architecture in cities and countryside – common links and peculiarities between Byzantium and neighbouring powers
  • Interdisciplinary approaches to interpretations of Byzantine (inter)action throughout the Mediterranean, taking into account multiple types of primary source evidence

The deadline for submission of abstracts is 1 August, and notification of acceptance will be communicated by mid-August. Please submit your abstract of no more than 300 words to edibyzpg@ed.ac.uk with your name and affiliation. There will be a small registration fee of £10 and lunch will be provided on both days. We will aim to publish a selection of the papers in a peer-reviewed volume that will bring together the strongest contributions in each area in order to produce an edited volume of high-quality, deep coherence and rich variety.

“Days of Justinian I” Special Thematic Strand for 2018: State and Empire, 6th International Scientific Symposium, Ohrid. Organised by the Institute of National History, Skopje University of Bologna, Euro-Balkan University, Skopje.

First Deadline for abstracts: 10 August 2018

Second Deadline for abstracts: 20 October 2018

The International scientific symposium “Days of Justinian I” is an annual interdisciplinary scholarly forum aimed at the presentation of the latest research followed by discussions on various aspects of Byzantine and Medieval Studies, that include the treatment and interpretation of cultural, historical and spiritual heritage in contemporary Europe. The Symposium is dedicated to Emperor Justinian I with the aim to address a broad range of issues related to Byzantium and the European Middle Ages, comprising the exploration of the cultural and historical legacy as an integrative component of the diversities and commonalities of Unified Europe.

This years’ special thematic focus State and Empire is inspired by the 1000th anniversary of the fall of the Samuel’s State and the Ohrid Archbishopric. The association of the city of Ohrid with the Samuel’s State and the Ohrid Archbishopric, predetermined the decision for organizing the 6th edition of “Days of Justinian I” in the UNESCO world heritage site. The city of Ohrid provides additional symbolism with Justinian I, considering that the Byzantine emperor and his Archbishopric Justiniana Prima are incorporated in the traditions of the Ohrid Archbishopric. Thus, apart from traditionally connecting Skopje-Bologna-Ravenna, “Days of Justinian I” this year will link the city of Ohrid, which reflects its key objective for integrating the European cultural and historical heritage and the scholars throughout the world.

The scholars will exchange their latest research and share the ideas on the historical phenomena of the State and Empire. The various issues will be explored related to the nature of the state, the state-building processes in the Middle Ages, the concept of the empire, the relationships between the states and empires. The fundamental problems of definition of the state and empire in Byzantine and Medieval World will be tackled and addressed within wider contexts and contemporary approaches.

First Deadline for submitting the abstract of the papers: 10 August, 2018.

Second Deadline for submitting the abstract of the papers: 20 October, 2018.

Notification of acceptance for early applicants: 15 August, 2018.

Notification of acceptance for other applicants: 25 October, 2018.

Deadline for submitting the full papers for publication: 1 March, 2019.

Please send the application form to the following address: days.justinian@gmail.com

Presentation of the papers will be limited to 10 minutes.

No participation fee is required.

Travel and accommodation expenses are covered by the participants themselves.

The full papers will be peer-reviewed.

Papers delivered at the Symposium will be published in the Proceedings of the Symposium.

For further inquires please contact the Secretary of the Symposium: Dr. Dragan Gjalevski (days.justinian@gmail.com).

You can download the Call for papers here.

Please check the Facebook page for news on the Symposium, the agenda, special events and the online application form here.

Workshop on Modes of Knowing and the Ordering of Knowledge in Late Antiquity at the Oxford Patristics Conference, 19-24 August 2019, Oxford. 

Deadline: 31 August 2018

We call for papers that investigate modes of knowing and attempts at ordering/organizing knowledge in Christian communities in diverse linguistic and cultural traditions (including Latin, Greek, Coptic, Syriac, Armenian, Georgian, and Ethiopic) for the period 100-850 CE in relation to three themes:

  • contemporary theological, philosophical, medical and rhetorical discourses
  • institutional structures (of empire, education and catechesis, liturgy, church, holy experts)
  • the materiality and embodied social practices of early Christianity (relics, sacred texts, asceticism, pilgrimage, liturgies).

We are also interested in papers that ask how this construction of late antique Christian epistemologies might inform modern theological reflection on Christian traditions engaging with modernity. The aim of this call for papers is to build upon and further the recent interest in outlining the lineaments of “late ancient knowing” from a variety of angles. Some of these are well established, such as the anthological and archival impulse evident in the way late ancient texts relate to older texts, but other aspects of this topic remain understudied, particularly those that involve material culture and embodied experience. Papers may be general or specific in scope and may employ any theoretical or methodological approach appropriate to the subject matter.

A team of researchers at Australian Catholic University is currently in the midst of a 5-year research program under the title “Modes of Knowing and the Ordering of Knowledge in Early Christianity” (2017-2021; Chief Investigators: Lewis Ayres, Michael Champion, Matthew Crawford, Andrew Radde-Gallwitz, Jane Heath), and at the annual meeting of the North American Patristics Society in May 2018, a separate initiative, led by Jeremiah Coogan and Philip Michael Forness, resulted in three sessions of papers on the theme “Organizing Knowledge in Late Antiquity.” We have decided to combine our efforts to sponsor one or more workshops at Oxford on this topic and are circulating a call for papers now in order to allow us time to vet the abstracts and submit the workshop(s) prior to the Oxford submission deadline of 31 December 2018. Depending on the size of the response we will consider putting together multiple workshops on various topics that would fit within this overarching theme. To make sure that we have sufficient lead time, we are asking for interested persons to send their abstracts to modesofknowingoxford2019@gmail.com by 31 August 2018. We will make a decision about which papers to include in the workshop(s) by 31 October 2018. Those persons whose papers we do not select would of course then be free to submit their proposals directly to the Oxford call for papers themselves and should have sufficient time to do so.

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 17/06/2018

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 17th June 2018
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

CONFERENCE: Vernacular languages in the long ninth century, 28 June 13:00 to 30 June 14:00, University of Kent.

The long ninth century was an important period for the history of vernacular languages in Europe in both Eastern and Western Christendom. Some of those languages appeared for the first time in written form and others changed considerably. This conference will compare and contrast the different histories of a wide variety of languages in this period including Old English, Old Norse, Frisian, Slavonic, Old Irish and Old High German. We will address questions such as: To what extent were their histories inter-connected? Why was this happening in the ninth century? To what extent was this mainly a religious and elite phenomenon or was it more widespread?

Full programme here

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2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

Terracotta lamps in Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic, Roman and Early Byzantine Anatolia: Production, use, typology and distribution. An international symposium, May 16-17, 2019, Dokuz Eylul University (DEU), Izmir, Turkey

Deadline: 1 January 2019
The Izmir Center of the Archaeology of Western Anatolia (EKVAM) is organizing a new international symposium entitled “Terracotta lamps in Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic, Roman and Early Byzantine Anatolia: Production, use, typology and distribution. An international symposium” that will take place on May 16-17, 2019 at the Dokuz Eylul University (DEU) in Izmir, Turkey. We warmly invite contributions by scholars and graduate students from a variety of disciplines of ancient studies related to this instrument. The symposium is free of charge. A post-symposium excursion is planned on May 18-19 to Samos, Greece through Kusadasi. We would be delighted, if you could consider contributing to our symposium and contact us with the required information below before January 1, 2019. Our e-mail addresses are: gulserenkan@hotmail.com or terracottas@deu.edu.tr
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3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 Research Associate, Cult of Saints (Greek Hagiography), Faculty of History, University of Oxford.

 Deadline: 12.00 noon on Thursday 21 June 2018.

Location: Oxford

Salary: £31,604 to £33,518 p.a. Grade 7

Hours: Full Time

Contract Type: Fixed-Term/Contract

Placed on: 6th June 2018

Job Ref: 135227

We are seeking a talented and enthusiastic researcher to join the flagship project ‘The Cult of Saints in Late Antiquity’. This is an opportunity to share in a major electronic project, and to familiarise yourself with important, and so far under-used, sources. The post is full-time, fixed-term for 6 months and available from July 2018.

You will work specifically with Greek hagiographical texts to identify early texts (those which can reasonably be considered to date from before AD 700), analyse and describe their probable context (geographical and chronological), summarise their contents and write entries for our database. You will manage your own research, collaborate in the preparation of publications and represent the project and meetings and seminars.

You will have a doctorate in a relevant field (or show evidence that a doctorate is imminent) and an excellent knowledge of Greek, with an ability to work swiftly through untranslated texts.

Very good written English, a good reading knowledge of French and Italian and reasonable background knowledge of the late antique Church are essential. You will also be able to work flexibly and effectively as part of a team.

To apply for this role and for further details, including the job description, please click on the link below.

The deadline for applications is 12.00 noon on Thursday 21 June 2018.

https://www.recruit.ox.ac.uk/pls/hrisliverecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=135227

 

6 positions for doctoral research associates, Research Training Group 2304 “Byzantium and the Euro-Mediterranean Cultures of War. Exchange, Differentiation and Reception”, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz

Deadline: 22 June 2018.

Within the Research Training Group 2304 “Byzantium and the Euro-Mediterranean Cultures of War. Exchange, Differentiation and Reception”, which is financed by the DFG (German Research Foundation), there are at the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz 6 positions for doctoral research associates (TV-L E13, 65%) to be filled by 1 October 2018 for a contract period of three years.

Participating in this Research Training Group are the disciplines of Ancient History, Antique Church History/Theology, Byzantine Studies, Medieval History, Eastern European History, Early Modern Church History, Classical Archaeology and Byzantine Art History, Early and Prehistorical Archaeology (with a focus on Medieval Archaeology) and Musicology.

The goal of the Research Training Group is to examine the Euro-Mediterranean Cultures of War and the importance of Byzantium for them from a transcultural perspective, from the Roman Imperial Period to the Early Modern Period. With cultures of war are understood to be the forms and practices of war as well as the norms, interpretations, attributions of meaning and reflections referring to war. The mutual processes of exchange, differentiation or reception (from antique influences in Byzantium to Byzantine models in the post-Byzantine Period) will be explored via four thematic areas:

  1. Strategies of justification and legitimation
  2. Conceptualizations of persons and groups
  3. Rituals and worship
  4. Knowledge and infrastructure

The prospective dissertation project must address at least one of these thematic areas as well as be housed within one of the participating disciplines.

Duties include:

  • Further scholarly attainment through the writing of a dissertation
  • Regular participation in the Research Training Group’s structured program of study and its events. The participants are thus required to reside in Mainz.

The Research Training Group offers intensive specialist and interdisciplinary exchange, cross-disciplinary doctoral supervision by two professors from amongst the participating scholars, praxis-oriented courses directed at public engagement (including through museums), a comprehensive range of key qualifications (e.g. from the sphere of Digital Humanities) and diverse opportunities for international networking.

Requirements for the application include a degree (Magister, M.A. or the equivalent) completed with above-average marks in a participating or related field as well as openness to interdisciplinary work.

The Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz is keen on increasing the proportion of women within the sphere of scholarship and therefore especially welcomes applications from female researchers. Qualified persons with disabilities will be given preference.

The following application materials are to be submitted electronically in a single .pdf (in German or English):

  • A letter of application (one page)
  • An outline of the planned dissertation project (two pages)
  • A curriculum vitae with list of publications (if applicable), degree diplomas, certificates of scholarly activities
  • Master’s Thesis (or equivalent)

The application materials along with two letters of recommendation from university-level instructors, who should submit their letters separately, are to be addressed to the Spokesman of the Research Training Group, Prof. Dr. Johannes Pahlitzsch, (address: grk2304@uni-mainz.de ; subject-line: grk2304_Last Name).

The application deadline ends by 22 June 2018.

For further information on the Research Training Group see here

For subject-related questions please direct your queries to the corresponding specialists of the Research Training Group, other questions to Prof. Dr. Johannes Pahlitzsch.

 

Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Humanities, Wolf Humanities Center, University of Pennsylvania

Deadline: 15 October 2018.

The Wolf Humanities Center (formerly Penn Humanities Forum) awards five (5) one-year Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowships each academic year to junior scholars in the humanities who are no more than eight years out of their doctorate and who are not yet tenured (may not be tenured during the fellowship year). Scholars are required to spend the year (late August–May) in residence at Penn.

For the 2019-20 academic year, our topic will be KINSHIP. The Fellowship carries a stipend of $56,225 plus single-coverage health insurance (fellows are responsible for coverage for any dependents) and a $3000 research fund. Fellows teach one undergraduate course in either the fall or the spring semester in addition to conducting their research.

The PhD is the only eligible terminal degree, and applicants must be humanists or those in such allied fields as anthropology or history of science. Ineligible categories include an MFA or any other doctorate such as EdD, social scientists, scholars in educational curriculum building, and performing artists (note: scholars of performance are eligible).

The fellowship is open to all scholars, national and international, who meet application terms. Scholars who received or will receive their PhD between December 2010 and December 2018 are eligible to apply. You must have your degree in hand or have passed your defense no later than December 2018 to be eligible. Your application will not be considered unless this condition is met (i.e., you are ineligible to apply if you will defend or otherwise submit your dissertation anytime in 2019).

During their year in residence, Fellows pursue their proposed research, are required to teach one undergraduate seminar during the year, and must also participate in the Center’s weekly Mellon Research Seminar (Tuesdays, 12:00–1:50), presenting their research at one of those seminars.

In selecting fellows, the Wolf Humanities Center aims for a balanced mix of recent Ph.D.s and more seasoned tenure-track faculty who do not yet have tenure. Preference will be given to candidates whose proposals are interdisciplinary, who have not previously enjoyed use of the resources of the University of Pennsylvania, and who would particularly benefit from and contribute to Penn’s intellectual life.

For further information see here

Contrat doctoral (36 mois) en histoire medieval, Projet ERC HornEast / Aix-Marseille Université / Institut de recherches et d’études sur les monde arabes et musulmans – UMR 7310.

Deadline: 15 October 2018.

Le projet ERC Consolidator Grant HornEast. Horn & Crescent. Connections, Mobility and Exchange between the Horn of Africa and the Middle East in the Middle Ages (P.I. Julien Loiseau) propose un contrat doctoral d’une durée de 36 mois.

Le projet ERC HornEast vise à documenter les connexions entre les sociétés de la Corne de l’Afrique (Éthiopie, Nubie) et leur environnement islamique aux échelles locale et régionale (Égypte, Palestine, péninsule Arabique), pour mieux comprendre les modalités du processus d’islamisation à l’œuvre dans la région et la recomposition des chrétientés africaines au Moyen Age (VIIe-XVe siècle).

Sujet de thèse: L’esclavage des Éthiopiens dans le monde islamique médiéval

Le commerce et l’emploi d’esclaves éthiopiens – femmes, hommes, eunuques – sont déjà attestés au Proche-Orient dans l’Antiquité tardive. Le développement de la traite à longue distance au Moyen Age, dans le cadre du monde islamique, leur donne une ampleur sans précédent. L’origine éthiopienne des esclaves était en effet prisée pour certains usages et certaines fonctions sociales, parfois au plus près du pouvoir. Des affranchis d’origine éthiopienne ont ainsi pu accéder à de hautes positions dans le monde islamique médiéval. Mais l’emploi domestique d’esclaves éthiopiens était aussi très fréquent à un niveau plus ordinaire.

La thèse, sous la direction de Julien Loiseau (Aix-Marseille Université, IREMAM), aura pour objectif de documenter l’histoire des esclaves et affranchis éthiopiens dans ses différentes dimensions. Les sources arabes d’époque mamelouke (XIIIe-XVIe siècle), produites en Égypte, Syrie et Hijaz, constitueront le corpus central de la thèse.

Titulaire d’un Master recherche en histoire et/ou en études arabes, le candidat ou la candidate aura une maîtrise suffisante de la langue arabe pour pouvoir commencer l’étude des sources éditées. L’apprentissage de l’arabe pourra néanmoins se poursuivre dans le cadre du doctorat.

Intégré à l’équipe du projet à Aix-Marseille Université, il/elle participera aux rencontres scientifiques du projet ainsi qu’à l’animation de son carnet de recherché (https://horneast.hypotheses.org/). Il/elle bénéficiera d’un soutien financier pour effectuer les missions indispensables à ses recherches et participer à toute rencontre scientifique pertinente dans le cadre de son doctorat.
Pour candidate envoyer à mellal@mmsh.univ-aix.fr en un seul fichier PDF avant le 16 juin 2018 :

  • un CV
  • une lettre de motivation
  • le mémoire de M2 ou, à défaut, le mémoire de fin de M1
  • une lettre de recommendation

Période du contrat: 1er Septembre 2018 au 31 Août 2021 (36 mois)
Rémmunération: 2 000 euros brut (à titre informatif, environ 1 500 euros net) par mois
Plus d’informations: https://horneast.hypotheses.org/478
Dossier à envoyer à: mellal@mmsh.univ-aix.fr

Posted in Byzness