The Byzness, 19/08/2019

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 19th August 2019
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
====

 1. NEWS AND EVENTS

 

The Byzantine Studies Association of North America’s 45th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference, University of Wisconsin, 17-20 October 2019, Madison, Wisconsin.

For the full programme and registration details, see here.

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

 

Call for Sessions: Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel at the 27th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 6-9 July 2020.

Deadline: 3 September 2019

To encourage the integration of Byzantine studies within the scholarly community and medieval studies in particular, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 27th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 6–9, 2020. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

The thematic strand for the 2029 IMC is “Borders.” See the IMC Call for Papers for additional information about the theme and suggested areas of discussion.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website.

Proposals should include:

  • Title
  • 100-word session abstract
  • Session moderator and academic affiliation
  • Information about the three papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 100-word abstract
  • CV

Successful applicants will be notified by mid-September if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. Successful applicants will be notified by mid-September if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. The Mary Jaharis Center will submit the session proposal to the International Medieval Congress and will keep the potential organizer informed about the status of the proposal.

The session organizer may act as the moderator or present a paper. Participants may only present papers in one session.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse a maximum of 4 session participants (presenters and moderator) up to $600 maximum for European residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside Europe. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

‘Frontiers of Late Antiquity’, 27th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 6-9 July 2020.

Deadline: 16 September 2019

Since the 1980s, scholars have largely abandoned traditional Limesforschungen in favour of a more nuanced approach to the study of Rome’s frontiers. Although many remain interested in imperial strategy and defense, limites are now commonly viewed as a permeable zone of influence and an area of economic and cultural exchange. Yet, these physical limites are just one possible way of thinking about frontiers in the Roman Empire and during Late Antiquity. Indeed, frontiers were also conceptual, about controlling access to power and privilege, and highlighting or minimizing difference, be it geographic or topographical (regional and supra-regional), political, legal, ethnic, economic, cultural, religious, or gender. Frontiers could also be imagined and constructed through rhetoric. Thus, the question of frontiers is intimately bound up with questions of liminality, of insiders and outsiders.

In keeping with IMC 2020 theme of “borders,” papers are being sought for a series of panels on frontiers in Late Antiquity (roughly 250 – 750 CE). We are hoping to include a diverse range of scholars representing as many approaches as possible. We especially encourage late-stage graduate students and early career scholars to apply.

Possible topics might include (but are not limited to):

  • Urban-suburban frontiers (city centre vs. periphery).
  • The frontiers of religious identity and authority (this might include liturgical frontiers; missionary activity; the construction of religious identity vis-à-vis borders).
  • Imagined/imaginary frontiers (perceptions of difference and distinction; spatial frontiers; the rhetoric of the frontier; polemic; perception of insiders and outsiders).
  • Communication, diplomacy, and political integration across the frontiers of the late antique Mediterranean and beyond (local/regional and geographic frontiers such as rovers, mountains, plains or agriculture zones; the reception of Roman territorial divisions).
  • Gender as a frontier (and its transgression).
  • Physical frontiers in late antiquity.
  • Movement of people across frontiers and their reception.

Those wishing to have their paper considered for inclusion are asked to submit a title and short abstract (no more than 250 words) to lateantiquefrontiers@gmail.com by Monday, September 16, 2019. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us collectively at the above email address or any of the individual organizers, listed below:

Samuel Cohen (Sonoma State University) samuel.cohen@sonoma.edu

Jonathan J. Arnold (University of Tulsa) jon-arnold@utulsa.edu

Rebecca Usherwood (Trinity College Dublin) usherwor@tcd.ie

Adrastos Omissi (University of Glasgow) adrastos.omissi@glasgow.ac.uk

 

‘Women and Artistic Production Beyond the Borders of Byzantium’, 27th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 6-9 July 2020.

Deadline: 10 September 2019

The ever-shifting borders of the Byzantine Empire and the spiritual power of Eastern Orthodoxy contributed to the development of new visual forms in regions of the Balkan Peninsula and the Carpathian Mountains between the thirteenth and sixteenth centuries. The rich art, architecture, and visual culture of these eastern European regions remain to be fully explored, as do the key roles women played in the transfer of artistic and cultural knowledge, the development of local artistic styles, as well as in the establishment of diplomatic relations and the transformation of identities and ideologies. Women have been frequently overshadowed by powerful husbands, sons, and communities, and too often relegated to the margins of scholarly inquiry.

This session explores women and female agency beyond the borders of Byzantium, in light of their roles within marital and inter-dynastic relations, as well as in religious and spiritual dynamics. In efforts to gain new perspectives on the nature of cultural contact and transfer, as well as on visual production in late medieval Eastern Europe as a result of the direct involvement of women, either as patrons, artists, mediators, and/or recipients, this session aims to focus on case studies that examine individual female figures from all walks of life (royal courts, noble families, monastic communities, etc.). Moreover, the session seeks to highlight the significance of prosopography, gender, and network studies in historical and art historical research.

Papers could address topics that include, but are not limited to:

  • The role of women as key agents of cultural contact, transfer, and adaptation of knowledge
  • Women as patrons, artists, and recipients of art beyond geographical, socio-political, and religious boundaries
  • Instances of art (icons, embroideries, manuscripts, metalwork) and architecture that speak to women, allow for self-identification, and/or established gender roles and norms

Proposals for 20-minute papers in English should include an abstract (300 words max.) and a brief CV (2 pages max.) and should be sent to Alice Isabella Sullivan (aisulli@umich.edu) and Maria Alessia Rossi (marossi@princeton.edu) by September 10, 2019.

This session is organized under the larger initiative North of Byzantium, which explores the rich history, art, and culture of the northern frontiers of the Byzantine Empire in Eastern Europe between the thirteenth and sixteenth centuries.

Mike Clover and the World of Late Antiquity’, 27th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 6-9 July 2020.

Deadline: 21 September 2019

Following the untimely death of Mike Clover, a much beloved and admired scholar of Late Antiquity in general and the Vandals in particular, his students, colleagues, and friends are proposing a series of conference sessions in his honor for the Leeds International Medieval Conference, 6-9 July 2020. Given Mike’s interests, the theme for next year’s conference, “Borders,” makes this initiative even more appropriate. We would welcome submissions on the kinds of topics that Mike liked to work on, things like barbarians/Vandals, prosopography, the Historia Augusta, Ammianus, hagiography, coinage, and late Roman history in general.

Submissions (title and brief abstract) can be sent to Ralph Mathisen, ralphwm@illinois.edu. The deadline for submissions in September 21.

‘The Lost Latin Historiography of Late Antiquity’, 27th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 6-9 July 2020.

Deadline: 15 September 2019

The project ‘The Missing Link: The Lost Latin Historiography of the Later Roman Empire (3rd-5th century)’, funded by the National Science Centre Poland, aims to collect and study cases of lost or fragmentarily preserved history works composed in Latin in the Later Roman Empire and their authors. In line with this goal we invite scholars at all career stages to submit proposals for twenty-minute papers relating to the subject of ‘The Lost Latin Historiography of Late Antiquity’.

Suggested topics for papers include, but are not limited to:

  • Identity and biographies of authors of lost history works
  • Transmission of fragments
  • Regional idiosyncrasies of history writing in the Roman Empire
  • Audiences and networks of authors – composing history as a social activity
  • Defining history – categories and limits of historical genres in Late Antiquity
  • History writing in the post-Roman West – continuity or a break?
  • History of the scholarship on the lost and fragmentarily preserved Latin historiography

Please send paper proposals in English of no more than 300 words to Aleksander Paradziński (a.k.paradzinski@uw.edu.pl) by 15 September 2019. Please note that conveners are, regrettably, unable to cover the congress registration fee and travel expenses.

Dumbarton Oaks Sponsored Sessions, International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 7-10 May 2020.

Deadline: 15 September 2019

Dumbarton Oaks is sponsoring five sessions at the 2020 International Congress on Medieval Studies. For more information, including the topics of each Dumbarton Oaks sponsored session, please visit their website.

Any proposals or questions can be directed to Nicole Eddy (eddyn01@doaks.org). Please indicate which session you are interested in.

All proposals should include an abstract of no more than one page and a completed participant information form, which can be found here.

Any proposals not chosen for inclusion by the session organizers will be forwarded to the congress organizers for consideration for the General Sessions.

 

Call for submissions for the Early Slavic Studies Association (ESSA) Book and Article Prizes.

Deadline: Final Call

This is the final call for submissions for the Early Slavic Studies Association (ESSA) prizes for best monograph and best article in the field of Early Slavic Studies for 2019. The prize committee is also willing to consider a special award for best translation of primary source material in the field, to be awarded at the committee’s discretion.

Books and peer-reviewed articles published between September 1, 2018 and August 31, 2019 are eligible for the award. All nominated works must be in English. The committee will accept nominations and self-nominations. Authors must be members in good standing of the ESSA. Please contact our secretary, Cynthia M. Vakareliyska (vakarel@uoregon.edu), to confirm your eligibility.

All nominations should be sent to the chair of the prize committee, Olga Grinchenko (olga.grinchenko@gmail.com).

Advertisements
Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 28/07/2019

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 28th July 2019
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

 1. NEWS AND EVENTS

Languages of God: Sacred Scripts of Ethiopia and Eritrea, 27 July – 13 October 2019, Weston Library, Oxford.

The collection of Ethiopic manuscripts in the Bodleian Library in Oxford is one of the most significant in Europe. Members of the Ethiopian and Eritrean communities from Oxford, London, and Milton Keynes have worked with the Bodleian to co-curate this display which will help us to find out more about these precious books and manuscripts and share them with the public.

The exhibition is part of an ongoing Bodleian Libraries project in partnership with the Faculty of Classics and the Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research, and is supported by the John Fell Fund and The Helen Hamlyn Trust.

For further details about the exhibition, see here.

For more information about this collaborative project, or to join the mailing list, please email ethiopia-eritrea@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

 

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

‘Acts of Excommunication in the Late Antique and Early Islamicate Middle East’, 12-13 March 2020, Leiden University.

Deadline: 1 October 2019

As part of the ERC-funded project, “Embedding Conquest, Naturalising Muslim Rule (600-1000)”, at Leiden University, this conference aims to bring together both senior and junior scholars to present research which illuminates the dynamics implicit in the act of excommunication and associated practices: ostracism, anathema, and other forms of religio-social exclusion, among the major religious communities of the Islamicate world, 600-1200 CE: including various Christian and Jewish denominations, Sunni, Shiʿi, ‘Khārijī’ and other groups within Islam; Zoroastrians and other relevant groups.

The workshop will focus on “acts of excommunication”, meaning that its primary focus will be specific cases, whether real or imagined, which display the dynamics and implications of excommunicatory practices. The discussion of specifc (pseudo-) documents is particularly encouraged. While participants will be asked to focus on specific cases, they should show how these examples illuminate the larger frameworks within which their cases occurred.

Topics to be covered might include the following:

  • Excommunicatory statements in contracts and oaths
  • Excommunication as a tool in managing institutional hierarchies and hierocracies
  • Maximal and minimalist excommunication
  • Exclusions from ritual, social activities, trade, place and space
  • Political rebels
  • Overlapping or contested jurisdictions
  • Enforcement issues
  • Excommunication at centre and periphery
  • Conversion and apostasy

Scholars of Judaism, Christianity, Zoroastrianism and Islam often study excommunication in separate silos, developing separate vocabularies and models. However, during the early Islamic period, these communities shared space and ideas. When compared, various contexts (theology, ritual, eschatology, social mores) indicate isomorphisms which suggest that different religious communities were as connected as they were divided.

Excommunication is a tool of coercion, and as such, it deserves to be studied in comparative context which might highlight the operation of intersecting power dynamics in society.

This workshop aims to move beyond the idea that acts of excommunication were purely the result of theological issues. Instead, this workshop aims to explore acts of excommunication as social and political as well as religious practice, with important implications for activities in local communities, but also for interactions with wider society and with governing authorities within the early Islamic empire.

While the theological, doctrinal and legal backdrop are important, an act of excommunication does not simply flow from the conceptual force of a doctrinal transgression, but rather it is situated within a set of overlapping fields which may include economic, institutional, familial, political, ethnic, linguistic and generational aspects. These fields, in turn, contributed to how an act of excommunication came to be interpreted and positioned within evolving systems of law, theology and doctrine.

The output of this workshop will be an open-access special issue on the topic of excommunication in and around the early Islamicate empire, to be published in Al-ʿUsur al-Wusta: The Journal of Middle East Medievalists.

Contributions to this workshop will be understood to be works in progress, with final versions to be submitted for the special issue. Please send an abstract of around 300 words to e.p.hayes@hum.leidenuniv.nl by October 1st, 2019. Pre-circulation of papers will not be necessary, but final versions of papers for publication will be requested by September 2020. If you are unable to attend the workshop, but would be interested in submitting to the special issue, please indicate this.

‘Jerusalem: The Holy City’, 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 7-10 May 2020, Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Deadline: 15 September 2019

The Stanford University Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (CMEMS) is pleased to announce that we will sponsor three sessions at the 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan (May 7-10, 2020). Among these are two linked panel sessions entitled ‘Jerusalem: The Holy City’. The first considers medieval imaginings of a distant Jerusalem across textual, visual, and material culture, while the second considers Jerusalem as an interreligious experience among Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Proposals should consist of a short abstract (300 words max) and a completed  participant information form. General submissions guidelines are available here, but please get in touch if you have any questions.

As per ICMS rules, any proposals not accepted for our sessions will be forwarded to the Congress committee to be considered for inclusion in the General Sessions.

Jerusalem (I): The Holy City in Textual, Visual, and Material Culture

Organizer: Mareike Elisa Reisch, Stanford University

This panel will focus on how Jerusalem was imagined from afar in textual, visual, and material

culture. As recent scholarship has shown, Jerusalem existed not only as a geographical space

entangled in local and transregional politics, but also as the subject of imaginations from afar because of its importance as a sacred space in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. People integrated, for example, images of Jerusalem into their personal devotional practices when they embarked on a virtual pilgrimage. As the place of Christian salvation, Jerusalem also inspired textual, visual, and material productions for public devotional practices. The city was imagined as the ultimate acquisition for religio-political expansion, as seen during the crusades. Material objects such as pilgrimage badges and gravesites show one’s personal connections and images of Jerusalem. The different ways in which Jerusalem was imagined from afar are still traceable in textual culture in the form of pilgrimage guidebooks, devotional texts, accounts of the crusades, and literary production, in architectural structures, in visual images such as altarpieces, epitaphs, and maps. This panel welcomes papers from all fields and aims for an interdisciplinary exchange.

Please send enquiries and submissions to mreisch@stanford.edu.

Jerusalem (II): The Holy City as Interreligious Experience.

Organizer: Ana C. Núñez, Stanford University

This panel will focus on the nature of Jerusalem as an interreligious space. As the home of Jews, Christians, and Muslims, as well as the destination of pilgrims, crusaders, and merchants, Jerusalem was a simultaneously shared, contested, and negotiated site. This panel will offer a forum to discuss how texts, architecture, and art reflect the centuries of contestation and negotiation from Late Antiquity to the Late Middle Ages. Pilgrimage texts from the ninth century, for example, detail the travel documents that the Christian pilgrim needed in order to visit Jerusalem under Muslim rule.

The Tomb of David on Mount Zion witnessed competing claims between Jews and Christians in the fifteenth century, until in the first half of the sixteenth century Muslim control resulted in the conversion of the chapel into a mosque, and the banned entry of both Jews and Christians. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre is another example of interreligious experience, in which various Christian communities—Latins, Georgians, Greeks, Armenians, and Ethiopians—vied for control and supremacy. To explore the long and multi-faceted history of Jerusalem as an interreligious space, we welcome papers from across disciplines, from anytime between Late Antiquity and the Late Middle Ages.

Please send enquiries and submissions to ananunez@stanford.edu.

Collectors and Scholars. The Numismatic World in the Long 19th Century, 16-17 April 2020, University of Tübingen.

Deadline: 31 October 2019

In the 19th century, developments in the study and collection of coins set the cornerstone for modern numismatics: major steps included the foundation of learned societies (e.g. Royal Numismatic Society in 1836, Numismatische Gesellschaft zu Berlin in 1843, American Numismatic Society in 1858, etc.) and the publication numismatic journals from the 1830s onwards (Revue numismatique in 1836, Numismatic chronicle in 1838, Revue belge de numismatique in 1842, etc.) leading to a thriving numismatic community.

The 19th century is also the time when previously private (Royal) collections became public institutions (e.g. in Paris following the French revolution, or the Münzkabinett Winterthur in 1861), and when new museums were created (e.g. the Capitoline medagliere in 1873, Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien in 1891, etc.). Subsequently, museum curators began publishing scholarly catalogues of their collections, such as the British Museum’s seminal catalogue series (e.g. Greek Coins from 1873 onwards, or Oriental Coins from 1875 onwards). Some of the works published in the 19th century were aimed at collectors, such as Théodore Mionnet’s or Henry Cohen’s reference works, but it is notably thanks to their publications that scholars were able to process coin finds as source for dating archaeological sites and discussing social history (e.g. Theodor Mommsen identifying Kalkriese as site for the battle of the Teutoburg Forest, as early as 1850, on the basis of numismatics).

At the same time, large and famous collections evolved, were traded, or finally bequeathed to museums leading to new research on the subject. Whilst earlier collectors were almost always generalists (coins being one collecting field among others such as antiquities, paintings, gems, etc.), collectors such as Hyman Montagu or Virgil Brand devoted themselves only to numismatics. These famous collectors were sometimes scholars themselves, writing noteworthy articles. The names of John Evans, Friedrich Imhoof-Blumer, William Henry Waddington, Archer Huntington and King Victor Emmanuel III are the most prominent examples of illustrious collectors with expertise and the desire to promote numismatic scholarship through their collections.

The 19th century is also the time when collectors started paying greater attention to the condition of a coin, and to their provenance, while the new medium of photography and improved book-illustrations allowed for the documentation and recognition of individual specimens in auction catalogues and scholarly works likewise. In the same spirit, numismatists themselves became focus of interest: medals and tokens were struck in their names, and books were written about them (e.g. Médailles et jetons des numismates in 1865).

We may also think of the institutional development of archaeology out of philology around the 1840ies to become a discipline of its own that triggered a shift in perceiving coins predominantly as material manifestations of the past. In addition, we need to take into consideration the large scale professional excavations of the century (e.g. the foundation of the Reichslimeskommission in Germany in 1892) that enabled new methods in studying coins from an academic perspective. Ultimately, this pathed the way for numismatics to become a university subject with the evolution of university coin collections. The 19th century was also a time that saw the growth of nationalism, which was accompanied by a focus on one’s history as mirrored in the practice of collecting and trading coins. Questions may also include to what extend numismatics was received in the realm of contemporary art such as Eugène Delacroix’s engravings, and literature – for example with the many coin references found in the work of Victor Hugo. These are some of the various new avenues and perspectives the symposium wishes to explore.

Our aim is to explore the numismatic world in the long 19th century – including both, the sphere of academia, and that of collecting and dealing – with a focus on ancient numismatics but also on medieval and modern numismatics, with an interest for the political, cultural, economic, and social changes of the era. Thus, a wide range of international experts, including numismatists, historians, archaeologists, anthropologists, and art historians are invited to present their research. Papers that explore specific case studies are particularly welcome, and talks on non-Western numismatics and on medals are hoped for.

Organizers: Stefan Krmnicek (Tübingen) & Hadrien Rambach (Brussels). Abstracts of no longer than 500 words should be sent by email to stefan.krmnicek@uni-tuebingen.de  and coinadvisor@yahoo.co.uk.

For further information, visit the conference website.

The Byzantine Society of Cyprus’s Third International Conference on Byzantine and Medieval Studies, 17-19 January 2020, Nicosia.

Deadline: 6 September 2019

The Byzantinist Society of Cyprus (ΒΕΚ: Βυζαντινολογική Εταιρεία Κύπρου) invites papers to

be presented at the Third International Conference on Byzantine and Medieval Studies. Honorary President: Theodoros Giagkou, Professor, University of Thessaloniki; Keynote Speaker: Enrico Zanini, Professor, Università di Siena.

Scholars, researchers and students are encouraged to present their ongoing research, work-in-progress or fieldwork report on any aspect of the history, archaeology, art, architecture, literature, philosophy and religion of Cyprus and the broader Mediterranean region during the Byzantine, Medieval and Ottoman periods.

The languages of the conference will be Greek, English, French and German. Every paper proposal submission must be accompanied by an abstract between 300 and 500 words summarizing the presented research, report or work-in-progress and indicating its

original contribution.

Please provide the requested information and submit your abstracts using our online application forms: Sessions of up to five papers can be submitted together in the following form by the session organizer. To submit a session proposal, follow this link.

Paper proposals will be reviewed based on their abstract and accepted on merit. This review will be anonymous. Notification of paper review will be sent by email by the beginning of October, 2019. Papers will be grouped in sessions according to their topic and theme. Each participant may deliver only one paper limited to 20 minutes. Accepted paper abstracts will be published in the conference’s ‘Book of Abstracts’. The best graduate student papers will be selected and awarded upon the conclusion of the conference.

The conference is organized by the Byzantinist Society of Cyprus. For membership information please visit the society’s website.

For more details about the conference, see the relevant section of the society’s website.

For inquiries: cbms2020@byzantinistsociety.org.cy

 

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Tenure-Track (Assistant or Associate) Professor in Classical Archaeology, Harvard University.

Deadline: 5 September 2019

The Department of the Classics seeks to appoint a tenure-track professor in Classical Archaeology. Preference will be given to candidates who set material culture within the broader socio-economic and cultural context of the Greco-Roman world writ large. Significant experience in archaeological fieldwork is desirable. The appointment is expected to begin on July 1, 2020. The tenure-track professor will be responsible for teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels and will be expected to participate fully in the activities of the Department of the Classics, the Harvard Art Museums, and the broader archaeological community at Harvard.

Basic Qualifications: Doctorate or terminal degree in Classical Archaeology or related discipline required by the time the appointment begins.

Additional Qualifications: Demonstration of a strong commitment to teaching is desired.

For more details, see here.

Fully-funded PhD position, University of Tübingen.

Deadline: Extended

The Research Group ‘Threatened Orders’ at Tübingen is searching for a candidate to work on a PhD dissertation on the 6th-7th century Visigothic monarchy and its relationship with the Byzantine Empire.

Prerequisites: A degree in Ancient History, excellent knowledge of Latin and Greek, as well as in-depth knowledge of Late Antique and Early Medieval history.

Salary: 65% TV-L 13.

Applications with the usual documents (curriculum vitae, certificates, references) must be sent in PDF format to Prof. Dr. Misha Meier (mischa.meier@uni-tuebingen.de).

For full details, see here.

Tsiter-Kontopoulou Short-Term Research Stipends at the Department of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies, University of Vienna.

Deadline: 31 October 2019

The Department of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies of the University of Vienna, thanks to the generosity of the Tsiter-Kontopoulou Fund, invites applications for a Short-Term Research Stipend to enable pre- and post-doctoral scholars to pursue research on Byzantine and early modern Greek culture, with particular emphasis on cultural and intellectual history in the widest sense, including the history of Orthodox Christianity.

Terms: The duration of the research stay is usually two weeks. During this time, the recipients of the stipend are expected to give an informal lunch-time presentation of their current research.

Eligibility: This stipend is intended to support young and early career scholars, i.e. from the final year of doctoral study to no more than eight years after the completion of the Ph.D.

Amount: The stipend offers the reimbursement of travel expenses plus a daily allowance, for a maximum of 2.500 Euros total (to be reimbursed after the completion of the stay). You are expected to make your own arrangements.

Appointment period: Any two weeks between 1 January 2020 and 31 December 2020, except 1 July to 15 September.

Application: Please send a description of the proposed research including a statement as to why you wish to conduct this research in Vienna, a provisional budget and an indication of preferred dates (max. 300 words), curriculum vitae (max. 3 pages), and list of publications, to Mrs. Petra Greger at the address below.

Doctoral students should also include a short letter of endorsement (max. 1 page) from their adviser. Submissions will be accepted by e-mail only.

Further Inquiries: Mrs. Petra Greger: petra.greger@univie.ac.at

For more information about the Department, its Library, and the Tsiter-Kontopoulou Trust see: https://www.byzneo.univie.ac.at

https://bibliothek.univie.ac.at/fb-byzantinistik/

https://tsiter-kontopoulou-schenkung.univie.ac.at

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings – TT 2019 Week 8

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 8

Trinity Term 2019

= = = = =

MONDAY 17th June

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, High St, Wharton Room

Neta Bodner (Hebrew University of Jerusalem/LMH),

‘Romanesque beyond Christianity – Jewish rituaarchitecture1150-1270′.

[+]

17.30   Perspectives on Education from the Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean

University College, High St, Swire Seminar Room

Eleanor Dickey (Reading)

What Did People Actually Do in a Roman School?

_ _ _

TUESDAY 18th June

_ _ _

WEDNESDAY 19th June

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Margarita Gleba (Cambridge)

Textile production in the pre-Roman northern Mediterranean: from qualitative to quantitative approach?

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Seminar

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’, Lecture Theatre

Zachary Chitwood (Mainz)

Orthodox Death, Burial and Commemoration in Late Byzantium and under Ottoman Rule, ca1300-1600.

[+]

17.00   Boethius (historical and philosophical perspectives)

Corpus Christi College, Merton St, Seminar Room

Mark Vessey (The University of British Columbia)

Intimations of the Architext: Boethius and Others of Cassiodorus’ Kind.

_ _ _

THURSDAY 20th June

17.00   A Conference to Celebrate Bryan Ward-Perkins

Trinity College, Broad St, Danson Room

For the full programme, see here.

The event is free but registration is essential. To register please contact Phil Booth (philip.booth@theology.ox.ac.uk).

_ _ _

FRIDAY 14th June

09:00   A Conference to Celebrate Bryan Ward-Perkins (Day 2)

Trinity College, Broad St, Danson Room

_ _ _

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 16/06/2019

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 16th June 2019
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

 

The Mark Whittow Memorial Conference ‘Urban and Rural Landscapes in the Medieval Mediterranean’, St John’s College, University of Oxford, 26th-27thJune 2019.

Attendance is free with a voluntary contribution to the Mark Whittow Memorial Fund, a fund in memory of Mark Whittow, aimed at supporting the work of Byzantinists and historians and those with interests in archaeology, landscape and the material world.

Please contact gillian.cane@orinst.ox.ac.uk to book your place. If you book your place before Monday 17 June, you will be catered for lunch and refreshments.

For the full programme, see here.

A Conference to Celebrate Bryan Ward-Perkins, Trinity College, University of Oxford, 20th-21st June 2019.

Bryan Ward-Perkins is retiring this year, after many years of service to Late Antique and Byzantine Studies and to academic life in Oxford. Please join friends, colleagues, and former students for a series of papers in his honour.

Speakers will include Averil Cameron, Ulrich Gehn, Ine Jacobs, Luke Lavan, Simon Loseby, Carlos Machado, Javier Martinez Jimenez, Neil McLynn, Efthymis Rizos, Claire Sotinel, Robert Wisniewski, George Woudhuysen, and others.

The event is free but please register with Phil Booth (philip.booth@theology.ox.ac.uk) in advance.

For the full programme, see here.

 

2.  JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Studies Award Opportunities, One-Month Research Awards

Deadline: 1st October 2019

Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection offers One-Month Research Awards of $3,000 to scholars holding a PhD and working on research projects in Byzantine studies or related fields. The awards were established to make the intellectual community, as well as the library, rare book, garden, and museum resources, of Dumbarton Oaks more widely available to a broader range of scholars for shorter terms and with some flexibility in starting dates. Awards are intended especially for those who might not be able to avail themselves of a longer-term fellowship at Dumbarton Oaks, or scholars in related disciplines who seek greater exposure to our fields of study. Applications due October 1, 2019 for January 15 – June 30 award period.

For further information on all awards, please visit the Dumbarton Oaks website.

 

Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Studies Award Opportunities, Fellowships

Deadline: 1st November 2019

Fellowships (junior, regular, summer, Tyler) are awarded to scholars on the basis of demonstrated scholarly ability and preparation of the candidate, including knowledge of requisite languages, interest and value of the study or project, and the project’s relevance to the resources of Dumbarton Oaks. Applications due November 1, 2019 for the 2020-2021 academic year.

For further information on all awards, please visit the Dumbarton Oaks website.

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings – TT 2019 Week 7

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 7

Trinity Term 2019

= = = = =

MONDAY 10th June

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, High St, Wharton Room

Benedicte Sere (University of Paris-Nanterre)

Inventing “The ChurchThe medievagenesis of political modernity.

[+]

17.30   Perspectives on Education from the Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean

University College, High St, Swire Seminar Room

Arietta Papaconstantinou (Reading)

Uses of Literacy in Early Islamic Egypt.

_ _ _

TUESDAY 11th June

14.15   Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Dr Julia Krivoruchko (Cambridge)

The silence of the idols: the story of ἄλαλος from classical into medieval (Judaeo-)

Greek [Septuagint Forum].

[+]

17.15   Medieval Church and Culture – MSt Medieval Studies Dissertation Projects

Harris Manchester College, Mansfield Rd, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Caitlin John

A Topographical Study of Popular Burial in Late Medieval Mediterranean Cities.

Adina Goldman

‘Let Us Pray for the Living’: the lives of the dead in medieval Ashkenaz.

_ _ _

WEDNESDAY 12th June

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Imed Ben Jerbania (Institut National du Patrimoine, Tunisia)

Recent excavations at Punic and Roman cemeteries in the region of Bizerte (Tunisia).

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Seminar

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’, Lecture Theatre

Petros Bouras-Vallianatos (Edinburgh)

Cross-cultural transfer of medical knowledge in the medieval Mediterranean: from the Islamic world to Byzantium.

[+]

17.00   Boethius (historical and philosophical perspectives)

Corpus Christi College, Merton St, Seminar Room

Giovanni Catapano (University of Padova)

The Harmony between Plato and Aristotle in the Consolation.

_ _ _

THURSDAY 13th June

17.00   ‘After Rome’: Aspects of the History and Archaeology of the 5th to 7th Centuries

Trinity College, Broad St, Danson Room

Efthymios Rizos (Oxford)

The murals of the imperial cult chamber in Luxor: New observations.

_ _ _

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 09/06/2019

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 9th June 2019
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

New OUBS Committee.

The full OUBS committee for 2019-20 has now been elected:

President: Dan Gallaher

Secretary: Lorenzo Saccon

Treasurer: Josh Hitt

As two of us step down, we would like to wish the new committee the best of luck for the upcoming year.

– Katerina Vavaliou (former President)

– Callan Meynell (former Secretary)

 

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS 

‘Nature(s), animaux et paysages: perception et usage de l’environnement a Byzance’ XIIes Rencontres internationales de doctorants en etudes byzantines11-12 October 2019, Paris.

New Deadline: 30 June 2019

From craggy rocks depicted on an icon to the animals of a Physiologos, from botanical knowledge to astrology, the Eastern Roman empire was populated by non-humans. Wild and domestic animals, plants, stars, seascapes and landscapes all created a setting for individuals to develop in. How did human actors infuse the multiple aspects of Creation with meaning? People have always had to adapt to the constraints of “Nature”, interact with the environment so as to benefit from it, understand and predict the “whims” of climate and the ravages of diseases, and, finally, depict a world that, to them, was saturated with meaning and ordered through symbols and analogies.

What are the implications of “Nature”? The universalism of this concept, usually opposed to that of “Culture”, is currently being challenged in the Humanities and Social Sciences, “Nature” being recognized as a specifically modern Western construct (P. Descola, Par-delà nature et culture, 2005). The aim of this year’s Byzantine Postgraduate Meetings in Paris is to ask this very question in Byzantine context, in order to define and illustrate the various relations that the women and men of the Empire maintained with their surroundings.

Whether we refer to the landscape archeology developed by Sharon Gerstel (Rural Lives and Landscapes in Late Byzantium: Art, Archaeology, and Ethnography, 2015) or recent diachronic studies from Gutenberg University in Mainz on the relations between man and “Nature”; whether we cite recent publications by John Haldon (The Empire That Would Not Die, 201 7) or Henry Maguire (Nectar and Illusion: Nature in Byzantine Art and Literature, 2012), current Byzantinists actively engage with the most pressing issues of the day.

The 12th Byzantine Postgraduate Meetings will offer the opportunity for four Master’s students from Paris and for eight international PhD students to present their research and engage in discussions on this key topic on October 11 and 12, 2019.

In this sense, contributions from all related topics and approaches are welcome: cultural history (landscapes and settlements; iconography, hymnography and theology; plant and animal symbolism); history of technology (as pertains to botany, agriculture, navigation, architecture, clothing and all other human creations exposed to the workings of the climate); environmental and natural history (archeozoological and paleoenvironmental studies and archaeometry are essential tools for understanding the crucial implications of migrations, harvests, demography or eschatological fears).

Proposals (max. 2000 characters) should be sent no later than 30th June 2019 to lesbyzantines@gmail.com and should include the paper’s title and language (French or English), as well as the name of the applicant’s research director and institution.

Organisation Committee:

Pierre Chaney (EPHE); Romain Goudjil (Paris-Sorbonne); Aleksandre Prosperini (EPHE); Milan Vukasinovic (EHESS); Lilyana Yordanova (EPHE).

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 03/06/2019

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 2nd June 2019
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
====

 1. NEWS AND EVENTS

‘Urban Agencies: Personal And Collective Agency In Anatolian And Caucasian Cities (13th-14th Centuries)’, 6 – 8 June 2019, Vienna.

Modern historiography concerning Anatolia and the Caucasus in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries sees the confluence of a host of totalizing historiographical narratives, principally about states, (male) rulers, and their military-political interactions. The interdependent paradigms of Ottoman growth, Seljuk disintegration, and Byzantine decline intersect with narratives of pre-Mongol Seljuk and Georgian ‘golden ages’, as well as a late Byzantine historiography structured around the conquests of Constantinople in 1204, 1261, and 1453. In part, these totalizing historiographical narratives have dominated the construction of the late-medieval Anatolian and Caucasian pasts because they have been produced or co-opted by (early) modern ethno-nationalisms, state-fetishisms, and religious binarisms.

This workshop aims to create a platform for the discussion of thirteenth- and fourteenth-century historiography (broadly conceived) outside of traditional state-centric and centralising narrative paradigms, as well as their supporting ethno-nationalist, religious, and linguistic foundations. Our approach in this workshop is to ask contributors to decentre the state, by focusing on the level of urban centres, a common (although by no means uniform) feature of thirteenth- and fourteenth-century Anatolia and Caucasia. We ask them to blur traditional state/territorial, linguistic, religious, and ethnic boundaries by examining expressions of personal and collective agency below, outside, and against ‘the state’. Urban centres in this period, whether ‘Byzantine’, ‘Armenian’, or ‘Seljuk’, were loci for a host of agencies that have either been partially or totally silenced by the dominant frameworks of the modern academic disciplines through which their study has been channelled. This can be seen most clearly in the alternative construction of thirteenth- and fourteenth-century individual and collective agencies in ‘the West’, most notably Italy and Flanders.

Urban centres offer a suitable framework for comparative and interdisciplinary research in this field. This event brings together specialists on different aspects of this period and space in an attempt to create a different paradigm for its history, one that is not confined from the outset to disciplinary, state-centric, or geographic silos.

Speakers include: Teresa Shawcross, Andrew Peacock, Scott Redford, Rachel Goshgarian, Dmitry Korobeynikov, Sara Nur Yıldız, Ioanna Rapti, Naomi Pitamber, and Johannes Preiser-Kapeller

For further information visit the website. The full programme of the workshop is available here.

Organisers:
Matthew Kinloch, Institute of Medieval Research, Division for Byzantine Research, Team Member of the ‘Moving Byzantium’ Wittgenstein Project.
Bruno De Nicola, Institute of Iranian Studies.

The Workshop is co-organised and co-sponsored by the Institute of Iranian Studies (OeAW) and the FWF Wittgenstein-Award Project ‘Mobility, Microstructures and Personal Agency’ of Prof. Dr. Claudia Rapp (University of Vienna / Austrian Academy of Sciences).

 

The Antioch Houses: Planning, decoration and household furnishing’, Seminaire Histoire urbaine de l’Orient romain tardif, 6 June 2019, 14:00-16:00, Sorbonne, salle D52.

For the poster and contact information see here.

 

‘Mapping the Sacred in Byzantium: Construction, Experience, and Representation’ 20-21 September 2019, Newcastle University.

The conference brings together scholars of Byzantium to explore novel ways to conceptualize and evaluate the production and representation of (sacred) space in the Byzantine world, aiming to contribute to the broader research on spatial paradigms and practices. It addresses spatial themes from the varying disciplinary perspectives of archaeology, art history, literature, and theology.

A description of the event, a list of confirmed speakers, and other details can be found on the website of the conference at Mapping the Sacred in Byzantium | Mapping the Sacred in Byzantium | Newcastle University.

 

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

‘Byzantium between East and West’, Mediterranean Historical Review Special Issue.

Deadline: 31 March 2020

David Jacoby, one of the leading historians of Byzantium, passed away in October 2018. Prof. Jacoby was a member of the international board of the Mediterranean Historical Review, and contributed to it in various ways. His research in the fields of trade, economy and society, revealed not only the Mediterranean aspects of these Byzantine activities, but also the importance that Byzantine history holds for the study of the Mediterranean. We regret this loss very much. To commemorate his lifelong achievements in the field of Mediterranean history, the MHR intends to publish a special issue dedicated to the theme “Byzantium between East and West”. We invite scholars to propose articles addressing this theme in view of the special position of Byzantium between the Levant, Eastern Europe and the Latin West. Byzantium boasts a history of over 12 centuries, maybe more than any other Mediterranean civilization. We wish to address the unique position it held, both geographically and chronologically, in the history of the region. Papers may deal with any aspect of the subject in history, art history or archaeology, in any timeframe (narrow or wide) and in local, global or entangled perspective. All papers will be peer-reviewed following the Journal’s normal evaluation process.

The call for papers has been published online here.

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings – TT 2019 Week 6

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 6

Trinity Term 2019

= = = = =

MONDAY 3rd June

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, High St, Wharton Room

Ben Savill (UEA)

Rolling eyeballs and slashed papyri: cutting heiresses out of early Anglopapal history.

[+]

17.30   Perspectives on Education from the Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean

University College, High St, Swire Seminar Room

Cecily Hennessy (London)

Children, Adolescents, Books and Learning in Byzantium.

_ _ _

 

TUESDAY 4th June

14.15   Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Dr Theofili Kampianaki (Birmingham)

Aspects of the appropriation of Flavius Josephus in medieval Greek and Latin literature.

[+]

17.00   Early Slavonic Seminar

Taylor Institution, St. Giles’ St, Main Hall

Dr Sean Griffin (Dartmouth College)

The Liturgical Past in Byzantium and Early Rus.

[+]

17.15   Medieval Church and Culture – MSt Medieval Studies Dissertation Projects

Harris Manchester College, Mansfield Rd, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Elizabeth Crabtree, Nicholas of Lyra’s Literal Commentary on Jacob And Esau

Franziska Kleybolte, Pograms as Foundation: Christian handling of Jewish space in the Middle Ages.

_ _ _

WEDNESDAY 5th June

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Regula Wahl-Clerici

The territorium metallorum Tresminas/Jales in Northern Portugal: A short introduction to the industrial park of a Roman goldmine.

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Seminar – Special OCBR Lecture

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’, Lecture Theatre

Jean-Luc Fournet (College de France, Paris)

Homer and Late antique Poetry in the light of new poems by Dioscorus of Aphrodite

[+]

17.00   Boethius (historical and philosophical perspectives)

Corpus Christi College, Merton St, Seminar Room

Peter Heather (King’s College London)

TBC

[+]

18.30   OUBS AGM and Elections

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’

_ _ _

THURSDAY 6th June

17.00   ‘After Rome’: Aspects of the History and Archaeology of the 5th to 7th Centuries

Trinity College, Broad St, Danson Room

Efthymios Rizos (Oxford)

The murals of the imperial cult chamber in Luxor: New observations.

_ _ _

FRIDAY 7th June

8.30-19.30       Pilgrimage & the Senses

St Luke’s Chapel, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford OX2 6HT

The full programme of the conference is available here.

[+]

9.30     Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’

Prof M. D. Lauxtermann

[+]

12.00   Byzantine Literature: Seventh-Century Poetry

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’

Prof M. D. Lauxtermann

16.00   Ancient Architecture Discussion Group

Lincoln College, Turl St, Garden Building Lower Lecture Room

Yoshiki Hori (Kyushu University)

Laser scanning of the city of Ostia and some consideration on upper structures

[+]

18.00   The OUBS & Oxford Medieval Society In Dialogue

St. John’s College, New Seminar Room

Various Speakers

The event will be followed by a drinks reception.

_ _ _

 

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 27/05/2019

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 27th May 2019
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

 1. NEWS AND EVENTS

Fils de Foi: Autour Des Broderies Religieuses de Tradition Byzantine’, Colloque International, 31 May 2019, INHA – Salle Vasari, 2 rue Vivienne 75002 Paris.

The full Programme of this conference is available here.

 

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

Stream on ‘Byzantine History & Arts’, 7th Annual International Conference on Humanities & Arts in a Global World, 3-6 January 2020, Athens, Greece.

Deadline: 31 May 2019

Sponsored by the Athens Journal of Humanities & Arts

The Athens Center for Classical & Byzantine Studies (ACCBS) of ATINER is organizing a Stream on “Byzantine History & Arts”, 3-6 January 2020, Athens, Greece as part of the 7th Annual International Conference on Humanities & Arts in a Global World sponsored by the Athens Journal of Humanities & Arts.

The aim of the stream is to bring together scholars and students of Byzantine Studies, focusing on the areas of History and Arts. The fields of study implied are quite broad, covering all aspects and periods of byzantine history (politics, economics, society, religion etc), and all forms and periods of byzantine art, from church architecture, iconography and mosaics, to “minor arts”, like metalwork, hardstone carving and jewelry, including artistic traditions of other cities that inherited and/or still maintain the byzantine style. Moreover, the stream will look at Byzantium’s role as a bridge between the classical and modern world, as well as its significant legacy to the social, political and cultural development of the Near East, Russia, Eastern Europe, and the West. You may participate as presenter of one paper or observer.

Fee structure information is available on www.atiner.gr/fees.

Special arrangements will be made with a local hotel for a limited number of rooms at a special conference rate. In addition, a number of special events will be organized: A pragmatic symposium (as organized in Ancient Athens but fine tuned to synchronous ethics), a special one-day educational island tour, an Athens educational walking tour, and an one-day visit to Delphi. Details of the social program are available here.

Please submit an abstract (email only) to: atiner@atiner.gr, using the abstract submission form by 31 May 2019 to: Dr. Nicholas Pappas, Vice President of Academic Membership, ATINER & Professor of History, Sam Houston University, USA.

Please include: Title of Paper, Full Name (s), Current Position, Institutional Affiliation, an email address and at least 3 keywords that best describe the subject of your submission. Decisions will be reached within four weeks of your submission.

If your submission is accepted, you will receive information on registration deadlines and paper submission requirements. Should you wish to participate in the Conference without presenting a paper, for example, to chair a session, to evaluate papers which are to be included in the conference proceedings or books, to contribute to the editing of a book, or any other contribution, please send an email to Dr. Gregory T. Papanikos, President, ATINER & Honorary Professor, University of Stirling, UK (gregory.papanikos@stir.ac.uk).

 

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Research Assistant in (Byzantine) Greek Philology, Ghent.

Deadline: 21 June 2019

The Greek Section of the Departments of Literary Studies and Linguistics at Ghent University (Belgium) is seeking a well-qualified collaborator for the Database of Byzantine Book Epigrams (DBBE, www.dbbe.ugent.be).

A full job description is to be found here.

Applications should include a full curriculum vitae (including accurate information on grades and study results), a motivation letter, and two letters of reference. Applications must be sent electronically (preferably as pdf) to Floris Bernard, no later than June 21, 2019.

 

Research Fellow in Early Mediaeval History – AR2224HM, School of History, University of St Andrews.

Deadline: 17 June 2019

Applications are invited for Fixed Term Research Fellowship in Global Medieval History tenable from 1 August 2019 to 31 March 2023. The position is part of the “Identifying the Blocks that Build Global History in the Middle Ages” project funded by the British Academy under its Global Professorships scheme. The PI on the project is Professor Eduardo Manzano Moreno (St Andrews / Madrid) The School of History welcomes applications from historians working on any topic related to the areas covered by this project, i.e. Europe, China, India and the Middle East (including North Africa). A command of any language of the textual traditions of any of these areas will be a requisite. In addition to pursuing research of his/her own design, the successful applicant will be required to participate in the broader work of the project by coordinating seminars, workshops, conferences and outreach activities, and by taking a leading role in the design of the project´s outreach in social media. He/she will also be responsible for editing one of the volumes which will result from the project.

Applicants should have completed or nearly completed a PhD in a related topic.

Further information on the University and the School of History can be found at the University website.

To discuss this post informally candidates may contact Professor Manzano Moreno or the Head of School, Professor MacLean.

The University is committed to equality for all, demonstrated through our working on diversity awards (ECU Athena SWAN/Race Charters; Carer Positive; LGBT Charter; and Stonewall).  More details can be found here.

Please quote ref: AR2224HM

Further Particulars: AR2224HM FPs.doc

Salary: £33,199 per annum

Start Date: 1 August 2019 or as soon as possible thereafter

Fixed Term until 31 March 2023

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings – TT 2019 Week 5

MONDAY 27th May

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, High St, Wharton Room

Serena Ferente (KCL)

In extrema Europae: a 15th-century microhistory of the Black Sea.

_ _ _

TUESDAY 28th May

14.15   Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Professor Kai Brodersen (Erfurt)

Earth, wind and fire: how the Septuagint translated divine elements

[Septuagint Forum]

[+]

17.15   Medieval Church and Culture – MSt Medieval Studies Dissertation Projects

Harris Manchester College, Mansfield Rd, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Pamela Kask, Reclaiming their Voices: images of survivors of trauma in

works of Geoffrey Chaucer

Uewelyn Hopwood, Creative Bilingualism in Late Medieval Welsh

Poetry

_ _ _

WEDNESDAY 29th May

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Thomas Matthews Boehmer (University of Cambridge)

Roman-period ‘micro-regions’ and their colonial contexts: a case study.

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Seminar

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’, Lecture Theatre

Alessandra Petrocchi (Oxford)

Arithmetic Texts and Networks of Learning: From Medieval India Through the Mediterranean World

[+]

17.00   Boethius (historical and philosophical perspectives)

Corpus Christi College, Merton St, Seminar Room

John Marenbon (University of Cambridge)

TBC

_ _ _

THURSDAY 30th May

17.00   ‘After Rome’: Aspects of the History and Archaeology of the 5th to 7th Centuries

Trinity College, Broad St, Danson Room

Mark Laynesmith (University of Reading)

The doctrine of baptism by blood: a reappraisal

_ _ _

FRIDAY 31st May

9.30     Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’

Prof M. D. Lauxtermann

[+]

12.00   Byzantine Literature: Seventh-Century Poetry

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’

Prof M. D. Lauxtermann

[+]

14.00-17.00     Faith and Reason: The ‘Double Truth’ in the Arabic and Latin Traditions

St Edmund Hall, Queen’s Lane, Old Library

Richard Taylor

The Complex Philosophical Foundations of the Duality of Discourses Behind the Notion of Double Truth

Ann Giletti

The Double Truth: A Case for Its Presence among Latin Scholastics

Please direct enquiries to ann.giletti@theology.ox.ac.uk

_ _ _

SATURDAY 1st June

9.30-17.00       Studying Scripture with Aquinas

A conference organised by Prof Piotr Roszak and Dr Jorgcn Vijgcn, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun and co-sponsored by the Aquinas Institute

Piotr Roszak (UMK Torun)

Christ’s Will to Die and Our Salvation in Aquinas’s Super Psalmum 21.

Mark Johnson, Marquette University

Aquinas’s Scriptum on 1 Cor 7: The Scripture as Norming and Inspiring

Jörgen Vijgen (Thomistic Institute, Utrecht)

Biblical Thomism: The Case-Study of Hebrews 2:9

Enrique Alarcon (Universidad de Navarra)

Biblical Thomism and the Future Development of Coipus Thomisticum

Bruno Clifton, OP (Blackfriars, Cambridge)

The Need to Bring Together Biblical Scholarship and Dogmatic Theology’

General Discussion

Attendance is free. Donations requested at door to cover lunch.

To book a place visit here

Posted in Byzness