The Byzness, 22/11/2020

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 22nd November 2020
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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 1.                 NEWS AND EVENTS

International Byzantine Greek Summer School, July-August 2021

After last summer’s cancellation due to Covid-19, we are happy to announce that the International Byzantine Greek Summer School will return in 2021. 

The 2021 teaching dates will be 12-23 July (Beginners) and 26 July – 6 August (Intermediate  and Advanced), and all courses are likely to be hosted online by Trinity College Dublin. Delivery, fee and application details will be confirmed in February 2021.

To register your interest please contact the course administrator, Seán McCrum. For basic course information see https://www.tcd.ie/classics/byzantine/ (mutatis mutandis for online delivery).

Séminaire sur Constantinople dans l’Antiquité tardive

Voici le lien permanent, au moins jusqu’au 15 décembre, pour le Séminaire sur Constantinople [le programme : https://danubius.huma-num.fr/2020/10/01/programme-du-viie-seminaire-sur-constantinople-dans-lantiquite-tardive-constantinople-du-danube-a-leuphrate-et-au-tigre/] qui se tiendra tous les mardis de 17h à 18h30 :  https://univ-lille-fr.zoom.us/j/96005558112?pwd=cDEzdkhHU3hrZXNMa1lxRFNuMk9jUT09

Stage d’initiation au manuscrit médiéval IRHT 2021

En raison de la situation sanitaire actuelle, le stage annuel d’initiation au manuscrit médiéval organisé par l’IRHT a été reporté à la semaine du 8 au 12 mars 2021.

Organisé dans les nouveaux locaux de l’IRHT, sur le Campus Condorcet, ce stage propose comme les années précédentes un parcours spécifique sur les “manuscrits grecs et orientaux“, destiné tout particulièrement aux étudiants hellénistes, syriacisants, coptisants et arabisants. Vous trouverez toutes les informations utiles en consultant la page de présentation du stage sur le site de l’IRHT : https://www.irht.cnrs.fr/?q=fr/agenda/stage-d-initiation-au-manuscrit-medieval

Une deuxième session de candidatures a été exceptionnellement rouverte jusqu’au 15 décembre 2020. Le formulaire de candidature ci-joint est à renvoyer avant cette date à l’adresse suivante :  stage-manuscrit-irht@services.cnrs.fr.

New NoB Digital Project: Mapping Eastern Europe

North of Byzantium has launched a new open-access digital project – Mapping Eastern Europe – intended to promote study, research, and teaching about the history, art, and culture of Eastern Europe between the 13th and 17th centuries among students, teachers, scholars, and the wider public.

https://mappingeasterneurope.princeton.edu/

Mapping Eastern Europe gathers a multitude of specialists – early career and senior scholars who have either already published or are currently researching new topics – to supply original online content in English in the form of historical overview, art historical case studies, short notices about ongoing projects, and reviews of recent books and exhibitions. 

This platform aims to stimulate new research and outreach focused on the networked regions of the Balkan Peninsula, the Carpathian Mountains, and further north into early modern Russia, which developed at the crossroads of the Latin, Greek, Slavic, and Islamic traditions during the late Middle Ages and early modern periods. 

Mapping Eastern Europe is made possible through generous support from the “Rapid Response Magic Project of the Princeton University Humanities Council”.

If you have suggestions for future contributions you or other colleagues might be interested in submitting, please be in touch at: https://mappingeasterneurope.princeton.edu/help.html

 Talk by Dr Lea Niccolai (Cambridge) on Eunapius’ Lives of Philosophers and Sophists

“We are returning this coming Tuesday with another exciting talk by Dr Lea Niccolai (Cambridge): 24 November 5.15 pm (via Zoom).

Wisdom for the Many, Wisdom for the Few: Re-Reading Eunapius’ Lives of Philosophers and Sophists

In this paper I look at Eunapius of Sardis’ Lives of the Philosophers and Sophistis (ca. 405 CE) as at a case study illuminating late antique perceptions of the impact of Christianisation on the role of philosophers in society.

The first part of the paper will prepare the ground by considering a set of prominent third- and fourth-century thinkers who deliberately sought to activate the opposition between Christianity and traditional Greco-Roman religion (e.g., Porphyry of Tyre, Eusebius of Cesarea, Emperor Julian, and Gregory of Nazianzus). I show how they all acknowledged and explored the tension between Christian claims to universalism and the Platonic drive to esotericism and elitism.

In the second part of the paper, I show that Eunapius’ work is a product of this universalism vs. elitism debate and actively contributes to it. Eunapius’ heroes, aristocratic free speakers who withdraw from crowds and refuse to divulge philosophical tenets, are not only a witness to the worsening of the social status of the pagan holy man following Julian’s downfall, but are prescriptive figures: they are constructed so as to encourage a politics of non-compromise with the many. Crucially, this politics was not meant by Eunapius to signal the detachment of pagan philosophy from public engagement, but, on the contrary, it strove to advertise the pagan holy men’s suitability for leadership. If any act of divulgation entails a loss of philosophical identity, it follows that only those intellectuals who, like the pagan Neoplatonists (and unlike the Christian theologians) choose not to preach, are worthy of being deemed philosophers; as such, they are also the only ones to whom Roman leaders should turn when seeking advice.”

Zoom Link: https://cam-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/93791464544…

Meeting ID: 937 9146 4544

Passcode: 338700

GACUK Autumn 2020 Lecture. Thursday 3 December 2020 (5pm UK time)

The Greek Archaeological Committee UK is very pleased to invite you to its  60th lecture entitled “Excavating the Cradle of an Imperial Dynasty: The  Material Culture and Prosopography of Byzantine Amorion” by Dr Olga  Karagiorgou and Dr Nikos Tsivikis. 

Under normal circumstances this lecture would have been given on 9th November in King’s College London’s Great Hall. It would also have been a  very special event intended to celebrate, upon her planned retirement, the  contribution of our Founder, Matti Egon, to Anglo-Greek cultural  understanding and appreciation, especially in the field of Archaeology.  Instead, we are now mourning her passing on 14th October and, because of  the pandemic, we cannot assemble at the Great Hall. 

The lecture, dedicated now to the memory of Matti Egon, will therefore be  given online through the ZOOM platform courtesy of the British School at  Athens, on Thursday 3rd December, starting at 5pm UK time, 7pm Greek  time. In order to participate in the event, it is necessary to register in  advance through the following link:  

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_UquK-l1WRlensfXCzZeZ8Q

Dr Olga Karagiorgou read History and Archaeology at Athens University  before gaining a MPhil and a DPhil at Christ Church, Oxford. She was the  Greek Archaeological Committee UK’s first ever scholar! She was also a  British Academy, A.S. Onassis Foundation and Dumbarton Oaks  (Washington, D.C.) postgraduate scholar. She was awarded post-doctoral  Fellowships by the Hellenic Scholarships Foundation and the Alexander von  Humboldt Stiftung. She taught at Oxford and at the Hellenic Open  University and worked for the King’s College London Project on the  “Prosopography of the Byzantine World-PBW”. She has participated in  excavations in Greece, Syria and Turkey and has attended numerous  conferences with papers related to her research on Late Antique  Archaeology and Byzantine Prosopography and Sigillography. She has  received the ARISTEIA II Award of the National Strategic Reference  Framework 2007-2013 for her Research Project entitled TAKTIKON and is  Secretary General of the Greek Committee for South Eastern European  Studies. She is currently Associate Researcher at the Research Centre for  Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Art of the Academy of Athens.

Apologists and Empire: conference programme

Please find here the programme for the virtual conference, ‘Apologists and Empire’, which will be held from the 16th – 18th of December. Two keynote speakers have also been: Prof. Laura Nasrallah (speaking on the 17th of December) and Prof. Tim Whitmarsh (speaking on the 18th of December).

Attendance is free for all; if you would like to attend, please email Ben Kolbeck (ben.kolbeck@kcl.ac.uk) or use the contact function on the conference website, and joining instructions will be circulated in due course. More information, including paper abstracts and the programme as a downloadable PDF, can be found at www.apologistsandempire.com.

In consideration of the challenges of multiple timezones, and respecting the dangers of ‘online meeting fatigue’, the papers have been scheduled over three half-day sessions, in the early-to-late afternoon UTC (though please note the standalone morning panel on Thursday the 17th). We hope to see many of you there – and please feel free to drop in and out as alternative commitments dictate.

Apologists and EmpireEarly Christian Literature in its Imperial Context

Wednesday 16th of December, 2020 (Day 1/3)

14:00–14:50 UTC                                   Introduction

Ben Kolbeck & James Corke-Webster (King’s College London)

Introduction: Apologists and Empire

Eleni Bozia (University of Florida, speaker local time 09:20 [UTC –5]).

Christian Apologists and Lucian of Samosata: Re-examining Religious Awareness and Literary Convergences

                                                             -10 minute break-

15:00–16:00 UTC                          Tertullian of Carthage

Susan Dunning (University of Oxford)

The Subversion of the Imperial Saeculum in Christian Apologetics of the Second and Third Centuries CE

Benjamin Haupt (Concordia Seminary, speaker local time 09:30 [UTC –6])

Tertullian’s Apologetic Use of a Sophisticated Latin Literary Identity

                                                           -30 minute break-

16:30–17:30 UTC                         Clement of Alexandria

Jane Heath (Durham University)

Clement of Alexandria and the Shaping of Christian Literary Practice

Ed Creedy (King’s College London)

All the World’s His Stage: The Divine Protagonist of Clement of Alexandria. Performance Soteriology and the Theatrum Mundi in the Protrepticus.

                                                          -10 minute break-

17:40–18:40 UTC                     Christian Martyr Literature

Justin Yule (University of Toronto, speaker local time 12:40 [UTC –5])

Visions of Bodily Wonders: the Martyrium of Polycarp and the Sacred Tales of Aelius Aristides

David J. DeVore (Cal. Poly. Pomona, speaker local time 10:10 [UTC –8])

Apologetic Across Mediterranean Courts: The Martyrdoms of Hegesippus Between Jerusalem, Corinth, and Rome

                                                      -Finish: 18:40 UTC-

Thursday 17th of December, 2020 (Day 2/3)

10:00–11:00 UTC                          Athenagoras of Athens*

David Evans (Macquarie University, speaker local time 21:00 [UTC +11])

Citizenship and Philanthropy in Athenagoras’ Legatio

Stuart R. Thomson (University of Oxford)

Philosopher-Kings and Roman Emperors: Greco-Roman Fissures in Justin Martyr & Athenagoras

                                                          -3 hours: no papers-

14:00–15:00 UTC                                 Justin of Rome

Ben Kolbeck (King’s College London)

Read it in Rome: Justin’s Appeals to Roman Legal Documents

James Corke-Webster (King’s College London)

The Apologists on Trials

                                                            -15 minute break-

15:15–16:15 UTC                              Keynote Address 1

Laura Nasrallah (Yale Divinity School, speaker local time [10:15 UTC –5])

Making Justice: Defixiones, Imperial Rescripts, and Christian Apologists

                                                  -Finish: 16:15 UTC / 11:15 EST-

* Thursday’s Athenagoras panel will be a standalone morning session; the rest of the programme will pick up in the afternoon UTC.

Friday 18th of December 2020 (Day 3/3)

14:15–15:15 UTC                           Keynote Address 2

Tim Whitmarsh (University of Cambridge)

The Apologists and the ‘Personal Voice’

                                                         -15 minute break-

15:30–16:30 UTC                       Fourth-Century Apology

Daniel Lemeni (West University of Timisoara, speaker local time 17:30 [UTC +2])

Philosophers, Monks and the anti-Pagan Apologetic Character of the Life of Anthony: Rethinking a Problematic Cultural Model

Adam Kemezis (University of Alberta, speaker local time 09:00 [UTC –7])

Eusebius as Reader of Philostratus and Hierocles: Apologetics, Interpretation and Authority

                                                          -30 minute break-

17:00–17:30 UTC                        Concluding Discussion

All Attendees

Concluding Discussion

-Finish: 17:30 UTC-

Communicating Objects. Material, Literary and Iconographic Instances of Objects in a Human Universe in Antiquity and the Middle Ages. 

(Department of Ancient History, Archaeology and History of Art, University of Bucharest & International Society for Cultural History)

The conference will be held online, on November 27-29, 2020. The program and abstracts are available at the following link:

A limited number of slots for audience is available through registration at the following email address (please provide your full name and host institution): objetsdialogue@gmail.com  

Marek Jankowiak (Oxford University), On Kyros of Alexandria, seventh-century popes and the Arab conquest of EgyptWarsaw late antique seminar, 26 November, 4:45 (Warsaw Time)
On Thursday, 26 November, 4.45 p.m. (Warsaw time), at Ewa Wipszycka’s Warsaw late antique seminar, Marek Jankowiak (Oxford University), will present a paper On Kyros of Alexandria, seventh-century popes and the Arab conquest of Egypt. We are meeting on  Zoom at the usual link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83501284547?pwd=aWt5a1Jla2ZmbUgzN1lyL0c4N1lsUT09

Abstract

The letter that patriarch Kyros of Alexandria sent in 638 to his colleague Sergios of Constantinople, and in which he enthusiastically endorsed the “Ekthesis” of Heraclius, contains a chronological contradiction. I will try to show that the problem can only be removed by amending the chronology of the bishops of Rome proposed by Louis Duchesne in 1886. I will argue that Duchesne made two mistakes that affect all the dates of the popes between 619 and 649. The consequences are manifold; I will focus only on those that pertain to the disgrace and trial of Kyros – a key event for the understanding of the last years of Byzantine Egypt. I will reassess the famous papyrus P.Lond. I 113.10 and will try to show that, far from proving Kyros’ presence in Alexandria in 639/40, it in fact supports the traditions on the “Kyros tribute” paid to the Arabs in the years before the final conquest in 641.


Forthcoming seminars
3.12: Andrzej B. Kutiak (Technische Universität München), The preliminary analysis of patterns and functions of the urban settlement at the ‘Marea’ peninsula
10.12: Joanna Wegner (UW), Looking (not only) to heaven: the Aphrodito clergy in the 6th c.
17.12: Marta Szada (Nicolaus Copernicus University), The Gothic language and the Homoian identity in the post-Roman successor kingdoms

 2.                 CALLS FOR PAPERS

23rd International Graduate Conference of the Oxford University Byzantine Society, ‘Self-Representation in Late Antiquity and Byzantium’. Provisional dates: 26-28 February 2021 (Online). Deadline for abstracts: 30 November 2020

 A reminder that the deadline for abstract submission for the OUBS 23rd International Graduate Conference is the 30 November 2020. Below are the call for papers and information on how to submit an abstract.

Self-representation is a process by which historical actors – individuals, communities and institutions – fashioned and presented a complex image of themselves through various media.

Referring to Byzantine portraits, Spatharakis claimed that this “form of representation cannot be divorced from its purpose and the requirements of the society in which the given visual language gains currency”. Equally, self-representation provides an original way to interpret the past, because this artificial and reflected image cannot be divorced from the cultural, social, economic, religious and political context of its time. As a methodological tool, it has received increasing attention in the field of Late Antique and Byzantine Studies, following the interest it has created in neighbouring fields such as Western Medieval or Early Modern studies.

The present call for papers aims to explore the cultural outputs of the Late Antique and Byzantine world – e.g. architecture, material culture, literary works – which conventionally or unconventionally can be understood as acts of self-representation. The Late Antique and Byzantine world was filled with voices and images trying to present and represent an idea of self. Some of the most famous examples of this are the lavish mosaics sponsored by imperial and aristocratic patrons, whose splendour still dazzles their observers and gives an idea of the kind of self-fashioning that they embody. Urban elites, such as churchmen, bureaucrats and intellectuals, constructed idealised personae through their literary works and the careful compilation of letter collections, while those of the provinces displayed their power through images on seals and inscriptions. In monastic typika, the founders presented themselves as pious benefactors, while donor epigraphy in rural churches secured the local influence of wealthier peasants. However, self-representation is not only a matter of introspection but also of dialogue with the “other”: such is the case of spolia, used to reincorporate a supposed classical past in one’s self-portrayal, or to create an image of continuity by conquerors. We see this clearly in the conscious use of Byzantine motifs in Islamicate architecture, the fiction of Digenes Akritas, and the religious polemics of Late Byzantium which pitted Muslim, Jews and Christians against one other. Through depicting what they were not, historical actors were (consciously or unconsciously) shaping their own identity.

This conference seeks to join the ongoing dialogue on self-representation in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies by providing a forum for postgraduate and early-career scholars to reflect on this theme in a variety of cultural media. In doing so, we hope to facilitate the interaction and engagement of historians, philologists, archaeologists, art historians, theologians and specialists in material culture. To that end, we encourage submissions from all graduate students and young researchers, encompassing, but not limited to, the following themes:

●       Literary works: self-portrayal in epistolographical collections; autobiographies; fictional personae in poetical and prose compositions; typika portraying an image of a founder or donor;

●       Manuscripts: from the commission of the material object itself, to the self-portraits jotted down in the margins by its owners or readers;

●       Portrayal of oneself in terms of gender and sexuality;

●       Epigraphy: material sponsored by both authorities and private citizens; self-representation on funerary artefacts, graffiti, inscriptions;

●       Numismatics: representation of power and authority in the world of Late Antiquity and Byzantium at large;

●       Sigillography: elite self-representation and its importance among the Byzantine upper classes;

●       Artistic Production: portrayals in mosaics and icons. Private and public forms of representation;

●       Gift-Giving: Elite items (e.g. cloths, manuscripts, jewellery) intended for use in diplomatic exchange which were designed to promote a specific image of an emperor and the empire;

●       Political Ideology: imperial or ecclesiastical messaging through literary works and monumental architecture;

●       Religion: different theological or philosophical stances, dogmatic truths or polemics as means of self-promotion or self-portrayal;

●       Dialogue with “the other”: Byzantium’s influence in neighbouring cultures as a consequence of its self-representation;

●       Reception: how the field of Late Antique and Byzantine Studies is influenced by the modern-day reception of the self-representation of historical actors;

●       Reception: how the field of Late Antique and Byzantine Studies is influenced by historical Western conceptions of the Late Antique and Byzantine world;

●       Comparative perspectives of the above elsewhere, in opposition or concordance with practices in Byzantium.

Please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, along with a short academic biography in the third person, to the Oxford University Byzantine Society at byzantine.society@gmail.com by Monday, 30th November 2020. Papers should be 20 minutes in length and may be delivered in English or French. As with previous conferences, there will be a publication of selected papers, chosen and reviewed by specialists from the University of Oxford in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies. Speakers wishing to have their papers considered for publication should try to be as close to the theme as possible in their abstract and paper. Nevertheless, all submissions are warmly invited.

Shifting Frontiers XIV: Scale and the Study of Late Antiquity June 3-5, 2021, The Ohio State University, Columbus OH*

*This event will take place virtually via Zoom

For the Fourteenth Meeting of the Society for Late Antiquity, we invite papers that investigate scale, which can be defined as a graduated range of values or measurements, whether, for example, of time, space, social organization, cosmology, or agency. Participants are encouraged to explore scale either as a methodological framework used by modern historians to interpret the past and/or as a type of late Roman analytic category, developed and employed by late ancient persons for their own heuristic purposes. Questions papers might ask include: To what extent does the world of Late Antiquity look different if we approach its events, institutions, and processes (whether political, economic, social, or religious) from a micro scale rather than a macro scale, and vice versa? How can we better understand the late Roman Empire through the examination of macro- and micro-scalar environmental phenomena, such as volcanic eruptions and mutating plague DNA, which were only partially (if at all) perceptible to the late Romans themselves? Alternatively, what graduated categories of measurement and values did late ancient thinkers deploy in their philosophical, scientific (including astrological), and religious works to make sense of metaphysical, ethical, or even physical quandaries? And what did scale mean to individuals on an everyday level, for agriculturalists or merchants whose livelihoods were embedded within multi-scalar economic, environmental, legal, social, and religious networks? Other papers might consider the fractal replication of structures and relationships across the Empire, for example in conciliar operations (Senate, local curia, church councils), patterns of deference across the social scale, or in the provincial extensions of imperial authority.

Comparativists are encouraged to consider how problems of scale inflect transhistorical arguments that encompass both late antiquity and other periods of history.

Featured Keynote Speakers:

C. Michael Chin, Department of Classics, UC Davis

Ann Marie Yasin, Department of Art History and Classics, University of Southern California

Special Directions for Virtual Format

The program committee recognizes that online conferencing opens opportunities for scholarly presentations and discussions that deviate from the traditional model of “present a paper and then take questions.” The past few months have been a time of experimentation for all of us. Rather than define (and thereby limit) those alternative modes in advance, we encourage you to propose them to us, and so our task will be to decide not only which papers will be included, but which formats too. Options include thematically linked papers that are posted before the conference so that attendees can read them before their authors hold a panel discussion at the conference; or scholars who wish to pre-post textual, visual, video, or audio material and then take only five minutes to present their argument, leaving more time for discussion. Each submission will still need to have a regular abstract, but please indicate whether you would like to experiment with an alternative mode of presentation.

In order to be considered for participation in this conference, please visit our website https://u.osu.edu/shiftingfrontiersxiv/, where you will find directions and the required application form (with required 500 word abstract). The deadline for submission is December 4, 2020.

Medievalisms on the Screen: The representation of the Middle Ages in Audio-visual Media in the 21st century. Online PhD Conference. Deadline: 1 February 2021

The technological advancements in audio-visual production taken place in the first two decades of the 21st century have accentuated the multiple representations of the Middle Ages in popular media. The explosion of the videogame 

industry, the refinement in digital technologies for the recreation of past spaces, and the popularization of streaming services like YouTube and Netflix have all allowed for an increase in the venues for representation of the medieval past. Be it the crusaders of Assassin’s Creed (2007) or the Scandinavian world of Vikings (2013-2020); from the fantasy universe of Game of Thrones (2011-2019) or bands like Rhapsody of Fire, to the hack-n-slash hell of Dante’s Inferno (2011), it is a non-academic version of the past which is more familiar to the general public. 

The way in which media affects our perceptions of the past have real-world ramifications. A specific distorted version of the Middle Ages has served as fuel for acts of violence and the rise of authoritarian, xenophobic and racist political agendas. Interestingly, this is a process that has gotten outside of traditional “medieval” scenarios into more global arena: the 2015 Indian film Padmaavati exacerbated Hindu-Muslim relations in some regions of the sub-continent, further highlighting the relation between media and politics regarding the representation of the past. 

Contributions might include, but are not limited to:

·         Global middle ages in popular media· 

·         Media and national identity 

·         Accuracy vs. authenticity 

·         Gender relations in medieval productions

·         Magic and the supernatural 

·         Political histories and their (sub)conscious implications 

·         Middle-ages and fantasy 

·         Rock music and the middle ages 

·         Screenwriting, cinematography and representation 

·         Gameplay mechanics, coding and procedural rhetoric

·         History popularization and education 

·         LARPERS and the middle ages 

·         Museums, memory and cultural institutions 

The purpose of this PhD interdisciplinary conference is to explore the characteristics and implications of calling an audio-visual product “medieval” in the 21st century. From products that purposely undermine their own historicity like A Knight’s Tale (2001), to those that rely on “accuracy” as part of their advertisement as in the case of videogames; from “European-based” productions like Dark Souls, to Netflix’s Kingdom (2019) set in Korea or Team Ninja’s Nioh (2017) set in Japan, we invite contributions from every area of knowledge relevant to this discussion. 

The conference will take place online on April 29th-May 1st 2021.Paper proposals, no longer than 400 words in length for a paper between 25 to 30 minutes, should be sent to the organizers: rubio-arevalo_juan@phd.ceu.edu no later than February 1st, 2021. The full slate of selected papers will be announced within two weeks after the submission deadline.

Call for papers: Ancient Greek, Roman and Byzantine engraved  gems in the eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea area. 13-14 May 2021. Deadline: 1 January 2021

We are glad to inform you that an international video conference on engraved gems in the Archaic, Classical,  Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea area will take place on May 13-14,  2021 on Zoom.us. An engraved gem, frequently referred to as an intaglio or cameo, is a small and usually semi precious gemstone that has been carved, in the ancient Greek and Roman tradition normally with images or  inscriptions only on one face. The engraving of gemstones was a major luxury art form in the ancient eastern  Mediterranean. Near Eastern glyptic art covers the field of small carved stones, including cylinder seals and  inscriptions in archaeological contexts. Though in the Graeco-Roman Mediterranean they were keenly  

collected in classical antiquity, most carved gems originally functioned as seals, often mounted in a ring.  Engraved gems were found in relatively large quantities in the eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea area,  where they were in use and produced frequently between the Bronze Age and Medieval periods. So far the  study of these multifunctional objects has been overlooked in the eastern Mediterranean whereas there is still  a huge amount of unpublished material from excavations and museums in an area from Albania down to  Egypt, including Greece, Turkey and Cyprus. Ancient engraved gems can be categorized based on different  criteria, including their gemological and mineralogical material, genres of material, decoration, production, use  and distribution.  

In this online conference we only focus on Greek, Roman and Byzantine engraved gems from the eastern  Mediterranean and Black Sea area between c. early sixth century B.C. and early seventh century A.D., and  attempt to set out a comprehensive model for the study of engraved gems, including their definition,  typology, chronology, contexts, function, regional characteristics and distribution patterns in the whole  eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea geographies. It is also our intention to create a complete bibliography of  previous publications on engraved gems.  

We warmly invite contributions by scholars and graduate students from a variety of disciplines related to  these objects. Intended to bring together scholars of Greek, Roman and Byzantine archaeology to discuss a  range of issues concerning these instruments’ characteristics, this electronic conference should be an excellent  opportunity to increase our knowledge about this material. The following theme groups are the main  questions of this online conference which are prescriptive:  

– Engraved gems from archaeological field projects, museums and private collections,  – Ancient Greek and Latin textual sources on engraved gems,  

– Evolution of engraved gems in the eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea area during the Archaic, Classical,  Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods,  

– Similar instrumenta in the ancient Near East and their relations to ancient Graeco-Roman gems,  – What ancient Greeks and Romans thought about afterlife? Engraved gems in funerary and votive contexts,  – Domestic and commercial use of engraved gems,  

– Magical gems,  

– Related instrumenta to engraved gems in the regards of their function,  

– Decoration, iconography and epigraphy at engraved gems in Greek, Roman and Byzantine periods,  – Major production centers of engraved gems in the eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea,  – Signatures at engraved gems,  

– Byzantine engraved gems in religious contexts,  

– Miscellanea. 

On these themes and questions, all disciplines, approaches and methods susceptible to bring some progress  to our current knowledge are of course welcome: classical archaeology, Byzantine archaeology, gemology,  mineralogy, archaeometry, petrography, history of art, ancient history, sigillography, glyptics and cultural  anthropology etc. Gemological, mineralogical and archaeometric papers related to engraved gem research are  most welcome. English is the official language of the e-conference. Your lecture will be recorded during the  conference and this record will be displayed in Youtube after. The e-conference is free of charge.  

We would be delighted, if you could consider contributing to our e-conference and contact us with the  required information below before January 1, 2021. Our e-mail addresses are: terracottas@deu.edu.tr or  gul1988kaynakci@gmail.com  

We would be thankful, if you send us your abstract and required information only in word doc. For all your  queries concerning the e-conference our phone number is: +90.539.511 74 08. The organizers seek to widen  participation at this e-conference, and would like to encourage colleagues from all parts of the world to  attend. The conference committee kindly requests that you alert any persons within your research community  who would be interested in participating at this e-conference, either by forwarding our e-mail through  Facebook or other similar social media, or by printing this circular or our poster and displaying it in your  institution. We hope that you will be able to join us on Zoom, and look forward to seeing you in May!  

 3.                 JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Postdoctoral Fellowships in Byzantine Studies (2021-2022)

The Byzantine Studies Research Center of Bogazici University in Istanbul invites applications for postdoctoral fellowships in the fields of Byzantine history, art history, and archaeology for the 2021-2022 academic year.

·  Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in Byzantine Studies
Application deadline: 22 December 2020

·  Andrew W. Mellon Short-Term Postdoctoral Research Grant in Byzantine Studies for Scholars Holding Academic Positions in TurkeyApplication deadline: 15 January 2021

For further information please visit http://byzantinestudies.boun.edu.tr/index.php?page=events&id=54

University of Notre Dame Byzantine Studies Postdoctoral Fellowship. Deadline: 1 February 2021

Following substantial investment in the area of Byzantine Studies at the University of Notre Dame, including the acquisition of the Milton V. Anastos Library of Byzantine Civilization and generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame is delighted to invite applicants for a nine-month Postdoctoral Fellowship in Byzantine Studies. This fellowship is designed for junior scholars with a completed doctorate whose research deals with some aspect of the Byzantine world. The fellow is expected to pursue promising research towards scholarly publication and/or the development of new subject areas. This Fellowship is open to qualified applicants in all fields and sub-disciplines of Byzantine Studies, such as history (including its auxiliary disciplines), archaeology, art history, literature, theology, and liturgical studies, as well as the study of Byzantium’s interactions with neighboring cultures. The fellowship holder will pursue research in residence at the University of Notre Dame’s famed Medieval Institute during the academic year (the position begins mid-August).

The intent of this Fellowship is to enable its holder to do innovative research drawing on the rich resources held in the Milton V. Anastos Collection, the Medieval Institute, and the Hesburgh Library more broadly. This may include the completion of book manuscripts and articles, work on text editions, or the development of new trajectories of research in one of the aforementioned fields. The Fellowship carries no teaching responsibilities, but the fellow will have the opportunity to participate in the multidisciplinary activities of Notre Dame faculty related to Byzantium, Eastern Christianity, and the history of the Levant. The Fellow will be provided with a private workspace in the Medieval Institute, enjoy full library and computer privileges, and have access to all the Institute’s research tools.

In addition, towards the conclusion of the fellowship period the fellow’s work will be at the center of a workshop organized within the framework of the Byzantine Studies Seminar. Senior scholars, chosen in cooperation with the Medieval Institute, will be invited for this event treating the fellow’s subject matter. The senior scholars will discuss draft versions of the fellow’s book manuscript or articles or discuss the further development of ongoing research projects.

EligibilityByzantine Studies fellows must hold a Ph.D. from an internationally recognized institution. The Ph.D. must be in hand by the beginning of the fellowship term. 

Stipend: $36,000, plus benefits 

Start Date: Approximately August 16, 2021 | End Date: Approximately May 15, 2022 

Application procedure: Applicants should submit a letter of application (cover letter), a project proposal of no more than 2500 words, a current C.V., and three confidential letters of recommendation. Submit  applications via Interfolio at http://apply.interfolio.com/80877. Deadline: 1 February 2021

Further details regarding materials are  available at https://medieval.nd.edu/research/grants-fellowships/#Byzantine-fellowship

Doctoral scholarships in the GSSP programme. Deadline: 15 January 2021

Scholarships for international doctoral candidates are announced at The Graduate School of the Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures (CSMC) at the University of Hamburg within the Graduate School Scholarship Programme (GSSP) of the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD).

The full scholarships (1200 EUR/month plus allowances) are awarded for three years, starting on 1 October 2021. An extension to a fourth year is possible in well-grounded cases.

We are looking for highly qualified and very motivated English-speaking international candidates (non-German citizens) holding a Master, Diploma or equivalent degree in any discipline concerned with the study of manuscript cultures and written artefacts, regardless of region.

About the CSMC as a research environment:

The CSMC is a unique research centre for the historical, comparative and scientific study of manuscript cultures and written artefacts from Asia, Africa, and Europe, building on decades of manuscript studies at the University of Hamburg.

In 2019, the Cluster of Excellence “Understanding Written Artefacts” has taken up its work, involving researchers from more than 30 disciplines at two faculties, seeking to establish a uni-fied, comparative and comprehensive approach for studying how the production of written artefacts has shaped human societies and cultures, and how these in turn have adapted written artefacts to their needs. Aims include the identification of recurring patterns and documenting the diversity of manuscript cultures and written artefacts, especially in Asia and Africa, to preserve them as cultural heritage.

Application deadline and further information:

Applications for GSSP doctoral scholarships are to be submitted by 15 January 2021 to the Coordinator of the Graduate School Dr Merryl Rebello, by e-mail: merryl.rebello@uni-hamburg.de

The full text of the call and further information on the documents to be submitted can be found here:
https://www.csmc.uni-hamburg.de/study-at-csmc/dr-phil/scholarships.html

Medieval Greek Summer Session at the Gennadius Library, Summer 2021. Deadline: 15 January 2021

The Gennadius Library of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens announces the summer session focused on the teaching of Medieval Greek, from June 28 to July 28, 2021.

Founded in 1881, the American School is the most significant resource in Greece for American scholars in the fields of ancient and post-classical studies. One of the two major research libraries of the School, the Gennadius Library, which houses over 146,000 volumes and archives, is devoted to post-classical Hellenic civilization.

The Library invites applications for a month-long Summer Session for Medieval Greek at the Intermediate to Advanced Level. The objective is to familiarize students who have a sound foundation in Classical Greek with Medieval Greek language and philology by exposing them to primary sources, different kinds of literary genres, paleography and epigraphy, drawing on the resources of the Gennadius Library. The two Professors leading the session are Professor  Alexander Alexakis, University of Ioannina, and Professor Stratis Papaioannou, Brown University/University of Crete.

Format
The month-long full-time program will include daily translation of Byzantine texts; introduction to Greek paleography and Byzantine book culture; use of the collections of the Gennadius Library; visits to area museums and libraries including the Byzantine, Benaki, and Epigraphical Museums; and visits outside Athens including Corinth, Mistra, Thessaloniki, and Hosios Loukas. Individual tutorials and assignments for each student will be determined by specific needs and field of study. The language of instruction is English. Participants should plan to arrive on June 29 and depart on July 29.

Eligibility

The program is offered at the intermediate to advanced level for up to twelve students enrolled in graduate programs in any field of late antique, post-antique, Byzantine or medieval studies at any university worldwide; preference may be given to students who have limited access to instruction in Byzantine Greek at their home institutions. A minimum of two years of college-level or post-doctoral Classical Greek (or the equivalent) is required. If there are available slots, faculty or postdoctoral scholars affiliated with any university worldwide may also be considered. A diagnostic test (available electronically) may be administered to finalists before the final selection of students is made.

Academic Credit

The American School is not a degree-granting institution. No grades are given for its programs, nor are transcripts provided. Upon request, an optional final exam at the end of the program may be provided and the directors will write a letter to the participant’s home institution, recommending that credit be granted, provided that the student has satisfactorily participated in the program and passed the final exam.

Costs and Scholarships

Twelve Leventis Foundation scholarships cover the costs of tuition, School fees, housing, required travel within Greece, and museum and site fees. International airfare to and from  Greece, meals, and incidental expenses are the participant’s responsibility.

Applications

Submit online application, curriculum vitae, two letters of recommendation (one from the  academic advisor and one from a Greek language teacher). Direct link to application:

https://ascsa.submittable.com/submit/116263/ascsa-gennadius-library-summer-sessionapplication

Applicants are required to submit scans of academic transcripts as part of the online application.

Web site: www.ascsa.edu.gr or https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/programs/gennadius-library-medieval-greek-summer-session

E-mail: application@ascsa.org

The selection results will be announced March 15.

ANAMED Regular and Join Fellowships, 2021-2022. Deadline: 15 December 2020

Koç University invites applications for a limited number of PhD, Post-Doctoral, and Senior Fellowships at Koç University’s Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations (ANAMED). A few Post-Doctoral or Senior applications for regular fellowships that qualify for collaborative fellowships involving Koç University faculty, centers, or facilities will be preferred. Additionally, several joint fellowships with specific application criteria may be available.

Given the ongoing and currently worsening pandemic situation around the world, ANAMED may have to make changes in currently advertised fellowship conditions. Applicants are asked to be patient and understanding of these circumstances and to plan accordingly.

Opportunities may include a combination of the following benefits: monthly stipend calculated by Koç University each year to cover most local expenses not covered by the fellowship, accommodation at ANAMED’s residential facility in the center of Beyoğlu-Istanbul, a meal allowance for five meals per week, transportation to and from Turkey, a modest research budget, health insurance, residence permit, museum-access card, and full access to the ANAMED Library and to lectures, symposia, and other activities at ANAMED and on the main Koç University campus.

All ANAMED fellows are expected to devote themselves full time to their research projects, to be active members of Koç University’s academic community, and, for full-year fellowships, to give three talks on their work during the course of the year. Applications from scholars of all nationalities are encouraged, yet fellows must be proficient in English, the language of instruction at Koç University.

Established in 2005, ANAMED’s mission is to promote and produce cutting-edge scholarship contributing to critical knowledge on Anatolia and its civilizations. Applications focusing on the archaeology, art history, heritage, and history of Anatolia from the Neolithic through the Ottoman eras are welcome from scholars of these allied disciplines, including those that focus on the management, conservation, and presentation of the past. Located in the Beyoğlu district of Istanbul, ANAMED is near many research institutions, archives, and other scholarly facilities and thus serves as a convenient and comfortable locus for intensive study.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 15 December 2020

Online application: https://anamed.ku.edu.tr/en/fellowships/application-conditions/

For more information please visit: anamed.ku.edu.tr

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: Up to 5 Postdoc Fellowships in Berlin for the Academic Year 2021/2022. Deadline: 6 January 2021

The research program EUROPE IN THE MIDDLE EAST—THE MIDDLE EAST IN EUROPE (EUME) will be continued. Applications are encouraged for up to 5 Postdoctoral Fellowships for the academic year 2021/2022 in Berlin. The deadline for applications is January 6, 2021.

Please find the call for applications via the following link:

https://www.eume-berlin.de/en/news-press/call-for-applications.html

The fellowships are addressed to scholars who are interested in the methodological perspective of dealing with regions or cultures not as closed entities or polarities, but by looking at processes of transfer, exchange and interaction in the sense of entangled or shared histories and cultures.

EUROPE IN THE MIDDLE EAST—THE MIDDLE EAST IN EUROPE (EUME) has been initiated in 2006 as a joint research program of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities, the Fritz Thyssen Foundation and the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin. It builds upon the previous work of the Working Group Modernity and Islam (1996-2006). Since 2011, EUME is continued as a program at the Forum Transregionale Studien. For more information on EUME, please visit their website and their EUME Facebook page.   

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS 
UP TO 5 POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2021/22

(Location: Berlin / Closing Date: January 6, 2020)

The Berlin-based Forum Transregionale Studien invites scholars to apply for up to five postdoctoral fellowships for the academic year 2021/2022 for the research program

EUROPE IN THE MIDDLE EAST—THE MIDDLE EAST IN EUROPE (EUME)

EUME seeks to rethink key concepts and premises that link and divide Europe and the Middle East. The program draws on the international expertise of a growing network of scholars in and outside of Germany and is embedded in university and extra-university research institutions in and outside of Berlin. EUME supports historical-critical philology, rigorous engagement with the literatures of the Middle East and their histories, the social history and life of cities and the study of Middle Eastern political and philosophical thought as central fields of research not only for area or cultural studies, but also for European intellectual history and other academic disciplines. The program explores modernity as a historical space and conceptual frame. EUME is interested in questions relating to ongoing transformation processes in Europe and the Middle East, in re-imaginations of the past and present that contribute to free, pluralistic and just societies.

The program puts forward three programmatic ideas:
1) supporting research that demonstrates the rich and complex historical legacies and entanglements between Europe and the Middle East; 2) re-examining genealogical notions of mythical ‘beginnings’, ‘origins’, and ‘purity’ in relation to culture and society; and 3) rethinking key concepts of a shared modernity and future in light of contemporary cultural, social, and political divisions and entanglements that supersede identity discourses as well as national, cultural or regional canons and epistemologies that were established in the nineteenth century.

EUME supports and rests upon interconnected research fields and themes:

TRAVELLING TRADITIONS: COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVES ON NEAR EASTERN LITERATURES
directed by Friederike Pannewick (Center for Near and Middle Eastern Studies/Department for Arabic Studies, Philipps-Universität Marburg) and Samah Selim (Rutgers University) reassesses literary entanglements and processes of translation and canonization between Europe and the Middle East.

CITIES COMPARED: GOVERNANCE, CONSULTATIVE MECHANISMS AND PLURALITY
directed by Ulrike Freitag and Nora Lafi (both Leibniz-Zentrum Moderner Orient, Berlin) contributes to the debates on civil society, deliberation, opinion formation, citizenship, migration and mobilization from the experience of cultural and religious differences in cities around the Mediterranean and beyond.

TRADITION AND THE CRITIQUE OF MODERNITY: SECULARISM, AUTHORITARIANISM AND RELIGION FROM MIDDLE EASTERN PERSPECTIVES
directed by Amnon Raz-Krakotzkin (Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva) tries to rethink key concepts of modernity in the context of experiences, interpretations, and critiques from the Middle East in order to contribute to a more inclusive language of culture, politics and community.

POLITICS AND PROCESSES OF CHANGE, ARCHAEOLOGIES OF THE PRESENT, AND IMAGINATIONS OF THE FUTURE
are research themes that emerged during the last years and are represented by the work of several EUME Fellows and members of the Collegium (e.g. Cilja Harders, Friederike Pannewick, Rachid Ouaissa).

These research fields and themes mark the open framework for the fellowship program that constitutes EUME. Since 1997, more than 300 scholars from and of the Middle East have been EUME Fellows, who, by their scholarly projects, engagement, and their inquiries into the order of knowledge, society and politics, shape the academic program of EUME. 


FELLOWSHIPS

The fellowships are intended primarily for scholars in the humanities and social sciences who want to carry out their research projects in connection with the Berlin program. Applicants should be at the postdoctoral level and should have obtained their doctorate within the last seven years. Fellows gain the opportunity to pursue research projects of their own choice within the framework of EUME. Successful applicants will be fellows of EUME at the Forum Transregionale Studien, and associate members of one of the university or non-university research institutes listed below or connected to the Forum Transregionale Studien.

The fellowships start on 1 October 2021 and will end on 31 July 2022. Postdoctoral fellows will receive a monthly stipend of 2,500 € plus supplements depending on their personal situation. Organisational support regarding visa, insurance, housing, etc. will be provided. Fellows are obliged to work in Berlin and to help shape the seminars and working discussions related to their research field. The working language of EUME is English.

Scholars are also invited to apply with their own funding, and should, if this may be an option, contact us.


APPLICATION PROCEDURE

We kindly ask you to submit your application via the secure online application platform of the Forum Transregionale Studien by 6 January 2021, 23.59h CET:

https://application.trafo-berlin.de/

Please note that applications by email will not be considered.

As part of your application, you will be asked to prepare and upload the following:
— a curriculum vitae (including a list of publications);
— a project description (no longer than 5 pages), stating what the scholar will work on in Berlin if granted a fellowship, and
— the names of two university faculty members who can serve as referees (no letters of recommendation required).

In case of questions, please consult the FAQ or send an email to eume@trafo-berlin.de.


INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK

EUROPE IN THE MIDDLE EAST—THE MIDDLE EAST IN EUROPE (EUME) has been initiated in 2006 as a joint research program of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities, the Fritz Thyssen Foundation and the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin. It builds upon the previous work of the Working Group Modernity and Islam (1996-2006). Since 2011 EUME is continued at the Forum Transregionale Studien.

In scholarly terms EUME is directed by a Collegium that currently consists of Ulrike Freitag (Leibniz-Zentrum Moderner Orient, Berlin), Cilja Harders (Otto Suhr Institute of Political Science, Freie Universität Berlin), Kader Konuk (Institut für Turkistik, Universität Duisburg-Essen), Nora Lafi (Leibniz-Zentrum Moderner Orient, Berlin), Rachid Ouaissa (Center for Near and Middle Eastern Studies, Philipps-Universität Marburg), Friederike Pannewick (Center for Near and Middle Eastern Studies, Philipps-Universität Marburg), Amnon Raz-Krakotzkin (Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva), Samah Selim (Rutgers University), and Stefan Weber (Museum for Islamic Art, Berlin).

The Berlin-based Forum Transregionale Studien (Forum) is a research institution that promotes the internationalization of research in the humanities and social sciences. It is dedicated to a research agenda that systematically links disciplinary approaches and the expertise of area studies by focusing on entanglements and interactions across national, cultural or regional borders. The Forum invites scholars from all over the world for fellowships and develops transregional communication formats. It provides scope for collaboration among researchers with different regional and disciplinary perspectives and appoints researchers from all over the world as Fellows. In cooperation with universities and research institutions in Berlin and Germany, the Forum carries out research programs and initiatives that examine emerging topics from diverse regions of the world in a comparative as well as integrative manner. The Forum is a registered society, its members are universities and research institutions in Germany. It cooperates with the Max Weber Stiftung – Geisteswissenschaftliche Institute im Ausland in the field of communication, and is funded by the Land Berlin.

The Forum currently supports the following research programs and initiatives: EUROPE IN THE MIDDLE EAST—THE MIDDLE EAST IN EUROPE (EUME), PRISMA UKRAÏNA: Research Network Eastern Europe, RE:CONSTITUTION: Exchange and Analysis on Democracy and the Rule of Law in Europe. The Forum is a founding member of the ACADEMY IN EXILE and of the consortium of MECAM: Merian Centre for Advanced Studies in the Maghreb, and connected to its former programs ZUKUNFTSPHILOLOGIE: Revisiting the Canons of Textual Scholarship and 4A LAB: Art Histories, Archaeologies, Anthropologies, Aesthetics.

For more information on the Forum Transregionale Studien, its programs, initiatives and communication, please visit:
www.forum-transregionale-studien.de

TRAFO – Blog for Transregional Research
https://trafo.hypotheses.org/

For more information on EUME and for detailed information on the research fields and themes, please visit:
www.eume-berlin.de

For information on the research institutions participating in EUME, please visit:

– Berlin Graduate School Muslim Cultures and Societies, FU Berlin
www.bgsmcs.fu-berlin.de

– Center for Middle Eastern and North African Politics, Otto Suhr Institute of Political Science, FU Berlin
www.polsoz.fu-berlin.de/en/polwiss/

– Leibniz-Zentrum Moderner Orient
www.zmo.de

– Friedrich Schlegel Graduate School of Literary Studies, FU Berlin
https://www.geisteswissenschaften.fu-berlin.de/en/friedrichschlegel/index.html

– Institute of Islamic Studies, FU Berlin
www.geschkult.fu-berlin.de/en/e/islamwiss

– Museum for Islamic Art
www.smb.museum/isl

– Seminar for Semitic and Arabic Studies, FU Berlin
www.geschkult.fu-berlin.de/en/e/semiarab

– Center for Near and Middle Eastern Studies, Philipps-Universität Marburg
www.uni-marburg.de/cnms

– Institut für Turkistik, Universität Duisburg-Essen
www.uni-due.de/turkistik/

German for Students of Classical Studies at Cologne 2021. Deadline: 31 January 2021

The Department for Classical Studies of the University of Cologne is now accepting applications for the 2021 “German for Students of Classical Studies” summer course. The course will take place in Cologne from June 7 to July 16, 2021 (Corona permitting). It is specially designed to meet the lingustic needs of students of Classics who wish to expand their  knowledge of written and spoken academic German.

The program includes a language class, reading tutorials, field trips to archaeological sites in the Rhineland and the opportunity to take part in the academic life of the Classics department of the  University of Cologne.

In the event that travel is still restricted in the summer of 2021 or that an in person-class seems unsafe, we will try to offer a virtual alternative.

The deadline for applications is January 31, 2021.

All the relevant information, including a flyer for download, can be found here:

https://ifa.phil-fak.uni-koeln.de/austauschprogramme-projekte/gscs-program

If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to send an e-mail to: german-for-classics@uni-koeln.de.

Judith McKenzie Student Essay Prizes. Deadline: 23.59 on 11 January 2021

Manar al-Athar is pleased to announce the launch of the Judith McKenzie Student Essay Prizes, named after its founder and first Director. 

The Essay Prizes will be awarded yearly to outstanding essays on a site, building, inscription, mosaic, wider theme, and so on, featured on the Manar al-Athar website. They will consist of £200 for the winner and £100 for the second best. The winning essays will be published on the Manar al-Athar website.

Essay instructions

·         Essays should be built around 7 to 10 images from the Manar website. 

·         Essay length should be between 750 and 1,000 words.

·         Essays should be submitted in English.

·         You should write for a general audience. This means that you should avoid things like technical terminology or detailed discussion of what scholars have said about a particular point.

·         Deadline: 23.59 on 11 January 2021. 

·         Winners will be announced at the end of January 2021.

Eligibility

The competition is open to anybody who is studying for a degree in the academic year 2020-2021, to students at any institution, in any country, and in any discipline.

Submission of essays

·         Essays should be sent to manar@classics.ox.ac.uk.

·         Entries should be submitted as either a Word document or a PDF.

·         You should include the name of an academic at your institution who will be able to confirm that you are a student in 2020-2021.

Please note that the Prize Committee will not be able to provide feedback on submissions.

Enquiries

Please send any enquiries to manar@classics.ox.ac.uk. Please allow five working days for a response.

About Manar al-Athar

The Manar al-Athar photo-archive (www.manar-al-athar.ox.ac.uk), based in the Faculty of Classics at the University of Oxford, provides high-resolution, searchable images for teaching, research, publication, and heritage work. These images of archaeological sites, buildings and artworks, cover the areas of the former Roman Empire which later came under Islamic rule (such as Syro-Palestine/the Levant, Egypt and North Africa), and adjoining regions (such as Armenia and Georgia). The chronological range is from Alexander the Great (i.e. from about 300 BC) through the Islamic period.

The photo-archive is open-access so that it can be freely used by anyone anywhere in the world. Photographs can be freely downloaded as original high-resolution images (tif images) without water marks, making them immediately available in a format suitable for publication or research, simply by acknowledging the source. Material is labelled in both English and Arabic to facilitate regional use, with the main instructions also available in other languages. Manar al-Athar means ‘Guide to Archaeology’ in Arabic.

Manar al-Athar currently has c. 80 000 photographs online.  Strengths include Late Antiquity (AD 250–750), the period of transition from paganism to Christianity and, in turn, to Islam, especially religious buildings (temples, churches, synagogues, mosques) and monumental art (including floor mosaics); early Islamic art (paintings, mosaics, relief sculpture); Roman and early Islamic (Umayyad) architecture; Petra and Nabataean sites; and iconoclasm.

Funding opportunity: Stein-Arnold Exploration Fund. Deadline: 1 December 2020

The British Academy has launched a call for its Stein-Arnold Exploration Fund which encourages researchon the antiquities or historical geography or early history or arts of those parts of Asia which come within the sphere of the ancient civilizations of India, China, and Iran, including Central Asia, or of one or more of these and so that special consideration shall be paid, if possible, to research of this character bearing upon the territories comprised in the present Kingdom of Afghanistan including the region of ancient Bactria and in the north-western frontier region of India’.
 
Applications are invited from early career and established scholars to engage in research that should be ‘so far as possible by means of exploratory work’. Awards are offered to support aspects of research including travel and research assistance. Grants are not available to fund attendance at conferences or seminars.

Eligibility: Applicants must be British or Hungarian subjects of postdoctoral status or comparable experience. Applications are not accepted from postgraduate students.
Duration: Awards are tenable for 24 months.
Funding: up to £2,500.

Deadline for submission of applications: 5pm Wednesday 13 January 2021 (internal Research Services deadline: 6 January 2021)
Results expected: 31 March 2021
Earliest Start Date for Research: 1 April 2021

If you’re interested in submitting an application, please get in touch with Bianca Schlawin (bianca.schlawin@humanities.ox.ac.ukno later than December 1.

Posted in Byzness | Leave a comment

The Byzness, 15/11/2020

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 15th November 2020
====
1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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  1. NEWS AND EVENTS

Using Byzantine legal sources in the Humanities (Van Gogh programme B. Caseau & D. Penna)
Title masterclass:  An online masterclass on the Basilica text and scholia,
taught by Prof. F. Brandsma and Dr. D. Penna, University of Groningen

Une masterclass de droit byzantin va porter sur les Basiliques et se fera en anglais.

Cette masterclass devait se tenir au printemps dernier. Elle sera désormais en ligne. Les conférences vont être enregistrées sur le blackboard de l’Université de droit de Groningen.

Que ceux que cela intéresse écrivent à Béatrice Caseau (bacaseau@yahoo.fr) qui transmettra à Daphne Penna leur nom prénom et adresse e-mail ou ceux de leurs étudiants.

Les conférences seront en ligne le 22 novembre et il y aura un séminaire  sur zoom le 27 novembre de 14h à 16h pour les questions. 

Description

The masterclass will focus on the most important Byzantine legal legislation, the Basilica (=
Imperial Laws), a massive legal compilation of sixty books which was issued around 900
during   the   reign   of   Leo   VI   the   Wise.   The   so-called Basilica   scholia, which were
commentaries added later on as marginal notes to the Basilica, will also be examined. The
Basilica   scholia  are   further   distinguished   into   the   ‘old’  Basilica   scholia  deriving   from
material of the sixth-century law professors (for example, Theophilus, Thalelaeus, Dorotheus,
Stephanus) and the so-called ‘new’  Basilica   scholia, which were written by jurists of the
eleventh and  twelfth   centuries  (for  example,  Xiphilinos,   Nicaeus,   Hagiotheodorites).  This
masterclass has a twofold aim: i. to present the ‘theory’ of the Basilica, which refers to their
construction and the distinction of their scholia, their relation to Justinianic legislation, their
validity, their problems, their manuscript tradition, their value and ii. to illustrate this ‘theory’
through Basilica fragments (text, ‘old’   and ‘new’   scholia), which   will   be   analysed   and
discussed.

Aram Conferences Melkite Christianity and the Archaeology of Byzantine Monasteries and Churches in the Levant, 12th – 14th July 2021, (Oxford University)

ARAM Society for Syro-Mesopotamian Studies is organizing its Fifty First International Conference on Melkite Christianity (the Patriarchates of Antioch, Jerusalem and Alexandria) and the Archaeology of Byzantine Monasteries and Churches in the Levant, to be held at the Oriental Institute, University of Oxford, on 12th – 14th July2021.

The conference will start on Monday 12th July at 9pm, finishing on Wednesday 14th July at 7pm. Each speaker’s paper is limited to 45 minutes, with an additional 15 minutes for discussion. All papers given at the conference will be considered for publication in a future edition of the ARAM Periodical, subject to editorial review. If you wish to participate in the conference, please contact our Oxford address: ARAM, the Oriental Institute, Oxford University, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE, England. Tel.  01865-514041 Email: aram@orinst.ox.ac.uk

The Aramaeans B.C.: History, Literature, and Archaeology, 15th – 17th July, 2021 (University of Oxford)

ARAM Society for Syro-Mesopotamian Studies is organizing its Fifty Second International Conference on the history and the cultural heritage of the Aramaeans B.C.: History, Literature, and Archaeology, to be held at the Oriental Institute, the University of Oxford, on 15th – 17th July, 2021.

The conference will start on Thursday July 15th at 9am, finishing on Saturday July 17th at 1pm. Each speaker’s paper is limited to 45 minutes, with an additional 15 minutes for discussion. All papers given at the conference will be considered for publication in a future edition of the ARAM Periodical, subject to editorial review. If you wish to participate in the conference, please contact our Oxford address: ARAM, the Oriental Institute, Oxford University, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE, England.  Tel.  01865-514041 Email: aram@orinst.ox.ac.uk

The Decapolis: History and Archaeology, 19th – 21st July, 2021 (University of Oxford)

ARAM Society for Syro-Mesopotamian Studies is organizing its Fifty Third International Conference on the theme of The Decapolis: History and Archaeology, to be held at Oxford University, 19th – 21st  July, 2021.

The conference will start on Monday July 19th at 9am, finishing on Wednesday July 21st at 7pm. Each speaker’s paper is limited to 45 minutes, with an additional 15 minutes for discussion. All papers given at the conference will be considered for publication in a future edition of the ARAM Periodical, subject to editorial review. If you wish to participate in the conference, please contact our Oxford address: ARAM, the Oriental Institute, Oxford University, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE, England.  Tel.  01865-514041 Email: aram@orinst.ox.ac.uk

Jerzy Szafranowski (UW), How to distinguish monks from clerics in sixth-century Gaul, Warsaw late antique seminar, 19 November, 4:45 (Warsaw Time)

On Thursday, 19 November, 4.45 p.m. (Warsaw time), at Ewa Wipszycka’s Warsaw late antique seminar, Jerzy Szafranowski (UW), will present a paper, How to distinguish monks from clerics in sixth-century Gaul. We are meeting on  Zoom at the usual link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83501284547?pwd=aWt5a1Jla2ZmbUgzN1lyL0c4N1lsUT09

Abstract
In the writings of Gregory of Tours, the clerical and monastic worlds intertwine in a peculiar way. Urban, non-monastic presbyters are titled as abbots with no monks to rule in sight. Those wishing to become monks are regularly made clerics even before they reach their future monastery. People who make a pilgrimage to a saint’s shrine and get healed are ordained clerics, but then immediately return to their homes in distant lands.
Gregory’s works present the society where the categories of ‘monk’ and ‘cleric’ are not strictly defined. The monastic and clerical vocations were so closely interweaved that in many cases it is impossible to determine whether someone was a monk, a cleric, or, indeed, both. In my paper, I will show the implications of this phenomenon, answering the crucial question: in what manner were clerics distinct from monks in sixth-century Gaul?
 
Forthcoming seminars
26.11: Marek Jankowiak (Oxford University), On Kyros of Alexandria, seventh-century popes and the Arab conquest of Egypt (yes, in English after all)
3.12: Andrzej B. Kutiak (Technische Universität München), The preliminary analysis of patterns and functions of the urban settlement at the ‘Marea’ peninsula
10.12: Joanna Wegner (UW), Looking (not only) to heaven: the Aphrodito clergy in the 6th c.

Slavonic and East European Medieval Studies Group, Zoom Meeting, 21 November 2020

The next meeting of the Slavonic and East European Medieval Studies Group (SEEMSG) will take place on 21 November online via Zoom. If you would like to join, please contact Olga Grinchenko at olga.grinchenko@gmail.com

The programme:

10 am – 10.35 am: Professor Richard Price, The Easter sermons of Kirill of Turov and their patristic analogues

10.35 pm – 11.10 am: Dr Nick Evans, Nullo commercio linguae: Guriata Rogovich’s Interpreters

11.10 am – 11.30 am: Break

11.30 am – 12.05 pm: Dr Elena Draghici-Vasilescu, Dionysius the Areopagite in Romanian theology

12.05 pm – 12.40 pm: Dr Susan Reynolds, The Czech version of the Tristan legend and a fragment from the Bodleian Library

12.40 pm – 1.00 pm AGM

2.     JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

MEDIEVAL GREEK SUMMER SESSION AT THE GENNADIUS LIBRARY, SUMMER 2021
Deadline: January 15, 2021

The Gennadius Library of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens announces the summer session focused on the teaching of Medieval Greek, from June 28 to July 28, 2021.

Founded in 1881, the American School is the most significant resource in Greece for American scholars in the fields of ancient and post-classical studies. One of the two major research libraries of the School, the Gennadius Library, which houses over 146,000 volumes and archives, is devoted to post-classical Hellenic civilization.

The Library invites applications for a month-long Summer Session for Medieval Greek at the Intermediate to Advanced Level. The objective is to familiarize students who have a sound foundation in Classical Greek with Medieval Greek language and philology by exposing them to primary sources, different kinds of literary genres, paleography and epigraphy, drawing on the resources of the Gennadius Library. The two Professors leading the session are Professor  Alexander Alexakis, University of Ioannina, and Professor Stratis Papaioannou, Brown University/University of Crete.

Format
The month-long full-time program will include daily translation of Byzantine texts; introduction to Greek paleography and Byzantine book culture; use of the collections of the Gennadius Library; visits to area museums and libraries including the Byzantine, Benaki, and Epigraphical Museums; and visits outside Athens including Corinth, Mistra, Thessaloniki, and Hosios Loukas. Individual tutorials and assignments for each student will be determined by specific needs and field of study. The language of instruction is English. Participants should plan to arrive on June 29 and depart on July 29.

Eligibility

The program is offered at the intermediate to advanced level for up to twelve students enrolled in graduate programs in any field of late antique, post-antique, Byzantine or medieval studies at any university worldwide; preference may be given to students who have limited access to instruction in Byzantine Greek at their home institutions. A minimum of two years of college-level or post-doctoral Classical Greek (or the equivalent) is required. If there are available slots, faculty or postdoctoral scholars affiliated with any university worldwide may also be considered. A diagnostic test (available electronically) may be administered to finalists before the final selection of students is made.

Academic Credit

The American School is not a degree-granting institution. No grades are given for its programs, nor are transcripts provided. Upon request, an optional final exam at the end of the program may be provided and the directors will write a letter to the participant’s home institution, recommending that credit be granted, provided that the student has satisfactorily participated in the program and passed the final exam.

Costs and Scholarships

Twelve Leventis Foundation scholarships cover the costs of tuition, School fees, housing, required travel within Greece, and museum and site fees. International airfare to and from  Greece, meals, and incidental expenses are the participant’s responsibility.

Applications

Submit online application, curriculum vitae, two letters of recommendation (one from the  academic advisor and one from a Greek language teacher). Direct link to application:

https://ascsa.submittable.com/submit/116263/ascsa-gennadius-library-summer-sessionapplication

Applicants are required to submit scans of academic transcripts as part of the online application.

Web site: www.ascsa.edu.gr or https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/programs/gennadius-library-medieval-greek-summer-session

E-mail: application@ascsa.org

The selection results will be announced March 15.

THE M. ALISON FRANTZ FELLOWSHIP IN POST-CLASSICAL STUDIES AT THE GENNADIUS LIBRARY
Deadline: January 15, 2021

The M. Alison Frantz Fellowship, formerly known as the Gennadeion Fellowship in Post-Classical Studies, was named in honor of archaeologist, Byzantinist, and photographer M.  Alison Frantz (1903–1995), a scholar of the post-classical Athenian Agora whose photographs of antiquities are widely used in books on Greek culture.

Fields of study: Late Antique through Modern Greek Studies, including but not limited to the Byzantine, Frankish, Post-Byzantine, and Ottoman periods.

Eligibility: Ph.D. candidates at a U.S. or Canadian institution or scholars holding a recent Ph.D. (up to five years) obtained from a U.S. or Canadian institution. Candidates should demonstrate their need to work in the Gennadius Library.

Terms: A stipend of $11,500 plus room, board, and waiver of School fees. Fellows are expected to be in residence at the School for the full academic year from early September to late May. A final report is due at the end of the award period, and the ASCSA expects that copies of all publications that result from research conducted as a Fellow of the ASCSA be contributed to the Gennadius Library.

Application: Submit an online application form for the “M. Alison Frantz Fellowship in Post-Classical studies at the Gennadius Library.” An application consists of a curriculum vitae, description of the proposed project (up to 750 words), and three letters of reference to be submitted online. Student applicants must submit transcripts. Scans of official transcripts are  acceptable. For more information about the application, visit the ASCSA web site at: https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/apply/fellowships-and-grants/graduate-and-postdoctoral 
Direct link to the online application: https://ascsa.submittable.com/submit/116910/m-alison-frantz-fellowship-in-post-classicalstudies-at-the-gennadius-library 

Web site: www.ascsa.edu.gr or https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/apply/fellowships-and-grants/graduateand-postdoctoral 

E-mail: application@ascsa.org

The award will be announced by March 15.

A. W. Mellon Junior Faculty Fellowship in Medieval Studies. Deadline: 1 February 2021

The Medieval Institute offers a fellowship for a junior faculty scholar in Medieval Studies, made possible through the generous response of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to a challenge grant awarded to Notre Dame by the National Endowment for the Humanities. This Fellowship is designed for junior faculty who currently hold a position in a United States university as an assistant professor. It is open to qualified applicants in all fields of Medieval Studies. The fellowship holder will pursue research in residence at Notre Dame’s famed Medieval Institute during the academic year (this is a nine-month position that begins mid-August).

The intent of this Fellowship is to enable its holders to complete research and writing on a book manuscript in advance of tenure. The Fellowship carries no teaching responsibilities, but holders are expected to participate in the multidisciplinary intellectual life of the Institute and to reside in South Bend. The Fellow will be provided with a private carrel in the Medieval Institute, enjoy full library and computer privileges, and have access to all the Institute’s research tools.

In addition, towards the conclusion of their residency the Fellow’s work will be at the center of a half-day conference. Three senior scholars, chosen in cooperation with the Medieval Institute, will be invited to campus for a half-day public seminar treating the subject matter of the Fellow’s research. The senior scholars will also read and discuss a draft version of the Fellow’s work in an extended private session, a one-to-one conversation following a close reading of the draft, with a view to improving the manuscript before its submission to a press.

Eligibility: Applicants must hold a tenure-track appointment at a U.S. institution, obviously with a  completed Ph.D., and should not be more than six years beyond receiving their Ph.D. at the time of  application. 

Stipend: $50,000 (paid directly to Fellow’s home institution). 

Start Date: approximately August 16, 2021 | End Date: approximately May 15, 2022 

Application procedure: Applicants should submit a letter of application (cover letter), a project  proposal of no more than 2500 words, a current C.V., and three confidential letters of  recommendation. Submit applications via Interfolio via http://apply.interfolio.com/80878. Further  details regarding materials are available at https://medieval.nd.edu/research/grants fellowships/#Mellon-fellowship. 

Byzantine Studies Postdoctoral Fellowship. Deadline: 1 February 2021

Following substantial investment in the area of Byzantine Studies at the University of Notre Dame, including the acquisition of the Milton V. Anastos Library of Byzantine Civilization and generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame is delighted to invite applicants for a nine-month Postdoctoral Fellowship in Byzantine Studies. This fellowship is designed for junior scholars with a completed doctorate whose research deals with some aspect of the Byzantine world. The fellow is expected to pursue promising research towards scholarly publication and/or the development of new subject areas. This Fellowship is open to qualified applicants in all fields and sub-disciplines of Byzantine Studies, such as history (including its auxiliary disciplines), archaeology, art history, literature, theology, and liturgical studies, as well as the study of Byzantium’s interactions with neighboring cultures. The fellowship holder will pursue research in residence at the University of Notre Dame’s famed Medieval Institute during the academic year (the position begins mid-August).

The intent of this Fellowship is to enable its holder to do innovative research drawing on the rich resources held in the Milton V. Anastos Collection, the Medieval Institute, and the Hesburgh Library more broadly. This may include the completion of book manuscripts and articles, work on text editions, or the development of new trajectories of research in one of the aforementioned fields. The Fellowship carries no teaching responsibilities, but the fellow will have the opportunity to participate in the multidisciplinary activities of Notre Dame faculty related to Byzantium, Eastern Christianity, and the history of the Levant. The Fellow will be provided with a private workspace in the Medieval Institute, enjoy full library and computer privileges, and have access to all the Institute’s research tools.

In addition, towards the conclusion of the fellowship period the fellow’s work will be at the center of a workshop organized within the framework of the Byzantine Studies Seminar. Senior scholars, chosen in cooperation with the Medieval Institute, will be invited for this event treating the fellow’s subject matter. The senior scholars will discuss draft versions of the fellow’s book manuscript or articles or discuss the further development of ongoing research projects.

Eligibility: Byzantine Studies fellows must hold a Ph.D. from an internationally recognized institution. The  Ph.D. must be in hand by the beginning of the fellowship term. 

Stipend: $36,000, plus benefits 

Start Date: Approximately August 16, 2021 | End Date: Approximately May 15, 2022 

Application procedure: Applicants should submit a letter of application (cover letter), a project proposal of  no more than 2500 words, a current C.V., and three confidential letters of recommendation. Submit  applications via Interfolio at http://apply.interfolio.com/80877. Further details regarding materials are  available at https://medieval.nd.edu/research/grants-fellowships/#Byzantine-fellowship. 

PhD Position, Department of Religious Studies (Jewish Studies), University of Tübingen. Deadline: 31 December 2020

The Department of Religious Studies (Jewish Studies) offers a PhD position (m/f/d, E 13 TV-L, 65%: Salary will be commensurate with university scale E 13 TV-L which, in the year 2020 and at 65%, ranges from EUR 32,442 to EUR 47,000 per annum, depending on experience.) preferably starting in April 2021. The fixed-term contract will be for 4 years. The position should focus on The Qur’an and Christian Arabic Poetry and is part of the ERC project “The Qur’an as a Source for Late Antiquity (QaSLA)”. The research project is funded by the European Research Council and directed by Prof. Dr. Holger Zellentin, at the University of Tübingen (Germany). QaSLA analyses the affinity between the Qur’an and known forms of Judaism and Christianity surrounding Arabia in order to sketch the religious landscape of the Arabian Peninsula at the turn of the seventh century C.E. Further details on the project can be found under https://uni-tuebingen.de/de/199075.

In this framework, we are offering one four-year doctoral position on the Qur’an and Arabic Christian Poetry. The successful candidate will participate in all academic aspects of the project and is expected to complete a PhD focused on the subject matter and collaborate in the preparation of the project’s other publications (both in English), as well as acting as a source of information and advice to other members of the project.

Holding a Master’s qualification (M.A./MPhil or equivalent), the successful candidate will possess a very good command of classical and Qur’anic Arabic and detailed knowledge of the classical Arabic literary tradition. In addition, the candidate should have good writing skills, and knowledge of the discipline of Qur’anic Studies. They should be willing to acquire expertise in working with late antique Jewish and Christian primary sources relevant to the study of the Qur’an. Additional familiarity with relevant classical languages and with modern research languages, as well as knowledge of Arabic-language scholarship, would be welcome; alternatively, some relevant courses are on offer in Tübingen. The QaSLA team will be constituted of five research positions; two further position – for the Qur’an and Aramaic and Ethiopic Christianity, respectively – are advertised separately. QaSLA is hosted by the Department of Religious Studies (Jewish Studies), which is part of the Faculty  of Protestant Theology at the University of Tübingen and will involve close collaboration with other Tübingen Institutes, as well as with an international network of scholars. The University of Tübingen offers a vibrant scholarly community with local expertise in Jewish, Christian and Islamic studies located in the fields of history, religious studies, as well as Catholic, Protestant and Islamic theology.

We are building an international and diverse team of scholars. In addition to the key requirements laid out above, we are looking for team players that are eager to learn from others and contribute to an ongoing mutual exchange of research findings by all team members. The university seeks to raise the number of women in research and teaching and therefore urges qualified women to apply for these positions. Equally qualified applicants with disabilities will be given preference.

Interested applicants are asked to submit the following materials:

• A cover letter briefly detailing their suggested contribution to the project (max. 800 words);

• a curriculum vitae;

• copies of two writing samples;

• two recommendation letters (to be submitted directly).

All materials should be submitted to sekretariat.judaicum@ev-theologie.uni-tuebingen.de.

The deadline is December 31, 2020 (midnight, CET). We are looking to hold interviews (most likely to be held remotely) towards the end of January 2021. The preferred starting date for the project is April 2021 (with room for flexibility due to the current health situation). Please feel free to contact us with any relevant questions you may have, or to request a copy of the full project description. The employment will be carried out by the central administration of the University of Tübingen.

RESEARCH ASSOCIATES for the project “Social Contexts of Rebellion in the Early Islamic Period” – SALARY LEVEL 13 TV-L. Deadline: 31 December 2020

The position in accordance with Section 28 subsection 3 of the Hamburg higher education act (Hamburgisches Hochschulgesetz, HmbHG) commences on 01.04.2021. This is a fixed-term contract in accordance with Section 2 of the academic fixed-term labor contract act (Wissenschaftszeitvertragsgesetz, WissZeitVG). The term is fixed until 31.03.2023, with a potential 2-year extension pending successful evaluation. The positions call for 75 % of standard work hours per week**.

Responsibilities:

Duties include academic services in the project named above. Research associates may also pursue independent research and further academic qualifications.

Specific Duties:

The Emmy Noether project “Social Contexts of Rebellion in the Early Islamic Period” funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) will study four categories of revolt in the ‘long 8th century’ (c. 692-816 CE). These four sub-projects comprise i) rebellions led by tribal notables; ii) revolts that made claims to power in the name of the family of ‘Alī b. Abī Ṭālib; iii) Khārijite rebellions; and iv) non-Muslim/mixed uprisings. The project’s geographical scope is limited to the central lands of the early Islamic Empire; regions like Transoxania or North Africa (including Egypt) are outside its purview. The project will proceed on two levels: individual case studies carried out by the team members, and comparative analyses focused on the macro level of rebellion in the early Islamic period. The successful applicants will conduct research on one category of rebellion each, either the first (tribal notables) or the second (pro-‘Alids/proto-Shī‘īs). They will be expected to write a Universität Hamburg has been certified. audit familiengerechte hochschule successful PhD thesis on their subject as well as contribute to the project group’s comparative research and publications.

Requirements:

A university degree in a relevant field. Applicants must have a degree (M.A.) in Islamic or Middle Eastern Studies or another relevant field. They must have excellent knowledge of Arabic and (for category 2) Persian reading skills. Knowledge of another language relevant to the project (e.g., Syriac, Armenian, Persian (category 1)) is desirable. Applicants must have a good grasp of early Islamic history, demonstrated e.g. by the subject of their M.A. thesis, and some prior experience working with pre-modern Arabic sources. Knowledge of the late antique history of the project region and/or experience working with pre-modern Islamic material culture (e.g., coins, archaeological evidence, inscriptions) is an added advantage. Applicants must have excellent command of English (both spoken and written) and French reading skills; knowledge of German is preferred, but not required. As this is a collaborative team project, strong communication and interpersonal skills are a prerequisite

Qualified disabled candidates or applicants with equivalent status receive preference in the application process.

For further information, please contact the research group leader, Hannah-Lena Hagemann, at hannah-lena.hagemann@uni-hamburg.de or consult our website at https://www.aai.unihamburg.de/voror/forschung/score.html

Applications should include a cover letter, a tabular curriculum vitae, copies of degree certificate(s), and contact details for two referees. Applicants should indicate their preference for category 1 or 2; PhD proposals focusing on select case studies from within either category of rebellion are very welcome. Please send applications by 31 December 2020 to: hannah-lena.hagemann@uni-hamburg.de

Please do not submit original documents as we are not able to return them. Any documents submitted will be destroyed after the application process has concluded.

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OUBS Conference 2021

Self-Representation in Late Antiquity and Byzantium

23rd International Graduate Conference of the Oxford University Byzantine Society

Provisional dates: 26th-28th February 2021.

Deadline for abstracts: 30th November 2020.

Self-representation is a process by which historical actors – individuals, communities and institutions – fashioned and presented a complex image of themselves through various media.

Referring to Byzantine portraits, Spatharakis claimed that this “form of representation cannot be divorced from its purpose and the requirements of the society in which the given visual language gains currency”. Equally, self-representation provides an original way to interpret the past, because this artificial and reflected image cannot be divorced from the cultural, social, economic, religious and political context of its time. As a methodological tool, it has received increasing attention in the field of Late Antique and Byzantine Studies, following the interest it has created in neighbouring fields such as Western Medieval or Early Modern studies.

The present call for papers aims to explore the cultural outputs of the Late Antique and Byzantine world – e.g. architecture, material culture, literary works – which conventionally or unconventionally can be understood as acts of self-representation. The Late Antique and Byzantine world was filled with voices and images trying to present and represent an idea of self. Some of the most famous examples of this are the lavish mosaics sponsored by imperial and aristocratic patrons, whose splendour still dazzles their observers and gives an idea of the kind of self-fashioning that they embody. Urban elites, such as churchmen, bureaucrats and intellectuals, constructed idealised personae through their literary works and the careful compilation of letter collections, while provincial elites displayed their power through sigillographic imagery and inscriptions. In monastic typika, the founders presented themselves as pious benefactors, while donor epigraphy in rural churches secured the local influence of wealthier peasants. However, self-representation is not only a matter of introspection but also of dialogue with the “other”: such as in the case of spolia, which was used to reincorporate a supposed classical past in one’s self-portrayal, or to create an image of continuity by conquerors. We see this clearly in the conscious use of Byzantine motifs in Islamicate architecture, in the fiction of Digenes Akritas, and in the anti-Jewish and anti-Islamic religious polemics of Late Byzantium. Through depicting what they were not, historical actors were (consciously or unconsciously) shaping their own identity.

Manuscripts: from the commission of the material object itself, to the self-portraits jotted down in the margins by its owners or readers;

This conference, to be held in late February 2021, seeks to join the ongoing dialogue on self-representation in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies by providing a forum for postgraduate and early-career scholars to reflect on this theme in a variety of cultural media. In doing so, we hope to facilitate the interaction and engagement of historians, philologists, archaeologists, art historians, theologians and specialists in material culture. To that end, we encourage submissions from all graduate students and young researchers, encompassing, but not limited to, the following themes:

  • Literary works: self-portrayal in epistolographical collections; autobiographies; fictional personae in poetical and prose compositions; typika portraying an image of a founder or donor;
  • Portrayal of oneself in terms of gender and sexuality;
  • Epigraphy: material sponsored by both authorities and private citizens; self-representation on funerary artefacts, graffiti, inscriptions;
  • Numismatics: representation of power and authority in the world of Late Antiquity and Byzantium at large;
  • Sigillography: elite self-representation and its importance among the Byzantine upper classes;
  • Artistic production: portrayals in mosaics and icons; private and public forms of representation;
  • Gift-giving: Elite items (e.g. cloths, manuscripts, jewellery) intended for use in diplomatic exchange which were designed to promote a specific image of an emperor and the empire;
  • Political ideology: imperial or ecclesiastical messaging through literary works and monumental architecture;
  • Religion: different theological or philosophical stances, dogmatic truths or polemics as means of self-promotion or self-portrayal;
  • Dialogue with “the other”: Byzantium’s influence in neighbouring cultures as a consequence of its self-representation;
  • Reception: how the field of Late Antique and Byzantine Studies is influenced by the modern-day reception of the self-representation of historical actors;
  • Reception: how the field of Late Antique and Byzantine Studies is influenced by historical Western conceptions of the Late Antique and Byzantine world;
  • Comparative perspectives of the above elsewhere, in opposition or concordance with practices in Byzantium.

Please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, along with a short academic biography written in the third person, to the Oxford University Byzantine Society at byzantine.society@gmail.com by Monday 30th November 2020. Papers should be 20 minutes in length and may be delivered in English or French. As with previous conferences, there will be a publication of selected papers, chosen and reviewed by specialists from the University of Oxford in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies. Speakers wishing to have their papers considered for publication should try to be as close to the theme as possible in their abstract and paper. Nevertheless, all submissions are warmly invited.

Posted in Byzness | Tagged | Leave a comment

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 1st November 2020
====
1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1.       NEWS AND EVENTS

Baptême et baptistères : regards croisés sur l’initiation chrétienne entre Antiquité Tardive et Moyen Âge (Zoom Meeting). 12-13 November 2020, 16:00-20:00 (Central European Time, UTC+1)

Programme joint

L’initiation chrétienne a été depuis longtemps un objet de recherche historique. On trouve d’un côté des travaux sur les diverses traditions théologiques, exégétiques et liturgiques pour la reconstruction de la pratique rituelle, d’un autre côté des recherches sur les typologies architecturales des baptistères, et sur leur décor qui ont été mises en relation plus ou moins efficacement avec la pratique liturgique révélée par les sources écrites.

Lors de cette rencontre dédiée au baptême et aux baptistères, nous espérons mettre en lumière la spatialisation des rituels baptismaux et leur évolution depuis l’Antiquité Tardive et le Moyen Age, en comparant les différentes régions de l’ancien monde romain et de ses voisins. En confrontant textes et archéologie, nous souhaitons poser la question de savoir si les pratiques baptismales sont le moment d’affirmation d’identités chrétiennes régionales ou confessionnelles.

Organisation : Béatrice Caseau (IUF/Sorbonne Université/UMR 8167 Orient & Méditerranée et LABEX RESMED), Lucia Orlandi (Labex RESMED/Sorbonne Université/UMR 8167 Orient & Méditerranée), Vincent Michel (Université de Poitiers/ HeRMA EA 3811, associé UMR 8167 Orient & Méditerranée)

Inscriptions : Tout public intéressé à assister aux séances est invité à écrire à lucia.orlandi@sorbonne-universite.fr avant le 5 novembre 2020.

Khamseen: Islamic Art History Online

Announcing the launch of the Khamseen: Islamic Art History Online website, accessible here on October 20th, 2020. Khamseen: Islamic Art History Online is a free and open-access online platform of digital resources to aid the teaching of Islamic art, architecture, and visual culture. It is sponsored by the Digital Islamic Studies Curriculum (DISC) at the University of Michigan through the support of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Khamseen currently offers a collection of short-form video presentations on a range of topics in the scholarly discipline of Islamic art history. These presentations are intended to support educators, particularly those who face limited access to institutional and archival resources, and to bring new voices, perspectives, methodologies, artworks, and objects into classrooms. Besides catering to undergraduate and graduate students, the materials provided here are also intended to help educate and inspire interested audiences outside of academia. Through this platform, we seek to take the study of Islamic art out to the world, reaching a truly international level of engagement and learning thanks to the possibilities of integrated digital technologies. 

If you are interested in contributing to Khamseen, please submit your idea here.

Dumbarton Oaks Fall Announcements

Dumbarton Oaks Research Fellowships and Project Grants

A number of opportunities are available to support research and learning internationally in Byzantine Studies at Dumbarton Oaks. Apply for 2021–2022 fellowships and project grants by November 1.

“Rethinking Byzantine Masculinities: Gender, Sexuality, Emotions, Devotion” Zoom Webinar

https://www.doaks.org/research/byzantine/scholarly-activities/rethinking-byzantine-masculinities-gender-sexuality-emotions-devotion

Registrations are open and provided in the link above

When: October 30, 2020 at 2:00pm EDT

“People and Power in Byzantium” Virtual Colloquium

https://www.doaks.org/research/byzantine/scholarly-activities/people-and-power-in-byzantium

Registrations are open and provided in the link above

When: November 5-6, 2020 from 9:00am-1:00pm EST

“The chatter, dialogue, and squabble of the Byzantine corridors of power”: Writing History in the Aftermath of Mantzikert (1071), Public Lecture by Eric McGeer, Honoring John Nesbitt

https://www.doaks.org/research/byzantine/scholarly-activities/writing-history-in-the-aftermath-of-mantzikert-1071

Registrations are open and provided in the link above

When: November 18, 2020 at 2:00pm EST

2021 Byzantine Coins and Seals Summer Program

https://www.doaks.org/research/byzantine/scholarly-activities/2021-byzantine-coins-and-seals-summer-program

Application Deadline: February 15, 2021

Pandemics and History: the Plague Concept, Disease, and the End of AntiquityWarsaw late antique seminar, 29 October, 16:46 (Warsaw Time)

On 29 October, 4.45 p.m. (Warsaw time), at Ewa Wipszycka’s Warsaw late antique seminar, Merle Eisenberg  (University of Maryland), will present a paper Pandemics and History: the Plague Concept, Disease, and the End of Antiquity. We are meeting on  Zoom at the usual link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83501284547?pwd=aWt5a1Jla2ZmbUgzN1lyL0c4N1lsUT09

Abstract

Pandemics are increasingly used to explain great historical transformations. Current narratives argue that cholera helped develop modern attitudes to public health. According to others, the Justinianic Plague (c. 541-750 C.E.) led to the fall of Rome. Yet, pandemics alone do not cause societies to collapse nor do they inevitably lead to drastic change. As the current pandemic has made all too clear, the impact of a pandemic is a result of a dynamic interaction between human societies and the environments they occupy.

This talk will explore three themes about the Justinianic Plague. First, it will situate the study of the Justinianic Plague in the broader history of pandemics over the course of the last century. Second, it will reveal how the idea that the Justinianic Plague must lead to significant mortality holds sway over our imagination: an idea I call the plague concept. And, finally, it will sketch out the empirical evidence we do have for the Justinianic Plague to reveal its varied impact. This model recognizes that there were different effects across the Mediterranean world in particular outbreaks as a way to create a picture of how communities and states learned to live with the plague.

The discovery of the cathedral at Faras in the 1960s marks the birth of modern studies on medieval Christian Nubia. Since this moment, the building, its interior and surroundings have been object of countless studies dealing with its particular aspects. Particular attention was paid to the cathedral’s complex architecture, its magnificent wall paintings, and innumerable wall inscriptions. Architecture was comprehensive published by Włodzimierz Godlewski in 2006 and the crowning of the studies on the murals is the recent catalogue by Stefan Jakobielski. These two works, alongside many other smaller or bigger contributions, greatly improve our understanding of the cathedral complex, yet, with their focus on some special features, they rarely refer to its functioning as a whole in its different dimensions.

The present paper will deal with various aspects of the whole complex in an attempt to comprehend it through the Nubians’ own eyes. My main purpose is to try to see what the faithful attending the liturgical services saw and how they perceived what they saw. I will thus endeavour to analyse the most conspicuous features of the cathedral (architecture, wall paintings, and inscriptions) entangled in their mutually defining image-text-context relationship. The theoretical background for my study is provided by Pierre Nora’s groundbreaking concept of ‘lieux de mémoire’. The concept, although fervently criticised and already quite exploited, seems a perfect framework for studying such a building as the cathedral of Faras. In this way, I hope to unravel (some of) the manifold and multidimensional meanings hidden behind (some of) its features and to demonstrate (some) mechanisms of memoria Nubiana in working.

Forthcoming seminars

5.11: Aleksander Paradziński (UW), Magnus of Carrhae, Ammianus Marcellinus and Sulpicius Alexander – the phenomenon of ‘soldier historians’ of the Later Roman Empire

12.11: Paweł Nowakowski (UW), ‘Why lies it idle, this beautiful stone?’, or a short introduction to a new project in early Byzantine epigraphy

19.11: Jerzy Szafranowski (UW), How to distinguish monks from clerics in sixth-century Gau

Robert Wiśniewski is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Ewa Wipszycka Late Antique Seminar (4.45 p.m. Warsaw time)
Time: This is a recurring meeting Meet anytime

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83501284547?pwd=aWt5a1Jla2ZmbUgzN1lyL0c4N1lsUT09

Meeting ID: 835 0128 4547
Passcode: 791010

PG ECR Late Antiquity Network: Erasure workshop & Keynotes

The Postgraduate and Early Career Late Antiquity Network is proud to announce a workshop on ‘Erasure in Late Antiquity’, hosted (virtually) by the Classics Department at Trinity College Dublin on the afternoons of Thursday 12th and Friday 13th November.  

Our presenters will be exploring a wide range of topics along the theme of including religious, ideological, epigraphic, and iconographic erasures. Please find the complete programme below.  The workshop will run as a closed event with precirculated papers. If you would like to participate, please email Dr. Rebecca Usherwood (usherwor@tcd.ie).  

We are also pleased to host two public keynotes: 

Professor Mark Humphries will be speaking on ‘Erasure and Spectacle in Late Antiquity’ at 17:00 on Thursday 12th Novemberhttps://www.eventbrite.ie/e/127465662227

Professor Irene van Renswoude will be speaking on ‘Erasure: an effective form of censorship? Editing contested content in late antique and early medieval manuscripts’ at 15:30 on Friday 13th November: : https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/127454382489

Everyone is welcome to register for these keynotes by using the Eventbrite links.  

All events will run virtually via Zoom at Dublin time (GMT).

Thursday 12th                 

               11:30   

               12:00    Meet & Greet

Panel I (Moderator: Rebecca Usherwood)

12:30    Mali Skotheim, Spolia and epigraphical erasure at the Church of Mary at Ephesus

               13:00    Anna Sitz, Epigraphic Erasures: ‘Grammatoclasm’ in Late Antiquity

               13:30    Mathilde Sauquet – A word is worth a thousand images: the iconophilic floor mosaic of the Church of the Virgin in Madaba, Jordan

               14:00    Break

Panel II (Moderator: Becca Grose)

14:30    Nicola Ernst, Erasing Babylas: Julian’s Funeral Law and Destruction of the Memory of St Babylas.

               15:00    Miriam Hay, Erasing difference on Christian sarcophagi: integrating Roman and Jewish pasts

               15:30    Atiyeh Taghiei, Anachronistic Erasures: Burial practices and Religious Identity in Early Islamic Iran 

               16:00    Break   

Keynote

17:00    Mark Humphries, Erasure and Spectacle in Late Antiquity

Friday 13th                      

Panel III (Moderator: Guy Walker)

11:30    Ben Kybett, Fighting Pagan Erasure: Claudian at the Court of Honorius

               12:00    David Rockwell, Justinian’s Legal Erasures

               12:30    Nadine Vierman, ‘Erasing an Emperor – Or: How to Make a Tyrant. The Fate of Phocas (602–610)

               13:00    Break

Panel IV (Moderator: Kay Boers)

13:30    Kelly Holob, Something Less than Human: Defacing and Restoring Criminal Bodies in the Roman Empire

               14:00    Ryan Denson, Defining the Mechanisms of Death: The (Attempted) Conceptual Erasure of Ghosts in Late Antiquity

               14:30    Becca Grose, Reading between the lines in late-antique Gallic commemorations: Avitus Ep. 5* and NRICG. 174

               15:00    Break

2nd Keynote     

15:30    Irene van Renswoude, Erasure: an effective form of censorship? Editing contested content in late antique and early medieval manuscripts.

               16:30    Roundtable

Centro argentino de Estudios bizantinos. Zoom Meeting, 4 December 2020, 15:30 (Argentina) 20:30 (Europe)

La Comisión Directiva del Centro argentino de Estudios bizantinos (CAEBiz) tiene el agrado de invitar a usted a participar del encuentro virtual programado para el viernes 4 de diciembre a las 15:30 (Argentina = 20:30 Europa), el cual se desarrollará en dos instancias:

1. Instancia abierta: dos ponencias seguidas de debate:

 * Gianmario Cattaneo (Università di Torino): “It was a Greek letter he wrote to me”: Towards a New Edition of  Cardinal Bessarion’s Greek Correspondence.

 * Paloma Cortez (Universidad de Buenos Aires): Intertextualidad y géneros literarios en la novela comnena Drosila y Caricles de Nicetas Eugeniano.

 2. Instancia cerrada (para los miembros del CAEBiz):

 + Presentación de la página web del Centro.

+ Posibilidades de visualización de nuestra producción.

+ Proyectos.

 El acceso a ambas instancias se hará mediante la plataforma Zoom:

 ID 846 8910 3442

Código de acceso: 886156

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84689103442?pwd=bG5LUDg1ZUF4S2N3aUkxWitaN2xKZz09

2.       CALL FOR PAPERS

Collecting Orthodoxy in the West: A History and a Look Towards the Future. Call for Papers extended to 9 November 2020. 

For more information, please visit: https://www.museumofrussianicons.org/conference/

Call for submissions: 1st Online Edinburgh Byzantine Book Festival. Deadline: 13 December 2020

https://www.ed.ac.uk/history-classics-archaeology/news-events/events/cfs-1st-online-edinburgh-byzantine-book-festival

The Edinburgh Byzantine Book Festival is the first of its kind as a way to learn about recently published books on any area of Late Antique and Byzantine studies (AD ca.300–ca.1500), including literature, history, archaeology, and material culture. Authors’ presentations will be introduced by fellow scholars (15 minutes), who will also facilitate audience questions as chairs (15 minutes). Entries should include books published in 2019 and 2020, and forthcoming books with an estimated publication date no later than June 2021. There is no restriction as regards the original language of the book, but all presentations will be in English. 

If you are an author of a monograph (including translations and commentaries of primary sources) on Late Antique and Byzantine studies, please complete the form below (Word or PDF document) and send it to Dr Petros Bouras-Vallianatos (petros.bouras-vallianatos@ed.ac.uk) by 13 December 2020.

 CFP 7th Black Sea Antiquities Congress. The Black Sea: Hub of Peoples and Cultures (8th century BC – 5th/6th century AD) (Thessaloniki – 27 September – 1 October 2021). The International Hellenic University, Thessaloniki. Deadline: 30 November 2020

The Organising Committee of the 7th International Congress on Black Sea Antiquities extend an invitation to all interested scholars to participate in the forthcoming Congress, either by contributing a paper or by attending as a discussant in the proceedings. The official languages of the Congress are English, French and German. Its specific subject is the Black Sea: Hub of People and Culture (8th century BC–5th/6th century AD). 

The Congress will be held at the International Hellenic University, Thessaloniki (it has a successful MA programme in Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Studies, with students from a range of countries).

The Proceedings of the Congress will be published by Archaeopress, Oxford. Those of the previous congress (Constanta 2017) will be out by the end of 2020 (from the same publisher).

The Congress is composed provisionally of four working sessions (see below), beginning on September 27th, 2021 (participants to arrive on September 26th). Once we have all proposals in hand, we may revise the format slightly to account for numbers and balance.

Since there will be no parallel sessions, the number of oral presentations will be limited to 8-10 papers (each of 15 minutes’ duration) per session. This means that not all submissions will be accepted for oral presentation but, to allow maximum participation, we are planning large poster sessions parallel to the oral proceedings, and scholars are strongly encouraged to offer their papers as posters. Posters are not secondary or second class: they will be published just like the oral presentations without distinction. The sessions have broad titles in order to encourage the submission of papers presenting current approaches and trends in scholarship. The main criteria for the selection of contributions will be originality and quality of research. Results from recent or current projects, innovation in methodology, and the exploration of lesser known areas will be given a high priority. We wish to cover as large a geographical and chronological range as possible. We reserve the right to assign any accepted paper to a poster session. Participants will be notified well in advance of the Congress date. A Congress web-site has been set up:  https://web.ihu.edu.gr/icbsa21/.

Abstracts no longer than 300 words should be submitted by November 30th, 2020 at the latest (this deadline is strict), though earlier submission is welcome. No submission without an abstract will be given consideration. All accepted abstracts will be made available in print during the Congress and on a web-site before the Congress. 

Please note that abstracts must be placed in the appropriate part of the participation form.

Planned Sessions:

= Opening Session and Opening Lectures

– Session 1. Scythian, Taurians, Sarmatians, Dacians, Thracians, Colchians, the local populations of the southern Black Sea etc.

– Session 2.  Relations of Greece, Rome and Anatolia with local peoples of the Black Sea: cultural, political, commercial.

– Session 3. Macedonia and the Black Sea.

– Session 4. New Excavations and Projects.

= Closing Session

During the opening reception there will be a book presentation ceremony.

The Participation Fee

The fee will be 100 Euros for participants and 50 Euros for spouses/accompanying persons. The fees are payable at the registration desk upon arrival. This will include: (1) lunches (2) tea/coffee breaks; (3) welcome cocktail reception; (4) farewell cocktails and canapés; (5) Congress folder; (6) all printed material (programme, summaries, etc.); (7) city map; (8) a one-day city excursion on September 29th (see below).

Excursions

Mid-Congress Excursion, September 29th 

Guided tour of Thessaloniki Archaeological Museum, early lunch, and afternoon in Vergina or Dion.

Post-Congress Excursion, October 2nd-3rd 

Two days: Eastern Macedonia and Thrace (including visits to Amphipolis, Abdera, Maroneia, etc.).

Detailed information, together with pricing, will be given in the Second Circular.

Accommodation

 A list of recommended hotels with a conference discount will be given in the Second Circular, which will be sent in spring 2021 to all returning the participation form.

Participation Form

The form can be found here. Please complete it and return it by the deadline of November 30th, 2020 (earlier would be most welcome) to Gocha R. Tsetskhladze, by e-mail attachment and in word.doc: g.tsetskhladze63@gmail.com.

CfP – Occhialì – Rivista sul Mediterraneo islamico

“Occhialì -Rivista sul Mediterraneo islamico” is a semi-annual scientific journal concerned with the  publication  of  studies,  researches and  reflections  on  Islam  and  the Mediterranean. Active since 2017, it has promoted over time a broad discussion on transversal themes from   different   perspectives:   historical,   linguistic,   political, economic, juridical, sociological, psychological or pedagogical, trying to represent the heterogeneity that characterizes its area of interest.

For  issue  7/2020,  it  has  been  decided not to limit  the  contributions  to  a  specific theme, but to open it to the proposals of scholars, so as to leave an open space and cast light on emerging horizons of study and research. Therefore, essays, analyses and translations concerning the  Islamic Mediterranean are  all  acceptable:  from  religious forms to histories, from institutions to languages, social movements, changes, cultural representations, migratory flows, in ancient times as well as today.

The  articles,  written  in  English,  French,  Italian  or  Spanish,  must  be  sent  by 15 December 2020 to laboratorio.occhiali@gmail.comin a format compatible with the procedure of blind review: a file will have to include the author’s name and surname, email address, a short biographical note, title and abstract (150 words in English), 3-5 keywords; the other file will have to include the contribution without any reference to the author or to their known works that might point back to them. The articles, formatted according to the norms indicated on http://phi.unical.it/wp34/occhiali/norme-redazionali/ shall not exceed 30,000 characters including spaces and excluding the bibliography.

3.     JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Medieval literature across languagesa multi-lingual summer school. Online Summer School, 17–28 May 2021. Application Deadline: 15 December 2020 

Second Revised Call

https://cml.sdu.dk/event/summer-school-medieval-literature-across-languages

This online summer school seeks to provide PhD students with a first immersion into the study of medieval literature across languages. Language training, with the aim of inviting PhD students to become acquainted with new medieval languages, will here be combined with lectures on case studies, addressing various methodological issues and approaches. The summer school focuses on five medieval languages: Georgian, Arabic, Greek, Latin, and French

Note: The programme has been changed to a completely online format to address the ongoing barriers to travel. All instruction will take place online between 14:00-17:00 (CEST, Danish local time).

The online summer school will be organized around language teaching and tutoring, lectures and presentations, and an introduction to TEI encoding. Substantial work will be required of students in advance of the summer school (learning of new alphabets, initial reading and encoding exercises).

Language Teaching

Beginning each day at 14:00 (CEST) language teaching will be followed by language tutoring, in which PhD students assist each other as tutors and will themselves receive help from others.

Lectures and Presentations

On alternating days, invited speakers will deliver lectures on a range of topics related to the study of medieval literatures across languages; on other days, students will be expected to deliver short presentations on their findings.

TEI Encoding

Students will receive an introduction to encoding texts using a TEI compliant architecture of XML tagging. Prior to the summer school, students will be provided with preliminary orientation materials; during the summer school, they will receive hands-on experience encoding a short section of the Barlaam and Josaphat text in their chosen target language.

Applications

Applications should be sent before 15 December 2020 to hogel@sdu.dk.

We encourage applications from PhD students from any field in medieval studies. Applicants are asked to specify one language they wish to study, and at least one language they can offer tutoring in (please indicate level of proficiency).

Lectures and seminars will be held in English. Your application should include an abstract of your current research and a statement addressing the contributions you can make to the summer school and what you hope to gain from participating (together no more than a single A4 page, single spaced). You must also name one referee who will be willing to write in support of your application. Referees of short-listed applicants will be contacted directly by the organizers of the summer school.

There is no cost for attending the Summer School.

ASCSA Fellowships for Research and Study at the Gennadius Library 2021-2022

FELLOWSHIPS FOR RESEARCH AND STUDY AT THE GENNADIUS LIBRARY 2021-2022

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens is pleased to announce the academic programs and fellowships for the 2021-2022 academic year at the Gennadius Library. Opened in 1926 with 26,000 volumes from diplomat and bibliophile Joannes Gennadius, the Gennadius Library now holds a richly diverse collection of over 146,000 books and rare bindings, archives, manuscripts, and works of art illuminating the Hellenic tradition and neighboring cultures. The Library has become an internationally renowned center for the study of Greek history, literature, and art, especially from the Byzantine period to modern times.

COTSEN TRAVELING FELLOWSHIP FOR RESEARCH IN GREECE: Short-term travel award of $2,000 for senior scholars and graduate students, for work at the Gennadius Library. Open to all nationalities. At least one month of residency required. School fees are waived for a maximum of two months.

Fellowships 2021-2022 Religion and Urbanity, Max-Weber-Kolleg, Erfurt

The research group “Religion and Urbanity. Mutual Transformations” at the Max-Weber-Kolleg of the University of Erfurt will again award scholarships in 2021/22. The Max Weber College accepts applications until January 8, 2021.

The DFG-funded research group is headed by the historian Prof. Dr. Susanne Rau and the religious studies scholar Prof. Dr. Jörg Rüpke. It is concerned with the question of how religion and urbanity – cities and urban lifestyles – have shaped each other in the course of history. This will first be examined using individual cities or networks of cities from antiquity to the European modern period and contemporary India, and compared across continents and epochs. Is it possible to think one without the other?

The scholarships now being offered will be awarded for a period of three to six months to researchers working in the humanities, especially in (religious) history or in the fields of sociology and urban studies with a focus on historical and religious developments. For further information on scholarship requirements and modalities please refer to the Call for applications. Organisational questions can also be directed to Dr. Elisa Iori.

—————–

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The Byzness, 25/10/2020

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 25th October 2020
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1.       NEWS AND EVENTS

Grzegorz Ochała, The Cathedral of Faras as a monument of Nubian memory. 22 October, 17.45 GMT

Ewa Wipszycka’s Late Antique Seminar

On 22 October, 4.45 p.m. (Warsaw time) Grzegorz Ochała (Leiden Universiteit & UW) will present a paper  The Cathedral of Faras as a monument of Nubian memory.

The full programme for the winter semester can be found on the seminar’s website.

The link below will be valid for all the meetings. If you have any problems with joing us, please write to Robert Wiśniewski: r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83501284547?pwd=aWt5a1Jla2ZmbUgzN1lyL0c4N1lsUT09

Meeting ID: 835 0128 4547
Passcode: 791010

Practicing Archaeology. 11 November 2020, 12.00-14.00 (Online via MS Teams). Link to the event here.

This lunchtime webinar will serve as an introduction to career pathways in Archaeology and Archaeological Science. The event will consist of the presentations of four experts in the fields of heritage, historic environment, commercial archaeology, and forensic archaeology. The aim is to inspire participants to think creatively about their future careers, to help them develop the necessary skillset and provide guidance for the next steps by signposting various resources available within and beyond the University of Oxford. The presentations will be followed by Q&As and participants are warmly invited to participate in the discussion. Even though the event has been designed with the archaeologists and archaeological scientists in mind, any student of the university with an interest in material and visual culture is welcome to attend.

For further information and to register contact Katerina Vavaliou (TORCH Heritage Programme Support Officer).

Updates on the International Congress of Byzantine Studies

The dates for the Byzantine Congress to be hosted in Venice and Padua will be 22-27 August, 2022. The conference will be hybrid, given the uncertainties of Covid and potential difficulties for travel. The Italian committee will essentially present the program organized by the Turkish Committee. They will make additional efforts to facilitate graduate student participation. Stay tuned for new deadlines for the submission of Round Table abstracts and for Free Communication paper proposals. 

In the meantime, you can look for updates on the website of the Italian Association for Byzantine Studies:

http://www.studibizantini.it/it/24th-international-congress-of-byzantine-studies-venice-padua-23-28-august-2022-2/

Podcast « De la médecine grecque à la médecine arabe » / F. Micheau (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)

La conférence de Françoise Micheau (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne) « De la médecine grecque à la médecine arabe » qui s’est tenue dans le cadre du cycle des conférences publiques de l’IISMM « La médecine, l’islam, les mondes musulmans », le 6 octobre dernier est désormais disponible en podcast à l’adresse suivante : https://soundcloud.com/iismm/de-la-medecine-grecque-a-la-medecine-arabe-f-micheau

Soundcloud IISMM : https://soundcloud.com/iismm

Programme du cycle des conférences publiques

Knowledge in Motion – Science and Medicine in the Islamic World – Online Lecture Series

Online lecture series created by the History of Science Museum, Oxford in partnership with the Oxford Centre for the History of Science, Medicine, and Technology and the Oxford Centre for Global History.

All welcome, free to register. For further details, see registration links below. 

Dr Taha Yasin Arslan (Medeniyet University, Istanbul), ‘Rings of Heaven’

Date: Thursday 29 October 2020, 6-7pm 
How to book: Registration link ‘Rings of Heaven’ online lecture

Professor Julia Bray (Oriental Studies, Oxford), ‘Arabic Books and Astronomy in Seventeenth-Century Oxford’

Date: Thursday 12 November 2020, 6-7pm
How to book: Registration link ‘ Arabic Books & Astronomy..’ online lecture

Daniel Burt, ‘Board Games and Medieval Medicine’

Date: Thursday 10 December 2020, 6-7pm 
How to book: Registration link ‘Board Games & Medieval Medicine’ online lecture

Dr Taha Yasin Arslan (Medeniyet University, Istanbul), ‘Is ‘Science’ Always Exact?’

Date: Thursday 7 January 2021, 6-7pm  
How to book: Registration link ‘Is Science Always Exact?’ online lecture

Online resources for medieval manuscripts

In November 2018, The Polonsky Foundation England and France 800-1200 Project was launched. This ground-breaking collaboration between the British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France digitised a total of 800 medieval manuscripts from our two collections. The British Library’s curated website, Medieval England and France, 700–1200 now includes its own downloadable list of all 400 British Library manuscripts that were featured in the project, in spreadsheet format and as a PDF. This list can be accessed from the website’s About page.

For details see https://blogs.bl.uk/digitisedmanuscripts/2020/08/online-resources.html

2.       CALL FOR PAPERS

Resilient Religion, 18th Annual conference of the European Association for the Study of Religions. Deadline: 31 January 2021.

The Italian Society for the History of Religions invites papers, posters, and workshops proposals for the 18th Annual Conference of the European Association for the Study of Religions (EASR), which will take place at the University of Pisa, 30th August – 3rd September 2021.

Though hoping that the event will be fully in presence, the organizers are ready for the event to take place with a mixed format (partly online, partly in presence).

This year’s theme is resilient religion. The submission deadline for papers, posters, and session proposals is 31st January 2021. For additional information, please visit https://www.easr2021.org/.

Call for Abstracts: Animals and Humans on the Move. Deadline for abstracts: 16 November

Viator essay cluster, edited by Przemysław Marciniak.

The relationship between humans and their nonhuman traveling companions changed over time, and over the distances they travelled. Who would Don Quixote be without Rocinante, or Alexander without Bucephalus? This cluster of short essays proposes to look at moving/traveling animals and animals as the companions of traveling/moving humans in the Middle Ages and early modernity. To move or travel might encompass physical travel in its various forms, such as pilgrimage, military campaigns, or travel for commercial or diplomatic reasons, or more conceptual travel across cultures and periods. Contributions might also consider texts that describe animals on the move, including ekphrastic works (such as Byzantine hunting ekphrases), an outsider’s (or traveler’s) perspective on autochthonic animals as recorded in travel accounts, or more abstract texts describing travels and adventures of animals.

This cluster aims to offer cross-cultural perspective; papers exploring Byzantine, Arabic, Turkish, Jewish, Persian and other non-Western cultures are particularly welcome.

Possible essay topics include:

– Animals as “companion species” in travel, war, pilgrimage, commerce, or politics

– Traveling menageries, circuses, and animals shows

– Journeys in search of real or imaginary animals

– Ekphrastic texts depicting traveling animals

– The dissemination and reception of texts about animals across languages, cultures, and time periods

Essays should be short, focused interventions (2000–3500 words). Contributions from early-stage scholars are especially welcome, including graduate students, postdocs, independent scholars, and members of the precariat.

Short abstracts of around 200 words should be emailed to przemyslaw.marciniak@us.edu.pl by November 16 with essays to be submitted by January 15.

3.     JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Call for two PhD Applicants, Liturgical Studies (Notre Dame)

The Graduate School at the University of Notre Dame accepts up to two, fully-funded PhD students per year in Liturgical Studies. The program in Liturgical Studies integrates three sub-disciplines: Liturgical History; Liturgical Theology; Ritual Studies.

The program offers a wide range of research opportunities with particular strengths in early and late antique Christian ritual and material culture, medieval liturgy, ritual studies, Byzantine Christianity, contemporary liturgical and sacramental theology, and manuscript studies. Recent dissertations have included topics on ritual at the Second Temple, architecture and liturgy in medieval Salisbury, liturgy and life in Crusader Jerusalem, ritual in Igbo culture, imperial rites for commemorating earthquakes in late antique Constantinople, and ritual and identity in the California Missions.

The Liturgical Studies program was founded in 1947 as the first graduate program in the Department of Theology and quickly grew to become an international center for the study of liturgy. Pioneers in the discipline who have taught at Notre Dame include Josef Jungmann, Louis Bouyer, Robert Taft, Paul Bradshaw, and many others. The program is currently comprised of seven faculty members and represents one of the largest concentrations of liturgical scholars at one place in the world.

In addition to its core strengths, Liturgical Studies offers a variety of opportunities for research collaboration with other institutions at Notre Dame, including the Medieval Institute, the Program in Sacred Music, other departments at the university (esp. History, Anthropology and Sociology) and other programs within the Theology Department, including Christianity and Judaism in Antiquity (CJA), the History of Christianity (HC), and Systematic Theology (ST). The Hesburgh Libraries system has extensive holdings in theology and one of the nation’s largest collections in medieval and Byzantine studies, including the Milton Anastos Collection. The Theology Department also offers a broad range of ancient languages, including regular course offerings in Greek, Latin, Hebrew, Syriac, and Coptic, with additional opportunities for studying other ancient languages.

Visiting Professorship in Byzantine Studies IHAC, NENU, Changchun (China) 2021/22. Deadline for applications: 20 January 2021

The Institute for the History of Ancient Civilizations (IHAC) at Northeast Normal University in Changchun, Jilin Province, P. R. China, invites applications for a full-time Visiting Professorship in Byzantine Studies. The appointment will be fixed term from 1 September 2021 to 15 July 2022, with the possibility of an extension for the following year, depending on positive assessment and mutual consent.

Every year, IHAC invites three to five visiting professors in the fields of Egyptology, Assyriology, and Classics/Byzantine Studies. The institute has been established for the past 35 years and is the largest in China for the study of the Ancient Near East and Western Classics including Byzantine Studies. IHAC has its own journal, the double blind peer-reviewed The Journal of Ancient Civilizations (http://ihac.nenu.edu.cn/ENGLISH/JAC.htm) as well as a profound and up-to-date research library.

The visiting professor will be expected to teach 4 courses [i.e. 8 hours] per semester week, all in English, and contribute to the research output and development of the institute. Term dates are roughly 1 September to 10 July of the following year, but these are subject to change depending on the lunar calendar; the Chinese holidays as well as the major national holidays of the appointee’s country will be observed. Salary will be approx. 6,000 RMB per month, and the university will also pay for and provide accommodation for the appointee and cover municipal expenses, such as electricity. Funding is also available for travel around China for academic purposes, and the university will pay for one round-trip flight from home country to Changchun. Health care will be provided by the university, but this does not cover the cost of prescriptions.

Northeast Normal University (http://en.nenu.edu.cn/) is located in the city of Changchun in Jilin Province. The city consists of about 7 million people and is home to a large number of universities. A ‘normal’ university in China refers to a university for future teachers, and there are over one hundred normal universities in China, of which NENU is ranked no. 4. The world history at NENU is among the top 3 in China, with IHAC as an integral part with independent structure. Living expenses are very reasonable in Changchun, and a single person will generally not spend more than 1,000 RMB per month on food. The climate is normally dry and sunny, but has extreme winters (-20c) and summers (+25c).

Duties, responsibilities and perspectives

The appointee will be responsible for designing and teaching courses to MA- and PhD-level students on the following subjects: Byzantine History and Culture, all in close cooperation with Chinese staff and the section of Classics. There is also the possibility for designing other courses upon agreement. It is also possible that the appointee may be asked to supervise students. All teaching is done in English. The appointee will also become executive editor of the double blind peer reviewed Journal of Ancient Civilizations, which is accredited by the Chinese Social Science Citation Index and Scopus, among others. IHAC welcomes enthusiastic and passionate academics, strongly supports and appreciates initiatives within our team, and offers profound and substantial support for own career plans and institute’s development.

Requirements:

– A PhD in Byzantine Studies or a related field

– Research experience and a publication record, both reflective of career stage

– Demonstrable commitment to high-quality teaching practice, and wide teaching scope in terms of content and didactics

– Excellent command of English

– Proficiency in Ancient and Byzantine Greek (other languages such as Latin are desirable)

– Editing experience desirable

Chinese scholars are not permitted to apply for this position, and a preference will be given to experienced candidates.

Application:

Deadline for applications: 20 January 2021

(Video-)Interviews: 1-5 March 2021

All applications should be sent to Prof. Dr. Sven Günther (sveneca@aol.com / svenguenther@nenu.edu.cn).

Applications should be in English and contain the following: cover letter, CV, details of 2 academic referees (with email addresses), and a publication sample (a chapter from a PhD thesis is also acceptable).

Informal inquiries can also be made to Prof. Dr. Sven Günther (Classics/vice-director) (sveneca@aol.com / svenguenther@nenu.edu.cn) or Dr. Li Qiang (Byzantine Studies) (liq762@hotmail.com).

RomanIslam Center (University of Hamburg) – Fellowship for the Academic Year 2021/2022. Deadline: 30 November 2020

The Center for Advanced Study “RomanIslam Center for Comparative Empire and Transcultural Studies” funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), invites applications for Resident fellowships (Post Doc). The fellowships should start in 2021 and have a duration between 1 and 12 months.

Fellowships are available for scholars at all stages of their academic career who have completed their doctoral degree and established an independent research profile. Applicants should be engaged in a research project in any relevant discipline that is related to the Center’s interests in Romanization and Islamication in the period and area in question. The Center also welcomes applications from scholars working on comparative empire and transcultural studies in a broader historical (or contemporary) perspective whose research has a strong focus on theoretical and methodological issues. The second year (2021) theme is ‘Imperial Religions and Local Beliefs’, i.e. the relationship between state authority and religion. Which forms of local religious practice remained in place, despite the dominance of eastern salvation religions, and which forms changed as a result thereof?

Applications should be in English, including a CV, a research proposal for the project pursued at Hamburg, including the project’s relation to the topic (2000 words), and an indication of the months the applicant wants to spend at the Center and the kind of financial support they require. All materials should be sent in a single pdf document to Dr. Rocco Selvaggi romanislam@uni-hamburg.de by November 30, 2020.

For more information see: https://www.romanislam.uni-hamburg.de/center/fellowship-program.html  

ASCSA Fellowships for Research and Study at the Gennadius Library 2021-2022

FELLOWSHIPS FOR RESEARCH AND STUDY AT THE GENNADIUS LIBRARY 2021-2022

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens is pleased to announce the academic programs and fellowships for the 2021-2022 academic year at the Gennadius Library. Opened in 1926 with 26,000 volumes from diplomat and bibliophile Joannes Gennadius, the Gennadius Library now holds a richly diverse collection of over 146,000 books and rare bindings, archives, manuscripts, and works of art illuminating the Hellenic tradition and neighboring cultures. The Library has become an internationally renowned center for the study of Greek history, literature, and art, especially from the Byzantine period to modern times.

COTSEN TRAVELING FELLOWSHIP FOR RESEARCH IN GREECE: Short-term travel award of $2,000 for senior scholars and graduate students, for work at the Gennadius Library. Open to all nationalities.. At least one month of residency required. School fees are waived for a maximum of two months.

DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2021.

THE GEORGE PAPAIOANNOU FELLOWSHIP: Ph.D. candidates or recent PhDs writing on Greece in the 1940’s and the post-war period, civil wars and the history of the Second World War. Fellows are required to make use of the George Papaioannou Papers housed at the Archives of the ASCSA. Open to all nationalities. School fees are waived for a maximum of two months. Stipend of €2,000. 

DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2022. Runs every other year.

THE M. ALISON FRANTZ FELLOWSHIP: Ph.D. candidates and recent Ph.D.s from colleges or universities in the U.S. or Canada, for work in the Gennadius Library for the full academic year. Stipend of $11,500 plus room, board, and waiver of School fees.

DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2021.

MEDIEVAL GREEK SUMMER SESSION AT THE GENNADIUS LIBRARY: Graduate students and university professors in any field of late antique, post-antique, Byzantine or medieval studies at any university worldwide. Month-long program in intermediate level Medieval Greek language and philology at the Gennadius Library, with site and museum trips. Up to twelve scholarships available. 

DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2021.

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES (NEH) FELLOWSHIPS: Awards for postdoctoral scholars and professionals in the humanities, not only limited to work at the Gennadius Library. Terms: Two to four fellows will be selected for awards of 4, 5, or 9 months duration. The monthly stipend per fellow is $4,200 allocated from a total pool of $75,600 per year. U.S. citizens or foreign nationals who have been U.S.. residents for three years before application deadline. Candidates must hold the Ph.D. or equivalent terminal degree at time of application.
DEADLINE: OCTOBER 31, 2020

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The Byzness, 11/10/2020

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 11th October 2020
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1.       NEWS AND EVENTS

Hagia Sophia Public Forum Zoom Webinar (Stanford University). Part 2: Friday 16 October, 12-1:30 pm (PST)/ 8-9:30 pm (BST)

Featuring Patricia Blessing, Princeton University; Ali Yaycioglu, Stanford University; Christina Maranci, Tufts University; Anna Bigelow, Stanford University; Ece Temelkuran, Political commentator, journalist, and writer

https://events.stanford.edu/events/889/88924/

Hagia Sophia is a masterpiece of world architecture, having served many different functions throughout its 1500 years of history: built as the cathedral of Constantinople in 532-537, then converted into a mosque 1453 when the city fell to the Ottoman Turks, and then transformed into a museum in 1934 by the founder of the Turkish Republic, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. The secularization emphasized the universal, historical value of the monument over the more divisive memory of the Byzantine empire and its Ottoman conquest. All this abruptly changed when on July 10, 2020 Turkey’s highest administrative court revoked the 1934 decree, leading to the reconversion of Hagia Sophia from a museum back to a mosque and mandated a switch of its jurisdiction from the Ministry of Culture and Tourism to the Directorate of Religious Foundations. Why this reversal, why a mosque, why now, for whom is this gesture intended? How does this action reshape the stewardship of the monument and Turkey’s image?

The Hagia Sophia Public Forum at the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford has invited a core group of scholars and a political commentator and journalist to address these questions and lead the discussion about the future of this great monument. Two consecutive sessions will address the implications of the reconversion on the survival of a multi-faith Turkey. The first session will present the Byzantine history of the building, the process of its museumification underwritten by significant American private donations, and the current conservation projects. The second will focus on the Ottoman significance, its role in the formation of the modern Turkish Republic, and the contemporary divisive politics. Each speaker will give 12-minute presentations, followed by discussion among the panelists and a public Q&A session. 

Co-organized by Patrick R. Crowley, Associate Curator of European Art at Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts and Dr. Bissera V. Pentcheva, Professor of Art & Art History at Stanford University

Byzantine Worlds Seminar, University of Cambridge, Michaelmas 2020

The Byzantine Worlds Seminar in Cambridge looks beyond the territory of Byzantium to provide a venue for exploring the material and intellectual entanglements between the medieval worlds of the Middle East, North Africa, Central Asia and Eastern Europe. We host fortnightly seminars presenting the research of speakers from a variety of disciplines from within and outside of Cambridge.

Due to COVID restrictions, we will be holding our seminars online in the coming term. As such, we are hosting speakers from around the world and would like to invite participants from other universities to attend the seminars and contribute to our discussions.

Additionally, from October 2020 we would like to invite researchers working outside Cambridge to join our Classical Armenian reading group, to help build connections between the (relatively few) specialists working in this language across institutions. Please contact Stephanie Forrest for details.

Please see the attached poster for this term’s events and sign-up details. For details about future events please follow us on Twitter or Facebook:

Warsaw Late Antique Seminar

Ewa Wipszycka’s Late Antique Seminar at the University of Warsaw is restarting on Zoom. We are beginning with Robert Wiśniewski’s paper Counting presbyters in late antique Rome, on Thursday, 15 October. The full programme for the winter semester can be found on the seminar’s website.

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83501284547?pwd=aWt5a1Jla2ZmbUgzN1lyL0c4N1lsUT09

Meeting ID: 835 0128 4547

Passcode: 791010

Online Ancient Greek, Latin, Biblical Hebrew and Old Slavonic Extensive Courses for 2020-2021

The Dan Slusanschi School for Classical and Oriental Languages is now accepting applications for our 2020-2021 remote study courses. This autumn we have once again expanded our offered course selection to include a Beginners Level Ancient Hebrew course alongside Ancient Greek, Latin and Old Slavonic. All courses will be held once a week via a social media platform for a total of twenty courses at two hours a week. Course fee: 150 Euros. Registration deadline: October 16, 2020. For more information and to register, visit http://ecum.ro/dan-slusanschi-school-of-classical-and-oriental-languages

Coptic Magical Papyri: Kyprianos Database of Ancient Ritual Texts and Objects Launch

The Coptic Magical Papyri team of the Chair of Egyptology at the Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg is very pleased to announce that the Kyprianos Database of Ancient Ritual Texts and Objects is now online. 

In this first stage, data on 677 manuscripts and 11 texts written in Coptic and Greek have been made available. This includes manuscript information on all published (and over 150 unpublished) manuscripts containing Coptic magical texts, as well as most of the Greek and Demotic magical papyri from the major collection known as the PGM (Papyri Graecae Magicae).

Regular additions to the published manuscripts and texts will be uploaded, as well as information on magical archives, and copies of drawings from the magical texts. Future updates will provide information on all of the published Greek magical manuscripts from Egypt, as well as begin to add older magical papyri from Egypt, magical texts from outside Egypt written on lead tablets and other material, and add other genres of texts – Christian liturgical papyri, as well as medical, alchemical, and astrological texts. 

More information on the structure and functionality of the database is to be found here.

An online seminar to present the database will be announced in the next few weeks. 

The database is still in its early stages, so feedback concerning any problems, corrections, or ideas that you may have is welcome. 

Updates will be announced on the Coptic Magical Papyri project website, where blog posts and podcasts focused on various topics related to the cultural context studied within the project are also regularly published.

‘Rethinking Byzantine Masculinities: Gender, Sexuality, Emotions, Devotion’. Zoom event, 30 October 2020

For the past five decades, Byzantinists have explored gender and sexuality. More recent work has turned to gendered emotions and religious devotion. While much of this research has its origin in women’s history, there has been an increasing interest in men, including monks and eunuchs, and in the articulations and performances of masculinity. 

This conversation brings together scholars across the globe who have actively promoted this research to reflect on their work and its evolving academic and nonacademic contexts.

Organizers: Claudia Rapp (University of Vienna and Austrian Academy of Sciences) and Derek Krueger (University of North Carolina at Greensboro)

Participants 

Derek Krueger is the Joe Rosenthal Excellence Professor of Religious Studies and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He serves as chair of the United States National Committee for Byzantine Studies (2016–2021) and as a senior fellow at Dumbarton Oaks (2015–2021). His current project is entitled “Monastic Desires: Homoeroticism in Byzantine Ascetic Literature.”

Mark Masterson is senior lecturer of classics at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. His major research interest is same-sex desire between men in classical antiquity and medieval Byzantium. His Between Byzantine Men: Desire, Brotherhood, and Male Culture in the Medieval Empire is forthcoming from Routledge.

Claudia Rapp is professor of Byzantine studies at the University of Vienna, director of the Division of Byzantine Research at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, and scholarly director of the Sinai Palimpsests Project. She serves as president of the Austrian Association for Byzantine Studies and as a senior fellow at Dumbarton Oaks (2019–2021). Her research and publications (including Brother-Making in Late Antiquity and Byzantium: Monks, Laymen, and Christian Ritual) focus on social and cultural history, often from the angle of religious history and manuscript studies.

Shaun Tougher is professor of Late Roman and Byzantine history in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. He works especially on Constantinian and Macedonian dynastic history and on eunuchs. His Roman Castrati: Eunuchs in the Roman Empire is forthcoming this autumn.

‘People and Power in Byzantium’. Zoom event, 5-6 November 2020

Bringing together specialists who investigate the formation of groups based on shared purpose, this colloquium raises important issues of scope regarding the methodology and interpretive models for the study of Byzantine society.

Research on the social and economic history of Byzantium has tended to focus on the upper levels of society, where the evidence is abundant and relatively easily accessible. It has traditionally been dominated by attention to the large structures of church and state, represented through the key figures of patriarch and emperor, and how they implemented their economic and ideological interests. This has resulted in a top-down view of Byzantine society. In recent years, however, greater attention has been paid to the study of group formation, especially with a view to vertical mobility through patronage networks. This colloquium aims to foreground these recent advances in scholarship.

The colloquium brings together eight specialists who investigate the formation of groups based on shared purpose, whether social, economic, or religious. Of particular interest is the interplay between external pressures and internal motivation in the perception and representation of groups, on the one hand, and in the formation of groups and networks, on the other. This often involves searching out previously unknown or underappreciated sources, or subjecting better-known sources to new analytical questions.

By elucidating these phenomena in different periods of Byzantine history and in different geographical and social settings, this colloquium raises important issues of scope regarding the methodology and interpretive models for the study of Byzantine society.

Colloquiarch: Claudia Rapp, University of Vienna

2.       CALL FOR PAPERS

3.     JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Dumbarton Oaks Fellowships and Grants in the Humanities. 2021-2022
Apply Now 

Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection is an institute in Washington, D.C., administered by the Trustees for Harvard University. It supports research and learning internationally in Byzantine, Garden and Landscape, and Pre-Columbian studies.

Fellowships

Fellowships are awarded to Byzantine, Garden and Landscape, and Pre-Columbian scholars on the basis of demonstrated scholarly ability and preparation of the candidate, including knowledge of the requisite languages, interest and value of the study or project, and the project’s relevance to the resources of Dumbarton Oaks. We place great value on the collegial engagement of fellows with one another and with the staff.

Applications and instructions are available online.

Fellowships are awarded to scholars who hold a PhD or appropriate final degree at the time of application, or who have established themselves in their field, and wish to pursue their own research. Application deadline: November 1

Junior Fellowships are awarded to degree candidates who at the time of application have fulfilled all preliminary requirements for a PhD or appropriate final degree, and plan to work on a dissertation or final project while at Dumbarton Oaks, under the direction of a faculty member from their own university.
Application deadline: November 1

Mellon Fellowships in Urban Landscape Studies are for cross-disciplinary scholars in urban landscape studies (PhD or MLA preference), and History Teaching Fellowships are for current faculty members in universities/other secondary educational institutions.
Application deadline: December 1

Grants

Project Grants support scholarly projects by applicants holding a PhD or the equivalent. Support is generally for archaeological research, preservation of historic gardens, and the recovery, recording, and analysis of materials that would otherwise be lost.
Application deadline: November 1

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS AND SELF-NOMINATIONS TO BSANA BOARD

The nominating committee of the Byzantine Studies Association of North America invites nominations and self-nominations to its Board for terms beginning this October 2020 at the virtual BSC.  As per our by-laws, the nominating committee, formed by the four outgoing members, seeks nominees who represent a range of disciplines within the field of Byzantine studies broadly defined, and reflect geographic representation. All ranks are welcome and nominees may hold any type of position, at any type of institution, or nominees may work independently. If elected at the 2020 meeting, new board members will serve until the 2024 meeting, joining the twelve remaining members to create a body of sixteen total board members. 

Board members attend the annual board meeting held during the Byzantine Studies Conference and serve, as needed, as chairs of panels, panelists in professional development workshops, and lead ad hoc committees as appointed by the Board.  Serving as a member of the Board not only provides an important service to our organization, it is also a great way to come to know colleagues from other parts of the country and in different disciplines. We have found the experience very rewarding. 

At this time we are also taking nominations and self-nominations for the Programming Committee for BSC 2021 in Cleveland. If you are interested in serving on the Programing Committee, please let us know.

Please send your nominations (or any questions you may have) to Galina Tirnanic (tirnanic@oakland.edu). Include the name, rank, institution and discipline, and please confirm that the person you are nominating has agreed to serve if elected.

Research Training Group 2304 “Byzantium and the Euro-Mediterranean Cultures of War. Exchange, Differentiation and Reception”

Wars both internal and external exert a large impact on the development of societies. The Byzantine Empire has always been in constant exchange and conflict with its neighbours and rivals due to its geographic position. Out of this arose a wide range of violent interactions with the Latin, Slavic and Islamic worlds, in addition to, as a consequence, manifold interrelationships between the respective martial cultures, which we define as the norms, interpretations, attributions of meaning and reflections related to war as well as its forms and practises. The aim of this Research Training Group is to analyse Euro-Mediterranean cultures of war and the importance of Byzantium for them in a transcultural perspective for the first time. The RTG is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) for 4,5 years in a first funding period (01.10.2018 – 31.03.2023).

Starting with the two overriding fields of study of “expressional forms” and “interpretative concepts”, these reciprocal processes of exchange, of distinction or also of reception will be analysed by means of four concrete subject areas: 1) strategies of justification and legitimisation; 2) conceptualisations of persons and groups; 3) rituals and cultic practises; 4) knowledge and infrastructure. The diachronic scope extends from the Roman Imperial Period, whose inclusion is indispensable for the understanding of Byzantine cultures of war, until the Early Modern Period, when the Byzantine heritage, especially in Eastern Europe, was still very vibrant. Within this interdisciplinary-orientated Research Training Group textual and visual sources, archaeological objects, visual sources, music as well as other media will be investigated in equal measure and brought in connection with one another, in order to grasp mentality and materiality and the related semantics of martial cultures. Based on this clearly-defined thematic complex, the immanent significance of Byzantium for the culture and history of the Euro-Mediterranean area will be explored in a thorough and systematic manner for the very first time.

The qualification programme and supervision strategy are construed according to the individual needs of the Ph.D. candidates, whereby there are not only included methodological, theoretical and thematic training and activities aimed at networking and internationalisation, but also museum research practice and collection-related work. In this regard Mainz provides an ideal location, not only because of the subject variety of the Johannes Gutenberg University and the structures provided by it for research and advanced training (including the Research Unit Historical Cultural Sciences), but also through the involvement of the Roman-German Central Museum as well as the Leibniz Institute for European History. In the field of interdisciplinary scholarship on Byzantium the aforementioned partners have long cooperated via the Leibniz-ScienceCampus “Byzantium between Orient and Occident”, thus providing an inspirational and international environment for junior scholars.

CRAC 12-month postdoctoral fellowships in ancient studies. Deadline: 10 November 2020

The Rector of the University of Warsaw invites applications for the position of two postdoctoral researchers under the Excellence Initiative – Research University Programme. The selected candidates will run their projects at the Centre for Research on Ancient Civilizations (CRAC) which brings together historians, classicists, archaeologists, orientalists, and Roman jurists from the University of Warsaw

More information at the following link: https://crac.uw.edu.pl/crac-postdoctoral-fellowships-call-for-candidates/

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The Byzness, 27/09/2020

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 27th September 2020
====
1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1.       NEWS AND EVENTS

York History of Art Research Seminars : ‘The medium and genre of the Codex of Georgios Klontzas’, by Professor Benjamin Anderson, Cornell University. 25 November 2020, 16.00-18.00.

The Codex of Georgios Klontzas (Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana, Marc. Gr. VII, 21) is a leather- bound volume containing 217 paper folios. Multiple hands copied the Greek texts and executed the drawings, of which there are over four hundred. A signature at the conclusion claims the whole as the work of the Cretan painter Georgios Klontzas, while at least one drawing may be dated to ca. 1592.

Klontzas was renowned as a painter of icons, but his codex is more difficult to classify. The seventh-century Apocalypse of Pseudo-Methodius provides the textual frame, beginning with the Expulsion from the Garden and concluding with the Last Judgment; which is however expanded through introduction of extensive Biblical and prophetic texts and Byzantine and Ottoman history. The drawings refer less to medieval traditions of icon painting than to contemporary (Venetian, Flemish, etc.) engravings, emblem books, and oracular images.

Is the codex historical, devotional, or prophetic? Is it a Byzantine miscellany grown Baroque, or the fantasy of a printed volume that no printer would ever underwrite? Close analysis of individual pages will cause us to pose these questions differently. The Codex of Georgios Klontzas does not conflate multiple categories of medium and genre. Rather, Klontzas knowingly situates a distinctive historical subjectivity within an early modern media ecology.

To join: https://york-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/93611844222

2.     CALL FOR PAPERS

New Insights on Plagues and Epidemics in the Medieval and Early Modern Eras. Deadline: 15 October 2020

“It Spread Without Stop”: New Insights on Plagues and Epidemics in the Medieval and Early Modern Eras, February 19-21, 2021

This conference will bring together academics and researchers from around the world to present current research on all aspects of epidemics in the Medieval and Early Modern periods (ca. 500-1800 C.E.) including:

  1. Identification of historical epidemics
  2. Contemporary and historical medical approaches
  3. Effects of epidemics on historical populations
  4. Social and cultural reactions to disease

Titles and abstracts for 20-minute presentations or posters due by October 15, 2020 to avianello@usf.edu

3.     JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

6 positions for doctoral research associates, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz. Deadline: 15 November 2020

Within the Research Training Group 2304 “Byzantium and the Euro-Mediterranean  Cultures of War. Exchange, Differentiation and Reception”, which is financed by the  DFG (German Research Foundation), there are at the Johannes Gutenberg University  of Mainz 

6 positions for doctoral research associates (pay scale TV-L13, 2/3 FTE) to be filled by 1st April 2021 for a contract period of three years. 

Participating in this Research Training Group are the disciplines of Ancient History,  Ancient Church History/Theology, Byzantine Studies, Medieval History, Eastern  European History, Early Modern Church History, Classical Archaeology, Christian  Archaeology and Byzantine Art History, Early and Prehistorical Archaeology (with a  focus on Medieval Archaeology) and Musicology. 

The goal of the Research Training Group is to examine the Euro-Mediterranean  Cultures of War from a transcultural perspective, from the Roman Imperial Period to  the Early Modern Period. With cultures of war are understood to be the forms and  practices of war as well as the norms, interpretations, attributions of meaning and  reflections referring to war. The mutual processes of exchange, differentiation or  reception will be explored via four thematic areas:

1. Strategies of justification and legitimation

2. Conceptualizations of persons and groups

3. Rituals and worship

4. Knowledge and infrastructure

A thorough description of the research program and the emphases of the participating  disciplines is available on the homepage [https://grk-byzanz-wars.uni-mainz.de]. The  prospective dissertation project must address at least one of these thematic areas as  well as be housed within one of the participating disciplines. The primary criterion for  the evaluation of applications is the originality and quality of the research project  summarized in the exposé. Suitable candidates can also apply on the basis of  suggested topics – a selection of possible dissertation topics is likewise to be found on  the homepage. 

Upon acceptance the graduate students are to participate in a structured doctoral  program at the JGU Mainz, for which residence in Mainz is required. The Research  Training Group offers intensive specialized and interdisciplinary exchange, cross disciplinary doctoral supervision by two professors from amongst the participating

scholars, praxis-oriented courses directed at public engagement (including through  museums), a comprehensive range of key qualifications (e.g. from the sphere of Digital  Humanities) and diverse opportunities for international networking.

Requirements for the application include a degree (Magister, M.A. or the equivalent)  completed with above-average marks in a participating or related field as well as  openness to interdisciplinary work.

The following application materials are to be submitted electronically in a single .pdf  (in German or English):

∙ A letter of application (one page)

∙ An outline of the planned dissertation project (two pages)

∙ A curriculum vitae with list of publications (if applicable), degree  diplomas, certificates of scholarly activities

∙ Master’s Thesis (or equivalent)

The Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz is keen on increasing the proportion of  women within the sphere of scholarship and therefore especially welcomes  applications from female researchers. Please refer to any disability status in the  application.

For subject-related questions please direct your queries to the corresponding  specialists of the Research Training Group, other questions to the Spokes-person. 

The application deadline ends by 15th November 2020.

The application materials along with two letters of recommendation from university level instructors, who should submit their letters separately, are to be addressed to the  Spokesperson of the Research Training Group, Prof. Dr. Johannes Pahlitzsch,  (address: grk2304@uni-mainz.de; subject-line: grk2304_Last Name).

1 position for doctoral research associate, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz. Deadline: 15 November 2020

Within the Research Training Group 2304 “Byzantium and the Euro-Mediterranean  Cultures of War. Exchange, Differentiation and Reception”, which is financed by the  DFG (German Research Foundation), there is at the Johannes Gutenberg University  of Mainz

1 position for doctoral research associate (pay scale TV-L13, 2/3 FTE) in  Protestant Theology/Early Modern Church History

to be filled by 1st April 2021 for a contract period of three years.

Participating in this Research Training Group are the disciplines of Ancient History,  Ancient Church History/Theology, Byzantine Studies, Medieval History, Eastern  European History, Early Modern Church History, Classical Archaeology, Christian  Archaeology and Byzantine Art History, Early and Prehistorical Archaeology (with a  focus on Medieval Archaeology) and Musicology.

The goal of the Research Training Group is to examine the Euro-Mediterranean  Cultures of War from a transcultural perspective, from the Roman Imperial Period to  the Early Modern Period. With cultures of war are understood to be the forms and  practices of war as well as the norms, interpretations, attributions of meaning and  reflections referring to war. The mutual processes of exchange, differentiation or  reception will be explored via four thematic areas:

1. Strategies of justification and legitimation

2. Conceptualizations of persons and groups

3. Rituals and worship

4. Knowledge and infrastructure

A thorough description of the research program and the emphases of the participating  disciplines is available on the homepage [https://grk-byzanz-wars.uni-mainz.de/].

Doctoral research on early modern church history can produce valuable insight on  the reception, impact and interpretation of Euro-Mediterranean cultures of war  affected by Byzantium. Candidates are asked either to submit their own proposals for  a dissertation topic or to orient their proposals upon one of the perspectives  discussed below.

“The fall of Constantinople and the ‘Turkish threat’: theological interpretations of the  conquest of the Byzantine Empire in Reformation theology” or: “Visions of an apoca lyptic war: the reception of Eastern Christian eschatological thought in Early Modern

Protestantism”, or: “The Spiritual Struggle. The Early Modern reception of an Early  Christian Topos and its circulation in the Euromediterranean”. 

Upon acceptance the graduate students are to participate in a structured doctoral  program at the JGU Mainz, for which residence in Mainz is required. The Research  Training Group offers intensive specialized and interdisciplinary exchange, cross disciplinary doctoral supervision by two professors from amongst the participating  scholars, praxis-oriented courses directed at public engagement (including through  museums), a comprehensive range of key qualifications (e.g. from the sphere of Digital  Humanities) and diverse opportunities for international networking.

Requirements for the application include a degree (Magister, M.A. or the equivalent)  completed with above-average marks in Protestant Theology/ Early Modern Church  History or related field as well as openness to interdisciplinary work.

The following application materials are to be submitted electronically in a single .pdf  (in German or English):

• A letter of application (one page)

• An outline of the planned dissertation project (two pages)

• A curriculum vitae with list of publications (if applicable), degree diplomas,  certificates of scholarly activities

• Master’s Thesis (or equivalent)

The Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz is keen on increasing the proportion of  women within the sphere of scholarship and therefore especially welcomes applica tions from female researchers. Please refer to any disability status in the application.

For subject-related questions please direct your queries to Prof. Dr. Irene Dingel, PD  Dr. Mihai Grigore or Dr. Stanislau Paulau, Leibniz Institute of European History (IEG),  other questions to the Spokesperson. 

The application deadline ends by 15th November 2020.

The application materials along with two letters of recommendation from university level instructors, who should submit their letters separately, are to be addressed to the  Spokesperson of the Research Training Group, Prof. Dr. Johannes Pahlitzsch,  (address: grk2304@uni-mainz.de; subject-line: grk2304_Last Name).

The William Sanders Scarborough Fellowships, Deadline: 1 November, 2020

This fellowship is intended to honor Professor William Sanders Scarborough’s memory and to help foster diversity in the fields of Classical and Hellenic Studies and the Humanities more broadly by supporting students and teachers from underrepresented groups in their study and research at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

William Sanders Scarborough (1852–1926), the son of an enslaved woman and a freedman, was a pathbreaking African American Classical scholar and public intellectual. Scarborough’s scholarship included philological works on Greek and Roman authors, as well as studies of African languages and African American folklore. His First Lessons in Greek (1881) was the first foreign language textbook by an African American author. He taught at Ohio’s Wilberforce University and Payne Theological Seminary, serving as Wilberforce’s president from 1908–1920. At least twice in his life (1886 and 1896), Scarborough hoped to attend the American School, with the encouragement of the School’s Managing Committee. Lack of funding, coupled with his many professional responsibilities, kept Scarborough from realizing his dream of going to Greece. 

Eligibility:  Graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars residing in the United States or Canada, regardless of citizenship, whose geographic origin, diverse experiences, and socio-economic background are underrepresented at the School (including persons from the Black, Indigenous, and Persons of Color communities), and whose studies, research, or teaching would benefit from residency at the School. Fellowship recipients need not be specialists in the field of Classical Studies. The School welcomes applicants from public and private universities, colleges, and community colleges, and particularly encourages those from Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Terms and Duration:  The fellowship supports up to three months in residence at the School to carry out proposed research projects and/or join the School’s academic programs (field trips and seminars during the regular academic year or the summer, excavations at the Agora or Corinth, scientific field schools, etc.). Applicants interested in using the fellowship to participate in summer programs should submit separate applications to programs of interest. The summer programs for 2021 are already largely filled with deferred applicants from 2020. Applicants to the Scarborough fellowship program wishing to be considered for summer programs in 2021 should contact the ASCSA Programs Administrator at application@ascsa.org for further guidance. Awards granted in the 2020 competition should normally be used between June 1, 2021 and May 30, 2022.

Each of the awards provides for $1500 per month (rounded upwards to the nearest whole month to a maximum of 3 month) as a stipend. The fellowship covers the costs of room and board in Athens, a waiver of any applicable School fees, and one roundtrip economy-class airfare to Athens. The School intends to make up to four such awards each year.

Application: Submit an online application here, https://ascsa.submittable.com/submit/171376/william-sanders-scarborough-fellowship. A complete application will include:

  1. A 2-page, single-spaced, statement indicating your eligibility, describing the proposed use of the fellowship including any formal program at the School you plan to apply for, the proposed timeframe for your work at the School, and your research project (as applicable).
  2. A curriculum vitae.
  3. A copy of current transcripts (for student applicants).
  4. Arrange for two letters of recommendation. Once an online application is submitted, recommenders will be sent an automated email with instructions about how to submit their letters of recommendation. Recommenders will be asked to upload their letters via the online application system, Submittable. It is also acceptable for recommenders to submit letters directly to this email address: application@ascsa.org.

Web site: https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/fellowships-and-grants/graduate-and-postdoctoral 

E-mail: application@ascsa.org                    

Award decisions will be announced in March 2021.

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The Byzness, 20/09/2020

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 20th September 2020
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1.       NEWS AND EVENTS

Catastrophes and Memory (500-1500 CE). 4th Annual Edinburgh International Graduate Late Antique, Islamic and Byzantine Conference (Online). 19-21 November 2020  

This conference will be held online by the Late Antique, Islamic and Byzantine Society of the University of Edinburgh on November 19-20, 2020. The conference focuses on disasters (natural, manmade or “supernatural”) that shape historical memory and our understanding of the past, concentrating on the problematic relations between catastrophes and memory in Late Antique, Islamic and Byzantine societies.

The conference will include Prof. Leslie Brubaker (University of Birmingham) and Prof. Antoine Borrut (University of Maryland) as the keynote speakers among many other prominent academics, researchers, postdoc, and graduate students.  

For any questions, please contact the conference committee: byzantine.pg@ed.ac.uk 

Cleveland Byzantine Studies Conference, October 7-10, 2021

The Byzantine Studies Conference is the most important annual event by far in the United States to foster knowledge about Orthodox history, religion, art and traditions. It is one of the three most significant annual events in the world dedicated to the study of Byzantium. The most active scholars and graduate students attend and present their work at this prestigious event. 

The first Byzantine Studies Conference was held in Cleveland in 1975. It has been held annually in a different city each year. The conference will be held again in Cleveland, between October 7–10, 2021. 

SPECIAL EVENTS 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2021

EVENING 

Presentation on the Work of the St. Catherine Foundation over the last twenty years by Dimitri Dondos, Dr. Helen C. Evans, and Hieromonk Justin 

Mr. Dondos is a prominent member of the Foundation, who belongs to the NYC and London Boards. Dr. Evans is the Mary and Michael Jaharis Curator for Byzantine Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, and (along with Elizabeth Bolman) a member of the NYC Board. 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2021 

EVENING 

Plenary Lecture by Hieromonk Justin of the Monastery of St. Catherine on Mount Sinai 

Hieromonk Justin is a scholar, and is in charge of the most important Orthodox library in the world, which is at the Monastery of St. Catherine on Mount Sinai. 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2021 

EVENING 

Banquet 

SCHEDULE 

Scholarly talks on all aspects of Byzantine history, art and religion will be presented between October 7-10. Three parallel sessions run at the same time. 

HOST: 

ELIZABETH BOLMAN 

holds her MA and PhD in Byzantine art history (Bryn Mawr College), and is the Elsie B. Smith Professo  in the Liberal Arts and Chair of the  Department of Art History and Art  at Case Western Reserve University.  She is a Senior Fellow in Byzantine Studies at Dumbarton Oaks (Harvard University’s Byzantine Studies Center).  She is also on the Board of theSt.  Catherine Foundation (NYC). She is the Vice President of the US National Committee for Byzantine Studies, which is the national branch of the International Committee for Byzantine Studies. She has a distinguished publication and fundraising record. 

Professor Bolman is hosting the conference in 2021.

JULIUS LECTURE IN BYZANTINE ART Heaven on Earth: Justinian’s Hagia Sophia. 12 October 2020, 5pm US Eastern Time

Register here: https://cwru.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_3Mc9XSmkSFCcpkrxr3zsxA

This talk addresses the transformation of the basilica as an architectural form and its subsequent impact on architecture in the eastern Mediterranean. Justinian’s Hagia Sophia represents a critical moment in architectural history in terms of form, meaning, and aesthetics.

ROBERT OUSTERHOUT is professor emeritus in history and art at the University of Pennsylvania, where he taught from 2007-2017 and also served as director of the Center for Ancient Studies. He taught previously at the University of Illinois, where he received his PhD. Ousterhout’s fieldwork has concentrated on Byzantine architecture, monumental art, and urbanism in Constantinople, Thrace, Cappadocia, and Jerusalem.

‘Early Rus’ Jewry: Byzantine Connections’ lecture webinar. 14 October 2020, 5pm BST

Prof Alexander Kulik will deliver a lecture-webinar on 14 October at 5pm BST

Free and open to the public. Register at:

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_G6tq3RF-SkisWkiS4NRToQ

The open lecture-webinar on the topic of ‘Early Rus’ Jewry: Byzantine Connections’ will be delivered by Alexander Kulik, Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Russian and Slavic Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The talk will reassess the evidence on the connections of early East European Jewry with Byzantium. It will focus on new or newly interpreted data which can help to define the origins of pre-Ashkenazi communities in Rus’ and possibly also help to solve some puzzles relating to literary activity in Kyivan Rus’.

About the speaker:

Alexander Kulik’s research concentrates on the cross-cultural transmission of texts and ideas. His scholarly interests encompass Slavic and Jewish studies. He received his Ph.D. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and conducted post-doctoral research at Harvard University. Kulik authored four books: Retroverting Slavonic Pseudepigrapha (two editions: Society of Biblical Literature: Atlanta GA, 2004 and Leiden-Boston: Brill, 2005), 3 Baruch: Greek-Slavonic Apocalypse of Baruch (Berlin-New York: De Gruyter, 2009), Biblical Pseudepigrapha in Slavonic Tradition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016; with S. Minov), and Jews in Old Rus’: A Documentary History (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press for HURI, forthcoming) and edited seven volumes, among them, the collected volume History of the Jews in Russia: From Antiquity to Early Modern Period in the bilingual series with Zalman Shazar Center (Jerusalem, 2010) and Gesharim (Moscow, 2010) and the Guide to Early Jewish Texts and Traditions in Christian Transmission (Oxford-New York, 2019: Oxford University Press; as editor-in-chief, with G. Boccaccini, L. DiTommaso, D. Hamidovic, and M. Stone). In 2010 he won the ERC grant for the project “Jews and Slavs in the Middle Ages.” Together with Moshe Taube he initiated and headed the international research group “Cultural Archaeology of Jews and Slavs: Medieval and Early Modern Judeo-Slavic Interaction and Cross-Fertilization” held at the Hebrew University Institute of Advanced Studies in 2011. Currently Kulik is directing the project “The Bible in Russian Modernism” (with Roman Timenchik; funded by ISF). He has founded and headed the Brill book series Studia Judaeoslavica. Presently he servers as Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Russian and Slavic Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Alexander Kulik has held visiting positions at Moscow SU, UC London, Stanford, Oxford, FU Berlin, and Ca’ Foscari Venezia. He is Member of the International Committee of Slavists.

2.     CALL FOR PAPERS

Call for papers, Changes of climate in Byzantium, 28September 2020

As known, the theme for the International Congress of Medieval Studies 2021 in Leeds (5-8 July) is ‘Climates’. It will be a panel concerned with ‘Changes of climate in Byzantium’ and we are looking for papers 30 minutes long on any aspect of this issue. The deadline for the submission of papers to this panel is the 28th of September 2020. 

Contact person: Elena Ene D-Vasilescu at elena.ene-v@wolfson.ox.ac.uk. “

3.     JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Three research assistant positions. Academy of Sciences in Göttingen. Deadline: 30 September 2020

The Academy of Sciences in Göttingen is looking for the research center of the project “The Editio critica maior of the Greek Psalter” in Göttingen on January 1st, 2021

three research assistants (f / m / d)

initially limited to December 31, 2023, remuneration: E 13 TV-L, scope of positions 100%. The workplace is generally suitable for part-time.

The aim of the academy project, which has existed since January 1, 2020, is to research the tradition and text history of the age of the Septuaginta, which will result in the elaboration of a new critical edition of the Psalmi cum Odis (“Psalms and Oden”), which will be available as a printed book and in a more publicly accessible form , should be presented in digital form.

The future area of ​​responsibility will essentially comprise two sub-areas, the construction of a collation database and the development of a handwriting database. The collation database should be planned, developed and optimized in joint teamwork. A central task will be to enter existing collations in this database and also to create new collations. The manuscript database should also be created in joint teamwork; in it all (approx. 1300) Greek psalter manuscripts are to be recorded and described.

A very good knowledge of ancient Greek as well as Greek palaeography and codicology is required. Experience in handling the collation and revision of manuscripts as well as practical experience in describing manuscripts are desirable. Existing insights into Septuagint research are advantageous.

A completed degree in theology or classical philology, proven knowledge of the ancient languages ​​(Greek, Latin, Hebrew, if possible also Syriac) and experience in dealing with Greek manuscripts are expected.

Further information on the project is available at: www.septuaginta-unternehmen.de

Contact person for questions: Dr. Felix Albrecht (Head of Department)

felix.albrecht@uni-goettingen.de , Tel .: 0551-3937014.

The academy aims to increase the proportion of women in areas in which women are underrepresented and therefore expressly encourages qualified women to apply. It also sees itself as family-friendly and promotes the compatibility of science / work and family. Severely disabled people will be given special consideration if they are suitable.

Please send your detailed application in digital form by September 30th, 2020 to the following email address: adw.bewerb@gwdg.de

Travel and application costs cannot be reimbursed.

We would like to point out that submitting the application constitutes consent under data protection law to the processing of your application data by us. You can find more information on the legal basis and use of data at:

https://adw-goe.de/ueber-uns/datenschutzerklaerung/ .

ASCSA National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships. Deadline: 31 October 2020

Founded in 1881, the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA) is a premier resource in Greece for American scholars in the fields of Greek language, literature, history, archaeology, philosophy, and art, from pre-Hellenic times to the present. It offers two major research libraries: the Blegen, with over 113,000 volumes dedicated to the ancient Mediterranean world; and the Gennadius, with over 146,000 volumes and archives devoted to post-classical Hellenic civilization and, more broadly, the Balkans and the eastern Mediterranean. The School also provides centers for advanced research in archaeological and related topics at the Athenian Agora and Corinth excavations, and at the Malcolm H. Wiener Laboratory for Archaeological Sciences. By agreement with the Greek government, the ASCSA is authorized to serve as liaison with the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports on behalf of American students and scholars for the acquisition of permits to conduct archaeological work and to study collections.

Since its inception in 1994, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowship program at the ASCSA has demonstrated its effectiveness by supporting projects for 60 scholars with distinguished research and teaching careers in the humanities.

Eligibility:  Postdoctoral scholars and professionals in all fields relevant to the mission of the ASCSA who are US citizens, or foreign nationals who have lived in the US for the three years immediately preceding the application deadline. Applicants must already hold their Ph.D. or have completed all requirements, except for the actual conferral of the degree, by the application deadline.

Terms:  Two to four fellows will be selected for awards of 4, 5, or 9 months duration. The monthly stipend per fellow is $4,200 allocated from a total pool of $75,600 per year. Applicants should indicate their preference for the length and dates of tenure of the award to coincide with the American School’s academic year: 9 months, Sept. 2021-beginning of June 2022; 4 months, Sept. – Dec.; 5 months, January to the beginning of June. School fees are waived, and the award provides lunches at Loring Hall five days per week. The NEH Fellow will pay for travel costs, housing, residence permit, and other living expenses from the stipend. A final report is due at the end of the award period, and the ASCSA expects that copies of all publications that result from research conducted as a Fellow of the ASCSA will be contributed to the relevant library of the School. The NEH Fellow is also required to send one copy of all books and electronic copies of articles directly to the NEH.

NEH Fellows should use the American School of Classical Studies at Athens as their primary research base, but research may be carried out throughout Greece.

Application: Submit Senior “Associate Membership with Fellowship” Application online on the ASCSA web site by October 31. Link to application: https://ascsa.submittable.com/submit/115299/associate-membership-with-fellowship-application  

The following items should be included in the application submitted online on the ASCSA web site:
1.   Short abstract of the project (up to 300 words).
2.   A statement of the project (up to five pages, single spaced), including desired number of months in Greece, a timetable, explicit goals, a selected bibliography, the importance of the work, the methodologies involved (where applicable), and the reasons it should occur at the ASCSA. 
3.   Current curriculum vitae.  If not a US citizen, state US visa status /date of residence.
4.   Names of three recommenders who are individuals familiar with applicant’s work and field of interest. Include a list of names, positions, and addresses of the referees.  Instructions for recommenders to submit letters will be sent through the application portal. Please make sure your recommenders have submitted their letters by November 4. These letters should comment on the feasibility of the project and the applicant’s ability to carry it out successfully. 

The following criteria will be used by the Selection Committee when considering applications.
1.  Are the objectives and approaches clearly stated and coherent?
2.  Will the project result in an important and original contribution?
3.  Are the research perspectives and methodologies appropriate?
4.  Is the projected timetable reasonable for the tenure of the fellowship?
5.  What resources are necessary? Does the ASCSA provide resources that are not available at the home institution?
6.  Will residence in Greece contribute substantially to the success of the project?   

Web site: www.ascsa.edu.gr or https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/apply/fellowships-and-grants/postdoctoral-and-senior-scholars  
E-mail: application@ascsa.org  

The awards will be announced during February. Awardees will be expected to accept the award within two weeks of notification of funding, but no later than March 1.

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens does not discriminate on the basis of race, age, sex, sexual orientation, color, religion, ethnic origin, or disability when considering admission to any form of membership or application for employment.

ARIT Fellowships for Research in Turkey, 2021-2022

The American Research Institute in Turkey (ARIT) is pleased to announce 2021-2022 fellowship programs for students and scholars based in the U.S. and Canada: 

ARIT / National Endowment for the Humanities Advanced Fellowships for Research in Turkey cover all fields of the humanities, including prehistory, history, art, archaeology, literature, and linguistics as well as interdisciplinary aspects of cultural history.  The fellowships support applicants who have completed their academic training.  The fellowships may be held for terms ranging from four months to a full year.  Stipend per month is $4,200.

ARIT Fellowships for Research in Turkey are offered for research in ancient, medieval, or modern times, in any field of the humanities and social sciences.  Post-doctoral and advanced doctoral fellowships may be held for various terms, for terms from one month up to one academic year.  Stipends range from $2,500 to $15,500.

Applications for ARIT and ARIT-NEH fellowships must be submitted to ARIT by November 1, 2020.  The fellowship committee will notify applicants in late January 2021.

ARIT Summer Fellowships for Advanced Turkish Language in Istanbul offers intensive advanced study of Turkish at Bogazici University for summer 2021.  Participants must have two years of Turkish language study or the equivalent.  The application deadline will be in early February 2021.  The fellowships cover round-trip airfare to Istanbul, application and tuition fees, and a maintenance stipend.  

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The Byzness, 07/09/2020

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 7th September 2020
====
1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1.       NEWS AND EVENTS

Yale Lectures in Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Architecture

This lecture series is organized by Robert S. Nelson, Robert Lehman Professor in the History of Art, and Vasileios Marinis, Associate Professor of Christian Art and Architecture at the ISM and YDS. Support is provided by the Department of Classics and the Department of the History of Art. 

 Zoom lectures begin at 12 noon Eastern Time; registration is required. You can register at any time to join a lecture. Your registration is valid for the whole series; attend as many as you like.  

Register for Yale Lectures in Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Architecture(link is external)

September 11
Visual Epitome in Late Antique Art
Jaś Elsner, University of Oxford
Respondent: Maria Doerfler, Yale

October 9
Visual Mastery of the Hippodrome?: Rethinking the Imperial Image in Byzantium
Paroma Chatterjee, University of Michigan
Respondent: Jacqueline Jung, Yale

November 13
Everlasting Monument [արձան մշտնջենաւոր]:
Ani Cathedral and its Contexts
Christina Maranci, Tufts University
Respondent: Vasileios Marinis, Yale

December 11
What do Mosaics Want? Or, Wall Mosaics and the Space between Viewer and Viewed
Liz James, University of Sussex
Respondent: Robert S. Nelson, Yale

January 8
The Nativity Church in Bethlehem in the Light of Recent Restorations
Michele Bacci, University of Fribourg
Respondent: Ariel Fine, Yale 

February 12
From Domestic to Divine: The Mosaics of Late Antique Syria
Sean Leatherbury, University College, Dublin
Respondent: Örgü Dalgıç, Yale

March 12
Africa in Late Antiquity: Faith, Politics, and Commerce between the Mediterranean and the Red Sea  
Andrea Achi, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Respondent: Felicity Harley, Yale

April 9
Auro, argento, aere perennius: Byzantine Art in and through Coins 4th–15th Centuries  
Cécile Morrisson, CNRS and Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres
Respondent: Benjamin Dieter R. Hellings, Yale

Mary Jaharis Center Lecture, 1 October 2020

The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture at Hellenic College Holy Cross in Brookline, MA, is pleased to announce that “Byzantine Pieces of an Umayyad Puzzle: A Basalt Platform in the Azraq Oasis” has been rescheduled. In this lecture, Dr. Alexander Brey, Wellesley College, will discuss an Umayyad-era basalt reservoir platform built within the Azraq oasis in eastern Jordan and places its carved interlocking stones in conservation with early Byzantine zodiac and celestial diagrams.

October 1, 2020 | Zoom | 4:00–5:00 pm (Eastern time)

This lecture will take place live on ZOOM, followed by a question and answer period. Please register to receive the ZOOM link. An email with the relevant ZOOM information will be sent 1–2 hours ahead of the lecture. Registration closes at 11:00 AM on October 1, 2020.

Register here: https://maryjahariscenter.org/events/byzantine-pieces-of-an-umayyad-puzzle-a-basalt-platform-in-the-azraq-oasis

Mary Jaharis Center lectures are co-sponsored by Harvard University Standing Committee on Medieval Studies.

Contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture, with any questions.

Oxford Medieval Graduate Conference 2020

The Oxford Medieval Graduate Conference 2020, which was postponed in March because of Covid-19, has now transitioned online and the registration is open. Registration is free. To register please fill in this form or email oxgradconf@gmail.com

OMGC 2020 First Day – Tuesday 29 September

10.00-10.15 Welcome

10.15-11.15 PANEL 1: Relics
Chair: Helen Lawson (St Anne’s College, Oxford)

Megan Bunce (Brasenose College, Oxford), ‘Translating Alban: Gallic episcopal approaches to a Romano-British cult.’

Hila Manor (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem),‘From the Heavenly to the Earthly and Back: Visual Translation and Sacred Body-Parts.’

11.15-11.30 Morning Break

11.30-12.45 PANEL 2: Philosophical Translation
Chair: Jose Maria Andres (St Hugh’s College, Oxford)

Jasmine Jones (Lady Margareth Hall, Oxford), ‘The Lady and the Letter: Two Ecclesiastical Analogies in the Old English Soliloquies’

Abigail Whalen (Magdalen College, Oxford), ‘Motion at a Given Instant: Assessing Avicenna’s Contribution to the Work of Albertus Magnus.’

Humma Mouzam (University of Birmingham),‘Translating Gerbert: William of Malmesbury, Pope Sylvester II and the lure of al-Andalus.’

12.45-14.15 Lunch Break

14.15-16.00 PANEL 3: Challenges of Translation
Chair: Henry Tann (Balliol College, Oxford)

Emily Di Dodo (Magdalen College, Oxford), ‘Boccaccio’s Decameron: The creatively unfaithful Castilian translation.’

Megan Bushnell (Linacre College, Oxford), ‘Navigating Lexis and Meaning: Douglas’ Line Ratios and How He Redefines the ‘Word-for-Word’ vs. ‘Sense-for-Sense’ Maxim.’

Eugeniia Vorobeva (Jesus College, Oxford), ‘Found in Translation, or Proverbial Poetics of Íslendingasögur.’

Brianna Daigneault (University of Toronto), ‘How Did Isidore Translate? The Reception and Adaptation of the Etymologiae in the Early Medieval British Isles.’

16.00-16.30 Afternoon Break

16.30-17.30 Keynote Address

Dr Mirela Ivanova (University College, Oxford), ‘Translating Language or Culture?: some examples from Central and Eastern Europe.’

OMGC 2020 Second Day – Wednesday 30 September

10.15-11.30 PANEL 4: Images
Chair: Sophie Thorup (Wolfson College, Oxford)

Serena Picarelli (Scuola Superiore Meridionale, Naples) and Sandra Gorla (Istituto Italiano di Studi Storici, Naples), ‘Italian Vernacular Instructions for the Illuminator in some French Medieval Romances: a Double Process of Translation.’

Emily Carrington Freeman (Independent Scholar), ‘Drawing conclusions: abstracting illuminated initials.’

Catrin Haberfield (University of Manchester), ‘‘A Book in Stone’: The Interaction between Manuscript Culture and Runic Epigraphy.’

11.30-12.00 Morning Break

12.00-13.00 PANEL 5: Religious Translation
Chair: Alex Peplow (Merton College, Oxford)

Audrey Southgate (Oxford, Merton College), ‘Choose Your Own Translation: Reader Participation in the Wycliffite Psalms.’

Rose Lyddon (St Anne’s College, Oxford), Charlie’s Angels: Translating Pseudo-Dionysius’ De caelesti hierarchia at the Carolingian court.’

13.00-14.30 Lunch Break

14.30-15.30 PANEL 6: Bilingualism
Chair: Sarah Bridge (St Hilda’s College, Oxford)

Llewelyn Hopwood (Corpus Christi, Oxford), ‘Creative Bilingualism in Late-Medieval Welsh Poetry: The Case of Ieuan ap Rhydderch’s Aureation.’

Isobel Staton (University of York), ‘Macaronicism and Cultural Translation in the Commonplace Book of Robert Reynes of Acle.’

15.30-16.00 Afternoon Break

16.00-17.00 Keynote Address

Professor Ad Putter (University of Bristol), ‘Caxton’s Anglo-Dutch Adaptations: Bad Translation or Linguistic Interference?’

17.00-17.15 Closing Remarks and Announcement of next year’s conference theme

Full PDF here:

OMGC 2020 Programme.pdf

OMGC 2020 Programme.pdf

2.     CALL FOR PAPERS

Modernity and Lateness in Medieval Architecture, 56th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 13-16 May 2021, Kalamazoo, MI. Deadline: 15 September 2020.

Session organized by Alice I. Sullivan (University of Michigan) and Kyle G. Sweeney (Winthrop University)

This panel challenges Eurocentric progress models of stylistic change that presuppose a nascent, fully-realized, and late style in architecture. The panel aims to (re)situate the eclectic visual vocabularies of secular and religious buildings from the thirteenth to the seventeenth centuries that are indebted to medieval building practices and designs within the larger and more established narratives of art and architectural history. Individual papers might address historiographic, methodological, or theoretical concerns related to the study of medieval architecture and its forms, focusing on the legibility and currency of medieval stylistic conventions across cultures over time; the relationships between monumental architecture and other forms of artistic expression; the role of ornament as bearer of cultural meaning and identity; the coexistence of Gothic and antique features; and issues of hybridity and eclecticism in architecture.

Please submit all proposals through the ICMS portal (wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) by September 15, 2020.  Session ID = 1232.

3.     JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

PhD student in Greek and Byzantine Studies, Uppsala University. Deadline: 24 September 2020

Uppsala University is a comprehensive research-intensive university with a strong international standing. Our mission is to pursue top-quality research and education and to interact constructively with society. Our most important assets are all the individuals whose curiosity and dedication make Uppsala University one of Sweden’s most exciting workplaces. Uppsala University has 46.000 students, 7.300 employees and a turnover of SEK 7.3 billion.


The Department of Linguistics and Philology is involved in research and education in a number of languages and language-related subjects and provides an international work environment. The department’s activities cover many of the classical and modern languages and cultures in large areas of Europe, Asia and Africa, as well as computational and general linguistics. Education is offered at the Bachelor, Master and PhD levels.
Doctoral studies extend over a 4-year period during which the PhD-student will receive a salary as an employee of the department. Doctoral students are expected to engage in full-time study and research, and contribute to and participate in the department’s activities. Teaching and/or administrative tasks may be involved up to a maximum of 20%, which is carried out against an appropriate prolongation of the contract.
Project description: Doctoral students in Greek at Uppsala university work in a lively research environment with scholars interested in the Greek language and Greek culture from antiquity to the Byzantine period. For this position we are looking primarily for a candidate who is interested in working within the frame of the research program “Retracing Connections: Byzantine Storyworlds in Greek, Arabic, Georgian, and Old Slavonic (c. 950–c. 1100)”, investigating various aspects of translinguistic and transcultural narration in medieval texts. Applications for projects that fall outside the scope of this research program are also welcome, but should fall broadly within the areas of expertise available at the department. The proposed doctoral project must be described in a research plan attached to the application. Particular consideration will be given to the project’s quality and feasibility within the stipulated time frame, as well as to the candidate’s fitness and qualifications for the task.
Requirements: To qualify for a doctoral position a candidate should hold a master’s degree in Greek or Byzantine Studies or equivalent.
Additional qualifications: Solid and broad language skills are a merit, as is experience from international study environments.
The application should contain:
* A letter of intent describing your research interests and motivation for PhD studies (maximum one page)
* A CV containing (i) a description of your education in Greek/Byzantine Studies and other relevant areas including a transcript of finished courses and their grades/dates, (ii) a list of any academic publications, (iii) professional experience relevant to academic research (maximum four pages)
* A copy of your MA thesis (or equivalent)
* A tentative research proposal which (i) states a research question which falls within the project or field described above, (ii) describes the methodology and work plan, and (iii) contextualises the expected results in relation to the state of the art.
* Other documents which the applicant would like to adduce.
The application may be written in English or Swedish.
Rules governing PhD students are set out in the Higher Education Ordinance chapter 5, §§ 1-7 and in Uppsala University’s rules and guidelines http://regler.uu.se/?languageId=1 and at https://www.sprakvet.uu.se/research/phd-studies/
Salary: According to local agreement for PhD students. Starting date: 01-01-2021 or as otherwise agreed.
Type of employment: Temporary position according to the Higher Education Ordinance chapter 5 § 7.
Scope of employment: 100 %
For further information about the position please contact: Professor Ingela Nilsson (ingela.nilsson@lingfil.uu.se)
Director of graduate studies Professor Christer Henriksén (Christer.Henriksen@lingfil.uu.se), phone + 46 (0)18 471 6845
Senior faculty administrator Lars Hagborg (Lars.Hagborg@uadm.uu.se), phone +46 (0)18 471 1907
Please submit your application by 24 September 2020, UFV-PA 2020/3010.

Research assistant, Uppsala University. Deadline: 18 September 2020

Uppsala University is a comprehensive research-intensive university with a strong international standing. Our mission is to pursue top-quality research and education and to interact constructively with society. Our most important assets are all the individuals whose curiosity and dedication make Uppsala University one of Sweden’s most exciting workplaces. Uppsala University has 46.000 students, 7.300 employees and a turnover of SEK 7.3 billion.


The Department of Linguistics and Philology is involved in research and education in a number of languages and language-related subjects and provides an international work environment. The department´s activities cover many of the classical and modern languages and cultures in large areas of Europe, Asia and Africa, as well as computational and general linguistics. Education is offered at the Bachelor, Master and PhD levels.
Duties/Project description: The present position is part of the research programme “Retracing Connections: Byzantine Storyworlds in Greek, Arabic, Georgian, and Old Slavonic (c. 950 – c. 1100)”, investigating various aspects of translinguistic and transcultural narration in medieval texts. We are seeking a programmer to process hagiographical data from printed secondary sources into a structured, web-accessible format. There are three primary tasks: database design (an appropriate XML data representation format for the data), data acquisition (OCR scan and post-process source materials) and interface development (an online front-end to the database for use by project members and other researchers). The resulting website should present the structured data alongside the relevant pages of the source material (for verification), and allow for some basic search functions.
Requirements: The employment requires a Master’s degree in computer science or a related discipline as well as documented competence to carry out at least two of the tasks described above (database design, data acquisition and interface development.
Additional qualifications: Reading knowledge of German and basic familiarity with Greek are qualifying. So is experience in communicating with colleagues across disciplinary boundaries.
Salary: Individual salary.  
Starting date: 01-01-2021 or as otherwise agreed.
Type of employment: Temporary position (1 year) according to central collective agreement.
Scope of employment: 100 %
For further information about the position please contact: Professor Ingela Nilsson, (ingela.nilsson@lingfil.uu.se, +46 18-471 1424) or Professor Michael Dunn (michael.dunn@lingfil.uu.se, +46 18-471 1341).
Please submit your application by 18 September 2020, UFV-PA 2020/2399.

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The Byzness, 23/08/2020

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 23rd August 2020
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

  1. CALLS FOR PAPERS
  2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
    ====

 

  1. NEWS AND EVENTS

 

Virtual Workshop ‘ Licht aus dem Osten? Natural Light in Medieval Churches Between Byzantium and the West. 26-27 November 2020, 13:00-17:15 [CET]

ORGANIZERS: Alice Isabella Sullivan, PhD, Dahlem Humanities Center, Freie Universität Berlin

Vladimir Ivanovici, PhD, Accademia di Architettura di Mendrisio, USI | Masaryk University

 

Throughout the medieval period, Christian churches were designed in such a way that natural light was deployed to underscore theological statements. The solutions usually found in Latin andByzantine churches have been analyzed in recent decades. However, the cultures that developed at the crossroads of the Latin, Greek, and Slavic cultural spheres, particularly in regions of the Balkan Peninsula and the Carpathian Mountains, advanced their own formulas for how to use natural light in ecclesiastical buildings, and these have been less studied. These solutions depended on know-how inherited from Antiquity and preserved in local hubs or filtered through the experience of Byzantine or Latin contexts, and were further shaped by local climatic, economic, and theological parameters. The present workshop explores the economy of natural light in churches constructed across Eastern Europe, from the Balkans to the Baltic Sea, and at the crossroads of Byzantium and the West throughout the medieval period. Whether adopted or inspired from the more established traditions on the margins of the Mediterranean, local customs are examined in order to understand how natural light phenomena unfolded in ecclesiastical spaces, and how they related to the design, architecture, decorations, liturgical objects, and rituals performed inside the buildings. The multilayered light Inszenierungen that this workshop addresses cast light on the structuring of sacred spaces in the Eastern Orthodox cultural sphere. Moreover, the expertise behind the deployment of these natural light effects reveals patterns of knowledge transfer and cultural interaction between Byzantium, the West, and the Slavic world that extended especially in regions of Eastern Europe during the Middle Ages.

To register for this event, please RSVP here!

 

Webinar: Hagia Sophia: The History of the Building and the Building in History. Tuesday, 1 September 2020 at 11:00 [EDT]

Dumbarton Oaks will be holding a Zoom webinar on Tuesday, September 1, 2020 at 11:00am EDT with scholars who have actively promoted research on the Hagia Sophia. The webinar, “Hagia Sophia: The History of the Building and the Building in History,” will cover historical facts, Dumbarton Oaks’ involvement, and the issues related to the recent reconversion of the monument.

 

  1.     CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Space and the Hospital, Lisbon, 26-28 May 2021. Deadline: 30 September 2020.

 

The International Network for the History of Hospitals (INHH), the Hospitalis: Hospital Architecture in Portugal at the Dawn of Moder nity Research Project, and the Hospital Real de Todos os Santos are pleased to  announce the call for papers for *Space and the Hospital*. The conference will take place in Lisbon, Portugal from 26-28 May 2021.

Space, in both its physical and conceptual manifestations, has been a part  of how hospitals were designed, built, used, and understood within the  wider community. By focusing on space, this conference aims to explore this  subject through the lens of its architectural, socio-cultural, medical,  economic, charitable, ideological, and public conceptualisations.

This thirteenth INHH conference will explore the relationship between space  and hospitals throughout history by examining it through the lens of five themes:
(1) ritual, space, and architecture;
(2) hospitals as spaces;
(3) the impact of medical practice and theory on space;
(4) hospitality and social space;
(5) sponsorship.

The themes and questions presented are by no means an exhaustive list; however, we encourage the submission of an abstract that examines any aspects of space and the history of hospitals in innovative ways. Please go to our website for a more comprehensive outline of the proposed themes.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers or posters which address the conference theme. Potential contributors are asked to bear in mind that engagement with the theme of space and the hospital will be a key criterion in determining which papers are accepted onto the programme.

Abstracts should be a maximum of 300 words in length, in English and accompanied by a brief biography of no more than 200 words. Proposals should be sent to space.inhh@gmail.com by *30 September 2020*. As with previous INHH conferences, it is intended that an edited volume of the conference papers will be published. Submissions are particularly encouraged from researchers who have not previously given a paper at an INHH conference.

 

 

Collecting Orthodoxy in the West: A History and a Look Towards the Future. Scheduled 11-12 June 2021. Deadline: 5 October 2020.

In a 1947 article titled “Byzantine Art and Scholarship in America,” Kurt Weitzmann examined the history of collecting Byzantine art in the United States. “…The combination of formal beauty and material splendor, coupled with great technical perfection and an aristocratic spirit which gives to even the smallest object a rare distinction…” renders these works particularly attractive to private collectors, wrote Weitzmann. Our conference takes this statement as a starting point and focuses on the history of collecting Christian Orthodox objects in the West from the nineteenth century to the present: a topic replete with spectacular objects, profound questions and captivating narratives. This international conference, organized and sponsored by the Museum of Russian Icons in Clinton, MA (USA), considers why, how, where, and by whom these objects have been and continue to be acquired. Once obtained, how are they classified, conserved, displayed, and described? How and by whom is their value, whether symbolic or monetary, determined? What is the relationship between their original purpose and the newfound one? From Marjorie Merriweather Post and Henry Walters to modern day collectors such as Gordon Lankton, small private museums to major public institutions, there has been a sustained interest in owning architectural remnants, manuscripts, liturgical objects, enkolpia and, of course, icons. Whether to save them from destruction, perpetuate a living tradition, preserve personal or communal memory, demonstrate erudition, wealth or taste, or to tell a story, these pieces are found in nearly every important collection. In addition to the above, topics include, but are not limited to: discussions of single objects or entire collections; individual or institutional collectors; related questions of loot, provenance, authenticity, religious and cultural sensitivity, and ethics; as well as past collecting patterns versus possible future directions. We welcome papers from museum professionals and scholars at any career stage.

Please send a CV as well as a 350-word abstract with at least one image to Lana Sloutsky at lsloutsky@ museumofrussianicons.com by 5 October 2020. Selected speakers will be notified by 6 November 2020. The virtual conference is scheduled for 11 and 12 June 2021. Interested presenters will have a chance to have their papers peer-reviewed and published in the 2022 issue of the Journal of Icon Studies.

 

Marco Manuscript Workshop 2021: “Immaterial Culture”. 5-6 February 2021. Deadline: 9 October 2020

The sixteenth annual Marco Manuscript Workshop will take place Friday, February 5, and Saturday, February 6, 2021. Sessions will meet virtually via an online platform. The workshop is led by Professors Maura K. Lafferty (Classics) and Roy M. Liuzza (English), and is hosted by the Marco Institute for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

This year’s workshop will consider some of the recent challenges that researchers have faced with the suspension of travel, the closing of libraries and universities, and the quarantine restrictions that have kept so many of us in our homes. How can our field, which has always emphasized the importance of physical place and tactile artifacts, work successfully in isolation and at a distance? What does it mean for us when our work takes place in an incorporeal world of light and numbers rather than ink and flesh, in matrices of data rather than dusty rooms? We propose to explore the advantages and disadvantages of this “immaterial culture,” and to think about how our work is shaped by access or lack of access to manuscripts, texts, catalogues, and objects. We would like to hear about experiences working remotely, discoveries made using virtual archives or catalogues, or advice on how to study manuscripts without visiting archives or how to teach codicology without a library. We welcome stories of scholars who have been productive in constrained circumstances. We would also like to learn from the experience of those for whom archives have been inaccessible for other reasons – scholars who are homebound, visually impaired, or otherwise physically challenged, or those whose access to libraries and collections has been restricted or denied. How have these constraints shaped your work? What can these experiences tell us about our discipline? We welcome presentations on any aspect of this topic, broadly imagined.

The workshop is open to scholars and graduate students in any field who are engaged in textual editing, manuscript studies, or epigraphy. This year’s workshop will be virtual, but we hope to retain as much of the format and the flavor of our in-person meetings as possible. Individual 75-minute sessions will be devoted to each project; participants will be asked to introduce their text and its context, discuss their approach to working with their material, and exchange ideas and information with other participants. We will prepare an online repository where presenters can place abstracts, presentations, or supporting material for access by all attendees. As in previous years, the workshop is intended to be more like a class than a conference; participants are encouraged to share new discoveries and unfinished work, to discuss both their successes and frustrations, to offer practical advice and theoretical insights, and to work together towards developing better professional skills for textual and codicological work. We particularly invite the presentation of works in progress, unusual problems, practical difficulties, and new or experimental models for studying or representing manuscript texts

The deadline for applications is October 9, 2020. Applicants are asked to submit a current CV and a two-page abstract of their project to Roy M. Liuzza, preferably via email to rliuzza@utk.edu.

Presenters will receive a $500 honorarium for their participation.

The workshop is also open at no cost to scholars and students who do not wish to present their own work but are interested in sharing a lively weekend of discussion and ideas about manuscript studies. In order to keep the virtual sessions manageable, preregistration will be required and spaces will be limited. Further details will be available later in the year; please contact the Marco Institute at marco@utk.edu for more information.

 

Adolf von Harnack – bridging the gaps”, University of Tartu, Estonia, 17-19 May 2021.  Deadline: 30 November 2020

In 2021 it will be 170 years since the birth of Adolf von Harnack – a Baltic-German Lutheran theologian, a church historian, leading figure in German science management and a notable social figure of the 19th and the 20th century. Harnack was not only born in Dorpat (Tartu) and studied there, but he remained profoundly shaped by a certain type of Baltic-German Academia and Piety, even when he moved to Leipzig, Gießen, Marburg and Berlin in later years. After two large conferences in 1998 and 2001 devoted to Harnack and organized by the Max-Planck-Society and the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences (two institutions which predecessors, the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Society and the Prussian Academy of Sciences, were deeply influenced by Harnack), it is time to deal with certain overlooked aspects, to enrich the image of a man of many talents in the context of his different networks and to confront Harnack-Studies with new ideas about the History of Christianity and his very challenging lifetime, full of rapid social and religious change in Russia and Germany, since the appearance of new scholarly work at the turn of the millennium.

The conference is titled “Adolf von Harnack – bridging the gaps”, because Harnack was not only a scholar of ancient Christianity, esteemed by Theologians as well as Ancient Historians, but made significant contributions to contemporary discussions on the “essence of Christianity” and on the understanding of History. He was part of a discussion on the institutional framework of Theology and Religious Studies in Germany, but also involved in the Institution-Building of Institutes for Sciences, Libraries and Social Work. As a public intellectual of the German Empire before 1918 and the first German republic after 1918 he contributed significantly to a large number of public debates. He also bridged the gaps between scientific cultures in Europe, Britain and the United States. What made him able to bridge so many gaps between Science and Humanities, Theology and other Humanities, University and broader public understanding of science? And what was the reason, that he could not bridge certain gaps, e.g. between University and Church, between German Protestantism and Russian Orthodoxy? The conference will be organized by the School of Theology and Religious Studies of Tartu University, because the Baltic-German background is crucial to understand Harnack and to answer such questions.

Can one use Harnack’s views to bridge those and other gaps also in the 21st century? Christianity as a source for practical religious life and personal freedom has not lost its meaning in the 21st century too, but the situation of Theology and Religion in the Baltic States, Germany and in the rest of Europe is quite different from Harnack’s times. The conference will focus on these and related questions, and calls to reflect upon Harnack’s role and influence on the debates of his own time and his relevance for the presence.

We welcome scholarly presentations Harnack’s life and the Baltic background, his successful and/or failed attempts to bridge the gaps between History and Theology, Theology and Religious Studies, Sciences and Humanities, University and public understanding of science, Academia and Weimar Republic and on his participation in debates on social cohesion and national German politics, as well as on his influence on theological discussions outside Germany.

Keynote speakers: Friedrich Wilhelm Graf (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)

Christoph Markschies (Humboldt University of Berlin)

Jonathan Teubner (Australian Catholic University, Humboldt University of Berlin)

The conference is organised by the University of Tartu and Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften.

Working language of the conference is English and the length of papers is 30 minutes.  Please send abstracts of papers of 250–300 words to Priit Rohtmets priit.rohtmets@ut.ee

Important dates: Deadline for submitting abstracts: 30.11.2020  

Notification of acceptance and opening of the registration: 01.02.2021 

For further inquiries you may also contact Priit Rohtmets priit.rohtmets@ut.ee

 

6th Forum Medieval Art Art – “Sinne / Senses” Scent and Sense (ICMA-sponsored session at the 6th Forum Kunst des Mittelalters, „Sinne / Senses“). Frankfurt am Main, 29 September to 2 October 2021.

 Deadline: 15 October 2020

 

(Please note that due to the COVID-19 pandemic it is not decided yet whether the Forum can take place ‘live’, partially virtually, entirely virtually, or whether it will be postponed.)

 

Organisation: Deutscher Verein für Kunstwissenschaft e.V. with the Institute for Art History, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main (Kristin Böse / Joanna Olchawa)

 

Session 4:

Scent and Sense: Olfaction and Memory in Medieval Material Culture

Session organiser: Elina Gertsman (Case Western Reserve University)

Session sponsor: International Center of Medieval Art [ICMA], New York)

 

Although we are used to thinking that the sense of sight reigned supreme in the Middle Ages, medieval scholars of all stripes were quite obsessively preoccupied with questions of olfaction. Ephemeral and fleeting but emotionally, spiritually, and physiologically impactful, the sense of smell was tightly tethered to the humoral, anatomical, and cognitive theories. Memories, in particular, could be affected by smells: a fetid odor, it was gleaned from Avicenna, induced such illness that could make one forget the names of his own children, while sweet-smelling perfumes could strengthen memory and increase devotion.

 

This session will explore the multivalent relationships between objects, smells, and memory, especially as they existed in the later Middle Ages. We seek to explore two distinct aspects of this relationship. On the one hand, we welcome papers that focus on visual representations of smell, as found in a broad range of manuscripts and printed texts, from medical treatises to romance literature, from tracts on philosophy to encyclopedias. On the other hand, we hope to see contributions that focus on objects whose function is predicated on the sense of smell: among them censers and thuribles used during Christian liturgical services; Jewish Havdalah spice (besamim) containers, used in a ceremony that concluded the Sabbath; incense burners used at receptions, events, and in places of worship throughout Islamic world. Papers may focus on specific case studies or else broadly thematize the intertwinement of smell, memory, and image within the vast sensory landscape of the Middle Ages.

 

 

 

  1.     JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

Junior Assistant Professor in Ancient Greek (ERC project PURA) at Venice University. Deadline: 3 September 2020

 

The ERC project PURA – Purism in Antiquity: Theories of Language in Greek Atticist Lexica and their Legacy (grant agreement no. 865817), to start in January 2021 at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Department of Humanities, is seeking a Researcher – Junior Assistant Professor in Ancient Greek (3 years, renewable for further 2; non-tenure-track). PURA investigates the Greek theories of linguistic purism, the texts which upheld it, and their legacy in later ages.

 

The Researcher’s duties will be to assist the PI, Olga Tribulato, in the linguistic analysis of the Atticist lexica; to produce the linguistic commentary on the lemmas selected for the aims of the project, in particular by focusing on Phrynichus’ works (also with regard to Phrynichus’ relationship with the contemporary Antiatticist lexicon, as well as his presence in Photius); and contribute to the other outputs of the project and the organization of workshops and conferences. Teaching duties in the field of Ancient Greek language and/or linguistics (30 hours per annum) are also part of this post. Candidates should hold a PhD in a related subject and possess the following requirements:

– excellent knowledge of the methodologies concerning the history of the Greek language, particularly as concerns the use of dialects (especially Attic) in literary and epigraphic texts, and their ancient exegesis, as shown by original publications and on-going research activity;

– adequate knowledge of Greek lexicography, its most representative works (including Atticist and Byzantine lexica), and its transmission;

– experience in the ecdotic methodologies for Greek texts, especially as concerns the indirect transmission of fragmentary texts (particularly those central to Attic literature and Atticist lexicography: comedy and oratory).

It is highly desirable that candidates have an international research profile, as shown by publications and/or experiences abroad.

Candidates are also expected to have first-class knowledge of the English language since the main outputs of the project will be in English.

The deadline for applications is 03/09/2020

Further particulars and the application procedure can be found here: https://www.unive.it/data/38002/?id=2020-UNVE000-0039904

For further information on the project and its objective please visit our website: https://www.unive.it/pura (under construction).

For enquiries, please feel free to e-mail me: olga.tribulato@unive.it.

 

 

 

BA Postdoctoral Research Fellowships in the Department of Classics at University of Reading. Deadline: 31 August 2020

 

Reading’s Department of Classics would be delighted to support a small number of applications to the British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship scheme, which is now opened: https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/funding/british-academy-postdoctoral-fellowships

This scheme offers an ‘opportunity to outstanding early career researchers to strengthen their experience of research and teaching in a university environment which will develop their curriculum vitae and improve their prospects of obtaining permanent lecturing posts by the end of the Fellowship. The primary emphasis is on completion of a significant piece of publishable research, which will be assisted by full membership of an academic community of established scholars working in similar fields’. Eligible candidates should have obtained their doctorate before the onset of the funding period, thus with their viva held between 1 April 2018 and 1 April 2021 (please see the website noted above for more eligibility information).

We herewith invite expressions of interest to myself <a.c.smith@reading.ac.uk>, cc. to Prof. Annalisa Marzano <a.marzano@reading.ac.uk>, by 31 August 2020. Expressions of Interest should contain a short academic cv (no more than 2pp.), including a list of publications and a one-page project proposal, along with a short statement regarding why Reading Classics would be an appropriate partner for this application.

 

Interested candidates should discuss their application with a member of academic staff in the Department of Classics before submission and seek their support. For an overview of our current academic staff and their research interests and activities please refer to our webpages at http://www.reading.ac.uk/classics/class-meet-the-team.aspx (see also Ure Museum research at https://collections.reading.ac.uk/ure-museum/research/)

 

 

Postdoctoral position at the University of Freiburg, Germany. Deadline: 4 September 2020

Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Germany, invites applications for the position of a postdoctoral researcher (4.5 years, salary according to German pay scale TV-L 13, 100%)  from November 1, 2020 to April 30, 2025) in the Research Training Group (DFG-Graduiertenkolleg) “Empires: Dynamic Change, Temporality and Post-Imperial Orders”.

 

Funded by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft), the interdisciplinary Research Training Group (RTG) focuses on imperial temporalities and their representation, reflection, resonance, and manipulation in periods of accelerated imperial change and in post-imperial contexts. The RTG follows three main lines of research: temporalities involved in a) the transformation of imperial space, b) imperial economies, and c) imperial institutions and normative structures.

 

The following disciplines participate in the RTG: Classics, Ancient History, Medieval, Early Modern, Modern, and Contemporary History of any global area, Sociology, Political Science, Near Eastern Studies, Literary/Cultural/Media Studies. For further information please visit: www.altegeschichte.uni-freiburg.de/forschung/imperien.

 

The postdoctoral researcher should have completed a PhD dissertation and present evidence of prior research in the field of empire studies. At the time of application, they should present a research project focusing on an innovative topic concerning imperial studies, possibly with a comparative component.

 

We expect:

  • a PhD dissertation in one of the disciplines represented in the RTG
  • expertise in one of the subject areas of the RTG, documented by the dissertation or any other publications
  • experience in international academic collaboration and interdisciplinary research
  • B2 knowledge of German and English; see https://www.sli.uni-freiburg.de/english/tests/tests#cef
  • willingness to relocate to Freiburg (exceptions can be made under the current circumstances of the Covid-19 pandemic)

 

We offer:

  • excellent opportunities for academic and interdisciplinary research
  • excellent opportunities for the development of an international research profile and career advancement
  • funding for a research stay abroad (up to eight months) at one of the RTG’s collaborating research institutions
  • travel grants for field work, attendance of conferences and lectures within and outside Germany
  • opportunities for joining courses on advanced research skills and professional training
  • opportunities for teaching, enhancing leadership skills, and gathering further experience in senior research practices (e.g. conference

organization, writing funding applications, editing publications, etc.)

 

 

Your employment will include:

  • to work independently on an innovative research project, which will be finished in 4.5 years with a monograph. It is possible to obtain a

Habilitation at the Freiburg University

  • to present your project on a regular basis within and outside of the RTG
  • to take part in the activities of the RTG and in the meetings of the executive board
  • to support and develop the RTG program, to liaise with the professorial staff and Ph.D. students, and to support the organization of

conferences and other events of the RTG

 

Your application should include:

  • a letter of motivation (1–2 pages)
  • an academic CV (including lists of publications, conference papers, distinctions and awards)
  • copies of degree certificates and diplomas
  • a proposal of a research project (ca. 10 pages), including a time schedule and details of how the project will fit into the RTG’s general research

profile

  • two letters of recommendation, providing information on your academic and personal qualifications as well as the quality of your application and

project, to be sent by the referees directly to the following address: kontakt@grk2571.uni-freiburg.de, under the heading GRK2571_[your

name].

 

Please send your application in a single PDF file by 04.09.2020 with the reference no: 00001167 to the following address: kontakt@grk2571.uni-freiburg.de.

 

Freiburg University seeks to increase the number of women in positions in which they are underrepresented. Preference will be given to applicants with disabilities if there are several equally qualified candidates. The University of Freiburg is committed to offering support for young scholars with families.

 

This invitation for applications is subject to the availability of the approved funding.

 

 

6 three-year PhD positions at the University of Freiburg, Germany. Deadline: 4 September 2020

Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Germany, invites applications for 6 Three-Year Positions (German pay scale TV-L E 13, 65%) from November 1, 2020 to October 31, 2023 in the Research Training Group (DFG-Graduiertenkolleg) “Empires: Dynamic Change, Temporality and Post-Imperial Orders”.

Funded by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft), the interdisciplinary Training Group will focus on imperial temporalities and their representation, reflection, resonance, and manipulation in periods of accelerated imperial change and in post-imperial contexts. The RTG will focus on three main lines of research: temporalities involved in a) the transformation of imperial space, b) imperial economies, and c) imperial institutions and normative structures. For further information on the Research Group please go to: https://www.altegeschichte.uni-freiburg.de/forschung/imperien.

We are looking for graduates with a background in the following disciplines: Ancient, Medieval, Early Modern, Modern, Eastern European and East Asian History as well as Sociology, Political Science, Literary/Cultural/Media Studies.

We expect:
•       an excellent Master’s degree or equivalent
•       high personal motivation for academic work and research
•       an innovative dissertation project within the scope of the Research Teaching Group
•       applicants with no prior knowledge of German will be expected to develop proficiency in German within the first year of their study
•       members of the Research Training Group are asked to participate in the qualification program tailored to academic as well as professional career paths
•       a willingness to take residence in Freiburg and to enroll as a doctoral student at Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg (exceptions may be made under the current circumstances of the Covid-19 pandemic)

We offer:
•       a PhD program with a clearly defined curriculum supporting your research, and preparing you for an academic career or other postdoctoral employment
•       ample opportunities for intensive professional and interdisciplinary exchange
•       regular supervision by two professorial members of the RTG
•       funding for up to six months abroad at a research institute cooperating with our program, as well as for attending conferences inside and outside Germany

Please submit the following documents:
•       a standard curriculum vitae
•       a letter of motivation (1-2 pages)
•       copies of degree certificates and diplomas
•       an outline of your proposed research, identifying the topic and provisional title, the area of research, main research questions, theoretical approaches and methodology, and a time schedule (7-10 pages)
•       two academic referees whom we may contact regarding your application

Please submit these materials in a single PDF file by 04.09.2020 to: kontakt@grk2571.uni-freiburg.de citing the reference no. 00001166.

Freiburg University seeks to increase the number of women in positions in which they are underrepresented. Preference will be given to applicants with disabilities, if there are several equally qualified candidates. The University of Freiburg is also dedicated to assist young scholars with families.

This is a temporary position limited to a term of 36 months in accordance with the Academic Fixed-Term Contract Law (WissZeitVG). The extension within the permissible fixed-time period/in accordance with the WissZeitVG in order to (successfully) complete the doctorate/project/PhD is possible.

This invitation for applications is subject to the availability of approved funding.

 

 

SHERA Publication Grant. Deadline: 15 October 2020

The SHERA Board is pleased to announce the SHERA Publication Grant, offered for the first time this fall. Made possible by a gift by an anonymous donor, the $3000 grant supports the realization of publications of the highest scholarly and intellectual quality in the field of Russian, Eastern European, and Eurasian art and architecture. The grant is intended to offset the substantial production expenses associated with the publication of an art-historical monograph, edited volume, or exhibition catalogue. Book projects must have been accepted by a publisher in order to be considered. Funds may be directed toward production costs (such as image rights, image reproductions, subventions, indexing, keeping down the final cost of the book). The grant does not fund research, writing, or editorial labor. Projects that are financially self-supporting are not eligible. Applicants do not need to be SHERA members to apply, but the recipient must join in order to accept the award. Applications should include a project description, author’s cv, letter of intent to publish and readers’ reports from the publisher, and a budget detailing the expenses to which the grant will be applied, as well as other sources of funding available for the project. Send applications to shera.artarchitecture@gmail.com by October 15, 2020.

 

 

Rome Global Gateway, Digital Palaeography Workshop. 18-22 January 2021

Instructors: Emmanuel C. Bourbouhakis, Department of Classics, Princeton University

David Jenkins, Firestone Library, Princeton University

This tuition-free online Greek Palaeography workshop is being offered as part of Princeton University’s participation in the Rome-based graduate seminars jointly sponsored with the universities of Notre Dame and Stanford, and supported by funding from Princeton’s Humanities Council. It is intended to provide graduate students from various fields, including Mediaeval and Early Modern Literature and History, Classics, Religion, and Art & Archaeology with an intensive initiation to Greek palaeography while also  exploring the potential for original scholarship in digitized manuscript libraries. The workshop will simultaneously examine how the constraints of remote research may prove consonant with the digital resources increasingly at our disposal and the expanded possibilities for what used to be privileged access to otherwise rarefied historical sources.

Course Description

The workshop will pivot mainly from the Vatican Library’s Greek manuscript collection and cover the gamut of palaeographical skills and analyses required to conduct research on various aspects of mediaeval books and literature. We will survey the main mediaeval Greek scripts and the characteristics which enable us to date codices; we will review the online (and print) tools for doing Greek manuscript research and how to make efficient use of them for a variety of research aims.

Assignments

In addition to daily transcription assignments designed to instill proficiency in the various Byzantine Greek scripts, students will draw up a palaeographical profile of a topic of their choice using the growing number of online materials and platforms.

Dates

The workshop will run from January 18 to 22, 2021. It will meet online for two hours per day, from 10am–12pm (EST), with an anticipated 2-3 hours of work each day outside of class.

Requirements

We welcome applications from qualified graduate students who can demonstrate a level of Classical/Mediaeval Greek commensurate with the demands of reading a broad range of mostly higher register texts (in most cases that means at least 2-3 years of university-level Greek). As all meetings will be held live online and make use of high-resolution images, participation will require a stable high-speed internet connection.

How to Apply

Students should send PDFs of the following to ebourbou@princeton.edu:

– a short letter describing your interest in Greek palaeography and its bearing on your current doctoral work or future research,

– a one-page CV detailing your studies thus far,

– a letter of reference from a faculty member familiar with your work

Application Deadline: October 15, 2020*

We expect to notify all applicants by November 2, 2020.

For all inquires about the course or the requirements, please write to  ebourbou@princeton.edu

 

—————–

Lorenzo Saccon

DPhil Candidate, Faculty of History

President, Oxford University Byzantine Society

byzantine.society@gmail.com

https://oxfordbyzantinesociety.wordpress.com

https://twitter.com/oxbyz

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