The Byzness 11/11/2018

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 11th November 2018
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

“Glazed Wares as Cultural Agents in the Byzantine, Seljuk and Ottoman Empires: Evidence from Technological and Archaeological Research”, 13th International ANAMED Annual Symposium, 6-7 December 2018, Istanbul. 

The intent of ANAMED’s 2018 Annual Symposium is to bring together researchers engaged in the study of decoration and technology of glazed pottery, ranging from the early Byzantine era to the end of the Ottoman period. More than 10 years ago, the first International Symposium on Late Antique, Byzantine, Seljuk and Ottoman Pottery and Tiles in Archaeological Context took place in Çanakkale, the site of a major Late Ottoman production. It is envisaged that this year’s symposium will be the continuation of that conference, this time focusing on the glazed wares and the new information from current interdisciplinary research.

The symposium is open to public and English – Turkish simultaneous translation will be provided with the support of the European Union.

For more information contact Naz Uğurlu (nugurlu@ku.edu.tr). The full programme can be found here.

“Reception, Appropriation and Innovation – Byzantium between the Christian and Islamic Worlds”, 2nd Annual International Edinburgh Postgraduate Byzantine Conference, University of Edinburgh, 30 November –  1 December 2018, Lecture Theater 2 of Appleton Tower, Edinburgh.

This year’s conference will be hosted by the Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Research Group, The Alwaleed Centre and The Society for the Promotion of Byzantine Studies. There is a full program of postgraduate speakers, plus many invited keynote presentations from: Prof. Claudia Rapp, Fr. Justin Sinaites, librarian of St. Catherine’s Monastery on Sinai, Dr. Andrew Marsham, and many of our own Byzantinists and Islamicists from the University of Edinburgh.

For further information visit the website.

Online registration is open until the last day of the conference (Dec 1) here.

“Editing Byzantine Learned Texts: Problems and Prospects”. 4th “Parekbolai” Symposium on Byzantine Literature and Philology, Friday 14 December 2018, Auditorium “Stefanos Dragoumis”, Museum of Byzantine Culture, Thessaloniki.

9:15 Welcome Speeches
9:30-10:00 Thamar Otkhmezuri (Tbilisi), Contemporary Editions of Medieval Texts and Ancient Editorial Tradition: On the Edition of the Georgian Translations of Medieval Commentaries on Gregory the Theologian’s Writings
10:00-10:30 Ilias Chrysostomidis (Ioannina), Η συλλογή των επιστολών του Γεωργίου Γρηγορίου Κυπρίου στον κώδικα Vat. gr. 1891
10:30-11:00 Dimitris Skrekas (Oxford), H ομιλία εἰς τὴν μνήμην τοῦ ἁγίου καὶ μεγαλομάρτυρος Δημητρίου από τη Συλλογή Ομιλιών του κώδ. Holkham Gr. 54
11:00-11:30 Coffee Break
11:30-12:00 Francesco G. Giannachi (Salento), Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Interlinear Commentaries to Pindar: Typologies and Editorial Problems
12:00-12:30 Ιoannis Vassis (Thessaloniki), Η συλλογή σχεδών του κώδικα Laurentianus 56.17. Εκδοτικά και άλλα ζητήματα
12:30-13:00 Claudia Ludwig (Berlin), Theodoros Metochites and his Sources: About the Paraphraseis of Aristotle’s Parva Naturalia
13:00-13:30 Coffee Break
13:30-14:00 Ottavia Μazzon (Padova), How to edit a Byzantine scholar’s anthology of excerpts: The case of Makarios Chrysokephalos’ Rhodoniai
14:00-14:30 Dimitrios Georgakopoulos (Ioannina), Η κριτική έκδοση του Χρονικού των Ιωαννίνων

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2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

“Contested Heritage: adaptation, restoration and innovation in the Late Antique and Byzantine world”, Oxford University Byzantine Society, 22-23 February 2019, History Faculty, Oxford. 

Deadline: 23rd November 2018

Byzantines considered themselves the legitimate heirs of the ancient world, a title they passionately defended against emerging empires east and west that also claimed hereditary rights to the Graeco-Roman past. From the fostering of cultural, scientific, and literary revivals and the commissioning of projects that used a well-established artistic and architectural vocabulary to the collection, conservation and display of consecrated ancient artefacts, anachronism was a powerful political and cultural tool, frequently used to build analogies with either past prosperity or a divine eternity. In addition, the use of deliberate archaism in literary forms and language served as both a demonstration of classical learning and elite status. Especially in Constantinople, ceremonial practices not only invited the participants to experience past events as if they were present, but also processed through consecrated landmarks from different historical periods – merging perception of space and time in a single, collective experience. Nevertheless, literary sources, such as the Parastaseis Syntomoi Chronikai, reveal that Byzantines sometimes had only a limited understanding of their own history and urban heritage. They compensate with interpretations, based on oral tradition and observation that often endowed ancient architectural remains and statues with a contemporary relevance. Subsequently this interpretation of the past was actively reshaped to fit contemporary worldviews. Lastly, extensive reuse of ancient material dominates our perception of Byzantium. Innovative aspects of its cultural output therefore often lie unnoticed and are deserving of greater scholarly attention.

Including contributions on political, social, literary, architectural and artistic history, and covering geographical areas throughout the central and eastern Mediterranean and beyond, this conference aims to provide a kaleidoscopic view of how cultural heritage was constructed, perceived and maintained in Late Antiquity and Byzantium.To that end, we encourage submissions from all graduate students and young researchers, encompassing, but not limited to, the following themes:

  • Literary works: stylistic imitation, adaptation and innovation in form and function of narrative sources and other literary production, as well as incorporation of older texts, historiographical traditions and archaiologia.
  • Manuscripts: scribal habits, palimpsests, marginal comments, illustrations and other decorative elements.
  • Architecture and urbanism: repurposing, adaptation and restoration of buildings and sites, architectural innovation and symbolism, monumentality, genius loci, use of spolia.
  • Religious objects: translation of relics, liturgical equipment, and vestments.
  • Ceremonial practice: religious processions, triumphs, adventus.
  • New aesthetics, especially in the reuse of old material.
  • Sculpture: interpretation and repurposing of ancient statues.
  • Epigraphy: textual content, form and style, use and location.
  • Mosaics: departures from classical and late antique mosaics, reuse of materials and reinterpretation of existing compositions.
  • Numismatics: reuse, adaption, or creation of imagery or types.
  • Comparative perspectives of the above elsewhere, in opposition or concordance with practices in Byzantium.
  • The past as a framework for political, legal and economic discourse.
  • Contemporary reaction to innovation, both overt and when disguised as restoration.

Please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, along with a short academic biography in the third person, to the Oxford University Byzantine Society by Friday, 23rd November 2018.

Papers should be 20 minutes in length and may be delivered in English or French.

As with previous conferences, there will be a publication of selected papers, chosen and reviewed by specialists from the University of Oxford in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies. Speakers wishing to have their papers considered for publication should try to be as close to the theme as possible in their abstract and paper. Nevertheless, all submissions are warmly invited.

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3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Baker-Nord Fellowship in the Humanities, Case Western Reserve University.

Deadline: 31 January 2019

The Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities at Case Western Reserve University seeks applicants for the inaugural offering of the “The Virginia and Walter Nord Fellowship in the Humanities.”

The purpose of the BNC Post-Doctoral Fellows Program is to support research in the humanities by providing scholars in the early stages of their careers with the time and resources necessary to advance their work.  During their time at the Baker-Nord Center, Fellows will pursue individual or collaborative research and writing for the full academic year.  An essential feature of the program is that Fellows make intellectual contributions to the CWRU community, through their participation in workshops, lectures and courses.  Fellows will be affiliated with one or more of the humanities departments represented on the BNC Steering Committee: Art History and Art, Classics, English, History, Modern Languages and Literatures, Music, Philosophy, Religious Studies, and Theater.  BNC Post-Doctoral Fellows will be expected to offer an undergraduate course during the spring of their fellowship year, following consultation with their host department.

Further information here.

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OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 6 / MT 2018

MONDAY 12th November

17:00   The Crucible of Empire: The Sasanian World and its Religious Minorities

Wolfson College, Linton Road

Charles Häberl (Rutgers University)

The Sasanian Role in the Mandaean World

[+]

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, Wharton Room

Claire Macht (Kellogg)

Resurrecting the Book of Life: Libri Vitae and Monastic Historical Writing

_ _ _

TUESDAY 13th November

14:15   Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Dr Max Leventhal (Cambridge)

Quotations of the Septuagint in Eleazar’s exegesis of the Law (Arist. 130-171) [Septuagint Forum]

[+]

15.30   Medieval Book Club

Various Speakers

Apocalyptic Visions (ii) – Islamic interpretations of Daniel

[+]

17.00   Medieval Church and Culture Seminar: Power and Authority

Harris Manchester College, Mansfield Rd, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Graeme Ward (Jesus College)

Ademar of Chabannes, Amalarius of Metz, and the Shaping of Carolingian Authority in Eleventh-Century Aquitaine

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WEDNESDAY 14th November

13.00   The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Colin Duval (University of Sheffield)

The development of new agropastoral and economic models in Western Europe between the Iron Age and the Roman period: new insights from cattle and pig bone morphometrics 

[+]

15.00   Arabic Epigraphy and Palaeography Reading Group

The Khalili Research Centre, 3 St John Street, lecture room (basement)

Dr Umberto Bongianino

Al-Andalus and the Maghrib, part II

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Dr Phil Booth

Byzantium and the Miaphysite commonwealth

[+]

17.00 Oxford Archaeological Fieldwork Seminar

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Dr. Melina Melfi

Hadrianopolis: Exploring an Ancient City in Epiros

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THURSDAY 15th November

11.00   Byzantine Art and Archaeology – a French perspective

Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, Basement Room 42

Etleva Nallbani

Early Medieval Albania: new archaeological evidence

[+]

17.00   Late Roman Seminar

Corpus Christi College, Seminar Room

Shunsuke Kosaka (Japan Society for the Promotion of Science)

Ammianus Marcellinus, the old age of Rome, and the populus Romanus

[+]

17.15 Khalili Centre Research Seminar

Wolfson College, Linton Road

Agnieszka Lic

Seventh- to Ninth-Century Churches in the Persian Gulf as ‘Museums of Forms’

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FRIDAY 16th November

10.00-11.30     Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Center, 66 St Giles

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

12.00-13.00     Byzantine Literature

Ioannou Center, 66 St Giles

Professor Lauxtermann

Posted in Byzness

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 5 / MT 2018

Important Note: There have been problems with the university website and we have not been able to confirm the location of several events that are not included in the OCLA booklet. We have used the usual venues of the seminars but please, double check before you show up for any of the following lectures.

MONDAY 5th November

15.30   OUBS Research Trip to Greece 1st Planning Session

History Faculty, Colin Matthew Room

[+]

17:00   The Crucible of Empire: The Sasanian World and its Religious Minorities

Wolfson College, Linton Road

Touraj Daryaee (University of California at Irvine)

Sometimes the Empire Strikes Back: The Sasanian Empire and its Religious Communities 

[+]

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, Wharton Room

Tom Licence (UEA)

Edward the Confessor’s Diplomas 

_ _ _

 

TUESDAY 6th November

14:15   Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Professor Galit Hasan-Rokem (Hebrew University)

Alexandria in the literary memory of the rabbis

[+]

15.30   Medieval Book Club

Various Speakers

Apocalypse as Heresy – Cathars, Joachites, & Hussites

[+]

17.00   Medieval Church and Culture Seminar: Power and Authority

Harris Manchester College, Mansfield Rd, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Christophe Masson (ERC-Project Music and Late Medieval European Court Cultures)

Cardinals’ palaces in Schismatic Avignon (1378-1403). When buildings are weapons

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WEDNESDAY 7th November

13.00   The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Annalisa Marzano, University of Reading

Grafting glory: the ideology and economy of Roman arboriculture

[+]

15.00   Arabic Epigraphy and Palaeography Reading Group

The Khalili Research Centre, 3 St John Street, lecture room (basement)

Dr Umberto Bongianino

Al-Andalus and the Maghrib, part I

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Professor Marc Lauxtermann

Story-telling east and west

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THURSDAY 8th November

11.00   Byzantine Art and Archaeology – a French perspective

Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, Basement Room 42

Vera Tchentsova

The later life of byzantine prophecies: the Klontsas manuscript in 17th century Russia

[+]

16.00   Antinous: boy made god

Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Marco Galli (Rome, La Sapienza) and Georgios Spyropoulos (Ephorate of Corinth)

Hadrian’s Legacy and the Villa of Herodes Atticus at Loukou

[+]

17.00   Late Roman Seminar

Corpus Christi College, Seminar Room

Claire Hall (Oxford)

Moses as prophet-sage in Philo and Origen

[+]

17.15   Khalili Centre Research Seminar

Wolfson College, Linton Road

Ayda Kaplan

Syriac Calligraphy: Introducing a Neglected Field of Study

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FRIDAY 9th November

10.00-11.30     Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Center, 66 St Giles

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

12.00-13.00     Byzantine Literature

Ioannou Center, 66 St Giles

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

17.00    The Cult of Saints in the First Millennium 

Danson Room, Trinity College

Christodoulos Papavarnavas (Vienna and Oxford)

Prison Space and Holiness in Martyr Narratives: A Literary Approach to Greek Passions

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 04/11/2018

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 4th November 2018
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

Oxford University Byzantine Society Research Trip to Greece 

Trip Dates: 3-13 April 2019. 

We will have the first planning session next Monday (5 November), at 15.30 at History Faculty, Colin Matthew Room.

Please come to get additional information about the trip, its draft itinerary and funding opportunities.

If you cannot attend but would like to find out more about the trip, please email Aikaterini.vavaliou@wadham.ox.ac.uk so as to be included in the list of those interested.

“English Bodies, Imported Silks: Byzantine Textiles in Thirteenth-century England”, 13 November 2018, Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA.

The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture at Hellenic College Holy Cross in Brookline, MA, is pleased to announce the fall lecture in its 2018–2019 lecture series: “English Bodies, Imported Silks: Byzantine Textiles in Thirteenth-century England”. Amanda Luyster discusses her project exploring the medieval English fascination with Byzantine and Islamic silks.

Details here.

Mary Jaharis Center lectures are co-sponsored by Harvard University Standing Committee on Medieval Studies.

For questions, contact Brandie Ratliff, Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture.

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2. CALLS FOR PAPERS 

“Narration in Byzantium: Synchronic and Diachronic Narratological Perspectives”, 3rd Byzantine Colloquium of the University of Buenos Aires, 29–30 August 2019, Section of Medieval Philology – Institute of Classical Philology, Faculty of Philosophy and Literature, University of Buenos Aires.

Deadline: 19 July 2019

The last years have witnessed a surge of narratological studies focusing on the vast Byzantine literary and artistic production, a recent example being the volume Storytelling in Byzantium. Narratological Approaches to Byzantine Texts and Images (ed. Ch. Messis – M. MulleJ – I. Nilsson). Today, Byzantinists apply sophisticated narratological techniques not only to narrative texts, but also to images and, in line with M. Fludernik’s theory, to non-narrative texts. A common language and a shared theoretical framework would be instrumental in making Byzantine narratological studies more unitary, in fostering the transdisciplinary dialogue with other fields of research, such as Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and in popularizing it among wider audiences.

In that context, the present colloquium wishes to provide Byzantinists and specialists in other disciplines with a forum of discussion and reflection on the narratological tools applied to their respective corpora, in order to conceptualize the specificity (or absence thereof) of Byzantine narration, from a synchronic and diachronic point of view, and to compare it, utilizing well-stablished and shared analytical categories, with other literary and artistic productions, contemporary or not.

We invite 20-minute papers on any topic pertinent to narrative in Byzantium in the widest sense. Please send your abstract no later than May 31, 2019 to tomas.fernandez@conicet.gov.ar, pablo.a.cavallero@gmail.com and reinhart.ceulemans@kuleuven.be.

Abstracts should 1000 characters or less (blank spaces included, but not counting bibliographical references), and should clearly state the hypothesis, goals and (expected) conclusions of the presentation.

Attendance of the conference will amount to 30 US$ ($500 for Agentina residents; $400 for members of SAEMED, AADEC or CAEBIZ). For students, doctoral students and research assistants, attendance is free.

Papers must be sent no later than July 19, 2019. 8 pp. Palatino Linotype 11; space between lines: 1½. Margins: 2 cm

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3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

1 Post-Doctoral Position within the Research Training Group for doctoral students 2304 “Byzantium and the Euro-Mediterranean Cultures of War. Exchange, Differentiation and Reception”, DFG (German Research Foundation), Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz.

Deadline: 23 November 2018

Within this span of time an individual research project which is both transcultural and transdisciplinary and dedicated to the topic of the Research Training Group is to be developed and carried out. Participating in this Research Training Group are the disciplines of Ancient History, Antique Church History/Theology, Byzantine Studies, Medieval History, Eastern European History, Early Modern Church History, Classical Archaeology and Byzantine Art History, Early and Prehistorical Archaeology (with a focus on Medieval Archaeology) and Musicology. Particularly desirable are projects that include Islamic history and culture.

The goal of the Research Training Group for doctoral students is to examine the Euro-Mediterranean Cultures of War and the importance of Byzantium for them from a transcultural perspective, from the Roman Imperial Period to the Early Modern Period. With cultures of war are understood to be the forms and practices of war as well as the norms, interpretations, attributions of meaning and reflections referring to war. The mutual processes of exchange, differentiation or reception (from antique influences in Byzantium to Byzantine models in the post-Byzantine Period) will be explored via two fields of inquiry, “Expressional Forms” and “Interpretative Concepts”. The prospective research must address one of these two fields of inquiry.

Duties include:

  1. Completion of a transcultural and transdisciplinary study
  2. Organization and management of a regular exchange with the doctoral students
  3. Co-editorship of a publication of proceedings from an international conference (2021/22), including the composition of an interdisciplinary methodological and theoretical introduction to it
  4. Support of both the doctoral students in the areas of methodology and theory as well as of the participating researchers in the further development of the program of study
  5. Regular participation in the events of the Research Training Group. For this reason, presence in Mainz is obligatory.

The Research Training Group offers intensive specialist and interdisciplinary exchange, opportunities to attain further qualifications in the sphere of Digital Humanities, the possibility of teaching and diverse opportunities for international networking.

Requirements for the application include an excellent dissertation in a participating or related field, that as a rule should not have been completed more than six years in the past, as well as experience in interdisciplinary work.

The Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz is keen on increasing the proportion of women within the sphere of scholarship and therefore especially welcomes applications from female researchers.

The following application materials are to be submitted electronically in a single .pdf file (in German or English):

  • Letter of application (one page)
  • Outline of the planned research project (three pages)
  • A curriculum vitae with list of publications, degree diplomas, information on scientific employment
  • Text of the dissertation and of an additional publication

The application materials along with two letters of recommendation from university-level instructors, who should submit their letters separately, are to be addressed to the Spokesman of the Research Training Group, Prof. Dr. Johannes Pahlitzsch (address: grk2304@uni-mainz.de; subject-line: grk2304_Last Name).

The application deadline is 23.11.2018.

For further information on the Research Training Group see here.

For subject-related questions please direct your queries to the corresponding participating researchers of the Research Training Group, other questions to the Spokesman.

AKMED Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship, Koç University.

Deadline: 31 December 2018

The Koç University Research Center for Mediterranean Civilizations (AKMED) will sponsor a post-doctoral researcher in the field of numismatics. The appointee’s primary duty will be to catalog the coins held in the collection of the Suna & İnan Kıraç Kaleiçi Museum, as well as preparing a catalog for future publication. The appointee will also be expected to participate in academic activities organized by AKMED and to assist the curator of a temporary exhibition on numismatics planned for the autumn of 2019. The post is full time, and will begin on February 1, 2019 and continue for 6 months thereafter. The appointee will reside in Antalya and receive a monthly stipend, as well as a meal card; if the appointee is from outside Antalya, he or she will also receive monthly accommodation assistance, and transportation support to/from Antalya. Candidates who have completed a doctorate in numismatics should have received their degree no earlier than 5 years prior to the date of appointment, and candidates should be no older than 45 years of age. At the time of application, candidates should not be employed at any institution. Candidates who satisfy the above conditions must apply directly to AKMED by December 31, 2018.

The application documents are as follows:

– A letter of application, including contact information

– Curriculum vitae, including lists of publications and projects in which the candidate has

taken part

– A research plan (maximum 1,000 words) detailing the candidate’s views, methods, and

planning in regard to the research and work expected

– Two letters of reference

– Application documents must be sent electronically to oyanardag@ku.edu.tr by December 31, 2018. Applications sent later than this date will not be taken into consideration.

GABAM-AKMED Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship in Byzantine Art And Archaeology, Koç University.

Deadline: 31 December 2018

Koç University Stavros Niarchos Foundation Center for Late Antique and Byzantine Studies (GABAM) and Koç University Research Center for Mediterranean Civilizations (AKMED) will sponsor a post-doctoral researcher in the fields of Byzantine art and archaeology. The post is full time, and will begin on February 1, 2019 and continue for 6 months thereafter. The appointee will be expected to present a research project in the areas of Byzantine art and archaeology, as well as to participate in academic activities organized by AKMED. The appointee will reside in Antalya and receive a monthly stipend, as well as a meal card; if the appointee is from outside Antalya, he or she will also receive monthly accommodation assistance, and transportation support to/from Antalya. Candidates who have completed a doctorate in Byzantine art or archaeology should have received their degree no earlier than 5 years prior to the date of appointment, and candidates should be no older than 45 years of age. At the time of application, candidates should not be employed at any institution. Candidates who satisfy the above conditions must apply directly to AKMED by December 31, 2018.

The application documents are as follows:

– A letter of application, including contact information

– Curriculum vitae, including lists of publications and projects in which the candidate has

taken part

– A research statement (maximum 1,000 words) detailing the candidate’s views, methods,

and planning in regard to the research and work expected

– Two letters of reference

– Application documents must be sent electronically to oyanardag@ku.edu.tr by December

31, 2018. Applications sent later than this date will not be taken into consideration. ​

Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute (CAARI) and Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC) Fellowships.

Deadline: 10 December 2018

CAARI in Nicosia, Cyprus, welcomes scholars and students specializing in archaeology, history, and culture of Cyprus and the eastern Mediterranean. CAARI is located in central Nicosia close to the Cyprus Museum and the Archaeological Research Unit of the University of Cyprus (both with major libraries), as well as the main business and commercial district. In addition to hostel accommodation for a total of twelve residents, the institute has excellent research facilities: a 10,000-volume library, comprehensive map and artifact collections, archival material, and facilities for Internet, scanning, and photography.

Recipients of fellowships are required to spend time as residents of CAARI and to submit a written report for the CAARI newsletter.

For further information see here. 

PhD program in Classics at USC.

Deadline: 5 January 2019

The Ph.D. program in classics at the University of Southern California’s Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences invites applications for admission to the USC Dornsife PhD program, which offers a 5-year funding package that consists of 3 years of fellowship and 2 years of teaching assistant support.

The Ph.D. program in classics at USC aims to train students to become scholars, teachers and interpreters of ancient Mediterranean civilizations, the Greek and Latin languages and literatures, and the traditions that have developed from them. To prepare students to work in a variety of intellectual contexts, the department seeks to provide both a traditional, substantive training in classical philology and the intellectual flexibility that will enable them to make the world of the past available to audiences of the present.

We welcome applications from outstanding candidates who have an undergraduate major in classics or the equivalent. The university particularly encourages underrepresented groups to apply.

The USC Dornsife PhD program offers a 5-year funding package that consists of 3 years of fellowship and 2 years of teaching assistant support (plus additional funding opportunities). Most students find fellowship or teaching opportunities for the following years.

For information on the program and how to apply, visit dornsife.usc.edu/clas/graduate/ and https://dornsife.usc.edu/clas/apply/

For questions, please contact: classics@dornsife.usc.edu or 213-740-3676.

All applicants are required to take the verbal and quantitative general tests of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE).

2 open rank positions in Global Art History, Department of Art History, College of Liberal Arts, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (UMTC).

Deadline: 15 November 2018

The Department of Art History in the College of Liberal Arts invites applications for two full-time, open rank faculty positions in Global Art History beginning in August 2019. Both positions begin fall semester 2019 (08/26/2019).

Appointments will be 100% time over the nine-month academic year (late-August to late-May). Appointments will be at the rank of tenure-track assistant professor, tenured associate professor, or tenured professor, depending on qualifications and experience, and consistent with collegiate and University policy. Both positions are open rank, but only one appointment may be made at the level of tenured associate professor or tenured full professor.

A Ph.D. or foreign equivalent in Art History or related field (ABD considered but Ph.D. is strongly preferred by appointment start date); college/university-level teaching experience; a promising record of research and publication. Salary is competitive.

Candidates will be evaluated according to a) overall quality of their academic preparation and scholarly work, b) relevance of their scholarly research to the department’s academic priorities and fields of inquiry, c) evidence of commitment to teaching and skills as a teacher, and d) strength of recommendations.

For further information see here.

 

 

Posted in Byzness

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 4 / MT 2018

MONDAY 29th October

11.00   Byzantine Art and Archaeology – a French perspective

Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, Basement Room 42

Michel Kazanski

The Eastern Roman Empire and the Barbarian peoples from the Northern and Eastern Black Sea regions (4th -7th c.) 

[+]

15.00   Medieval Archaeology Seminar

Institute of Archaeology Lecture Room

Marianne Hem Eriksson

The lives and deaths of houses in Iron and Viking Age Scandinavia

[+]

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, Wharton Room

Kate Sykes (Birmingham)

The Men in the Mirror: Marriage and Monastic Reform in Tenth-Century England

 

TUESDAY 30th October

14.15   Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Professor Jonathan Ben-Dov and Asaf Gayer (Haifa)

Prolegomena to the writings in cryptic script from Qumran

[+]

15.30   Medieval Book Club

Various Speakers

Apocalypse as History – Augustine, Jerome, & Orosius 

[+]

17.00   The Crucible of Empire: The Sasanian World and its Religious Minorities

Wolfson College, Linton Road

Simcha Gross (University of California at Irvine)

Babylonian Jews as Sasanian Jews: The Politics of Accommodation

[+]

17.00   OCLA, Middle East Centre & Faculty of Oriental Studies Special Event

Investcorp Lecture Theatre, St. Anthony’s College

Panel Discussion to mark the publication of Christian Martyrs under Islam: Religious Violence and the Making of the Muslim World by Christian C. Sahner.

The discussion will be led by Phil Booth, Julia Bray and John-Paul Ghobrial.

[+]

17.00   Medieval Church and Culture Seminar: Power and Authority

Harris Manchester College, Mansfield Rd, Charles Wellbeloved Room

David Zakarian (Oriental Institute/Pembroke)

The Authority and the Power of the Queen in Arsacid Armenia

 

WEDNESDAY 31st October

13.00   The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Amanda Kelly (University College Dublin)

The Aqueducts of Knossos

[+]

15.00   Arabic Epigraphy and Palaeography Reading Group

The Khalili Research Centre, 3 St John Street, lecture room (basement)

Dr Umberto Bongianino

The Ifrīqī milieu

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Dr James Howard-Johnston

The typology of nomad empires

 

THURSDAY 1st November

11.00   Byzantine Art and Archaeology – a French perspective

Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, Basement Room 42

Ioanna Rapti

Byzantine tradition, levantine audience and court culture: revisiting the Greek-Latin Hamilton psalter (Kupferstichkabinett 78.A.9)

[+]

12.00-13.00     Archaeomaterials Seminar

Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art, OX1 3QY

George Green

Chemical Analyses of Roman Gold Coins at the Ashmolean Museum (LA-ICP-MS, Muon Beam and XRF)

[+]

17.00   Late Roman Seminar

Corpus Christi College, Seminar Room

Julia Hillner (University of Sheffield)

The cycle and the void: Writing Helena

[+]

17.00   Heritage Pathway Training Sessions

Radcliffe Humanities, Woodstock Road, Seminar Room

Laurence Gouldbourne (Head of Diversity & Inclusion, National Trust), Dr Hannah Young (V&A), Rachel Harrison (Pitt Rivers Museum)

Diversifying Heritage

 

FRIDAY 2nd November

10.00-11.30     Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Center, 66 St Giles

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

12.00-13.00     Byzantine Literature

Ioannou Center, 66 St Giles

Professor Lauxtermann

 

SATURDAY 3rd November

17.00   The Herculaneum Society Lecture

Ioannou Center, 66 St Giles

Professor Bert Smith

The image and cult of Antinous, AD 130-138

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 28/10/2018

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 28th October 2018
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS 

Oxford University Byzantine Society Research Trip to Greece

Dates: 3-13 April 2019.

 We will have the first planning session next Monday (5 November), at 15.30 at the History Faculty, Colin Matthew room.

Please come to get additional information about the trip, its draft itinerary and funding opportunities.

If you cannot attend but would like to find out more about the trip, please email Aikaterini.vavaliou@wadham.ox.ac.uk so as to be included in the list of those interested.

“Remembering Mark Whittow: Historian, Teacher and Friend”, 3 November 2018, St Peter’s College, Oxford.

St Peter’s, Corpus Christi and Oriel Colleges invite all those who knew Dr Mark Whittow to share in a day that celebrates Mark’s academic work, teaching and friendship on Saturday, 3rd November 2018.

As well as this special event a fund has been set-up in memory of Mark, aimed at supporting the work of Byzantinists and historians and those with interests in archaeology, landscape and the material world.

An overview of the event and information to donate via each College can be found here.

“Migration and Mobility Across the Roman-Persian Frontier, 3rd-7th c. A.D.”, 13-15 December 2018, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany. 

Thursday 13th December

Oberschulamt, Keplerstraße 2, Hörsaal 001

19.00 – Keynote Lecture

James Howard-Johnston (Oxford)

‘Military and political mobility within and across the Eastern Roman-Sasanid Persian frontier regions’

Friday 14th December

Schloss Hohentübingen, Fürstenzimmer

9.30-10.00 – Registration

10.00-10.15 – Introduction – Ekaterina Nechaeva (Tübingen) / Alexander Sarantis (Tübingen)

10.15-11.15 – Sassanid Persia

Salvatore Liccardo (Vienna) – ‘Representing Persia: geography of otherness in the Tabula Peutingeriana

Yuliya Minets (Princeton) – ‘“Rushing noise” and “mingled clamor”: The Persian language and its speakers from the perspective of their western neighbours in Late Antiquity’

11.15-11.45 Coffee

11.45-12.45 – Mobility & Technology Transfer

Giulio Maresca (Naples) – ‘Bridges between Rome and Persia’

Brahim M’Barek (Strasbourg) – ‘Roman military architecture on the Eastern frontier in the context of population and technology transfer’

12.45-14.30 – Lunch

14.30-15.30 – Religions & Mobility: Going East I

Josef Rist (Bochum) – ‘Bischof Maruta von Maiperqat: Spätantike Kirchenpolitik zwischen Rom und Persien’

Luise Marion Frenkel (Cambridge) – ‘Roman missionary activity in 4th to 5th c. Sassanid Persia’

15.30 – 15.45 – Comfort break

15.45 – 16.45 – Religions & Mobility: Going East II

Zofia Brzozowska (Łódź) – ‘Captives and refugees. The forced migration of the inhabitants of the Byzantine eastern frontier during the 6th-7th centuries in light of Byzantine hagiographical texts’

Craig Morley (Chester) – ‘The forced movement of Christians across the Roman-Sassanian frontier’

16.45-17.15 – Coffee

17.15-18.15 – Religions & Mobility: Going West

Daniel Oltean (Leuven) – ‘Borrowing religious models, shaping local identity: East Syrian monastic mobility across the Roman-Persian frontier (4th-7th centuries)’

Shihong Lin (Manchester) – ‘A Saint on the move: the life and afterlives of St Golinduch’

Saturday 15th December

Schloss Hohentübingen, Fürstenzimmer 

9.30-11.00 – Transcaucasia and Armenia

Ian Colvin (Cambridge) – ‘Controlling migration and mobility in Lazika and the south Caucasus, 3rd-7th c. A.D.’

Frank Schleicher (Jena) – ‘Das Imperium als Arbeitplatz. Iberer in römischen Diensten’

Teresa Wolińska (Łódź) – ‘In search of a better patron: Armenian warriors in Persian and Byzantine service in the 6th century’

11.00-11.30 – Coffee

11.30-12.30 – Warfare & Nomads

Georgios Kardaras (Athens) – ‘The steppe nomads in the frame of the Byzantine-Persian conflicts (491-565)’

Jakob Ecker (Innsbruck) – ‘Huns at the gates. The depiction of Huns as influencing Roman-Persian relations in Procopius and Pseudo-Zachariah’

12.30-13.00 – Concluding Discussion

====

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

“Seventh Century Syrian Numismatic Round Table”, 6-7 April 2019, ‘The Hive’, Worcester.

The Round Table aims to bring together numismatists, historians and archaeologist with an interest in Late Antiquity/Early Islam in Syria/Palestine and the surrounding area. We hold small informal conferences at roughly two-yearly intervals which usually include at least twelve papers with ample time allowed for discussion. The central focus is the Syrian Arab-Byzantine coinage, but papers can cover Byzantine or Post-Reform Umayyad coinage, or deal with aspects of the history or archaeology of Syria/Palestine. We also normally include one or two papers on related topics (e.g. seals, weights etc.) or adjacent localities (e.g. Egypt or the Sasanian Empire). Papers sometimes present completed pieces of research, but more often they deal with ‘work in progress’.

If you are interested in presenting a paper (or would just like more information about the conference) please contact Tony Goodwin on a.goodwin2@btopenworld.com. Presentations should normally last no more than 40 minutes, but much shorter papers are equally acceptable. A short abstract will be circulated before the conference and the papers will be published in full in the conference proceedings. The Hive conference centre in Worcester was the very successful venue for our last but one conference in 2013.

2nd Annual International Conference on Classical and Byzantine Studies, 3-4 June 2019, Athens, Greece.

Deadline: 5 November 2018

Sponsored by the Athens Journal of Philology, the Athens Journal of History, the Athens Journal of Humanities & Arts, the Athens Journal of Mediterranean Studies and the Athens Journal of Architecture.

Please note that all our conferences are non-thematic as explained in our policy (click here). However, academic members and friends can take the lead to organize and chair a stream as part of this conference. Please click here to see our members’ and friends’ stream-panel proposals that are being organized as part of this conference.

Academic member responsible for the conference:

Important dates:

  • Deadline to submit abstracts: 5 November 2018 (Decisions are reached in less than 4 weeks after the abstract submission-Please click herefor our policy on abstract and paper acceptance).
  • Deadline to register with a paper presentation: Please see your acceptance letter sent to you after submitting the abstract.
  • Deadline to register without a presentation: At least one month before the conference subject to approval.
  • Deadline to submit full papers: 6 May 2019 (Unless otherwise is specified in your acceptance letter). Click here for Paper Guidelines. Please submit the paper only if the abstract submission has been officially accepted. ATINER does not consider papers for publication if they are not presented by the author at one of its conferences. Please submit your paper using the following paper submission form (click here).

====

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

ANAMED 2019-2020 Fellowships.

Deadline: 15 December 2018 

Koç University invites applications for PhD, Post-Doctoral, and Senior Fellowships at Koç University’s Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations (ANAMED). Additionally, several Joint Fellowships with specific application criteria are available as well.

All ANAMED fellows are expected to devote themselves full time to their research projects, to be active members of Koç University’s academic community, and, for full-year fellowships, to give two lectures on their work during the course of the year.

AWARDED FELLOWS WILL RECEIVE:

  • A monthly stipend calculated by Koç University each year to cover most local expenses not covered by the fellowship
  • Accommodation at ANAMED’s residential facility in the center of Beyoğlu, Istanbul
  • Five meals per week
  • Transportation to and from Turkey
  • A modest research budget
  • Health insurance
  • Residence permit
  • Full access to the ANAMED Library, its library services, affiliates (via BiblioPera), and online resources
  • Full access to lectures, symposia, and other activities at ANAMED and on the main Koç University campus
  • Museum cards

For further information, please visit the ANAMED website.

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 21/10/2018

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 21st October 2018
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

“Byzantine Epigraphy: Texts and Contexts”, Byzantine Studies Center, Bogazici University, 4-5 November 2018, Bogazici University, Istanbul. 

Deadline: 26 October 2018

Organised by Andreas Rhoby (Austrian Academy of Sciences) and Ida Toth (Oxford University)

It is well known and widely acknowledged that many aspects of ancient Greek and Roman civilization can be accessed only through inscriptional source material. Administrative and legislative actions, and the acts of beneficence, commemoration, and thanksgiving all depended for their promulgation on publically displayed and highly visible epigraphs. Such traditions continued throughout Late Antiquity, a time during which inscriptions still functioned as official announcements as well as becoming an effective way to confess, express, and spread the new religion endorsed by the Roman State – Christianity.

Even after Late Antiquity (ca. AD 600), inscriptions persisted as regular features of Byzantine written culture until, as well as beyond, the fall of Constantinople in 1453. Although there was some decline in the production of stone and mosaic inscriptions, new epigraphic media were employed, such as monumental fresco inscriptions and epigrams on movable objects. Byzantium preserved earlier and produced new inscriptional material: this epigraphic heritage encompasses multiple habits and traditions, and it draws meaning from its distinct archeological, iconographic, topographical, and historical contexts.

The two-day seminar, organized by the Bogazici University Byzantine Studies Research Center, will address a wide range of issues relating to Byzantine epigraphic traditions with an aim to show how diverse kinds of inscribed writings contribute to our knowledge of the society and culture that produced them.

The classes, held in English, will take place at the Byzantine Studies Research Center and in a number of Byzantine sites in Istanbul. Participants will receive a certificate at the end of the program.

The deadline for application is 26 October 2018. For more detail on the program and the application process, please visit the webpage of the Boğaziçi University Byzantine Studies Research Center here.

ANDREAS RHOBY

Andreas Rhoby works at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Medieval Research. He is deputy head of the Division of Byzantine Research, where he also functions as group leader of the research cluster “Communities and Landscapes”. In addition, he is a Privatdozent at the University of Vienna and chair of the commission “Corpus Fontium Historiae Byzantinae” and, together with Ida Toth, a coordinator of the International Commission for Byzantine Epigraphy of the Association Internationale des Etudes Byzantines. His publications include a 4-volume corpus of Byzantine inscriptional epigrams. His main research interests are Byzantine literature, especially poetry, epigraphy and cultural history.

IDA TOTH

Ida Toth holds the posts of Senior Lecturer and Research Fellow at Oxford University, where she convenes graduate courses in Byzantine Greek and Byzantine Epigraphy. She is a historian of Byzantine literary culture with research interests in rhetoric, narrative prose, and public display of texts. She has published on late Byzantine imperial orations, on the medieval Greek and Slavonic transmission of wisdom literature, and on Byzantine inscriptional traditions in the seventh, eleventh and thirteenth centuries. She is a member of the Executive Committee of the Society for the Promotion of Byzantine Studies, and, together with Andreas Rhoby, a coordinator of the International Commission for Byzantine Epigraphy (AIEB).

 “Sailing to Byzantium: Insular and Coastal Urban Spaces In The Medieval Mediterranean”, 9 November 2018, Bilkent University, Ankara. 

Welcome Speeches

10.00

 

H.E. LUIGI MATTIOLO, Ambassador of Italy to Turkey

Dr. DAVID THORNTON, Chair, Department of History

Session I

10.30-11.30

 

 

SALVATORE COSENTINO (University of Bologna) – Insularity, economy and social countryside in the early Byzantine period

MATTHEW HARPSTER (Koç University) – Rebuilding the Maritime Landscape of Medieval Amalfi

Coffee Break  
Session II

11.45-12.45

 

 

 

ENRICO ZANINI (University of Siena) – Gortyn of Crete: one archaeological site and four (basic) ideas about the Byzantine insular city

LUCA ZAVAGNO (Bilkent University) – “Cities of Islands”: brief notes on Byzantine insular urbanism in the early Middle Ages.

Lunch Break  
Session III

14.00-15.30

SCOTT KENNEDY (Bilkent University) – In search of the Ideal State: Utopia and the Sea in Bessarion’s Encomium of Trabzon.

MACIT TEKINALP (Hacettepe University) – Late Antique Arykanda and the Arif Kale in Lycia

NATHAN LEIDHOLM (Bilkent University) – A Turkish Basileus in Smyrna: Tzachas/Çaka Bey between Byzantium and the Seljuqs, ca.1080-1100

“Histoire de la période paléologue (1261-1453): Byzance, Orient latin, monde slave”, Séminaire organisé par Marie-Hélène Blanchet (UMR 8167 Orient et Méditerranée, Monde byzantin) et Raúl Estangüi Gómez (Université Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne), 2018-9,  Sorbonne.

11.10.2018 Raúl ESTANGÜI GÓMEZ (Université Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne)

Byzance et les Turcs (XIIIe-XVe siècle): un état de la question

Marie-Hélène BLANCHET (UMR 8167, CNRS)

Bilan des publications récentes sur Bessarion

15.11.2018 Giannis DEMETRACOPOULOS (Université de Patras)

Late Byzantine Philosophy: current approaches

06.12.2018 Thierry GANCHOU (UMR 8167, CNRS)

LEnquête archivistique sur les antécédents byzantins de Géôrgios Palaiologos Dishypatos alias Georges de Bissipat, seigneur de Hannaches et vicomte de Falaise (1473-1496)

11.01.2019 Pagona PAPADOPOULOU (Université Aristote, Thessalonique)

La monnaie à l’époque des Paléologues

17.01.2019 Job GETCHA (Institut d’études supérieures en théologie orthodoxe, Chambésy, Suisse)

Le Traité sur les sacrements de Job Hamartolos (fin XIIIe siècle)

08.02.2019

 

Marco SCARPA (Académie bulgare des sciences, Sofia)

Traductions et traducteurs slaves au XIVe siècle

21.03.2019

 

Luigi SILVANO (Université de Turin)

Réécritures paléologues de récits sur la fin du monde et sur le monde à venir. Bilan des études et perspectives de recherche

11.04.2019

 

Jean SCHNEIDER (Université de Lyon II / UMR 5189 HiSoMA)

Les lettres de Maxime Planude et le genre littéraire de la lettre

23.05.2019

 

Smilja DUSANIĆ (Université de Belgrade)

La représentation du souverain serbe dans les Mémoires de Jean VI Cantacuzène

====

 2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

Sudan Studies Postgraduate Conference 3: Oxford Edition, 4 May 2019, loannou Centre, University of Oxford. 

Deadline: 31 January 2019

After the success of the last two events, we invite paper and poster proposals from postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers working on subjects with a focus on Sudan (ancient and modern), for this the third year of the 2019 Sudan Studies Postgraduate Conference.

This one-day Conference will be held at the University of Oxford with the aim to bring together researchers in order to explore new innovative approaches to research in Sudan and South Sudan and to encourage connections across disciplines.

The event has been organised through a collaboration of current postgraduate students from both universities.

Please send an abstract (200-word max) for either a poster or podium presentation to DUSESG@hotmail.com by 31 January 2019.

Confirmation of acceptance will be issued by 28 February 2019.

For further information, please send an email to DUSESG@hotmail.com to contact the conference organisers: Samantha Tipper (Durham University), Lettie Ki/roe (University of Oxford) and Siobhan Shinn (University of Oxford).

“Recovering the Ritual Object in Medieval and Early Modern Art”, AAH Conference, 4–6 April 2019, Brighton.

Deadline: 5 November 2018 

Session Convenors: Dr Catriona Murray, University of Edinburgh, c.a.murray@ed.ac.uk; Dr Halle O’Neal, University of Edinburgh, halle.o’neal@ed.ac.uk

In the medieval and early modern worlds, ritual served as a legitimising process, a dynamic mechanism for mediating a transference or transformation of status. Objects played an essential part in this performative practice, charged with symbolism and invested with power. Distanced from their original contexts, however, these artefacts have often been studied for their material properties, disconnecting function from form and erasing layers of meaning. The relationships between ritual objects and ritual participants were identity-forming, reflecting and shaping belief structures. Understanding of how these objects were experienced as well as viewed, is key to revealing their significances.

This panel intends to relocate ritual objects at the centre of both religious and secular ceremonies, interrogating how they served as both signifiers and agents of change. The organisers specialise in early modern British art and medieval Japanese art, and so we invite proposals from a range of geographical perspectives, in order to investigate this subject from a cross-cultural perspective. We particularly encourage papers which discuss medieval and early modern ritual objects—broadly defined —as social mediators.

Issues for discussion include but are not limited to:

– Recovery of the everyday in ritual objects

– Embodiment

– Audiences and interactions

– Performativity

– Ritual object as emotional object

– Spatiality and temporality

– Re-use, recycling, removal

– Illusion and imagination

– Memory

– Thing theory

How to apply: Please email your paper proposal direct to the session convenors, details above. Provide a title and abstract (250 words maximum) for a 25-minute paper, your name and institutional affiliation (if any).

The call for papers is also published here.

====

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Villa I Tatti–Boğaziçi University Joint Postdoctoral Fellowship (2019-2020).

Deadline: 15 November 2018 

The Byzantine Studies Research Center of Boğaziçi University in Istanbul and Villa I Tatti – The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies in Florence offer a joint residential fellowship for the 2019-2020 academic year. Scholars will spend the fall term (September-December) in Istanbul and the spring term (January-June) in Florence. The fellowship will be open to scholars whose research focuses on the interaction between Italy and the Byzantine Empire (ca. 1300 to ca. 1700).

For further information please visit the website.

Posted in Byzness

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 3 / MT 2018

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 3

Michaelmas Term 2018

= = = = =

MONDAY 22nd October

15.30 LABS Coffee and Cake Event

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

This is an opportunity for the new LABS students to meet, alongside their tutors and supervisors, emeriti and research fellows.

[+]

17:00   The Crucible of Empire: The Sasanian World and its Religious Minorities

The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH), Woodstock Road

Albert de Jong (Universiteit Leiden)

Serial Orthodoxy: State, Faith and Power in the Sasanian Empire

TUESDAY 23rd October

14:15 Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Professor Sarah Pearce (Southampton)

Cleopatra and the Jews

[+]

17.00 OCLA Lecture

Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College

Dr Konstantin Golev (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences)

Facing the Steppe Winds: The Cuman-Qipchaq Frontiers with Rus’ and Khwarazm compared

 

WEDNESDAY 24th October

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Angela Trentacoste (Oxford)

Morphological changes in ancient Italian livestock: Romanisation, intensification, or something else?

[+]

15.00 – 17.00 Arabic Epigraphy and Palaeography Reading Group

The Khalili Research Centre, 3 St John Street, lecture room (basement)

Dr Umberto Bongianino

The Abbasid horizon

[+]

17.00 Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Professor Jaś Elsner

Looking east: Christian art outside the world of Christian hegemony 

[+]

17.00 Oxford Archaeological Fieldwork Seminar

Institute of Archaeology Lecture Room, 36 Beaumont Street

Dr Sophie Moore (Cardiff)

Interpreting Medieval Anatolian Burials: What to do with Unexpected

Byzantines

 

THURSDAY 25th October

12.00-13.00 Archaeomaterials Seminar

Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art, OX1 3QY

Peter Bray

The Science of Exhaustion: “what happens after we analyse ALL the metal?”

[+]

17.00 Late Roman Seminar

Corpus Christi College, Seminar Room

Margaret Atkins (Boarbank Hall / Blackfriars)

Augustine on Lying 

[+]

17.15 Khalili Centre Research Seminar

Wolfson College, Linton Road

Robert Schick

The Decline of Christianity in Southern Jordan after the Muslim Conquest

 

FRIDAY 26th October

10.00-11.30 Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Center

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

12.00-13.00 Byzantine Literature

Ioannou Centre

Professor Lauxtermann

[+]

17.00 The Cult of Saints in the First Millennium Seminar Series hosts a special OCLA Event

Danson Room, Trinity College

Phil Booth, Marek Jankowiak and Richard Price

Book launch: Richard Price, The Acts of the Second Council of Nicaea (787), Translated Texts for Historians 68, Liverpool University Press.

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness 08/10/2018

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 7th October 2018
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

  1. NEWS AND EVENTS

“The Byzantine Commonwealth 50 years on: empires and their afterlife”, University of Oxford Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar, Michaelmas Term 2018, Ioannou Centre for Classical & Byzantine Studies, Oxford. 

Wednesdays, 17.00, Lecture Theatre

The seminar forms a continuation of the theme “The Byzantine Commonwealth 50 years on: empires and their afterlife”, which was the subject of a two-day conference at Worcester College, Oxford on 27-28 September 2018, celebrating the centenary of the birth of Sir Dimitri Obolensky, one of the outstanding Byzantine historians of the 20th century. Both conference and seminar series aim to return to some of the lines of enquiry and themes that Obolensky explored in his writings, the singularity of Byzantium and the empire’s place in the Eurasian world, and its interaction with other societies, cultures and powers.

Week 1

(10 Oct)

Professor Elizabeth Jeffreys

Byzantine literature in the Slavic world: serendipity or intention?

Week 2

(17 Oct)

Dr Catherine Holmes

Centres, peripheries and networks: an impossible triangle to square in Byzantium?

Week 3

(24 Oct)

Professor Jaś Elsner

Looking east: Christian art outside the world of Christian hegemony

Week 4

(31 Oct)

Dr James Howard-Johnston

The typology of nomad empires

Week 5

(7 Nov)

Professor Marc Lauxtermann

Story-telling east and west

Week 6

(14 Nov)

Dr Phil Booth

Byzantium and the Miaphysite commonwealth

Week 7

(21 Nov)

Dr Ida Toth

Antiquity and identity in Byzantine, Italian and Ottoman cultures

Week 8

(28 Nov)

Professor Dame Averil Cameron

Empire and commonwealth today

Each seminar will be followed by a wine reception.

==== 

  1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

 “Ideological and cultural reception of Byzantium by other cultures (7th-15th centuries)”, 39th Symposium of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Archaeology and Art, ChAE, 31 May – 2 June 2019, Byzantine and Christian Museum, Athens.

Deadline: 5 March 2019

 The 39th Symposium of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Archaeology and Art of the Christian Archaeological Society will be held in Athens on 31 May to 2 June 2019.

The one-day special topic of the 39th Symposium of the ChAE Ideological and Cultural Reception of Byzantium by other cultures (7th-15th centuries) is the continuation of the special topic of the 38th Symposium Seeking the place of the “other” in Byzantium which explored the impact of other religious and ethnic groups on the material culture and the artistic production of Byzantium. The special topic of the 39th Symposium will attempt to complete the picture by investigating the image of Byzantium and its ideological and cultural reception by others, especially by its neighbors, Slavs, Russians, Georgians, Armenians, Seljuk and Ottoman Turks, Arabs, Normans, Scandinavians, Venetians, Genoese, Franks and other Crusaders etc.

Thanks to its military, diplomatic, and cultural supremacy, the Byzantine empire was diachronically a model for imitation and a reference point for foreign peoples. The great impact of this ecumenical uniqueness that characterized the period of the empire’s apogee (843-1071), was gradually reduced when the European states of the West shifted their attention toward the East (1071-1204), but this change was not entirely perceived by the ruling dynasty, state officials, economic elites and intellectuals during the difficult circumstances of the last period (1204-1453).

The purpose of the Symposium’s special topic, as a continuation of last year’s discussions, is to investigate the cultural and politico-economic image of the Byzantine empire its coreligionists, on heterodox peoples and followers of other religions with whom Byzantium came into contact from the 7th century to the Fall of 1453. More specifically, during the Symposium we will examine evidence of material culture and artistic expressions of these peoples with reference to Byzantium. The aim is to evaluate the image other peoples had of the Byzantine state, the Byzantine economy, Byzantine technology, Byzantine society, and the expression of Byzantine culture and civilization.

Apart from major papers, which the Organizing Committee will assign to specialists in the field, thematically relevant communications of 15 minutes’ duration will be presented on the same day.

Themes to be addressed during the Symposium may include:

  • The reception of Byzantium by others, especially by neighboring cultures and its function as a model. The imaginary Byzantium from the point of view of others and especially of neighbors (presentation by period and region with reference to appropriate written sources and works, e.g. terms for offices and dignities, legislation, liturgy, coins, seals, hagiography etc.).
  • Patrons (social strata, rulers, aristocrats, laymen, clergymen), appearance/attire, epigraphic evidence.
  • Byzantine echoes in the typology and form of monuments in other, especially neighboring lands (urban planning, secular architecture, church architecture, funerary architecture, architectural sculpture).
  • Byzantine traces in the artistic expression of other and especially neighboring lands (iconographic and decorative subjects, modes of painting, painters/ateliers and commissions).
  • Byzantine models in material culture, in works of everyday life and luxury items, technological achievements of other and especially neighboring lands (pottery, tools, metalwork-vessels-jewelry-weaponry, etc.).

The language of the Symposium is Greek.

Speakers from abroad may deliver their papers in English or French.

It is reminded that papers should be original and constitute a substantial contribution to scholarship. They must not exceed 15 minutes in length. The subjects of communications should fall within the framework of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Archaeology and Art. The Administrative Board has decided not to consider papers dealing with monuments that postdate 1830. Each participant can deliver only one paper, even if this is in collaboration with other speaker(s). Please indicate upon submission, whether proposed paper is intended for the special topic of the Symposium.

Due to the large number of papers submitted for the annual ChAE Symposium, the organizers encourage all those planning to present work involving excavations, restoration projects, and the conservation of art works and monuments to make use of the alternative method of presenting their contributions in the form of posters. Participants will assume the responsibility for creating and printing their posters (60×85 cm. [A1]), whereas their display in a specially-designed space will be the responsibility of the Organizing Committee. Posters should be submitted to the Organizing Committee on the morning preceding the opening of the Symposium. During the Symposium participants with posters will be allotted time to present their contribution to the audience. Please indicate upon submission whether proposed paper concerns a communication in poster form.

As in previous Symposia, the summaries of contributions will be published. The resulting publication has the character of a preliminary presentation. Those interested are requested to send by e-mail together with their application the summary of their contribution (major paper, communication, poster presentation) without footnotes or bibliography, in accordance with the following specifications (line drawings may be included):

  • The speaker’s name (last name, first name), his title and affiliation, and title of their contribution in upper case letters should come first.
  • The summary should include no fewer than 250 and in no case more than 400 words
  • A short abstract of about 100 words.
  • In cases where 1 or 2 drawings are included, the text should not be shorter than 350 words in length. The drawings should be submitted as TIFF files.
  • Suggested font: Times New Roman, size 12, line spacing 1.5.
  • At the end of the summary, speakers are requested to provide their e-mail and postal address, as well as a contact telephone number.

The Board of the Christian Archaeological Society and the Organizing Committee of the 39th Symposium of the ChAE reserves the right to propose changes or reject abstracts which:

  • do not deal with the fields of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine archaeology and art,
  • do not meet the standards of originality and contribution to scholarship,
  • include personal attacks,
  • are submitted afterthe deadline.

Applications along with abstracts should be sent by e-mail to chae1884@gmail.com.

Applications accompanied by summaries will be accepted until Tuesday, 5 March 2019.

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  1. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

2-year Postdoc Position (F/M) at the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna

Deadline: 5 November 2018

Within the framework of the ERC Project Neoplatonism and Abrahamic Traditions. A Comparative Analysis of the Middle East, Byzantium and the Latin West (9th-16th Centuries), there is a 2-year postdoc opportunity hosted by the Institute for Medieval Research at the Austrian Academy

of Sciences in Vienna. The successful candidate will work on the reception of Proclus’ Elements of Theology in Byzantium. The deadline is 5 November.

Please refer here for more information.

For further inquiries contact Dr Dragos Calma.

Posted in Byzness

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 1 / MT 2018

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

= = = = =

MONDAY 8th October

17.00 Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, Wharton Room

Dr Cordelia Beattie (Edinburgh)

Willing Wives: Probate, Property and Piety in Late Medieval England

[+]

17:00   The Crucible of Empire: The Sasanian World and its Religious Minorities

Wolfson College, Linton Road

Dr Shai Secunda (Bard College)

A Babylonian Babel: The Sasanians and the Crystallization of Judaism

 

TUESDAY 9th October

10.00-11.30 Byzantine Numismatics

Ashmolean Museum, Floor 2, Coin Study Centre

Dr Baker

An Introduction 

[+]

14:15 Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Dr James Aitken (Cambridge)

Homeric rewriting in Greek Sirach [Septuagint Forum]

[+]

15.30 Medieval Book Club

Merton College

Various Speakers

Satirical Apocalypse – The Apocalypse of Golias

[+]

17.00 Transnational and Global History Seminar (TGHS)

Nuffield College. Butler Room,

Graduate Welcome Event

Roundtable: How are Graduate Students practicing Global History at Oxford? 

[+]

17.00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar

Harris Manchester College, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Dr Conrad Leyser (Worcester)

Trustworthy Men? Law and Priestly Power in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages

 

WEDNESDAY 10th October

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Professor Andrew Wilson (Oxford)

Water-powered marble sawing at Aphrodisias

[+]

15.00 – 17.00 Arabic Epigraphy and Palaeography Reading Group

The Khalili Research Centre, 3 St John Street, lecture room (basement)

Dr Umberto Bongianino

The formative period

[+]

3.30-4.30 [Late Antique and Byzantine] Epigraphy

Ioannou Centre

Dr Toth

An Introduction

[+]

17.00 Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar

The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Professor Elizabeth Jeffreys (Oxford)

Byzantine literature in the Slavic world: serendipity or intention?

[+]

17.00 Oxford Archaeological Fieldwork Seminar

Institute of Archaeology Lecture Room, 36 Beaumont Street

Matt Hitchcock (Manchester), with discussant Dr Melanie Giles (Manchester)

Methods in Matter: Archives as Archaeology

 

THURSDAY 11th October

9.30-10.00 Theology [Late Antique and Byzantine Studies]

Danson Room, Trinity College

Dr Booth

An Introduction

[+]

16.00 Antinous: boy made god

Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’

Elena Calandra (Istituto Centrale per l’Archeologia, Rome)

From Egypt to Hadrian’s Villa: the construction of the image of Antinoos

[+]

17.00 Late Roman Seminar

Corpus Christi College, Al-Jabar Auditorium

Professor Andrew Wilson (Oxford)

The walls of Carthage and the date of Augustine’s De Trinitate

[+]

17.15 Khalili Centre Research Seminar

Wolfson College, Linton Road

Hassan Chahdi

The Qur’an, its Transmission and Textual Variants: Confronting Early Manuscripts and Written Traditions

 

FRIDAY 12th October

10.00 Byzantine Literature

Ioannou Centre

Professor Lauxtermann & Dr Toth

An Introduction

Posted in Byzness