Oxford Listings – Week 6

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 6


Hilary Term 2018

= = = = =


MONDAY 19th February

15:00
Greek Paleography Lecture
Ioannou Centre


Nigel Wilson


[+]


15:00
Medieval Archaeology Seminar
Lecture Room, Institute of Archaeology


Matt Austin

‘Great Hall Complexes’: Elite Residences and Landscapes of Power in Early England, c. AD 550-700

[+]


17:00
Medieval History Seminar
Wharton Room, All Souls


Ian Forrest (Oxford)

Trustworthy men: how inequality and faith made the medieval Church

TUESDAY 20th February

9:00
Mosaics and Society in Late Antiquity
Ioannou Centre


Stefanie Lenk

Merely decorative? How mosaics in baptisteries shape the ritual

[+]


14:00
Byzantine Epigraphy
Ioannou Centre


Ida Toth


[+]


17:00
Medieval Church and Culture Seminar (Medieval Islam)
Charles Wellbeloved Room, Harris Manchester


Peter Frankopan (Oxford)


Ibn Fadlan, historicity and the value of knowledge in the Abbasid Caliphate

WEDNESDAY 21st February

17:00
Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar
Ioannou Centre


Emilio Bonfiglio

Cultural Mobility in Late Antique Armenia

THURSDAY 22nd February

11:00
Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Archaeology Seminar
Ioannou Centre


Rachele Ricceri (Ghent)

See the beauty of these writings: visual elements of Byzantine book epigrams

[+]


14:00
Khalili Centre Research Seminar
Lecture Room Khalili Research Centre


Eloise Brac de la Perriere (Paris-Sorbonne)

In the light of the Gwalior Koran: contextualising the Bihari manuscripts in Sultanate India

[+]


14:00
Late Roman Seminar
Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College


Silvia Orlandi (Rome)

TBC

FRIDAY 23rd February

10:00
Byzantine Text Seminar – Constantine VII
Ioannou Centre


Michael Featherstone

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Posted in Oxford Listings

Byzness 18/02/18

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 18th February 2018
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS
2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

WORKSHOP: Syriac and its Users in the Earl Modern World, 1500-1700, 15-16 March 2018, Christ Church Oxford

Speakers include:
Colin Clarke, Philip Forness, Erica Hunter, Ephrem Ishac, John-Paul Ghobrial, George Kiraz, András Mércz, Sergey Minov, Heleen Murre-van den Berg, Radu Mustaţă, Lucy Parker, István Perczel, Anton Pritula, Hidemi Takahashi and David Taylor

Preregistration, by February 26, is essential. Please contact lucy.parker@history.ox.ac.uk

This workshop is held in association with the European Research Council-funded project ‘Stories of Survival: Recovering the Connected Histories of Eastern Christianity in the Early Modern World’; for more information visit storiesofsurvival.history.ox.ac.uk. The workshop is also generously funded by the John Fell Fund.

CONFERENCE: Late Antique Funerary Practices, 17 March 2018, Birkbeck

This conference reviews the state of late antique funerary practices, on a thematic basis, from scientific examinations of skeletons and their DNA, to treatments of the deceased body, to the nature of memorial structures and how they were treated over time.

(A) DEMOGRAPHY

(i) OSTEOLOGY: LATE ANTIQUE LIVES FROM BONES

09.45-10.45 Flavio de Angelis (Sop. Arch. Di Roma) and Andrea Battistini (Sop. Arch. Di Roma) Lives from Bones: Anthropological Evaluation in the City of Rome

(ii) BIOMOLECULES IN LATE ANTIQUITY (ISOTOPES, DIET, MIGRATION, EPIDEMIC, ENDEMIC DISEASE)

11.00-11.30 Alexandra Chavarria (Padova) Northern Italy

11.30-12.00 Mathew Emery (McMaster) Southern Italy (via Skype)

(B) RITUALS AND IDENTITIES: DEATH RITUALS AND TREATMENT OF THE BODY

12.15-12.45 Rhea Brettell (Bradford) Organic residues from mortuary contexts (Britain).

12.45-13.15 Thibaut Devièse (Oxford) Colourants and dyes

Respondant: Béatrice Caseau (Paris IV) Treatment of the body: Ointments and perfumes

(C) COMMEMORATION, MONUMENTS, FUNERARY TOPOGRAPHY

(i) MEMORIALS – LATE ANTIQUE COMMEMORATION,

14.00-14.30 Zsolt Magyar (?Budapest) Mausolea in Pannonia

14.30-15.00 Chris Sparey-Green (Kent) Mausolea in NW Europe

(ii) SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS OF DEAD TO LIVING

15.15-15.45 Judit Ciurana Prast (Barcelona) Funerary Landscapes of Catalonia

15.45-16.15 Efthymios Rizos (Oxford) Christian elite burials in Anatolia / Constantinople & the cult of relics

(iii) MEMORIAL AND OBLIVION: SPOLIA AND ATTITUDES TO TOMBS

16.30-16.45 Luke Lavan (Kent) Spolia and the archaeology of memory

16.45-17.15 Douglas Underwood (Kent) City walls and tomb destruction (Skype)

17.15-17.45 Nick Mishkovsky (Kent) City walls and tomb preservation

17.45-18.00 Conclusion.

All are welcome. Admission 25 GBP, 10 GBP Students. Registration is via Eventbrite: https://laaburial2018.eventbrite.co.uk

Venue: Room 421 inside Birkbeck College, Malet Street, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 7HX. Metro: Russell Square.

====
2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

The 44th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference, 4-7 October 2018, San Antonio, Texas

Deadline: 15 March 2018

The Forty-fourth Annual Byzantine Studies Conference (BSC) will be held in San Antonio, Texas, from Thursday evening, October 4th through Sunday afternoon, October 7th. For information on BSANA, please consult the BSANA website, http://www.bsana.net; for details on the conference, please consult the 2018 BSC website, https://www.bsc2018.com/, which will be further updated as new information becomes available.

The Local Arrangements Chair for 2018 is Dr. Annie Labatt of the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

The BSC is the annual forum for the presentation and discussion of papers on every aspect of Byzantine Studies, and is open to all, regardless of nationality or academic status. It is also the occasion of the annual meeting of the Byzantine Studies Association of North America (BSANA), conducted by its officers:

President:  Emmanuel Bourbouhakis, Literature (Princeton University, NJ) (ebourbou@Princeton.EDU)
Vice President: Jennifer Ball, Art History (City University of New York, NY) (jennball312@gmail.com)
Secretary: Marica Cassis, Archaeology (Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada) (bsanasec@yahoo.com)
Treasurer: Betsy Williams, Dumbarton Oaks (williamse@doaks.org)

We welcome proposals on any aspect of Byzantine studies.

Proposals are submitted as individual abstracts. Proposals consist of:

1.   Your contact information; a proposed title; and, if part of a panel proposal, proposed panel information (see below).
2.   A single PDF copy of the 500-word or less, blind abstract (title only, no name), formatted and submitted according to the detailed instructions below.

All abstracts, including those in proposed panels, will be reviewed by each member of the Program Committee and will be accepted on their own merits. Please note that this review is anonymous; all personal information is removed before the abstracts are read. Your anonymous abstract is the sole basis for judging your proposed paper for acceptance. Please keep in mind that all of the readers of your abstract, the eight members of the program committee, are unlikely to have in-depth knowledge of your specific topic of research, or of your general area of study. As indicated above, the areas of expertise of committee members range across several disciplines.  One or more of these readers are unlikely to be expert in the chronological period with which you are dealing, or the historiographic or special issues involved in your field of scholarship. Thus your abstract should introduce your topic for presentation, including the significance of your work, the argument you are making, and the conclusions you propose, to an educated reader well-versed in Byzantine Studies writ large, but who is not an expert in your own subject.

For the conference, the 2018 BSC program chair will group papers into sessions, with the expectation that many sessions will be interdisciplinary. The session topics in the final program will depend on the subjects represented in accepted the submissions.

The Abstract

The abstract should be no more than 500 words in length and should indicate the paper’s original contribution in sufficient detail and with some indication of the contributor’s conclusions so that the Program Committee can assess its merits.

All proposed papers must be substantially original and never have been published or presented previously in a public forum. Each contributor may deliver only one paper. The Program Committee may give preference to those who did not present a paper at the last BSC. We accept abstracts and papers in English or French. Organized panels may also be proposed; see instructions below.

If accepted, the abstract will be published in the Byzantine Studies Conference’s annual Abstracts of Papers. Submission of the accepted abstract for publication constitutes agreement to present the paper at the conference. Follow the Instructions for Preparation of the Abstract to facilitate its publication. BSANA has no paid staff; failure to prepare the abstract carefully will make it impossible to publish.

Notice of acceptance or rejection will be sent by email by March 15th. For inquiries on the results of the review process, please contact the 2018 BSC Program Chair, Benjamin DeLee (benjamin.delee@cortland.edu).

Method of Submission

BSANA is using for the second time an online submission method: Easy Chair, a free software used across the globe by over 50,000 conferences and universities to date, especially in the fields of science and technology.  The abstract will now be submitted with title only (a blind abstract) and must be uploaded as a PDF file.

https://easychair.org/account/signin.cgi?key=63963823.o5MuFUK4tmIbHbCz

BSANA Vice President Jennifer Ball (jennball312@gmail.com) will oversee the submission process and will confirm receipt of your submission.

Greek Fonts

The PDF submission format is designed to avoid problems arising from the use of different Greek fonts.  Alphabets other than Greek should be transliterated.

Commitment

The submission of a proposal and its acceptance represents a commitment from the contributor to read the paper in person at the BSC. Those who cannot attend must withdraw no later than June 1st. Failure to notify the Program Committee in a timely fashion will adversely affect future chances to present at the BSC. To deliver your paper at the BSC, you must be a member of BSANA in good standing. If a speaker is not a member in good standing by the date of the conference, she/he will not be permitted to present. To join or renew membership, consult the website: http://www.bsana.net

Instructions for Preparing the Abstract

• The maximum word count for this abstract is 500 words.
• Your document must be composed in Microsoft Word, and saved in final form as a PDF.
• Margins: one inch at the top and bottom, 0.75 inches at each side.
• Font: Times New Roman, 12 point.
• Line Spacing: Single spaced.
• The title line(s) must be in Boldface, centered at the top of the page.
• Titles may not be longer than two lines.
• Capitalize only the first letters of words in the title.
• Do not put your title in quotation marks or underline your title.
• Skip one line (i.e., double space) before the first line of the body of the abstract.
• If your paper is a study based on a particular manuscript, consider citing the MS in your abstract title as a help to scholars when they search our abstracts for previous studies of MSS.
• Please follow the Bulletin Codicologique convention for proper citation of manuscripts (in abstract titles or in the body of your abstract).
• Please write your abstract text flush left; do not use the right-hand margin justification.
• Indent first lines of each paragraph five spaces.
• Leave one empty line between paragraphs.
• Do not use footnotes. If you need to include a citation, put it within your text in parentheses.
• Please do NOT use the future tense (“This paper will investigate…”). Your abstract may be edited for grammar and stylistic consistency to remove the future tense.
• Italicize titles and words in foreign languages.
• Quotations and titles in foreign alphabets other than Greek should be transliterated.
• Avoid using tables or diagrams in the abstract. Photographs cannot be reproduced.

Instructions for Organized Panel Proposals

The BSC welcomes proposals for whole panels. Each paper author prepares an individual abstract and submits her/his abstract, selecting the pull-down menu online for organized panel, and providing panel title, organizer, and panel summary.

The panel summary will include a summary of the overall topic, the format for the panel (such as a debate, papers followed by a discussion, or a traditional session of papers), and the reasons for covering this topic as a prearranged, whole session. This should be no longer than 300 words. The organizer may also propose a session chair; please note that the session chair cannot also be a speaker in the panel.

The Program Committee shall first decide whether to accept or reject each panel proposal in its entirety based on its summary and contents. Then each paper will be evaluated according to the regular anonymous evaluation procedure established by the BSC. In the event that most but not all the papers in the panel are accepted, the Program Committee will alert the organizer and will make every effort to keep the remaining papers together.

If a panel proposal is rejected, the various component abstracts will be placed in the regular pool of paper proposals, to be accepted or rejected as stand-alone presentations (unless otherwise indicated by the authors of these abstracts).

All participants in the panel (organizer as well as speakers) will be notified of the proposal’s receipt by BSANA Vice President Jennifer Ball, and notice of the Program Committee’s final decision will be made in the usual way.
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3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Associate Professor of Byzantine History (500-1200), University of Oxford

Deadline: 19 March 2018

We are seeking to appoint an Associate Professor of Byzantine History (500-1200) from 1 September 2018 or as soon as possible thereafter. The appointment will be made in association with a Fellowship at Corpus Christi College.

You will have research and teaching expertise in any area of Byzantine History from 500 to 1200. You will conduct advanced research, give lectures, classes and tutorials, supervise, support and examine students at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and undertake administrative duties for both the Faculty and College. You will also play a strategic role in developing research programmes in Byzantine History and actively participate in the governance and administrative work of the Faculty and College.

You will have a doctorate in a relevant field, significant postdoctoral research and teaching experience and a recognised academic track record in Byzantine History (500-1200). You will have the ability to educate and inspire graduate and undergraduate students, and sufficiently wide historical interests to contribute effectively to the long-term development of the study of Byzantine History at Oxford. Outstanding communication and interpersonal skills are essential.

Applications are particularly welcome from women and black and minority ethnic candidates, who are under-represented in academic posts in Oxford.

All applications must be made online. For further information, including details about how to apply, please click on the links below.

The deadline for applications is 12.00 noon on Monday 19 March 2018.

www.recruit.ox.ac.uk/pls/hrisliverecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=133018

Posted in Byzness

Oxford Listings – Week 5

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 5

Hilary Term 2018
= = = = =

MONDAY 12th February

15:00 Greek Paleography Lecture
Ioannou Centre

Nigel Wilson

[+]

17:00 Medieval History Seminar
Wharton

​ ​

Room, All Souls

Rebecca Springer (Oxford)
Being a parishioner in late twelfth-century England

TUESDAY 13th February

9:00 Mosaics and Society in Late Antiquity
Ioannou Centre

Efthymios Rizos (Oxford)
The martyrs in the mosaics of Thessalonike

[+]

14:00 Byzantine Epigraphy
Ioannou Centre

Ida Toth

[+]

17:00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar
Charles Wellbeloved Room, Harris Manchester

Christian Sahner (Oxford)
The first iconoclasm in Islam and the edict of Yazid II (AD 723)

[+]

17:00 Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period
Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Gilles Dorival (Aix-Marseille)
Is the Septuagint the Old Testament of the Church Fathers?

WEDNESDAY 14th February

17:00 Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar
Ioannou Centre

Constantin Zuckerman
The accounting in the Book of Ceremonies

[+]

17:00 Isaiah Berlin Lectures: ‘Political Theology: A Risky Subject in History’
Lecture Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Gyorgy Gereby (CEU)
Two swords and two luminaries. The conflict in the Latin West

THURSDAY 15th February

11:00 Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Archaeology Seminar
Ioannou Centre

Lukasz Sokolowski (Warsaw)
Canon or dynamics? Some reflections on the origin and development of funerary portrait reliefs from Palmyra

[+]

14:00 Khalili Centre Research Seminar
Lecture Room Khalili Research Centre

Susana Calvo Capilla (Madrid)
The visual construction of the Umayyad Caliphate in al-Andalus through the Great Mosque of Cordoba

[+]

14:00 Late Roman Seminar
Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College

Erin Dailey (Leeds)
Christian Clergy and the Emergence of Trial by Ordeal in the Post-Roman West

FRIDAY 16th February

10:00 Byzantine Text Seminar – Constantine VII
Ioannou Centre

Michael Featherstone

[+]

17:00 The Cult of Saints in the First Millenium
Sutro Room, Trinity College

Matthieu Pignot (Brussels)
Cult in Latin Martyrdom Accounts from Italy before 700. An Overview

Posted in Oxford Listings

Byzness 11/02/18

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 11th February 2018
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS
2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

SCHOOL: Byzantine Greek Summer School, 9–27 July 2018, Bogazici University, Istanbul

Application deadline: 30 April 2018

The Byzantine Studies Research Center is pleased to announce the organization of its second Byzantine Greek Summer School program to be held at Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey, from July 9 to July 27, 2018. Students will have the chance to participate in an intensive program in Medieval Greek with Prof. Niels Gaul and Dr. Athanasia Stavrou, while enjoying various attractions of the Bogazici University campus on the Bosphorus and the Byzantine sites of Istanbul.

For more information, please see:

http://byzantinestudies.boun.edu.tr/

Eligibility

Graduate students and advanced undergraduates, as well as individuals with an academic interest in or a career relevant to Byzantine studies can apply granted that they meet the requirements mentioned above. Priority will be given to graduate students in the field of Byzantine studies. A diagnostic test may be administered to the candidates before the final decision.

Scholarships

Thanks to a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, all the successful candidates who are accepted to the program will attend the courses free of charge. Additionally, we offer:

  4 scholarships to foreigners from outside Turkey that will cover accommodation in a shared apartment, airfare to/from Istanbul, and a meal plan for the duration of the program.
  4 scholarships to Turkish citizens from outside Istanbul that will cover transportation expenses to/from Istanbul and a meal plan for the duration of the program.
  6 scholarships to Turkish students resident in Istanbul that will cover a meal plan for the duration of the program. 
Please indicate in your application which scholarship you would like to

​          ​

apply. 


 
To Apply: 
Candidates should submit their application to the Byzantine Studies Research Center at Bogazici University before April 30, 2018. The application file should be in English and include a statement of purpose and a detailed CV. The applicant should indicate in the statement of purpose his/her background in Classical or Byzantine Greek and the relevance of attending this summer program for his/her future studies or career development. Applicants currently enrolled as students in a higher education institution should also submit a transcript and two reference letters (one of which must be written by an instructor in Greek). The referees should send their letters directly to the Byzantine Studies Research Center. 
Applications should be sent to: byzantinestudies@boun.edu.tr 


2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

The Byzantine Liturgy and the Jews, 9-11 July 2019 Sibiu

Deadline: 1 July 2018

 
Anti-Jewish elements have persisted in the Byzantine liturgy for over a thousand years in areas under the influence of the Eastern Christian Empire. These elements have spread through translation from Byzantium to all countries and cultures which worship today according to the Byzantine rite. Despite the profound theological and liturgical changes that have taken place in the second half of the 20th century in Western Christianity, hymns that were composed in the polemical context of the 8th -9th centuries are still used today in Eastern countries and in the Christian Orthodox Communities of the diaspora.

The conference with the topic Byzantine liturgy and the Jews addresses the issue of liturgical anti-Judaism from various perspectives, in order to provide the necessary tools so that we can better understand this reality:

Historical-criticism – which hymns fall within this discussion? When were these texts included in the liturgy and what were the overall social and political contexts in which they were written? What differences can one identify between original versions and translated ones and what are the aspects that have led to innovation in translating these texts? And how do texts with Byzantine anti-Jewish elements differ from analogous texts from the Syriac, Coptic, Armenian and Georgian traditions?

Patristic and liturgical approach – which is the role of hymns within the liturgical structure? What is the relationship between hymnography and homilies and other patristic writings? To what extent can one identify a patristic origin of certain anti-Jewish topoi and how did this very fact assure their transmission in worship? And what can be said about the image of the Jews in Byzantine iconography and their possible relation with hymnographic texts?

Theological approach – what kind of relationship is there between biblical statements regarding Israel and anti- Jewish hymnography? What is truly anti-Jewish in the Byzantine rite? Which are the criteria that would guide us today in evaluating liturgical texts from this perspective?

Socio-cultural impact – to what extent can one follow how these hymns reflect, consolidate and modify the mentalities of given religious communities?

Presentation abstracts of no more than 200 words should be sent to: cces@ecum.ro Deadline: July 1, 2018. Papers may be presented in English and German.
Conference proceedings will be published in the PeterLang’s Edition Israelogie series. Financial support may be available upon consultation with the organisers.

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATIONS

Postdoctoral Position, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz

Deadline: 14 February 2018

The interdisciplinary Research Training Group (GRK) 1876 “Early Concepts of Man and Nature: Universal, Local, Borrowed” established by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz invites applications for a

​ ​

four-year postdoc position (wissenschaftliche/r Mitarbeiter/in, 13 TV-L 100%) starting on April 1, 2018.

The GRK is directed by scholars from the fields of Egyptology, Ancient Near Eastern Studies, Pre- and Protohistorical Archaeology (Pleistocene Archaeology), Near Eastern Archaeology, Classical Archaeology, Classics (Greek and Latin), Byzantine Studies and Medieval German Studies.

In the GRK’s research program, the object is to record examples of concepts of man and nature in the Near Eastern, Northeast African and European area in the period dating from ca. 100.000 years B.C.E. until the Middle Ages – based on textual, pictorial and material sources – and to study them from a culturally immanent as well as transcultural perspective. Four main focal subject areas have been defined:

(1) Primordial conditions and elements, the origin and the end of the world; (2) Natural phenomena, the forces of nature, and natural catastrophes;
(3) Flora, fauna, and natural environment;
(4) The conceptualization of the human body, of disease, healing and death.

For detailed information regarding our program for research and training and the academic staff involved, please refer to our homepage (http://www.blogs.uni-mainz.de/fb07-grk-man-nature/).

Your tasks will be:

– to work independently on an innovative research project from a transcultural comparatistic perspective within the above- mentioned subject areas, which will be finished in four years with a monograph
–  to present your project on a regular basis within and outside of the GRK 


–  to lead, with support from the members, one of the workgroups focusing on the subject-areas (1)+(2) or (3)+(4) and to primarily author articles on the level of synthesis, which will be co-written by several authors of the workgroup
– to take part in supporting and developing the graduate school program and to communicate cooperatively with the professors and the Ph.D. students
- to take part in the activities of the GRK and in the meetings of the executive board

Your qualifications:

–  finished Ph.D. with more than average success in one of the member-disciplines of the GRK
–  very good knowledge in one of the four subject-areas of the GRK and in the field of cultural theories and methods, documented by publications and/or your dissertation

–  experience in international scientific cooperation and interdisciplinary research 

–  structured and independent way of working, originality, team-orientation, social skills and the ability to communicate clearly and effectively with various publics
– very good knowledge of German and English.

We expect your regular presence at the location of the GRK in Mainz and your participation in the program (e.g. general meetings and meetings of the executive board).

What we offer:

–  ample opportunities for intensive professional and interdisciplinary exchange
–  a mentoring program with cooperating partners in Germany and abroad
–  additional funding for travelling to conferences and lectures inside and outside Germany
–  a wide selection of courses for the acquisition of key qualifications and further professional training 


–  a modern and pleasant working environment 

–  opportunities to enhance your teaching experience, to acquire leadership skills and further qualifications for an 
academic career at a senior level 

 
We kindly ask you to submit your application electronically including the following documents: 
A) as pdf:
1.) one page of motivational letter
2.) CV focusing on your previous academic career, list of publications, transcripts of records incl. high school diploma 3.) 6 pages outlining your intended research-project (problem, current state of research, aim, methods, work schedule) 
B) two letters of recommendation:
directly from your supervisors, electronically to: grk1876@uni-mainz.de; subject heading: GRK1876_Your name. 
C) additional pdf-files:
two of your most important publications and your dissertation 
***
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz is keen on increasing the number of women among its scholars and therefore encourages women to apply. The university supports its members in balancing professional and family lives and offers family-friendly study and working conditions. Persons with disabilities will be given preference if equally qualified. It is 
recommended to refer to a possible handicap in the application. 
Further details regarding the application process and the selection of candidates are given on the homepage of the GRK. For questions concerning your specific area of research, you may also directly contact the relevant scholars listed on our homepage. For organizational questions, you may contact the coordination office. 
Please submit your complete application in electronic form (pdf) only no later than February 14th, 2018 to the GRK spokesperson Univ.-Prof. Dr. Tanja Pommerening (grk1876@uni-mainz.de). Interviews will be held in Mainz on February 27, 2018.

PhD Position, Getty Foundation

Deadline: 28 February 2018

The international research program, “Material Entanglements in the Ancient Mediterranean and Beyond,” funded by the Getty Foundation as part of its Connecting Art Histories initiative, invites applications from advanced doctoral (PhD) candidates to participate in the program’s research activities. The successful candidate will develop an individual research project related to the theme of the Program and participate in the Program’s activities, including attending two workshops to be held in Athens, one running from Oct. 1-10, 2018, and one in fall 2019. Costs for attending the workshops, including travel, accommodations and meals, will be covered by the Program.


Applicants should be pursuing a PhD degree in Classical and/or Near Eastern art/archaeology, and have fluency in the English language as demonstrated by language certificates and/or thesis/publications.

Applicants will be assessed on the basis of their academic accomplishments and their commitment to the study of ancient cultural interactions, as demonstrated by their scholarly work (PhD thesis, publications, professional activities outlined in the CV), their project proposal, and other supporting documentation (i.e., recommendations by 2 academic referees).

ABOUT THE PROGRAM


The Mediterranean nexus for cultural interactions and entanglements – a complicated dance of moving people, things and ideas throughout its history – has long been celebrated as a domain for scholarly studies of an expansive geographical and temporal scope. Interconnections between the Mediterranean space and the lands of Western and Central Asia, though also historically significant, have yet to be as intensely examined. Redressing this imbalance, Material Entanglements in the Ancient Mediterranean and Beyond investigates more extensive vistas onto ancient cultural and artistic contacts spanning the vast territories from the Jaxartes and the Indus in the east to the Straits of Gibraltar in the west for over two millennia, from the Middle Bronze Age to the Sasanian Period (c. 2000 BCE – c. 650 CE).

Setting the larger historical backdrop of this investigation is an ever growing “internationalism,” allied with expanding diplomatic and political networks and trading ventures, phenomena of far-flung colonization, and a succession of powerful states aspiring to extended territorial control — bridging the geographical divides among the three continents of the Old World. At the heart of the research narrative are the artistic products of these complex interactions: architectural and sculptural creations, as well as luxury, votive and everyday objects, whose technical execution, styles, forms, materials and imagery variously emanated from and gave shape to processes of cultural contacts through combination, incorporation and adaptation of different regional material resources, traditions of craftsmanship, aesthetics, ideological trends and worldviews.

The range and volume of pertinent artistic products are immense. Our approach is to consider representative artifacts and ensembles, including monumental complexes and small-scale “treasures” with mixed contents of multi-regional objects; and to query mechanisms and outcomes of cultural interactions by breaking down different aspects of materiality, such as scale and proportions, technologies, iconographies, forms and color – examined individually and in concert with one another. Aspects of the materials and media used in (and the economic/social mechanisms that promoted) the production of the artworks also occupy an important domain within the investigation, especially regarding the sources and methods of procurement and disbursement of materials such as stones and metals.

Thinking in terms of material properties like scale, form or technologies, issues of portability/transferability, and the exchange and mobility of craftspeople and skills requires discussion of methodological and theoretical frameworks. A robust body of such frameworks has developed over the last several decades, informed by post-colonial studies, cultural contact studies, materiality studies and agency studies. For the representational arts, iconography remains an important method for accessing meaning and significance, which can be enhanced through notions of object biographies or life ways that permit changes in valences over space and through time. The investigation, thus, takes as a central aim not just the production of new historical and social reconstructions according to the ancient artworks, but also the examination, application and assessment of these developing methodological frameworks.

As part of the Getty Foundation’s Connecting Art Histories initiative, the Program aims to forge connections at both the level of ideas and that of people, crossing chronological and regional disciplinary divides, fostering dialogue among scholars from a range of countries both within and outside the greater Mediterranean, and encouraging the exchange of viewpoints, methods and theoretical constructs among specialists who rarely come into contact with one another’s work.

The Program pivots around two, nine-day workshops, during which the program participants, the two co-PIs, and a Research Fellow will gather for a series of presentations, round-table discussions and site visits. The workshops will be held at the National Hellenic Research Foundation in Athens, Greece, the first one running from October 1-10, 2018, the second in fall 2019.

A website created for the Program (URL to be announced) will list participants and their individual projects, present information regarding the workshops, and provide updates about the progress of the Program’s work.

REQUESTED DOCUMENTS

· Curriculum Vitae, including candidate’s nationality
· Abstract of doctoral thesis, between 300-500 words in length
· Research proposal (max. 1,000 words): The proposal should justify the connection of the proposed research with the aims of the Program as presented in the Program description. It should be clearly defined and set goals that can be achieved during the course of the Program.
· Writing sample
· References: Applicants should arrange to have letters sent separately from 2 academic referees to agorou@eie.gr; the subject heading of the electronic message should contain “Recommendation for MATERIAL ENTANGLEMENTS PhD position” followed by the applicant’s last name.

SUBMISSION

Application submission deadline: February 28, 2018 (24h00 – EET)

The requested documents should be submitted electronically, as a single pdf file by the deadline of February 28, 2018, to the address: agorou@eie.gr. The Subject heading of the electronic message should contain “Application for MATERIAL ENTANGLEMENTS PhD position” followed by the applicant’s last name.

Final selection of participants will be made by the Program directors.

All candidates will be informed by e-mail by April 1, 2018 at latest.

Requests for further clarifications on the application procedure may be addressed to agorou@eie.gr

Postdoctoral Fellowship in Archaeology and the Ancient World, Brown University

Deadline: 12 March 2018

The Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University invites applications for a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Archaeology and the Ancient World.  Exceptional junior scholars who augment or complement the present strengths and diversity of the Joukowsky Institute community, and who enhance our commitment to inclusive education and research, are particularly encouraged to apply.

We seek candidates who have demonstrated a capacity for innovative research, engaged scholarship, and cross-disciplinary thinking.  We are interested in individuals whose work focuses on any aspect of or time period in Mediterranean archaeology, and who have significant fieldwork experience in that region.

In addition to pursuing their research, successful candidates will be expected to teach half time — i.e., one course per semester.  Teaching may be at both the undergraduate and graduate levels; interdisciplinary offerings are desirable.  Applicants must have received their doctorate from an institution other than Brown within the last five years, and the Ph.D. must be in hand prior to July 1, 2018.  Successful candidates will be expected to make substantive contributions to the ongoing development of the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, through the organization of reading or working groups, a topical symposium, or another project intended to foster a stimulating intellectual environment in which to pursue research and to develop new interdisciplinary or community connections.  This will be a one-year position, with the possibility of a one-year renewal, beginning on July 1, 2018.

All candidates should submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae, short descriptions of 3-4 proposed courses (150-300 words each), and contact information for three references by March 12, 2018. Applications received by March 12, 2018 will receive full consideration, but the search will remain open until the position is closed or filled.

Please submit application materials online at apply.interfolio.com/48636.  There is no need to provide hard copies of application materials for those that have already been submitted electronically.

For further information:

Professor Peter van Dommelen
Chair, Search Committee
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
Brown University
Box 1837 / 60 George Street
Providence, RI 02912
Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu

Graduate Programmes, Bogazici University, Istanbul

(I) ANDREW W. MELLON SCHOLARSHIP FOR THE M.A. PROGRAM IN BYZANTINE STUDIES

The Byzantine Studies Research Center at Bogazici University is pleased to announce three scholarships for the M.A. program in the field of Byzantine studies at the Department of History for the 2018-2019 academic year. The scholarships are open to future applicants as well as current students enrolled in the M.A. program of the department. Applicants from any country with an interest in Byzantine history, art history, and archaeology are encouraged to apply.

The scholarship is funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation on the basis of an annual total of $6,000 net for the duration of two years, provided that the accepted candidates continue to meet necessary academic requirements. Successful foreign candidates living abroad will be eligible for a supplementary grant (max. $1,500) towards one-time airfare and health insurance. Please note that recipients of the schol arship cannot be employed in any other institution.

Applicants should follow the admission procedures for the M.A. program of the History Department at Bogazici University, specifically indicating their wish to be considered for the scholarship in their statement of purpose. Application deadline is 13 April 2018 (5:00 PM local time).

For application procedures:

http://adaylar.boun.edu.tr/en-EN/Home

http://hist.boun.edu.tr/content/student-application-information

Current students enrolled in the department should apply directly to the Byzantine Studies Research Center with a statement of purpose written in English and a current transcript by 4 May 2018.

Questions can be addressed to: byzantinestudies@boun.edu.tr For more information on the Byzantine Studies Research

Center: http://byzantinestudies.boun.edu.tr/

(II) ANDREW W. MELLON SCHOLARSHIP FOR THE PH.D. PROGRAM IN BYZANTINE STUDIES

The Byzantine Studies Research Center at Bogazici University is pleased to announce one scholarship for the Ph.D. program in the field of Byzantine studies at the Department of History for the 2018- 2019 academic year. The scholarship is open to future applicants as well as current students enrolled in the Ph.D. program of the department. Applicants from any country with an interest in Byzantine history, art history, and archaeology are encouraged to apply.

The scholarship is funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation on the basis of an annual total of $9,000 net for the duration of three years, provided that the accepted candidate continues to meet necessary academic requirements. A successful foreign candidate living abroad will be eligible for a supplementary grant (max. $1,500) towards one-time airfare and health insurance. Please note that the recipient of the scholarship cannot be employed in any other institution.

Applicants should follow the admission procedures for the Ph.D. program of the History Department at Bogazici University, specifically indicating their wish to be considered for the scholarship in their statement of purpose. Application deadline is 13 April 2018 (5:00 PM local time).

For application procedures:

http://adaylar.boun.edu.tr/en-EN/Home

http://hist.boun.edu.tr/content/student-application-information

Current students enrolled in the department should apply directly to the Byzantine Studies Research Center with a statement of purpose written in English and a current transcript by 4 May 2018.

Questions can be addressed to: byzantinestudies@boun.edu.tr For more information on the Byzantine Studies Research

Center: http://byzantinestudies.boun.edu.tr/

(III) ANDREW W. MELLON SHORT-TERM RESEARCH GRANT IN BYZANTINE STUDIES FOR M.A. AND PH.D. STUDENTS

The Byzantine Studies Research Center at Bogazici University is pleased to announce one short-term research project grant in the field of Byzantine studies for M.A. or Ph.D. students enrolled at the Department of History, Bogazici University. The aim of the grant is to sponsor the expenses of the successful candidate for acquiring language skills and/or for conducting research in libraries and/or museums within or outside Turkey in 2018. The grant, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, offers up to $1,400 for the above-mentioned expenses to be spent in 2018.

Candidates should submit their application to the Byzantine Studies Research Center at Bogazici University before 6 May 2018. The application file should be in English and include a research project proposal, an expected budget for expenses, a detailed CV, and a transcript.

Applications should be sent both in electronic format by e-mail and as a hardcopy to:

E-mail: byzantinestudies@boun.edu.tr

Address: Byzantine Studies Fellowships Committee, Department of History, Bogazici University, Bebek 34342, Istanbul, Turkey 

Posted in Byzness

Oxford Listings – Week 4

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 4

Hilary Term 2018
= = = = =

MONDAY 5th February

15:00 Greek Paleography Lecture
Ioannou Centre

Nigel Wilson

[+]

15:00 Medieval Archaeology Seminar
Lecture Room, Institute of Archaeology

Stuart Wrathmell & Simon Mays
The Walking Dead of Wharram Percy? Recent scientific analysis of human remains from the medieval settlement

[+]

17:00 Medieval History Seminar
Wharton Room, All Souls

Katie Fellows (Oxford)
A very Roman affair: conflict and disorder in Rome, 1433-1533

TUESDAY 6th February

9:00 Mosaics and Society in Late Antiquity
Ioannou Centre

Ine Jacobs (Oxford)
‘Magical’ motifs and patterns

[+]

14:00 Byzantine Epigraphy
Ioannou Centre

Ida Toth


[+]

17:00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar (Medieval Islam)
Charles Wellbeloved Room, Harris Manchester

Laura Varnam (Oxford)
The book of Margery Kempe: feelings, exemplarity, and purpose

WEDNESDAY 7th February

17:00 Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar
Ioannou Centre

Catherine Holmes
Some ways in which to think about Byzantium as global

[+]

17:00 Isaiah Berlin Lectures: ‘Political Theology: A Risky Subject in History’
Lecture Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Gyorgy Gereby (CEU)
“No church without an emperor.” The Byzantine symphony

THURSDAY 8th February

11:00 Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Archaeology Seminar
Ioannou Centre

Panagiotis Doukelis (Athens)
Between ideology and utopia: urban space and landscape in Libanios’ Antiochikos

[+]

14:00 Khalili Centre Research Seminar
Lecture Room Khalili Research Centre

Ruba Kana’an (Oxford)
Friday mosques, rulers, and the ulama: the case for art and law in Sunni, Shiʿi, and Ibadi schools

[+]

14:00 Late Roman Seminar
Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College

Dave Addison (Oxford)
Ascetics and aesthetics in late antique Hispania: the devotional worlds of Prudentius and Priscillian

[+]

17:00 The Long History of Ethnicity and Nationhood Reconsidered
Stanford House, High Street

Roman Shliakhtin (Koc University Research Centre for Anatolian Civilizations, Istanbul)

“Turks Howling Like Wolves”: The Acoustic Identity of Turks in Twelfth-Century Byzantine Sources’

FRIDAY 9th February

10:00 Byzantine Text Seminar – Constantine VII
Ioannou Centre

Michael Featherstone

[+]

12:00 Byzantine Literature
Ioannou Centre

Foteini Spingou
Byzantine Beauty: Beauty Theory and the Human Beauty in Byzantium

We will be reading the following texts:

Michael Psellos, On Beauty and On Intelligent Beauty, transl. Ch. Barber and D. Jenkins in Michael Psellos on Literature and Art: A Byzantine Perspective on Aesthetics, eds. Ch. Barber and Str. Papapioannou, Notre Dame 2017, 274–78.

Charedimos or On Beauty, M. D. Macleod, Lucian, vol. 8, (Cambridge, Mass., 1967), 468–502.  (Avaliable online via Solo)

Posted in Oxford Listings

Byzness 04/02/18

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 4th February 2018
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS
2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

IMAGINING THE DIVINE OPEN DAYS: Religion, Art, and Community in Oxford, 17-18th February

Saturday and Sunday 17-18th February will be your VERY LAST CHANCE to see ‘Imagining the Divine’, now on at the Ashmolean. To mark the occasion, the curators of Imagining the Divine will be holding two final open days on that weekend discussing the Empires of Faith project’s work on religion and material culture, the modern photography show ‘Those Who Follow’ (by Arturo Soto), and giving members of the University and the general public the chance to engage in our ongoing research.

You can sign up here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/open-days-religion-art-and-community-in-oxford-tickets-42246110253

And read more about the open days here: https://empiresoffaith.com/workshops/

Days start at 11 in the Classics department, 66 St. Giles, and run to 15:30. The day includes FREE access to Imagining the Divine, Those Who Follow, lunch, and discussion with the curators of both exhibitions (Stefanie Lenk and Dominic Dalglish). The days are designed both to open up the research of the Empires of Faith project, and to push it forward as we continue to study the importance of art and material culture in relation to religion.

Students (of any level), staff, and members of the public are all welcome. If you have any particular requirements or further questions, then please contact Dominic Dalglish at dominic.dalglish@arch.ox.ac.uk

CONFERENCE: The Oxford University Byzantine Society’s 20th International Graduate Conference, Space and Dimension in Late Antiquity and Byzantium, 23-24 February 2018, History Faculty, Oxford

The full programme for the conference can be found here

SEMINAR: Paul Lemerle, forty years later, 2 March 2018, Maison Francaise d’Oxford

Paul Lemerle, forty years later – convenor Vivien Prigent (Maison française d’Oxford)

Seminar on the occasion of the publication of Autour du Premier humanisme byzantin & Études sur le XIe siècle, edited by Jean-Claude Cheynet et Bernard Flusin.

Presentation of the book by Marc Lauxtermann (Exeter College) and James Howard-Johnston (Corpus Christi College) followed by two communications by Jean-Claude Cheynet (Université Paris-Sorbonne) and Bernard Flusin (Université Paris-Sorbonne – EPHE).

2nd of March, 15.00-18.00. Maison française d’Oxford, 15, Norham Road, OX2 6SE
====

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

Topographies in Motion: Urban Movement and Mobility in Late Antiquity (4th to 6th Centuries), 4-5 October 2018,  LMU Munich

Deadline: 23 February 2018

What defines a late-antique city? For some years, scholars have debated this question starting from infrastructure, monuments, squares etc. In this perspective, cities appear as rather static environments and as vessels, as it were, for urban activity and life to take place. More recent research, however, is emphasizing performative aspects of the antique city. Primarily with respect to republican and post-republican times, urban movement and mobility have become a key for understanding how human life within antique cities unfolded and how this motion created and altered urban spaces.

This workshop asks how late-antique urban topographies were constituted, shaped, and changed by societies, people(s), objects, and goods moving through these cities and across their boundaries. More specifically, the workshop pursues a case-by-case approach. We are interested in case studies and contributions that examine particular practices in specific cities from across the late-antique Roman Empire. Through the lenses of movement and mobility, applicants may consider the making and un-making of (different kinds of) urban spaces, their religious, social, or economic meaning, their symbolic value, or their function as means of representation and performance. While scholars are encouraged to draw on all relevant types of sources, individual cases should be discussed in dialogue or contrast with the respective urban topographies.

Forms of urban movement and mobility to consider may include:

· Spatial mobility of objects and artefacts (e.g. images, religious objects, statues)
· Private and communal urban movement
· The role of religion for urban movement and mobility
· Commercial movement and the mobility of goods
· Traffic routes and their impact on urban and suburban movement and mobility
· Mobility (spatial and social) and the boundary between city and countryside

We encourage submissions both from established scholars as well as younger colleagues working in all relevant disciplines (e.g. history, archaeology, religious studies and church history, art history, literature). Simon Malmberg (Classical Archaeology, Bergen) will be giving the keynote lecture.

Applicants are invited to submit a short CV and an abstract for a paper of 20 minutes. Please submit your application by 23 February 2018 to Florian Wöller (florian.woeller@lmu.de).

The workshop will be hosted at the Center for Advanced Studies (CAS) at LMU Munich. Travel and accommodation expenses can be reimbursed up to a certain amount. For any questions, please write to Florian Wöller (florian.woeller@lmu.de).

Seventh Century Syrian Numismatic Round Table Conference, 6-7 April 2019, Worcester

The Round Table aims to bring together numismatists, historians and archaeologist with an interest in Late Antiquity/Early Islam in Syria/Palestine and the surrounding area. We hold small informal conferences at roughly two yearly intervals which usually include at least ten papers with plenty of time allowed for discussion. The central focus is the Syrian Arab-Byzantine coinage, but papers can cover Byzantine or Post-Reform Umayyad coinage, or deal with aspects of the history or archaeology of Syria/Palestine. Papers sometimes present completed pieces of research, but more often they deal with ‘work in progress’.

If you are interested in presenting a paper (or would just like more information about the conference) please contact Tony Goodwin on a.goodwin2@btopenworld.com. Presentations should normally last no more than 40 minutes, but much shorter papers are equally acceptable. A short abstract will be circulated before the conference and the papers will be published in full in the conference proceedings.

The Hive conference centre in Worcester was the very successful venue for our last but one conference in 2013.
====

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Three Visiting Fellowships, Institute of Classical Studies

Deadline: 14 February 2018

The Institute of Classical Studies intends to appoint three visiting fellowships for 2018-2019 in memory of Dorothy Tarrant, A.D.Trendall and Tom Webster.

These Fellowships are awarded to scholars from universities outside the UK with research interests in any field of classical studies. The successful candidates are each expected to spend a minimum of six weeks at the Institute and to deliver the a named lecture. She or he is provided with a stipend of £5000 toward the cost of travel and accommodation. Further details are available at https://ics.sas.ac.uk/awards/fellowships

Applicants for one or more of these fellowships are encouraged to send to the a CV to director@ics.sas.ac.uk, a short account of the research project they intend to pursue with the aid of the Fellowship, the subject of the lecture they would give, and the names and addresses of two referees. The deadline for applications will be 14th February 2018. Results are normally announced in April. Successful candidates are encouraged to lecture elsewhere in the UK if invited and some funds are available to make this possible.

Two Research Assistants: (Byzantine) Greek Philology, University of Ghent

Deadline: 28 February 2018

The Greek Section of the Departments of Literary Studies and Linguistics at Ghent University (Belgium) is seeking two well-qualified collaborators for the “Database of Byzantine Book Epigrams” (DBBE, www.dbbe.ugent.be).

A full version of the job description is to be found here: http://www.letterkunde.ugent.be/en/DBBEJobs2018

Applications should include a full curriculum vitae (including accurate information on grades and study results), a motivation letter, and the name and contact details of two referees. Applications must be sent electronically (preferably as pdf) to Professor Kristoffel Demoen (kristoffel.demoen@ugent.be), no later than February 28, 2018.

Onassis Foundation International Scholarships for Humanities, Arts, Social Science and Economics & Finance in Greece

Deadline: 28 February 2018

As a key driving force of both social and personal development, Education is one of the main pillars of the Onassis Foundation’s public-benefit activities. The Foundation has been supporting the right to equal access to Education, Health and Culture for decades now, its ultimate goal being to help release the potential of those who want to get ahead in their careers, to distinguish themselves in their chosen field, to pursue their dream. And it continues to do so by rewarding excellence.

Within this framework, the Onassis Foundation has been providing support to young scientists, researchers and artists for forty years, placing Education at the very centre of its activities with a view to benefiting society as a whole. True to the leading role it has played in the field of academic scholarships since 1978, the Onassis Foundation announces its 24th Onassis Fellowships Program for International Scholars for the 2018–19 academic year.

The above program is aimed at academics of all ranks, post-doctoral researchers and Ph.D. candidates and covers subjects relating to Greek culture, society and the Greek economy to be researched in Greece.

The eligibility criteria and terms and conditions for awarding the scholarships are mentioned in the relevant announcements. Application forms are only submitted online and can be found in the Onassis Foundation official website

Newton International Fellowships

Deadline: 27 March 2018

The Newton International Fellowships enable researchers to work for two years at a UK institution with the aim of fostering long-term international collaborations.

With the generous support through the Newton Fund, The British Academy, in partnership with the Academy of Medical Sciences and the Royal Society, is inviting applications from postdoctoral researchers at an early stage of their career working outside the UK with an exciting opportunity to work at a UK research institution for two years to foster long-term relations between Newton International Fellows and the UK research base.

Newton International Fellowships last for two years. Funding consists of £24,000 per annum for subsistence costs, and up to £8,000 per annum research expenses, as well as a one-off payment of up to £2,000 for relocation expenses. Awards include a contribution to the overheads incurred, at a rate of 50% of the total award to the visiting researcher.

Applications must be submitted via the Royal Society’s electronic grant application system Flexi-Grant® accessible at: https://royalsociety.org/grants-schemes-awards/grants/newton-international/ and applications will be considered by the cross-Academy selection panel.

Closing date: 27 March 2018
Results: September 2018

All projects must commence between 1 October 2018 and 31 March 2019

Find out more about this call, eligibility and how to apply: https://www.britac.ac.uk/newton-international-fellowships.
If you have any further questions, contact: info@newtonfellowships.org

Posted in Byzness

Oxford Listings – Week 3

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 3

Hilary Term 2018
= = = = =

MONDAY 29th January

15:00 Greek Paleography Lecture
Ioannou Centre

Nigel Wilson

[+]

17:00 Medieval History Seminar
Wharton Room, All Souls

Sophie Page (UCL)
Demons in Heaven: Late Medieval Cosmology and Ritual Magic


TUESDAY 30th January

Please note that the usual Byzantine Epigraphy lecture with Ida Toth has been rescheduled to Week 9.

9:00 Mosaics and Society in Late Antiquity
Ioannou Centre

Ine Jacobs (Oxford)
Mosaics in 8th-century Palestine: damage and reuse

[+]

17:00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar (Medieval Islam)
Charles Wellbeloved Room, Harris Manchester

Irene Bavuso (IHR)
Merovingian frontiers: the Scheldt-Lower Meuse area in the 7th-8th c.

WEDNESDAY 31st January

17:00 Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar
Ioannou Centre

Nicholas Matheou
Narrating the Eleventh-Century Crisis from Constantinople to Caucasia: Aristakes Lastivertsi and Michael Attaleiates Compared

[+]

17:00 Isaiah Berlin Lectures: ‘Political Theology: A Risky Subject in History’
Lecture Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Gyorgy Gereby (CEU)
Christianity for and against the empire. Eusebius or Augustine?

THURSDAY 1st February

11:00 Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Archaeology Seminar
Ioannou Centre

Adam Bollok (Oxford)
Mortuary display and the burial of the rich in the late antique Eastern Mediterranean

[+]

14:00 Khalili Centre Research Seminar
Lecture Room Khalili Research Centre

Carine Juvin (Louvre Museum)
The art of teaching: on some late Mamluk calligraphic albums

[+]

14:00 Late Roman Seminar
Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College

Efthymios Rizos (Oxford)
The Army and the Cities in the Late Roman Balkans

[+]

19:30 Oxford Orthodox Christian Student Society Lecture
St Gregory’s House, 1 Canterbury Road

Elena Draghici Vasilescu
Pseudo-Dionysius, a statue, and a concept of beauty

FRIDAY 2nd February

17:00 The Cult of Saints in the First Millenium
Sutro Room, Trinity College

Mary Cunningham (Nottingham)
“Garden without Seed”: The Virginal Body of Mary, the Theotokos, in Byzantium

SATURDAY 3rd February

12:15 Talking Religion
Gallery 58, Ashmolean Museum

Hugh Jeffery & Sajda van der Leeuw
Deities and Daemons

Posted in Oxford Listings

Byzness 28/01/18

====
THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 28th January 2018
====

1. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

====


1. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Associate Professor, History of Byzantine Art, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice

Deadline: 15 February 2018

The Department of Philosophy and Cultural Heritage of Ca’ Foscari University of Venice invites applications for a position in the field of History of Byzantine Art. Further information can be found here

To participate in the selection candidates must submit their application only using the procedure available on the web at:
http://static.unive.it/domandeconcorso-en/accesso/decreto003-2018

Library Research Fellowship Progam, Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection, California State University

Deadline: 28 February 2018

Thanks to generous ongoing funding from the Elios Charitable Foundation and additional funding from the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Foundation, the University Library at California State University, Sacramento is pleased to announce the continuation of the Library Research Fellowship Program to support the use of the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection by fellows for scholarly research in Hellenic studies while in residence in Sacramento, CA. The Program provides a limited number of fellowships ranging from $1,000 to $4,000 to help offset transportation and living expenses incurred during the tenure of the awards and is open to external researchers anywhere in the world at the doctoral through senior scholar levels (including independent scholars) working in fields encompassed by the Collection’s strengths who reside outside a 75-mile radius of Sacramento. The term of fellowships can vary between two weeks and three months, depending on the nature of the research, and for the current cycle will be tenable from July 1, 2018-June 30, 2019.

Consisting of the holdings of the former Speros Basil Vryonis Center for the Study of Hellenism, the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection is the premier Hellenic collection in the western United States and one of the largest of its kind in the country, currently numbering approximately 75,000 volumes. It comprises a large circulating book collection, journal holdings, electronic resources, non-print media materials, rare books, archival materials, art and artifacts. With its focus on the Hellenic world, the Collection contains early through contemporary materials across the social sciences and humanities relating to Greece, the Balkans, the Ottoman Empire and modern Turkey, and the surrounding region, with particular strengths in Byzantine, post-Byzantine, and Modern Greek studies, including the Greek diaspora. There is a broad representation of over 20 languages in the Collection, with a rich assortment of primary source materials. Since 2009 the collection has experienced particularly dramatic growth through several major gift acquisitions. For further information about the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection, visit http://library.csus.edu/tsakopoulos-hellenic-collection.

For the full Library Research Fellowship Program description and application instructions, see: http://library.csus.edu/tsakopoulos-hellenic-collection/lrfp. Questions about the Program can be directed to George I. Paganelis, Curator, Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection (paganelis@csus.edu).

Stavros Niarchos Fellow in Classical Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston MA

Deadline: 15 March 2018

The Stavros Niarchos Fellow in Classical Art will perform a range of curatorial activities in the Department of Art of the Ancient World. Projects will be determined by the department according to greatest need. Duties may include research and interpretation, improvement of records in the MFA’s collections-management database, object handling, assisting with gallery work, and presentations to the general public.

Qualifications/Requirements: advanced graduate student or recent PhD in Classical, late Roman, or early Byzantine art preferred; excellent clerical, computer, and communication skills required; attention to detail and accuracy a must; applicants must be able to provide proof of U.S. work authorization at the time of hire.

This is a temporary position for approximately 3 months, during the summer of 2018 (starting date negotiable). A stipend of $6,500 will be offered.

For consideration, please submit your letter of interest, résumé, contact information for two references, and your availability during the summer 2018 to: resumes@mfa.org. You may also submit your materials via postal mail to: Human Resources Department, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115.

Postdoctoral Researcher, ‘The Legacy of the Psalms in Byzantine Poetry’, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna

Deadline: 15 March 2018

Duration: 4 years (2018-2022)
Beginning: June 1st, 2018

Description of subject area: “The Legacy of the Psalms in Byzantine Poetry: Book Epigrams and Metrical Paraphrases” is a joint project of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and Ghent University. It is funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF, project I 3544) and the Research Foundation Flanders (FWO) and directed by PD Dr Andreas Rhoby (Vienna) and Professor Dr Kristoffel Demoen (Ghent). It aims to investigate the reception of the Psalms in some specific genres of Byzantine poetry, i.e. in metrical paratexts (book epigrams) and metrical paraphrases. In addition, the project will analyse the impact of the Psalms for Byzantine (religious) poetry as well as the context of poems dealing with the Psalms. More specifically, the aim of the project part carried out at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, is to provide the first full critical edition of Manuel Philes’ Metaphrasis of the Psalms (of almost 3600 fifteen-syllable verses) (partly ed. by G. Stickler 1992).

Duties: The position involves the critical edition of Manuel Philes’ Metrical Metaphrasis of the Psalms (the main text witness is cod. Vat. gr. 16). Moreover, the position includes the participation in meetings of the two research partners and the participation in the academic and organizational preparation of a one-day workshop on psalters and Byzantine poetry in Ghent and a one-day workshop on Manuel Philes’ poetry in Vienna. The successful candidate is also required to contribute to the editing of the proceedings of the Ghent workshop.

Payment: according to FWF’s standard personnel costs and salaries list for postdocs (gross salaries!):
https://www.fwf.ac.at/en/research-funding/personnel-costs/

The successful candidate will have

1. a PhD in Byzantine Studies with specific focus on Byzantine literature (preferably poetry)

2. excellent knowledge of Ancient and Byzantine Greek
3. editorial skills (and experience in editing Byzantine texts) including an excellent knowledge of Greek palaeography
4. a very good knowledge of Byzantine literary, political and cultural history, especially of the Palaiologan period
5. a substantial record of (peer reviewed) publications
6. excellent knowledge of English (and preferably a working knowledge of German)

Application procedure: Applications must include a cover letter (max. 2 pages) describing the applicant’s qualifications, his/her interest in the subject and the additional expertise he/she expects to bring for the further development of the project. Also required are a CV (max. 2 pages; in list form, not as a narrative) and a complete list of publications. These documents are to be sent to andreas.rhoby@oeaw.ac.at. In addition, two letters of reference should be sent directly by the referees to andreas.rhoby@oeaw.ac.at.

Deadline of application: March 15th, 2018 (letters of reference must be received by this deadline as well).
Candidates will be notified about the outcome of their application by the end of March 2018. 

Posted in Byzness

Oxford Listings – Week 2

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 2

Hilary Term 2018
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MONDAY 22nd January

15:00 Greek Paleography Lecture
Ioannou Centre

Nigel Wilson

[+]

15:00 Medieval Archaeology Seminar
Lecture Room, Institute of Archaeology

Sarah Mallet
Diets in Early Medieval Britain: what the isotope data tell us. A perspective from the EngLaId project

[+]

17:00 Medieval History Seminar
Wharton Room, All Souls

Benjamin Pohl (Bristol)
Sometimes less is more… On the vices and virtues of writing medieval biographies

TUESDAY 23rd January

9:00 Mosaics and Society in Late Antiquity
Ioannou Centre

Jane Chick (UEA)
Mosaics in context: A sixth-century mosaic pavement at Qasr el-Lebia in Cyrenaica

[+]

14:00 Byzantine Epigraphy
Ioannou Centre

Ida Toth

[+]

17:00 Medieval Church and Culture Seminar
Charles Wellbeloved Room, Harris Manchester

Gervase Rosser (Oxford)
Cloaks of sanctity: dress in the medieval fraternities

WEDNESDAY 24th January

12:15 Talking Religion
Gallery 58, Ashmolean Museum

Andy Doll & Ilenia Scerra
What do pages of the Quran, an ivory plaque from the court of Charlemagne, and a map tell us about God?

[+]

17:00 Late Antique and Byzantine Studies Seminar
Ioannou Centre

Dan Reynolds
Anatomy of a murder: Patriarch John VII of Jerusalem († 966) and Melkite status in early Islamic Palestine

[+]

17:00 Isaiah Berlin Lectures: ‘Political Theology: A Risky Subject in History’
Lecture Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Gyorgy Gereby (CEU)
Theocracy and the Kingdom of God. Biblical and Early-Christian Polities

THURSDAY 25th January

11:00 Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Archaeology Seminar
Ioannou Centre

Suna Cagaptay (Cambridge/Istanbul)

Water nymphs and the Kolymbos: The Laskarid Palace at Nymphaion revisited

[+]

14:00 Khalili Centre Research Seminar
Lecture Room Khalili Research Centre

Mustafa Tupey (Oxford)
After the fall from grace: notes on the post-Timurid architecture of Central Asia

[+]

14:00 Late Roman Seminar
Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College

Ulriika Vihervalli (Cardiff)
TBC

FRIDAY 26th January

10:00 Byzantine Text Seminar – Constantine VII
Ioannou Centre

Michael Featherstone

[+]

12:00 Byzantine Literature
Ioannou Centre

Foteini Spingou
Byzantine Beauty: Kosmos, Beauty, Phantasia, and Byzantine Rhetoric

We will be reading Photios’ Homily XVII. The text in English translation by Cyril Mango is available here

[+]

14:15 Seminar in the History of the Book
Visiting Scholars’ Centre, Weston Library

Julia Bray (Oxford)
Scrolls into codices: Jilyani’s picture-poems for Saladin

SATURDAY 27th January

12:15 Talking Religion
Gallery 58, Ashmolean Museum

Sylvia Alvares-Correa & Hugo Shakeshaft
Wandering Images: Envisioning the Buddha and Christ

Posted in Oxford Listings

Byzness 21/01/18

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 21st January 2018
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1. CALLS FOR PAPERS
2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
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1. CALLS FOR PAPERS

Call for Sessions: Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 44th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference, 4-7 October 2018, San Antonio, Texas

Deadline: 5 February 2018

As part of its ongoing commitment to Byzantine studies, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 44th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website (https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/44th-annual-annual-byzantine-studies-conference).

Proposals should include:

Proposed session title
CV of session organizer
300-word session summary, which includes a summary of the overall topic, the format for the panel (such as a debate, papers followed by a discussion, or a traditional session of papers), and the reasons for covering the topic as a prearranged, whole session
Session chair and academic affiliation. Please note: Session chairs cannot present a paper in the session.
Information about the four papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 500-word abstract. Please note: Presenters must be members of BSANA in good standing.

Session organizers may present a paper in the session or chair the session. If a co-organzier is proposed for the session, the co-organizer must also give a paper in the session or chair the session.

Applicants will be notified by February 9, 2018. The organizer of the selected session is responsible for submitting the session to the BSC by February 15, 2018. Instructions for submitting the panel proposal are included in the BSC Call for Papers (http://www.bsana.net/conference/2018_BSANA_CFP.pdf).

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and chair, if the proposed chair is selected by the BSC program committee) up to $600 maximum for North American residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from abroad. Funding is through reimbursement only (check issued in US dollars or wire transfer); advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

Novel Saints: Novel, Hagiography and Romance from the 4th to the 12th Century, 22-24 November 2018, Ghent

Deadline: 15 April 2018

The early history of the novel has not been written yet. The oldest representatives of this genre (also called ‘ancient romances’ in scholarship) were written in Latin and Greek in the first few centuries of the Common Era. Often, scholars have observed an interim period between the fourth and twelfth centuries from which no novels are said to have been preserved, and identify a so-called ‘re- emergence’ of the genre in Byzantium. Building on recent research that studies hagiography as literature, this conference of the ERC project Novel Saints (Ghent University) aims to challenge this view by studying hagiography as a continuation of novelistic literature during the so-called ‘dark age’ of the novel. A number of texts from this period have already received attention for their novelistic qualities, such as Ps-Nilus’ Narrationes, Ammonius’ Report on the Slaughter of the Monks of Sinai and Rhaithou, the Historia Monachorum, Palladius’ Historia Lausiaca, The Martyrdom of Galaction & Episteme, Jerome’s Lives of Malchus, Paul and Hilarion, and the Syriac Life of Abraham and his Niece Mary. Moreover, both ancient fiction and some of these (and other) hagiographical narratives are known to have impacted medieval romance (e.g. Metiochus and Parthenope as a source for the Persian love romance Vāmiq & ‘Adhrā and the Life ofSaint Eustace/Placidas for chivalric romance in the West).

The conference aims to examine the persistence of ancient novelistic material in hagiography and instances of continuity of novelistic and/or hagiographical strands in medieval romances in the West, Byzantium and Persia. We invite papers exploring intersections between two or three of the following narrative traditions:

1) ancient novelistic fiction (broadly defined), including Greek novels (both extant and fragmentarily preserved; e.g. Ninus, Achilles Tatius’ Leucippe and Clitophon, Heliodorus’ Aethiopica, etc.), Latin novels (Apuleius’ Metamorphoses, Petronius’ Satyrica and the Historia Apollonii Regis Tyri), Jewish novels (e.g. the Book of Tobit, Joseph and Aseneth) and so-called ‘fringe novels’ or ‘novelistic biographies’ (i.e. the Alexander Romance, the Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles, the Pseudo-Clementines, Philostratus’ Life of Apollonius of Tyana, the Life of Aesop, etc.); and/or

2) hagiography from the fourth to the twelfth century, including Lives, Martyr Acts, hagiographical romances, and edifying tales written in Greek, Latin, Syriac, Arabic, Armenian, Georgian, Ethiopian and Coptic; and/or

3) medieval romance in the West, Byzantium or Persia.

Of particular interest are contributions that study:

•   ancient fiction as a literary model in hagiography alongside other models (such as the Bible);

•   different forms and types of the impact/relevance of the novelistic tradition on/for hagiographical texts: intertextuality, direct or indirect borrowings, common narrative 
techniques, generic topoi, etc.;

•   conceptualizations of overlaps and similarities between novels and hagiography. Which theoretical concepts, tools or frameworks are useful to do so?

•   evidence of the circulation of ancient fiction in Oriental Christian literatures like Syriac, Arabic, Armenian, Georgian, Ethiopian, and Coptic, which can lend support to discussions of the impact of the ancient novel on the hagiographical production in those languages;

•   late antique and medieval literary practice: the role(s) of schools, classical education, ancient rhetoric, metaphrasis for the composition of hagiographical texts; hagiographers as students or readers of ancient prose fiction; etc.;

•   implications of persistences of ancient pagan or Jewish fiction into Christian hagiography (or vice versa in the case of later novels, such as Heliodorus’ Aethiopica): religious implications, literary implications; implications for the concepts of fiction at work, etc.;

•   the continuation of hagiographical narrative traditions into medieval Western and Eastern romance;

•   generic awareness: which are markers in hagiography that proclaim awareness of the novelistic tradition, indicate affinity with and/or a distance from it (or vice versa in the case of later novels)? To what extent and how do writers of novels, hagiography and/or romance present themselves as belonging to a particular genre and/or narrative tradition?

•   the usefulness of the concept of genre: how useful is our current generic classification, labelling texts as ‘novels,’ ‘romance’ or otherwise, and establishing and promoting distinctions between ‘novels,’ ‘romance,’ ‘fictional biography’ and ‘hagiography;’ between ‘core novels,’ ‘fringe novels;’ ‘family romances,’ and ‘hagiographical romances;’ between ‘epic passions’ and ‘historical passions,’ etc.? Are there alternative ways to think about and study these texts and their interrelations? 


 
Please send your abstracts to Flavia Ruani (flavia.ruani@ugent.be) by 15 April 2018


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Abstracts (350 words max, in English or French) should include name, title of proposed paper, affiliation, and position. Notification about participation will be emailed by 15 June 2018. 
For further queries, please contact flavia.ruani@ugent.be or tine.scheijnen@ugent.be


From Homer to Hatzi-Yavrouda – Aspects of oral narration in the Greek tradition, 29-30 September 2018, The Danish Institute at Athens

Deadline: 1 May 2018

The aim of this conference is to analyze and discuss various aspects of orally produced and diffused stories from the Greek tradition, from Antiquity up to the storytelling communities in the 20th century.

In European culture, literature has been orally created and diffused as a parallel to written literature, but until rather recently the two traditions have mostly been studied separately. However, there is a closer interrelationship between the two, and it is not just the orally diffused folk literature that is inspired by the written high-culture literature. It is also vice versa. Therefore, the conference will start with the question: What is orality?

We wish to study orality from different genres and periods within the Greek tradition and from different academic fields, as e.g. classical philology, byzantine studies, folklore, and comparative literature. Proposals in all these fields are welcome as are proposals addressing the interrelationship between oral and written literature, or the influence from and to other cultures. For the modern period special focus will be given to the folktale.

The Greek tradition is taken as a point of departure for a diachronic analysis of orality, from Homer to one of the most intriguing narrators of Greek folktales, Hatzi-Yavrouda of Kos. But it is our belief that the results of the analysis of the Greek case could easily be applied to other European traditions.

It will be a two-day conference with four key-note papers: by Professor Emeritus from the Department of Folklore at the University of Athens, Michalis Meraklis, Professor Emerita from the Department of Classics at the University of Southern Denmark, Minna Skafte Jensen, Assistant Professor Emerita and Senior Research Fellow at the Austrian Academy of Science, Carolina Cupane, and Professor Emerita from the Department of Modern Greek at Harvard University, Margaret Alexiou, in a joint paper with artist Katerina Samara.

To add another dimension to the academic conference, we hope to be able to include two live performances in the programme: by the British storytellers Hugh Lupton and Daniel Mordon, who will do a re-telling of Homer, and by Greek narrator Sasa Voulgari, who will tell Modern Greek folktales.

Abstracts of no more than one page should be sent before 1 May 2018 to: birgit.olsen@diathens.gr

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An academic committee will evaluate the abstracts received.

The acts of the conference will be published in the Monography Series of The Danish Institute (MoDIA). All contributions will be peer-reviewed. Please state in your abstract that you accept publication.
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2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

MA Scholarships in Syriac Theology, University of Salzburg

The University of Salzburg invites applications now for its MA in Syriac Theology starting in October 2018.  Some part scholarships are available from the Syriac Institute and the Syriac Theological Seminary Salzburg and the course fees are minimal in line with European levels.  The MA is taught in English by leading international lecturers, including Sebastian Brock (Oxford), Herman Teule (Leuven), Hidemi Takahashi (Tokyo) and Shabo Talay (Berlin).

For full details of the MA please see www.uni-salzburg.at/syriac

If you have any questions, please contact mast@sbg.ac.at

 
Two research assistants in Byzantine Greek Philology,

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University of Ghent

Deadline: 28 February 2018

More information and how to apply here 

Post-doctoral Mellon Fellowships, Institute of Medieval Studies

Deadline: 1 February 2018

More information and how to apply here

Posted in Byzness