The Oxford Listings – TT 2019 Week 8

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 8

Trinity Term 2019

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MONDAY 17th June

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, High St, Wharton Room

Neta Bodner (Hebrew University of Jerusalem/LMH),

‘Romanesque beyond Christianity – Jewish rituaarchitecture1150-1270′.

[+]

17.30   Perspectives on Education from the Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean

University College, High St, Swire Seminar Room

Eleanor Dickey (Reading)

What Did People Actually Do in a Roman School?

_ _ _

TUESDAY 18th June

_ _ _

WEDNESDAY 19th June

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Margarita Gleba (Cambridge)

Textile production in the pre-Roman northern Mediterranean: from qualitative to quantitative approach?

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Seminar

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’, Lecture Theatre

Zachary Chitwood (Mainz)

Orthodox Death, Burial and Commemoration in Late Byzantium and under Ottoman Rule, ca1300-1600.

[+]

17.00   Boethius (historical and philosophical perspectives)

Corpus Christi College, Merton St, Seminar Room

Mark Vessey (The University of British Columbia)

Intimations of the Architext: Boethius and Others of Cassiodorus’ Kind.

_ _ _

THURSDAY 20th June

17.00   A Conference to Celebrate Bryan Ward-Perkins

Trinity College, Broad St, Danson Room

For the full programme, see here.

The event is free but registration is essential. To register please contact Phil Booth (philip.booth@theology.ox.ac.uk).

_ _ _

FRIDAY 14th June

09:00   A Conference to Celebrate Bryan Ward-Perkins (Day 2)

Trinity College, Broad St, Danson Room

_ _ _

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Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 16/06/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 16th June 2019
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1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

 

The Mark Whittow Memorial Conference ‘Urban and Rural Landscapes in the Medieval Mediterranean’, St John’s College, University of Oxford, 26th-27thJune 2019.

Attendance is free with a voluntary contribution to the Mark Whittow Memorial Fund, a fund in memory of Mark Whittow, aimed at supporting the work of Byzantinists and historians and those with interests in archaeology, landscape and the material world.

Please contact gillian.cane@orinst.ox.ac.uk to book your place. If you book your place before Monday 17 June, you will be catered for lunch and refreshments.

For the full programme, see here.

A Conference to Celebrate Bryan Ward-Perkins, Trinity College, University of Oxford, 20th-21st June 2019.

Bryan Ward-Perkins is retiring this year, after many years of service to Late Antique and Byzantine Studies and to academic life in Oxford. Please join friends, colleagues, and former students for a series of papers in his honour.

Speakers will include Averil Cameron, Ulrich Gehn, Ine Jacobs, Luke Lavan, Simon Loseby, Carlos Machado, Javier Martinez Jimenez, Neil McLynn, Efthymis Rizos, Claire Sotinel, Robert Wisniewski, George Woudhuysen, and others.

The event is free but please register with Phil Booth (philip.booth@theology.ox.ac.uk) in advance.

For the full programme, see here.

 

2.  JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Studies Award Opportunities, One-Month Research Awards

Deadline: 1st October 2019

Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection offers One-Month Research Awards of $3,000 to scholars holding a PhD and working on research projects in Byzantine studies or related fields. The awards were established to make the intellectual community, as well as the library, rare book, garden, and museum resources, of Dumbarton Oaks more widely available to a broader range of scholars for shorter terms and with some flexibility in starting dates. Awards are intended especially for those who might not be able to avail themselves of a longer-term fellowship at Dumbarton Oaks, or scholars in related disciplines who seek greater exposure to our fields of study. Applications due October 1, 2019 for January 15 – June 30 award period.

For further information on all awards, please visit the Dumbarton Oaks website.

 

Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Studies Award Opportunities, Fellowships

Deadline: 1st November 2019

Fellowships (junior, regular, summer, Tyler) are awarded to scholars on the basis of demonstrated scholarly ability and preparation of the candidate, including knowledge of requisite languages, interest and value of the study or project, and the project’s relevance to the resources of Dumbarton Oaks. Applications due November 1, 2019 for the 2020-2021 academic year.

For further information on all awards, please visit the Dumbarton Oaks website.

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings – TT 2019 Week 7

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 7

Trinity Term 2019

= = = = =

MONDAY 10th June

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, High St, Wharton Room

Benedicte Sere (University of Paris-Nanterre)

Inventing “The ChurchThe medievagenesis of political modernity.

[+]

17.30   Perspectives on Education from the Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean

University College, High St, Swire Seminar Room

Arietta Papaconstantinou (Reading)

Uses of Literacy in Early Islamic Egypt.

_ _ _

TUESDAY 11th June

14.15   Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Dr Julia Krivoruchko (Cambridge)

The silence of the idols: the story of ἄλαλος from classical into medieval (Judaeo-)

Greek [Septuagint Forum].

[+]

17.15   Medieval Church and Culture – MSt Medieval Studies Dissertation Projects

Harris Manchester College, Mansfield Rd, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Caitlin John

A Topographical Study of Popular Burial in Late Medieval Mediterranean Cities.

Adina Goldman

‘Let Us Pray for the Living’: the lives of the dead in medieval Ashkenaz.

_ _ _

WEDNESDAY 12th June

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Imed Ben Jerbania (Institut National du Patrimoine, Tunisia)

Recent excavations at Punic and Roman cemeteries in the region of Bizerte (Tunisia).

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Seminar

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’, Lecture Theatre

Petros Bouras-Vallianatos (Edinburgh)

Cross-cultural transfer of medical knowledge in the medieval Mediterranean: from the Islamic world to Byzantium.

[+]

17.00   Boethius (historical and philosophical perspectives)

Corpus Christi College, Merton St, Seminar Room

Giovanni Catapano (University of Padova)

The Harmony between Plato and Aristotle in the Consolation.

_ _ _

THURSDAY 13th June

17.00   ‘After Rome’: Aspects of the History and Archaeology of the 5th to 7th Centuries

Trinity College, Broad St, Danson Room

Efthymios Rizos (Oxford)

The murals of the imperial cult chamber in Luxor: New observations.

_ _ _

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 09/06/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 9th June 2019
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

New OUBS Committee.

The full OUBS committee for 2019-20 has now been elected:

President: Dan Gallaher

Secretary: Lorenzo Saccon

Treasurer: Josh Hitt

As two of us step down, we would like to wish the new committee the best of luck for the upcoming year.

– Katerina Vavaliou (former President)

– Callan Meynell (former Secretary)

 

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS 

‘Nature(s), animaux et paysages: perception et usage de l’environnement a Byzance’ XIIes Rencontres internationales de doctorants en etudes byzantines11-12 October 2019, Paris.

New Deadline: 30 June 2019

From craggy rocks depicted on an icon to the animals of a Physiologos, from botanical knowledge to astrology, the Eastern Roman empire was populated by non-humans. Wild and domestic animals, plants, stars, seascapes and landscapes all created a setting for individuals to develop in. How did human actors infuse the multiple aspects of Creation with meaning? People have always had to adapt to the constraints of “Nature”, interact with the environment so as to benefit from it, understand and predict the “whims” of climate and the ravages of diseases, and, finally, depict a world that, to them, was saturated with meaning and ordered through symbols and analogies.

What are the implications of “Nature”? The universalism of this concept, usually opposed to that of “Culture”, is currently being challenged in the Humanities and Social Sciences, “Nature” being recognized as a specifically modern Western construct (P. Descola, Par-delà nature et culture, 2005). The aim of this year’s Byzantine Postgraduate Meetings in Paris is to ask this very question in Byzantine context, in order to define and illustrate the various relations that the women and men of the Empire maintained with their surroundings.

Whether we refer to the landscape archeology developed by Sharon Gerstel (Rural Lives and Landscapes in Late Byzantium: Art, Archaeology, and Ethnography, 2015) or recent diachronic studies from Gutenberg University in Mainz on the relations between man and “Nature”; whether we cite recent publications by John Haldon (The Empire That Would Not Die, 201 7) or Henry Maguire (Nectar and Illusion: Nature in Byzantine Art and Literature, 2012), current Byzantinists actively engage with the most pressing issues of the day.

The 12th Byzantine Postgraduate Meetings will offer the opportunity for four Master’s students from Paris and for eight international PhD students to present their research and engage in discussions on this key topic on October 11 and 12, 2019.

In this sense, contributions from all related topics and approaches are welcome: cultural history (landscapes and settlements; iconography, hymnography and theology; plant and animal symbolism); history of technology (as pertains to botany, agriculture, navigation, architecture, clothing and all other human creations exposed to the workings of the climate); environmental and natural history (archeozoological and paleoenvironmental studies and archaeometry are essential tools for understanding the crucial implications of migrations, harvests, demography or eschatological fears).

Proposals (max. 2000 characters) should be sent no later than 30th June 2019 to lesbyzantines@gmail.com and should include the paper’s title and language (French or English), as well as the name of the applicant’s research director and institution.

Organisation Committee:

Pierre Chaney (EPHE); Romain Goudjil (Paris-Sorbonne); Aleksandre Prosperini (EPHE); Milan Vukasinovic (EHESS); Lilyana Yordanova (EPHE).

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 03/06/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 2nd June 2019
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS
====

 1. NEWS AND EVENTS

‘Urban Agencies: Personal And Collective Agency In Anatolian And Caucasian Cities (13th-14th Centuries)’, 6 – 8 June 2019, Vienna.

Modern historiography concerning Anatolia and the Caucasus in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries sees the confluence of a host of totalizing historiographical narratives, principally about states, (male) rulers, and their military-political interactions. The interdependent paradigms of Ottoman growth, Seljuk disintegration, and Byzantine decline intersect with narratives of pre-Mongol Seljuk and Georgian ‘golden ages’, as well as a late Byzantine historiography structured around the conquests of Constantinople in 1204, 1261, and 1453. In part, these totalizing historiographical narratives have dominated the construction of the late-medieval Anatolian and Caucasian pasts because they have been produced or co-opted by (early) modern ethno-nationalisms, state-fetishisms, and religious binarisms.

This workshop aims to create a platform for the discussion of thirteenth- and fourteenth-century historiography (broadly conceived) outside of traditional state-centric and centralising narrative paradigms, as well as their supporting ethno-nationalist, religious, and linguistic foundations. Our approach in this workshop is to ask contributors to decentre the state, by focusing on the level of urban centres, a common (although by no means uniform) feature of thirteenth- and fourteenth-century Anatolia and Caucasia. We ask them to blur traditional state/territorial, linguistic, religious, and ethnic boundaries by examining expressions of personal and collective agency below, outside, and against ‘the state’. Urban centres in this period, whether ‘Byzantine’, ‘Armenian’, or ‘Seljuk’, were loci for a host of agencies that have either been partially or totally silenced by the dominant frameworks of the modern academic disciplines through which their study has been channelled. This can be seen most clearly in the alternative construction of thirteenth- and fourteenth-century individual and collective agencies in ‘the West’, most notably Italy and Flanders.

Urban centres offer a suitable framework for comparative and interdisciplinary research in this field. This event brings together specialists on different aspects of this period and space in an attempt to create a different paradigm for its history, one that is not confined from the outset to disciplinary, state-centric, or geographic silos.

Speakers include: Teresa Shawcross, Andrew Peacock, Scott Redford, Rachel Goshgarian, Dmitry Korobeynikov, Sara Nur Yıldız, Ioanna Rapti, Naomi Pitamber, and Johannes Preiser-Kapeller

For further information visit the website. The full programme of the workshop is available here.

Organisers:
Matthew Kinloch, Institute of Medieval Research, Division for Byzantine Research, Team Member of the ‘Moving Byzantium’ Wittgenstein Project.
Bruno De Nicola, Institute of Iranian Studies.

The Workshop is co-organised and co-sponsored by the Institute of Iranian Studies (OeAW) and the FWF Wittgenstein-Award Project ‘Mobility, Microstructures and Personal Agency’ of Prof. Dr. Claudia Rapp (University of Vienna / Austrian Academy of Sciences).

 

The Antioch Houses: Planning, decoration and household furnishing’, Seminaire Histoire urbaine de l’Orient romain tardif, 6 June 2019, 14:00-16:00, Sorbonne, salle D52.

For the poster and contact information see here.

 

‘Mapping the Sacred in Byzantium: Construction, Experience, and Representation’ 20-21 September 2019, Newcastle University.

The conference brings together scholars of Byzantium to explore novel ways to conceptualize and evaluate the production and representation of (sacred) space in the Byzantine world, aiming to contribute to the broader research on spatial paradigms and practices. It addresses spatial themes from the varying disciplinary perspectives of archaeology, art history, literature, and theology.

A description of the event, a list of confirmed speakers, and other details can be found on the website of the conference at Mapping the Sacred in Byzantium | Mapping the Sacred in Byzantium | Newcastle University.

 

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

‘Byzantium between East and West’, Mediterranean Historical Review Special Issue.

Deadline: 31 March 2020

David Jacoby, one of the leading historians of Byzantium, passed away in October 2018. Prof. Jacoby was a member of the international board of the Mediterranean Historical Review, and contributed to it in various ways. His research in the fields of trade, economy and society, revealed not only the Mediterranean aspects of these Byzantine activities, but also the importance that Byzantine history holds for the study of the Mediterranean. We regret this loss very much. To commemorate his lifelong achievements in the field of Mediterranean history, the MHR intends to publish a special issue dedicated to the theme “Byzantium between East and West”. We invite scholars to propose articles addressing this theme in view of the special position of Byzantium between the Levant, Eastern Europe and the Latin West. Byzantium boasts a history of over 12 centuries, maybe more than any other Mediterranean civilization. We wish to address the unique position it held, both geographically and chronologically, in the history of the region. Papers may deal with any aspect of the subject in history, art history or archaeology, in any timeframe (narrow or wide) and in local, global or entangled perspective. All papers will be peer-reviewed following the Journal’s normal evaluation process.

The call for papers has been published online here.

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings – TT 2019 Week 6

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 6

Trinity Term 2019

= = = = =

MONDAY 3rd June

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, High St, Wharton Room

Ben Savill (UEA)

Rolling eyeballs and slashed papyri: cutting heiresses out of early Anglopapal history.

[+]

17.30   Perspectives on Education from the Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean

University College, High St, Swire Seminar Room

Cecily Hennessy (London)

Children, Adolescents, Books and Learning in Byzantium.

_ _ _

 

TUESDAY 4th June

14.15   Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Dr Theofili Kampianaki (Birmingham)

Aspects of the appropriation of Flavius Josephus in medieval Greek and Latin literature.

[+]

17.00   Early Slavonic Seminar

Taylor Institution, St. Giles’ St, Main Hall

Dr Sean Griffin (Dartmouth College)

The Liturgical Past in Byzantium and Early Rus.

[+]

17.15   Medieval Church and Culture – MSt Medieval Studies Dissertation Projects

Harris Manchester College, Mansfield Rd, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Elizabeth Crabtree, Nicholas of Lyra’s Literal Commentary on Jacob And Esau

Franziska Kleybolte, Pograms as Foundation: Christian handling of Jewish space in the Middle Ages.

_ _ _

WEDNESDAY 5th June

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Regula Wahl-Clerici

The territorium metallorum Tresminas/Jales in Northern Portugal: A short introduction to the industrial park of a Roman goldmine.

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Seminar – Special OCBR Lecture

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’, Lecture Theatre

Jean-Luc Fournet (College de France, Paris)

Homer and Late antique Poetry in the light of new poems by Dioscorus of Aphrodite

[+]

17.00   Boethius (historical and philosophical perspectives)

Corpus Christi College, Merton St, Seminar Room

Peter Heather (King’s College London)

TBC

[+]

18.30   OUBS AGM and Elections

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’

_ _ _

THURSDAY 6th June

17.00   ‘After Rome’: Aspects of the History and Archaeology of the 5th to 7th Centuries

Trinity College, Broad St, Danson Room

Efthymios Rizos (Oxford)

The murals of the imperial cult chamber in Luxor: New observations.

_ _ _

FRIDAY 7th June

8.30-19.30       Pilgrimage & the Senses

St Luke’s Chapel, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford OX2 6HT

The full programme of the conference is available here.

[+]

9.30     Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’

Prof M. D. Lauxtermann

[+]

12.00   Byzantine Literature: Seventh-Century Poetry

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’

Prof M. D. Lauxtermann

16.00   Ancient Architecture Discussion Group

Lincoln College, Turl St, Garden Building Lower Lecture Room

Yoshiki Hori (Kyushu University)

Laser scanning of the city of Ostia and some consideration on upper structures

[+]

18.00   The OUBS & Oxford Medieval Society In Dialogue

St. John’s College, New Seminar Room

Various Speakers

The event will be followed by a drinks reception.

_ _ _

 

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 27/05/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 27th May 2019
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

 1. NEWS AND EVENTS

Fils de Foi: Autour Des Broderies Religieuses de Tradition Byzantine’, Colloque International, 31 May 2019, INHA – Salle Vasari, 2 rue Vivienne 75002 Paris.

The full Programme of this conference is available here.

 

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

Stream on ‘Byzantine History & Arts’, 7th Annual International Conference on Humanities & Arts in a Global World, 3-6 January 2020, Athens, Greece.

Deadline: 31 May 2019

Sponsored by the Athens Journal of Humanities & Arts

The Athens Center for Classical & Byzantine Studies (ACCBS) of ATINER is organizing a Stream on “Byzantine History & Arts”, 3-6 January 2020, Athens, Greece as part of the 7th Annual International Conference on Humanities & Arts in a Global World sponsored by the Athens Journal of Humanities & Arts.

The aim of the stream is to bring together scholars and students of Byzantine Studies, focusing on the areas of History and Arts. The fields of study implied are quite broad, covering all aspects and periods of byzantine history (politics, economics, society, religion etc), and all forms and periods of byzantine art, from church architecture, iconography and mosaics, to “minor arts”, like metalwork, hardstone carving and jewelry, including artistic traditions of other cities that inherited and/or still maintain the byzantine style. Moreover, the stream will look at Byzantium’s role as a bridge between the classical and modern world, as well as its significant legacy to the social, political and cultural development of the Near East, Russia, Eastern Europe, and the West. You may participate as presenter of one paper or observer.

Fee structure information is available on www.atiner.gr/fees.

Special arrangements will be made with a local hotel for a limited number of rooms at a special conference rate. In addition, a number of special events will be organized: A pragmatic symposium (as organized in Ancient Athens but fine tuned to synchronous ethics), a special one-day educational island tour, an Athens educational walking tour, and an one-day visit to Delphi. Details of the social program are available here.

Please submit an abstract (email only) to: atiner@atiner.gr, using the abstract submission form by 31 May 2019 to: Dr. Nicholas Pappas, Vice President of Academic Membership, ATINER & Professor of History, Sam Houston University, USA.

Please include: Title of Paper, Full Name (s), Current Position, Institutional Affiliation, an email address and at least 3 keywords that best describe the subject of your submission. Decisions will be reached within four weeks of your submission.

If your submission is accepted, you will receive information on registration deadlines and paper submission requirements. Should you wish to participate in the Conference without presenting a paper, for example, to chair a session, to evaluate papers which are to be included in the conference proceedings or books, to contribute to the editing of a book, or any other contribution, please send an email to Dr. Gregory T. Papanikos, President, ATINER & Honorary Professor, University of Stirling, UK (gregory.papanikos@stir.ac.uk).

 

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Research Assistant in (Byzantine) Greek Philology, Ghent.

Deadline: 21 June 2019

The Greek Section of the Departments of Literary Studies and Linguistics at Ghent University (Belgium) is seeking a well-qualified collaborator for the Database of Byzantine Book Epigrams (DBBE, www.dbbe.ugent.be).

A full job description is to be found here.

Applications should include a full curriculum vitae (including accurate information on grades and study results), a motivation letter, and two letters of reference. Applications must be sent electronically (preferably as pdf) to Floris Bernard, no later than June 21, 2019.

 

Research Fellow in Early Mediaeval History – AR2224HM, School of History, University of St Andrews.

Deadline: 17 June 2019

Applications are invited for Fixed Term Research Fellowship in Global Medieval History tenable from 1 August 2019 to 31 March 2023. The position is part of the “Identifying the Blocks that Build Global History in the Middle Ages” project funded by the British Academy under its Global Professorships scheme. The PI on the project is Professor Eduardo Manzano Moreno (St Andrews / Madrid) The School of History welcomes applications from historians working on any topic related to the areas covered by this project, i.e. Europe, China, India and the Middle East (including North Africa). A command of any language of the textual traditions of any of these areas will be a requisite. In addition to pursuing research of his/her own design, the successful applicant will be required to participate in the broader work of the project by coordinating seminars, workshops, conferences and outreach activities, and by taking a leading role in the design of the project´s outreach in social media. He/she will also be responsible for editing one of the volumes which will result from the project.

Applicants should have completed or nearly completed a PhD in a related topic.

Further information on the University and the School of History can be found at the University website.

To discuss this post informally candidates may contact Professor Manzano Moreno or the Head of School, Professor MacLean.

The University is committed to equality for all, demonstrated through our working on diversity awards (ECU Athena SWAN/Race Charters; Carer Positive; LGBT Charter; and Stonewall).  More details can be found here.

Please quote ref: AR2224HM

Further Particulars: AR2224HM FPs.doc

Salary: £33,199 per annum

Start Date: 1 August 2019 or as soon as possible thereafter

Fixed Term until 31 March 2023

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings – TT 2019 Week 5

MONDAY 27th May

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, High St, Wharton Room

Serena Ferente (KCL)

In extrema Europae: a 15th-century microhistory of the Black Sea.

_ _ _

TUESDAY 28th May

14.15   Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Professor Kai Brodersen (Erfurt)

Earth, wind and fire: how the Septuagint translated divine elements

[Septuagint Forum]

[+]

17.15   Medieval Church and Culture – MSt Medieval Studies Dissertation Projects

Harris Manchester College, Mansfield Rd, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Pamela Kask, Reclaiming their Voices: images of survivors of trauma in

works of Geoffrey Chaucer

Uewelyn Hopwood, Creative Bilingualism in Late Medieval Welsh

Poetry

_ _ _

WEDNESDAY 29th May

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Thomas Matthews Boehmer (University of Cambridge)

Roman-period ‘micro-regions’ and their colonial contexts: a case study.

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Seminar

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’, Lecture Theatre

Alessandra Petrocchi (Oxford)

Arithmetic Texts and Networks of Learning: From Medieval India Through the Mediterranean World

[+]

17.00   Boethius (historical and philosophical perspectives)

Corpus Christi College, Merton St, Seminar Room

John Marenbon (University of Cambridge)

TBC

_ _ _

THURSDAY 30th May

17.00   ‘After Rome’: Aspects of the History and Archaeology of the 5th to 7th Centuries

Trinity College, Broad St, Danson Room

Mark Laynesmith (University of Reading)

The doctrine of baptism by blood: a reappraisal

_ _ _

FRIDAY 31st May

9.30     Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’

Prof M. D. Lauxtermann

[+]

12.00   Byzantine Literature: Seventh-Century Poetry

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’

Prof M. D. Lauxtermann

[+]

14.00-17.00     Faith and Reason: The ‘Double Truth’ in the Arabic and Latin Traditions

St Edmund Hall, Queen’s Lane, Old Library

Richard Taylor

The Complex Philosophical Foundations of the Duality of Discourses Behind the Notion of Double Truth

Ann Giletti

The Double Truth: A Case for Its Presence among Latin Scholastics

Please direct enquiries to ann.giletti@theology.ox.ac.uk

_ _ _

SATURDAY 1st June

9.30-17.00       Studying Scripture with Aquinas

A conference organised by Prof Piotr Roszak and Dr Jorgcn Vijgcn, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun and co-sponsored by the Aquinas Institute

Piotr Roszak (UMK Torun)

Christ’s Will to Die and Our Salvation in Aquinas’s Super Psalmum 21.

Mark Johnson, Marquette University

Aquinas’s Scriptum on 1 Cor 7: The Scripture as Norming and Inspiring

Jörgen Vijgen (Thomistic Institute, Utrecht)

Biblical Thomism: The Case-Study of Hebrews 2:9

Enrique Alarcon (Universidad de Navarra)

Biblical Thomism and the Future Development of Coipus Thomisticum

Bruno Clifton, OP (Blackfriars, Cambridge)

The Need to Bring Together Biblical Scholarship and Dogmatic Theology’

General Discussion

Attendance is free. Donations requested at door to cover lunch.

To book a place visit here

Posted in Byzness

The Byzness, 20/05/2019

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THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY
The Byzness, 20th May 2019
====

1. NEWS AND EVENTS

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
====

 1. NEWS AND EVENTS

Celebrations in the Eastern Mediterranean: Private and Public’, 20th Postgraduate Colloquium of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek studies, University of Birmingham, 1 June 2019, Arts Building, Arts LR1 and LR3.

 

9:00-9:30         Registration and Coffee

9:30-9:50         A Tribute to Ruth Macrides (Professor Leslie Brubaker)

 

Panel One: Celebrations and Identity (Chair Vicky Kaisidou)

9:50-10:15       Banquets as a theater of cultural difference in 12th century Byzantine romance

Zoe Kokka (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki)

10:15-10:40     Archbishop Makarios III, the 1st April, and the creation of “the Cypriot”

Antonios Savva (University of Birmingham)

10:40-11:05     Modern Greek Celebrations – A Journal Ethnography

Holly Chalcraft (University of Durham)

 

11:05-11:20     Coffee Break

 

Panel Two: Public Celebrations (Chair Dr Christopher Markiewicz)

11:20-11:45     The Brumalia festival from Rome to Byzantium: continuity or ideological remaking?

Elena Nonveiller (EHESS Paris)

11:45-12:10     Celebrating sanctity. The public celebrations of saints in Coptic hagiography

Chloé Agar (University of Oxford)

12:10-12:35     The ‘Giostra’ as celebratory propaganda in Renaissance Crete: La nobilissima barriera della Canea: poema cretese del 1594 by Giancarlo Persio

Amanda Skamagka (University of Athens)

12:35-13:00     Privacy in public: transgressions at the Greek Orthodox carnival in late Ottoman Istanbul

Sada Payir (University of Oxford)

 

13:00-14:00 Lunch

 

Panel Three: Religious Celebrations (Chair Dr Daniel Reynolds)

14:00-14:25     Chrysostom’s Catechetical Homily on Pascha (CPG 4605): a case study in approaching the question(s) of Pseudepigrapha

Mark Huggins (University of Edinburgh)

14:25-14:50     ‘Blood for the Blood God!’. The survival of ritual sacrifice in Late Antiquity and Beyond

Michael Burling (University of Birmingham)

14:50-15:15     The celebration of saints in Theodore the Studite’s Hymns

Maria-Lucia Goiana (University of Vienna)

15:15-15:40     Pascha in Contemporary Greek poetry: five poets at the Cross

Mariza Parasyri (King’s College London)

 

14:40-16:00 Coffee Break

 

Panel Four: Celebrations and the Imperial Ceremonial (Chair Lauren Wainwright)

16:00-16:25     ‘Daphne/Laurus‘: triumphal rhetorics and wedding ceremonies in the Imperial Palaces of Late Antiquity

Alfredo Calahorra Bartolomé (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

16:25-16:50     The imperial dress and the coronation ceremony: the etiquette and the signs of excellence of the rank

Antonio Pio Di Cosmo (Pontificio Istituto Orientale)

16:50-17:15     The political significance of Maria Skleraina’s ceremonial performances as Sebaste (1042-1046)

Ewan Short (Cardiff University)

17:15-17:40     When celebration goes wrong: the collapse of the Middle Byzantine honours system

James Cogbill (University of Birmingham)

 

17:40-18:00     Final Remarks

Dr Rhoads Murphey

 

18:00                Wine reception

 

Registration for the event can be found at here.

A book stall and poster display will be running throughout the day in Arts LR3.

The Organising Committee: Rachael Helen Banes, Alessandro Carabia

This is a student-led postgraduate colloquium organised under the auspices of the College of Arts and Law, University of Birmingham.

 

2. CALLS FOR PAPERS

‘Motifs, Influences, and Narrative Strategies in the Epics of the Medieval East and West‘, Swedish Research Institute in Istanbul, 17–18 September 2020

Deadline: 30 March 2020

Organisers: Markéta Kulhánková (Masaryk University, Brno) and Ingela Nilsson (Swedish Research Institute in Istanbul/Uppsala University)

The impetus to organize this workshop is the research project A Narratological Commentary on Digenis Akritis (https://www.muni.cz/en/research/projects/44579), currently ongoing at Masaryk University in Brno and funded by the Czech Science Foundation. The aim of the project is to prepare a book-length commentary discussing the treatment of narrative categories, narrative strategies, literary and oral techniques, motifs, parallels, and influences and also including a summary of historical and philological discussions concerning the poem.

Our ambition is to make this literary work accessible and understandable to a wider audience from different fields. Within the planned workshop, we aim to bring together scholars working on the Digenis poem and related Byzantine genres (in particular vernacular poetry and novels) with specialists in both western and eastern medieval epics. We would like to invite you to discuss the character of these narratives and common problems and challenges for literary historians dealing with medieval epics.

Topics for discussion include but are not restricted to:

  • motivic parallels in epics across medieval Europe and the Near East
  • the mixing of cultures in border epics
  • medieval epics and other genres (influences, interaction)
  • epical and other narrative strategies
  • medieval epics and narratology
  • orality and textuality

Please send an abstract (ca 250 words) for a 20-minute presentation to Markéta Kulhánková by 30 March 2020.

 

‘The Citizen in Late Antiquity’, The Postgraduate and Early Career Late Antiquity Network, University of Utrecht, 25th November 2019.

Deadline: 26 July 2019

‘Citizen’ in Late Antiquity was an emotive and complex term. In the classical world, the term not only signified the distribution of rights and duties of members of city and empire, but perhaps much more importantly reflected the intricate processes of inclusion and exclusion that shaped Greco-Roman culture in a myriad of ways. Conventional historiography, which tended to focus on legal citizenship almost exclusively, once characterized citizenship as defunct by the onset of Late Antiquity: it has argued that the mass enfranchisement of the edict of Caracalla and the gradual transformation – or collapse – of the classical city, turned the ‘citizen’ into an anachronism, with its social, cultural and political significance returning only at the onset of the Renaissance. Recent scholarship however has started to contest this view by positing that neither the collapse of the Roman Empire in the west nor the transformation of the classical city brought an end to the concept of the citizen.

Next to other forms of self-identification, such as gender, class and ethnicity, people in late Roman and post-Roman polities continued to imagine and conduct themselves as citizens and these categories could themselves be understood in terms of legal and social citizenship. The citizen was also omnipresent in religious discourses, most significantly in late antique Christianity where the followers of Christ could either be perceived as citizens par excellence (viz. of the civitas Dei) or as intrinsic strangers and outsiders, namely to the civitas of the transitory world. Furthermore, citizens, of whatever kind, were also represented in material and visual culture, they took part, as citizens, in economic and artistic life and they appear most frequently in a vast number of textual sources and genres. An understanding of the full spectrum of ‘citizenship’ and ‘the citizen’ in Late Antiquity thus requires the use of a wide range of sources and approaches, and the fresh insights of a new generation of scholars.

This workshop, The Citizen in Late Antiquity, aims at providing an informal, constructive environment for postgraduate and early career researchers to present their work, meet others working in the field, and discuss current trends and issues. The Late Antiquity Network provides a single platform for those working on a broad range of

geographical and disciplinary areas within the period of Late Antiquity, and participants are thus encouraged to interpret ‘citizen’ in a broad sense, thinking about how the theme intersects with their own research. Papers will be of twenty minutes, with ten minutes allocated for discussion. Facilitating this will be an address by our visiting speaker, Professor Engin Isin of Queen Mary University London, an acclaimed and prolific theorist on the subject of citizenship. The workshop is generously supported and hosted by the Dutch NWO VICI research project “Citizenship Discourses in the Early Middle Ages” and the Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies (UCMS) at Utrecht University. Some suggested topics for discussion are:

– Different types of citizens

– Citizens and material culture and imagery

– Citizens and non-citizens, and interactions between different kinds of citizenship

– The spatial dimensions of citizenship

– Citizens, universalism and cosmopolitanism

– Criteria for becoming or ceasing to be a citizen

– Alternatives to citizenship discourse

– Citizens and the city

– Citizens and religion

– Poverty and citizenship

– Citizens in different literary genres

– Citizens and lawmaking

Abstracts of no more than 400 words with a brief biography to be sent to the conveners Thomas Langley and Kay Boers by Friday 26th July. Please include your affiliation (independent scholars welcome) and current academic status (or the year your PhD was awarded). If interested in the opportunity to run the seminar next year, please detail any relevant previous experience alongside the biography when you submit the abstract. Successful applicants will be notified by Monday 19th August.

 

7th International Symposium ‘Days of Justinian I’, Special thematic strand ‘Identities’, 15-16 November 2019, Skopje.

Deadline: 10 August 2019

Confirmed keynote speaker: Professor Anthony Kaldellis (The Ohio State University).

The International scientific symposium “Days of Justinian I” is an annual interdisciplinary scholarly forum aimed at the presentation of the latest research followed by discussions on various aspects of Byzantine and Medieval Studies before 1500; this includes the treatment and interpretation of cultural, historical and spiritual heritage in contemporary modern Europe. The Symposium is dedicated to Emperor Justinian I with the aim to bring together scholars from around the world to address a broad range of issues related to Byzantium and the European Middle Ages, comprising the exploration of the cultural and historical legacy as an integrative component of the diversities and commonalities of Unified Europe.

This year’s special thematic strand Identities aims to incite scholarly debate about the differing perceptions of identity in Byzantium and in Medieval Western Europe. Aside from the discursive evidence in the contemporary sources, modern theoretical approaches will be addressed in exploring the complex concepts and notions of identity, covering the broad range of modes of identification. Various fundamental questions will be raised in defining how identities were formed in the Middle Ages and how they were expressed, maintained, negotiated or transformed. This will encompass the ways in which Byzantium and other pre-modern states and empires have shaped and configured the composite spectrum of political, ethnic, provincial, legal, religious or cultural identities.

The symposium will embrace broader geographical areas, chronological scope, and varieties of political, ideological, cultural, social or religious contexts in exploring the multiple layers of identity in the Eastern Roman Empire and in Medieval Western Europe.

Papers are welcomed on various topics that may include, but are not limited to the following areas of discussion:

  • Romanness in the Middle Ages: Concepts and approaches
  • Being Byzantine or Roman: Interpreting the identity of Byzantium / Romania
  • Mapping ethic identities in Byzantium and in Medieval Western Europe
  • Imagining Identities in Middle Ages: Modern theoretical definitions
  • Strategies of identification
  • Concepts of the “Other” in the Middle Ages
  • Ethnicity, ethnogenesis and identity
  • Premodern ethnicity and national identity
  • Narrative, memory and identity
  • Language and linguistic identities
  • Art and identity
  • Material culture and identity
  • Roman law and legal identities
  • Gender and Identity
  • Heritage discourses and cultural identity
  • Religion, religious communities and identities
  • Heresy and Identity
  • Music and identity
  • Cultural heritage: Interpretation, restoration and protection

First Deadline for submitting an abstract of the paper: 10 August 2019.

Second Deadline for submitting an abstract of the paper: 15 October 2019.

Notification of acceptance for early applicants: 15 August 2019.

Notification of acceptance for other applicants: 20 October 2019

Deadline for submitting the complete paper for publication: 1 March 2020.

Please send the application form to the following address: days.justinian@gmail.com

Presentation of the papers will be limited to 10 minutes.

Working languages: Macedonian and English.

No participation fee is required.

Travel and accommodation expenses are covered by the participants themselves.

The excursion will be covered by the organizer.

Papers delivered at the Symposium will be published in the Proceedings of the

Symposium.

The papers submitted will be peer-reviewed before publication.

For further inquiries you can contact the Secretary of the Symposium, Prof. Dragan

Gjalevski: days.justinian@gmail.com.

Please check the Facebook page for news.

about the Symposium, the agenda, special events and the online application form.

Symposiarch: Professor Mitko B. Panov

 

Call for Sessions: Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, 7–10 May 2020.

Deadline: 29 May 2019

To encourage the integration of Byzantine studies within the scholarly community and medieval studies in particular, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, May 7–10, 2020. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website (https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/55th-international-congress-on-medieval-studies). The deadline for submission is May 29, 2019. Proposals should include:

**Title

**Session abstract (300 words)

**Intellectual justification for the proposed session (100 words)

**Proposed list of session participants (presenters and session presider)

**CV

Successful applicants will be notified by May 30, 2019, if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. The Mary Jaharis Center will submit the session proposal to the Congress and will keep the potential organizer informed about the status of the proposal.

The session organizer may act as the presider or present a paper. The session organizer will be responsible for writing the Call for Papers. The CFP must be approved by the Mary Jaharis Center. Session participants will be chosen by the session organizer and the Mary Jaharis Center.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse up to 5 session participants (presenters and presider) up to $600 maximum for North American residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming abroad. Session organizers and co-organizers should plan to participate in the panel as either a participant or a presider. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions. Further information about the International Congress on Medieval Studies is available here.

 

3. JOBS AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Research Associate or Research Fellow, Department of History and Archaeology, University of Cyprus, Nicosia.

Deadline: 1 June 2019

The Department of Ηistory and Archaeology announces one (1) part-time position (70 hours/month) of Research Associate or Research Fellow for employment in the Research Project “Greek learning in France in the sixteenth century: Grammars & sententiae” funded by the University of Cyprus and under the direction of Dr Natasha Constantinidou.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION, DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF SELECTED CANDIDATE

This project aims to collect and analyse information relating to two specific kinds of Greek editions printed in France in the sixteenth century: Greek grammars and short anthologies of dicta or sententiae of ancient philosophers (often also known as Dicta septem sapientium). Through the collection and study of this information, the project aims at providing an insight into the learning of Greek in sixteenth and early seventeenth century France.

The successful candidate will assist the PI in collecting data regarding sixteenth-century Greek editions of grammars and anthologies. He/she is expected to spend time in libraries in France and elsewhere.

QUALIFICATIONS

Candidates with backgrounds (MA or PhD level) in any of the following subjects are welcome to apply: Classics, History, Bibliography (Early Printed Books)

Apart from English, working knowledge of Ancient Greek, Latin and French

Prior experience in working with early printed books is not necessary, but would be regarded favourably

Knowledge of modern Greek is not necessary

Shortlisted candidates are expected to be interviewed in Cyprus or via video conference during the week of 10-15 June 2019

Fellowship starts on the 1st of July or soon thereafter

Candidates who are shortlisted will require two favourable academic references at time of interview

EMPLOYMENT TERMS

The position is on a contract basis of one year, and are renewable. The monthly salary is equal to € 1200-1500, based on qualifications and experience.  Employee and employer contribution will be deducted from the above amount.  The position does not include a 13th Salary bonus or medical insurance coverage.

Interested candidates should submit the following items, in PDF or Word format, via e-mail to Dr Natasha Constantinidou (email Constantinidou.natasha@ucy.ac.cy) by the 1st of June, 2019:

  1. Cover letter (that also specifies their employment availability date)
  2. A detailed curriculum vitae

iii.        The names and contact details of at least two University professors from whom references may be requested

  1. Details of any relevant experience or publications if applicable

For more details and other information, interested individuals may contact Dr Natasha Constantinidou.

 

Managing Editor of Byzantine Studies, Dumbarton Oaks.

Deadline: The position remains open until filled.

Position Title: Managing Editor of Byzantine Studies

Supervisor: Director of Publications

Department: Publications

Grade: 57, exempt

Hours: Full-time, 35 hours per week, Monday-Friday

Summary

To serve as editor of the journal Dumbarton Oaks Papers, and manage all aspects of production of Byzantine Studies publications such as symposia and colloquia conference proceedings, Dumbarton Oaks collections publications, and various other books in established series.

Duties and Responsibilities

  • In your role as editor of Dumbarton Oaks Papers you will be responsible for evaluating submissions for the journal, determining whether each article is of suitable length, subject, and tone. In addition, you will evaluate the need for manuscript development and work with authors on needed changes to prepare articles for peer review. You will also work directly with the editorial board to conduct and manage double-blind peer review.
  • In addition, you will conduct and manage double-blind peer review for all Byzantine scholarly books, and make sure that all concerns of peer reviewers have been met by authors and volume editors.
  • Work with the director of publications to create and maintain reasonable production schedules to ensure projects are produced in a timely manner.
  • See each edited volume, monograph, and the journal Dumbarton Oaks Papers through the publishing production process, from transmittal to final print production.
  • Work with volume editors and authors to transmit all final files, text, and images for production in a timely manner, make sure all permissions are in place, and work with production manager to ensure all image files are ready for print production..
  • Hire and manage contractors such as copyeditors, proofreaders, indexers, cartographers, and illustrators as needed, including setting reasonable schedules and writing contracts.
  • Provide information, instructions, and schedules to the organizers of Dumbarton Oaks symposia and colloquia who hope to publish their proceedings as edited volumes.
  • Write and administer contracts for volume editors, monograph authors, contributing authors in edited volumes, and journal article authors. Ensure that authors’ contractual obligations are met.
  • Cleanup and prepare copyedited text files and send text and images to the graphic designer or type compositor.
  • Review all proofs and traffic to multiple editors, authors, and contractors, compiling and marking up corrections for the compositor and making sure all corrections have been made.
  • Write marketing (website and catalog) and jacket or cover copy for all volumes.
  • Compile complimentary copy lists for reviewers, authors and contractors; send book

announcements to specialized listservs; and apply for relevant book awards.

  • Write monthly reports outlining the progress of all publications.
  • Maintain publication submission guides and style guides.
  • Perform related duties as assigned.

Qualifications Basic:

  • Graduate degree in Byzantine studies or a cognate field.
  • Five + years of experience as a manuscript editor or production editor in scholarly

publishing, experience with mechanical and substantive editing of book-length manuscripts,

experience with project management.

  • Demonstrated experience in ancient Greek required.
  • Familiarity with prevailing standards of documentation and advanced knowledge of the

Chicago Manual of Style, 17th ed.

Additional:

  • PhD in Byzantine studies preferred.
  • Other than ancient Greek, one or more other languages relevant to Byzantine studies highly

preferred (e.g., Latin, French, German, Russian, modern Greek).

  • Familiarity with trends and issues in Byzantine and medieval studies.
  • Computer fluency and proficiency in onscreen editing techniques and fluency with Microsoft

Office Suite, particularly Microsoft Word, is essential.

  • Familiarity with Adobe Creative Suite strongly preferred.
  • Ability to work with authors from different national and disciplinary backgrounds.
  • Familiarity with copyright, publishing contracts, budgets, and workflows.
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills.Superb organizational abilities, with keenattention to detail. Ability to handle multiple projects simultaneously and to meet deadlines. Flexibility and excellent interpersonal skills.

To apply:

The position remains open until filled. Please forward résumé and cover letter detailing relevant qualifications by clicking the link below. A copyediting test will be administered to finalists to determine skill, style, and proficiency.

All information is also available here.

Dumbarton Oaks is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE). 

Posted in Byzness

The Oxford Listings – TT 2019 Week 4

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BYZANTINE SOCIETY

OXFORD LISTINGS: Week 4

Trinity Term 2019

= = = = =

MONDAY 20th May

17.00   Medieval History Seminar

All Souls College, High St, Wharton Room

Christian Sahner (St Cross)

Ending Islamic rule in medieval Iran: the case of Mardawij ibn Ziyar (d.935).

[+]

17.30   Perspectives on Education from the Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean

University College, High St, Swire Seminar Room

Sophia Xenophontos (Glasgow)

John Pachymere’s Commentary on Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics.

_ _ _

TUESDAY 21st May

14.15   Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Clarendon Institute, Walton Street

Dr Helen Spurling (Southampton)

The representation of Arabs in late-antique apocalyptic literature

[+]

17.00   Early Slavonic Seminar

Taylor Institution, St. Giles’ St, Main Hall

Dr Anna Joureval (Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)

Confused or concise? On the interpretation of the Kniga palomnik by Anthony of Novgorod.

[+]

17.15   Medieval Church and Culture – MSt Medieval Studies Dissertation Projects

Harris Manchester College, Mansfield Rd, Charles Wellbeloved Room

Leona DobrescuImages of Leprosy in Medieval Manuscripts.

Danielle LaurinDecoding the Monstrous in Medieval Icelandic Sagas.

_ _ _

WEDNESDAY 22nd May

13.00 The Roman Discussion Forum

Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Lecture Room

Janice Kinory (University of Oxford)

HEIR and the Roman World.

[+]

17.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Seminar

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’, Lecture Theatre

Mirela Ivanova (Oxford)

Cyril and Methodios, apostles to the Slavs?: Missionary Hagiography between Rome and Constantinople

[+]

17.00   Boethius (historical and philosophical perspectives)

Corpus Christi College, Merton St, Seminar Room

Mark Edwards (University of Oxford)

TBC

[+]

17.00   Aquinas Series

Blackfriars Hall, Aula

Prof. Timothy Pawl

Is the Incarnation of God Impossible?

_ _ _

THURSDAY 23rd May

11.00   Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’, First Floor Seminar Room

Vendi Jukić Buča

Late Antiquity in Pula (Croatia) – St Theodore’s Quarter.

[+]

17.00   ‘After Rome’: Aspects of the History and Archaeology of the 5th to 7th Centuries

Trinity College, Broad St, Danson Room

TBC

_ _ _

FRIDAY 24th May

9.30     Byzantine Text Seminar

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’

Prof M. D. Lauxtermann

[+]

12.00   Byzantine Literature: Seventh-Century Poetry

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’

Prof M. D. Lauxtermann

[+]

16.00   Ancient Architecture Discussion Group

Lincoln College, Turl St, Garden Building Lower Lecture Room

Paola Santospagnuolo (Freie Universität Berlin)

The bathing culture in Roman Sicily: current data and future prospects.      

Posted in Byzness